Chapter 12.14
AREA, DIMENSIONS AND DESIGN

Sections:

12.14.010    Purpose.

12.14.020    Interpretation of tables.

12.14.030    Residential area and dimensions.

12.14.040    Commercial and industrial dimensions.

12.14.050    Setbacks – General measurement method.

12.14.060    Setbacks – Adjoining alleys.

12.14.070    Setbacks – Applying to specific building or use.

12.14.080    Setbacks – Modifications.

12.14.085    Setbacks – Offspring lot setbacks applicable within attached residential zones.

12.14.090    Setbacks – Projections allowed.

12.14.100    Setbacks – Panhandle lots.

12.14.110    Building height – General measurement method.

12.14.120    Building height – Exceptions to limit.

12.14.130    Building limitations – Accessory buildings and structures.

12.14.140    Building and hard surface coverage.

12.14.150    Fences and freestanding walls.

12.14.155    Storage space and collection points for recyclables and garbage.

12.14.160    Lot divided by zone boundary.

12.14.170    Site and exterior building design, generally.

12.14.180    Site design.

12.14.190    Exterior building design.

12.14.200    Exterior building design – Multiple-family residential.

12.14.210    Exterior building design – Commercial and industrial.

12.14.220    Exterior building design – Multifamily residential, commercial or industrial development abutting single-family residential zoning.

12.14.230    Design of developments on or adjacent to historic register or historic inventory properties.

12.14.240    Exterior lighting.

12.14.250    Alternative energy infrastructure.

12.14.010 Purpose.

The purpose of this chapter is to establish area, dimension and design regulations which comply with and implement the goals and policies of the Imagine Bothell... Comprehensive Plan with respect to the desired intensity and appearance of development within the city’s residential, commercial and industrial areas. (Ord. 2171 § 3 (Exh. C), 2015; Ord. 2053 § 3 (Exh. C), 2010; Ord. 1876 § 2, 2002; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996).

12.14.020 Interpretation of tables.

A.    BMC 12.14.030 and 12.14.040 contain general density and dimension standards for the various zones. Methods for measuring these standards are set forth in BMC 12.14.050 through 12.14.140.

B.    The area and dimension standards are arranged in a table for each of two general land use categories:

1.    Residential;

2.    Commercial/industrial.

C.    Development standards are listed down the left side of both tables, and the zones are listed at the top. The matrix cells contain the area and dimensional requirements of each zone. All dimensions are measured in lineal feet, and all areas are measured in square feet. The parenthetical numbers in the matrix identify specific requirements or other information which is set forth following the matrix. (Ord. 2171 § 3 (Exh. C), 2015; Ord. 2053 § 3 (Exh. C), 2010; Ord. 1876 § 2, 2002; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996).

12.14.030 Residential area and dimensions.

A.    Development Standards Table.

Residential Development Standards (1)

Zoning Classification

R 40,000

R 9,600

R 8,400

R 7,200

R 5,400d

R 5,400a

R 4,000

R 2,800

R-AC (always in combination with OP, NB, CB, and/or LI)

Minimum lot area per single- family dwelling unit (square feet) (2)(10)

40,000

9,600 avg.; 8,400 min. per BMC 12.14.030
(B)(2)

8,400

7,200

5,400

None

None

None

None

Minimum land area per multifamily dwelling unit (square feet) (3)

 

 

 

 

 

5,400

4,000

2,800

None (9)

Minimum lot circle diameter (4)

150

70 – 80 per BMC 12.14.030
(B)(4)

70

60

50

None

None

None

None

Minimum front yard setback (5)(10)

30

20

20

20

20

20

20

20

See BMC 12.14.040(A)

Minimum rear yard setback (5)(10)

35

15

15

15

15

15

25

25

Minimum side yard setback (5)(10):

One side yard

Combined side yards (10)

5

15

5

15

5

15

5

15

5

15

5

15

5

15

5

15

Maximum building height (6)

30

35 in certain situations (6)

30

35 in certain situations (6)

30

35 in certain situations (6)

30

35 in certain situations (6)

30

35 in certain situations (6)

30

35 in certain situations (6)

35

35, or as established for designated centers (6)

As established for designated centers (6)

Maximum building coverage (7)

35%

35%

35%

35%

35%

50%

50%

50%

See BMC 12.14.040(A)

Maximum accessory building coverage (8)

5%

5%

5%

5%

5%

5%

5%

5%

See BMC 12.14.040(A) (no limit except for landscaping requirements)

Maximum hard surface coverage (7)

35%

45%

50%

65%

70%

70%

75%

75%

80%

The area within the front yard setback shall not contain any hard surface except for driveways, walkways, and structures allowed to project into the setback in accordance with BMC 12.14.090. If critical areas are present anywhere on the property, impervious surface coverage is further regulated by BMC Title 14, Environment.

If critical areas are present anywhere on the property, impervious surface coverage is further regulated by BMC Title 14, Environment.

B.    Notes.

1.    General Notes.

a.    Where a district combines multiple zoning classifications (e.g., R-AC, OP, CB), the most permissive standards of the individual zoning classifications shall apply.

b.    Development standards may be modified through the planned unit development process. See Chapter 12.30 BMC.

c.    Development standards for mobile/manufactured home parks are contained in Chapter 12.08 BMC.

2.    Single-Family Minimum, Average and Maximum Lot Area.

a.    In the R 40,000, R 8,400, R 7,200 and R 5,400d zones, no lot shall be less than the minimum lot area per single-family dwelling unit, except as may otherwise be permitted under an approved planned unit development, in accordance with Chapter 12.30 BMC or under Fitzgerald/35th Avenue SE Subarea regulations in accordance with Chapter 12.52 BMC. No more than one primary dwelling unit shall be placed on a lot.

b.    In the R 9,600 zone, subdivisions shall achieve an average of no less than 9,600 square feet per lot, except as may be otherwise permitted under an approved planned unit development, in accordance with Chapter 12.30 BMC or under Fitzgerald/35th Avenue SE Subarea regulations in accordance with Chapter 12.52 BMC. That is, the total area of all lots within a proposed subdivision divided by the number of lots shall amount to an average lot area of at least 9,600 square feet. Twenty percent of the lots in a subdivision may be smaller than 9,600 square feet, but no lot shall be smaller than 8,400 square feet, nor larger than 14,400 square feet. No more than one primary dwelling unit shall be placed on a lot.

c.    In order to promote efficient use of land, no subdivision shall contain any lot having more than one and one-half times the minimum lot area, in the R 40,000, R 8,400, R 7,200 and R 5,400d zones, or one and one-half times the average lot area, in the R 9,600 zone (i.e., 14,400 square feet), except as follows:

(1)    Any subdivision of four lots or fewer may contain larger lots, but the property lines of such a subdivision shall be laid out so as to allow future subdivisions which comply with this subsection;

(2)    A subdivision of five or more lots may contain larger lots to accommodate phasing of the subdivision; provided, that at completion of all phases, the subdivision complies with this subsection;

(3)    A subdivision of five or more lots may contain a larger lot to permit the preexisting house and any related outbuildings and grounds to be retained intact on one property;

(4)    These maximum lot size regulations do not apply to any common tracts for critical area protection, open space retention, storm water retention/detention or other purposes as may be required by the city as a condition of subdivision approval.

d.    Land area in roads and other rights-of-way, critical areas, critical area buffers, or land dedicated to the city, shall not be included in any proposed single-family lot, unless so stated in the conditions of an approved planned unit development, in accordance with Chapter 12.30 BMC.

e.    Land in an access easement, utility easement, or other form of easement which is not set aside as a separate tract shall be counted as part of the area of a parcel for the purpose of calculating minimum lot area.

3.    Multifamily Minimum and Maximum Density.

a.    In the R 5,400a through R 2,800 zones, one dwelling unit shall be allowed for each whole number multiple of the stated minimum land area per multifamily dwelling unit except as otherwise may be permitted under an approved conditional use permit for specialized senior housing, in accordance with Chapter 12.10 BMC.

b.    In order to promote efficient use of land, no multifamily development shall contain fewer units than would result if the total number of units were calculated at one and one-half times the minimum land area per multifamily dwelling unit for the zoning classification in which the subject property is located, except as follows:

(1)    The total number of units may be fewer than as required above if the development is proposed to be phased; provided, that at completion of all phases, the development complies with the above requirements;

(2)    These minimum density regulations do not apply to any multifamily/commercial combination zoning classification (e.g., R 2,800, OP, CB);

(3)    These minimum density regulations do not apply to any common tracts for critical area protection, open space retention, storm water retention/detention or other purposes as may be required by the city as a condition of development approval.

c.    In the R 5,400a through R 2,800 zones, land area in critical areas, critical area buffers, or land dedicated to the city shall not be counted in the calculation of number of units or offspring lots allowed, unless so stated in the conditions of an approved planned unit development, in accordance with Chapter 12.30 BMC.

d.    Land in an access easement, utility easement, or other form of easement which is not set aside as a separate tract shall be counted as part of the area of a parcel for the purpose of calculating number of units allowed.

4.    Each lot must be of sufficient size to fully accommodate the diameter circle specified in the development standards table under this section for the underlying zoning designation except as may otherwise be permitted under an approved planned unit development, in accordance with Chapter 12.30 BMC or under Fitzgerald/35th Avenue SE Subarea regulations in accordance with Chapter 12.52 BMC. In the R 9,600 zone, the lot circle diameter shall be 80 feet for lots of 9,600 square feet or larger, and shall decrease proportionally with smaller lot sizes to a minimum diameter of 70 feet for lots of 8,400 square feet. Critical areas as defined under Chapter 14.04 BMC and their associated buffers shall not be included within the lot circle.

5.    Setbacks.

a.    “Setback” shall mean the distance from the lot line to the point where a structure may be constructed, not including those structures permitted under BMC 12.14.090 to project into the setback. The area between a lot line and a setback is a yard. Setbacks shall be in accordance with BMC 12.14.050 through 12.14.100.

b.    Garages, carports, and other structures whose intent is to house or provide parking for vehicles shall be set back from streets and access tracts a minimum of 20 feet.

c.    Special setbacks apply to specific building types, uses and accessory structures. See BMC 12.14.070.

6.    Building height shall be measured as set forth in BMC 12.14.110 through 12.14.130. Special building height regulations apply to certain activity centers and within certain residential zones as follows:

a.    Within the following activity centers identified in the Imagine Bothell... Comprehensive Plan and illustrated in Figure 12.14-0:

(1)    Filbert/Winesap neighborhood activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.72.030.

(2)    Juanita-Woodinville Way/I-405 neighborhood activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.60.040 and 12.66.035.

(3)    Maltby/York/Jewel neighborhood activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.74.050.

(4)    Canyon Park community activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.44.020 and 12.48.040.

(5)    Downtown community activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.64.202 Building Height (Downtown-Specific Definition).

(6)    Thrasher’s Corner community activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.48.020 and 12.74.040.

(7)    Canyon Park regional activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.48.030.

(8)    North Creek regional activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.56.080.

Fig. 12.14-0

b.    Within the R 40,000, R 9,600, R 8,400, R 7,200, R 5,400d, and R 5,400a zones, single-family residential structures which incorporate peaked roofs having a minimum roof pitch of four feet vertical for every 12 feet horizontal (4:12) may be up to 35 feet in height under any of the following conditions:

(1)    Within those portions of subdivisions five lots or greater recorded after October 27, 2007, which are 50 feet or more from the exterior boundary of the subdivision, except that this 50-foot limitation shall not apply under any of the following circumstances:

(A)    Where the subdivision applicant or subsequent lot purchaser receives permission from the adjacent property owner or owners to allow structures up to 35 feet tall within the 50 feet, and a notarized copy of said permission is provided to the city; or

(B)    Where the subdivision is adjacent to a property which is undeveloped; or

(C)    Where the subdivision is adjacent to an open space tract which is at least 50 feet wide and dedicated as part of an adjacent development; or

(D)    Where the subdivision is adjacent to property which is zoned R 40,000 through R 5,400a and contains a nonresidential use such as a church, school or municipal use; or

(E)    Where the subdivision is adjacent to multifamily or nonresidential zoning which permits structures at least 35 feet in height; or

(F)    Where the subdivision is adjacent to another subdivision qualifying for 35-foot-tall structures under these regulations; or

(G)    Where the subdivision is adjacent to a public right-of-way at least 50 feet in width; or

(H)    Where a 12-foot-wide Type II landscape buffer tract plus a 25-foot setback are provided; or

(2)    On existing lots of record when each adjacent property meets at least one of the following criteria:

(A)    The primary residential structures on the adjacent property are at least 50 feet from the boundary of the subject lot; or

(B)    The adjacent property is zoned R 40,000 through R 5,400a and contains a nonresidential use such as a church, school or municipal use; or

(C)    The adjacent property has multifamily or nonresidential zoning which permits structures at least 35 feet in height; or

(D)    The adjacent property is a subdivision which qualifies for 35-foot-tall structures under these regulations; or

(3)    On existing lots of record when a 12-foot-wide Type II landscape buffer plus a 25-foot setback are provided on the subject property.

7.    Building and hard surface coverage shall be measured as set forth in BMC 12.14.140. For the purposes of this section, driveways within the front yard setback shall be no wider than necessary to accommodate three vehicles across, and walkways within the front yard setback shall not exceed five feet in width.

a.    Notes. Hard surfaces legally established on a site prior to December 31, 2016, and which exceed the limits set forth in BMC 12.14.030 and 12.14.040 shall be subject to nonconforming provisions of Chapter 12.26 BMC.

8.    Accessory building coverage shall be measured as set forth in BMC 12.14.130. When combined, the primary and accessory building coverage shall not exceed the maximum building coverage as established above. Garages and carports located in R 8,400, R 7,200 and R 5,400d zoned properties may exceed the five percent coverage limitation, provided the garage or carport is 480 square feet in area or less. Combined garages and carports in R 5,400a, R 4,000 and R 2,800 zoned properties shall not be subject to the 480-square-foot maximum, but are limited to an area no greater than five percent of the lot area.

Detached accessory dwelling units may exceed the five percent coverage limitation, as long as they meet the size limits in BMC 12.06.140(B)(4)(e)(1).

9.    Within the R-AC zoning classification, no specific density is prescribed. The number of dwelling units attainable shall be controlled by site and building envelope design regulations.

10.    Lands with a zoning classification of R 5,400a, R 4,000, R 2,800, DC, DT, DN, GDC, or R-AC where offspring lots are proposed to be created within a parent site through the subdivision provisions of BMC Title 15 may apply setback dimensions to the offspring lots as set forth in BMC 12.14.085. (Ord. 2200 § 2 (Exh. B), 2016; Ord. 2171 § 3 (Exh. C), 2015; Ord. 2140 § 2 (Exh. B), 2014; Ord. 2123 § 2 (Exh. B), 2013; Ord. 2053 § 3 (Exh. C), 2010; Ord. 2043 § 2 (Exh. B), 2010; Ord. 1995 § 1, 2008; Ord. 1988 § 1, 2008; Ord. 1980 § 2, 2007; Ord. 1946 § 2, 2005; Ord. 1876 § 2, 2002; Ord. 1871 § 1, 2002; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996).

12.14.040 Commercial and industrial dimensions.

A.    Development Standards Table.

Commercial and Industrial Development Standards (1)

Zoning Classification

OP

NB

CB

GC

LI

Minimum front yard setback (2)

Setbacks shall be the distance required for landscaping, in accordance with Chapter 12.18 BMC, except as otherwise provided under BMC 12.14.080

Minimum rear yard setback (2)

Minimum side yard setback (2)

Maximum building height (3)

35, or as established for designated centers (3)

35, or as established for designated centers

35, or as established for designated centers (3)

35

35, or as established for designated centers (3)

Maximum building coverage (4)

100%, except for any required landscaping, in accordance with Chapter 12.18 BMC, and required critical areas and their buffers, in accordance with BMC Title 14, Environment

Maximum hard surface coverage (4)

B.    Notes.

1.    General Notes.

a.    Where a district combines multiple zoning classifications (e.g., R-AC, OP, CB), the most permissive standards of the individual zoning classifications shall apply.

b.    Development standards may be modified through the planned unit development process.

2.    Setbacks shall be in accordance with BMC 12.14.050 through 12.14.100.

3.    Building height shall be measured as set forth in BMC 12.14.110 through 12.14.130. Special building height regulations apply in the following activity centers identified in the Imagine Bothell... Comprehensive Plan and illustrated in Figure 12.14-0:

a.    Canyon Park community activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.44.020 and 12.48.040.

b.    Thrasher’s Corner community activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.48.020 and 12.74.040.

c.    Canyon Park regional activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.48.030.

d.    North Creek regional activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.56.080.

e.    Downtown community activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.64.202, Building Height (Downtown-Specific Definition).

f.    Juanita-Woodinville Way/I-405 neighborhood activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.60.025 and 12.66.035.

g.    Filbert/Winesap neighborhood activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.72.030.

h.    Maltby/York/Jewel neighborhood activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.74.050.

4.    Building and hard surface coverage shall be measured as set forth in BMC 12.14.140. (Ord. 2200 § 2 (Exh. B), 2016; Ord. 2171 § 3 (Exh. C), 2015; Ord. 2053 § 3 (Exh. C), 2010; Ord. 2043 § 2 (Exh. B), 2010; Ord. 1876 § 2, 2002; Ord. 1871 § 1, 2002; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996).

12.14.050 Setbacks – General measurement method.

A.    Front Yard Setbacks.

1.    Front yard setbacks shall be measured from the street right-of-way boundary to a line parallel to and measured perpendicularly from the street right-of-way boundary. In the case of corner lots, there shall be a front yard setback provided for each lot side abutting an existing or proposed public right-of-way. The yards opposite said front yards need only meet the side yard setback requirements.

2.    Where a property abuts a street identified as a collector, minor arterial, principal arterial or freeway/limited access highway in the Imagine Bothell... Comprehensive Plan, the front yard setback shall be measured from the projected right-of-way boundary for the street as if it were fully developed in accordance with the plan.

3.    Should the edge of a street surface improvement, including roadway, curb and gutter, and sidewalk, extend beyond the street right-of-way boundary, the front yard setback shall be measured from the edge of the surface improvement. For the purposes of this chapter, the edge of the surface improvements shall be the edge of the pavement, curb or sidewalk.

B.    Side and rear yard setbacks shall be measured from the interior lot line to a line parallel to and measured perpendicularly from the interior lot lines at the depth prescribed for each zone.

C.    The director is authorized to designate front, side and rear yard setbacks in accordance with subsections A and B of this section. If these subsections do not establish a front, side and rear yard setback, the director shall establish the setbacks based upon orientation of the lot to surrounding lots and to any existing development pattern. All other setbacks shall be established in relation to the established front, side and rear yard setbacks. (Ord. 2123 § 2 (Exh. B), 2013; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996).

12.14.060 Setbacks – Adjoining alleys.

A.    Structures shall be set back from a property line abutting an alley a minimum of five feet, except as provided in subsection B of this section.

B.    Vehicle access points from garages, carports or fenced parking areas shall be set back from the alley property line to provide a straight line length of at least 25 feet from the access point to the opposite edge of the alley. No portion of the garage or the garage door in motion may cross the property line. (Ord. 2123 § 2 (Exh. B), 2013; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996).

12.14.070 Setbacks – Applying to specific building or use.

When a building or use is required to maintain a specific setback from a property line or other building, such setback shall apply only to the specified building or use.

A.    Any structures containing two or more attached primary dwelling units shall set back a minimum of 25 feet from any property line abutting R 40,000 through R 5,400d zones, unless the adjacent property already is occupied by structures containing two or more primary dwelling units.

B.    Rear yard setbacks for accessory buildings and structures within all residential zone classifications shall be five feet, except that detached accessory dwelling units shall maintain the same rear yard setback as primary structures.

C.    Gas station pump islands shall be set back a minimum of 25 feet from any property line.

D.    Abutting an R-zoned property, not including combined zones, the setback shall be 50 feet for any building containing manufacturing, distribution, storage or warehousing uses, and 30 feet for any other nonresidential use.

E.    Pad-mounted heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment such as heat pumps, air conditioning units, furnaces, and other similar equipment installed after October 16, 2010, shall comply with the following (note: these requirements shall not apply to portable generator use during times of emergency):

1.    Not be located in any front yard setback area;

2.    Be located at least five feet from any adjacent property line or structure, including fences;

3.    Be screened from view of any public right-of-way by means of either landscaping or fencing. Any such screening should be installed such that it can either be readily removed to provide access to said equipment, or should be placed at least three feet from said equipment to allow for access. (Ord. 2171 § 3 (Exh. C), 2015; Ord. 2123 § 2 (Exh. B), 2013; Ord. 2047 § 2 (Exh. B), 2010; Ord. 1946 § 2, 2005; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.080.).

12.14.080 Setbacks – Modifications.

The following setback modifications are permitted:

A.    When the common property line of two lots is covered by a building(s), the setbacks required by this chapter shall not apply along the common property line;

B.    When a lot is located between lots containing structures which are located at nonconforming front yard setbacks, the required front yard setback for such lot may be the average of the two nonconforming setbacks or 60 percent of the required front yard setback, whichever results in the greater front yard setback; and

C    Any modification of setbacks shall be reviewed by the fire department for potential effects on fire flows. (Ord. 2123 § 2 (Exh. B), 2013; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.090.).

12.14.085 Setbacks – Offspring lot setbacks applicable within attached residential zones.

Lands with a zoning classification of R 5,400a, R 4,000, R 2,800, DC, DT, DN, GDC, or R-AC where offspring lots are created through the subdivision provisions of BMC Title 15 may apply the following special setbacks to offspring lots within a parent site; provided, however, that setbacks from the exterior lot lines of the parent site shall be consistent with BMC 12.14.030(A), 12.14.050, 12.14.060, 12.14.070, and 12.14.080(B):

A.    Side and rear yard setbacks from offspring lot lines that are not a parent site lot line may be based upon the building separation requirements of the applicable building and fire codes; provided, that zero, common, or shared lot lines may be allowed as set forth within subsection C of this section;

B.    Front yard setbacks from internal private access streets and/or access drives shall be at least five feet or shall be set back from the internal private access street and/or access drive tract or easement line sufficient to provide a straight line length of at least 25 feet from the access point of the garage, carport or parking area to the opposite edge of the private access street and/or access drive tract or easement. No portion of a garage or any garage door which may be in motion may cross any lot line;

C.    Zero, common, or shared lot lines may be permitted subject to the standards of the applicable building and fire codes;

D.    Existing developments comprising detached condominiums or common wall townhouses may utilize the setback provisions of this section if converting to fee simple lots as provided by the subdivision process of BMC Title 15; and

E.    Figure 12.14.085-1 provides a visual example of the parent site and offspring lot line setback requirements as set forth within subsections A, B, and C of this section and Figure 12.14.085-2 provides a visual example of zero, common, or shared offspring lot line requirements as set forth within subsection C of this section.

(Ord. 2123 § 2 (Exh. B), 2013).

12.14.090 Setbacks – Projections allowed.

Projections may extend into required setbacks as follows:

A.    Fireplace structures, bay or garden windows, enclosed stair landing, or similar structures may project into any setback, provided such projections are:

1.    Limited to one per facade;

2.    Not wider than 10 feet; and

3.    Not more than 18 inches into a setback.

B.    Uncovered porches and decks which exceed 18 inches above the finished grade may project:

1.    Eighteen inches into side and rear yard setbacks; and

2.    Thirty-six inches into the front yard setback.

C.    Uncovered porches and decks not exceeding 18 inches above the finished grade may project to the property line.

D.    Eaves may not project more than:

1.    Eighteen inches into a side or rear yard setback;

2.    Twenty-four inches into a front yard setback; or

3.    Eighteen inches across a lot line in a zero lot line development.

E.    Fences with a height of six feet or less may project into any setback; provided, that sight distance requirements are maintained in accordance with the Bothell Design and Construction Standards and Specifications. (Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.100.).

12.14.100 Setbacks – Panhandle lots.

In determining setbacks for a panhandle lot, the handle or access portion of the lot shall not be used to determine building setbacks. Setbacks shall be determined as though no handle was on the lot. (Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.110.).

12.14.110 Building height – General measurement method.

A.    Building height shall be measured vertically from the average city-approved finish grade to the highest point of the structure.

B.    The average city-approved finish grade shall be measured by first delineating the smallest rectangle which can enclose the building and then averaging the existing ground elevations taken at the midpoint of each side of the rectangle. In the event the midpoint of the rectangle drawn is not located on the subject property, the measurement point shall be determined by establishing the midpoint of the property line where it intersects the rectangle.

C.    Submittal Requirements.

1.    The site plan shall indicate the existing ground elevations and proposed finish grades, as determined by a licensed land surveyor.

2.    Building elevations or sections shall be provided for all sides of the building.

D.    Compliance with the height requirement shall be determined by:

1.    Review of building permit plans, including a site plan indicating existing and proposed finished grades and building footprint, and elevations for each side of the structure; and

2.    Field verification at the completion of building framing. On sloping lots or when the structure is within two feet of the height limit, certification by a licensed surveyor is required. On all other structures, verification shall be provided to the building official as required at the time of the framing inspection. (Ord. 1980 § 2, 2007; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.120.).

12.14.120 Building height – Exceptions to limit.

The following structures may be erected above the height limits as set forth in BMC 12.14.110:

A.    Roof structures housing or screening ventilating fans, HVAC (heating and cooling equipment), or similar equipment required for building operation and maintenance;

B.    Fire or parapet walls, flagpoles, chimneys, smokestacks, communication transmission and receiving structures, utility line towers and poles, water towers/storage tanks, and similar structures;

C.    On properties with any of the following zoning designations: R 2,800, R-AC, OP, NB, CB, CG, or LI, architectural elements including, but not limited to, peaked roofs and steeples; provided, that the increase in height shall not increase usable floor area;

D.    Structures containing certain manufacturing processes within the Canyon Park regional activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.48.020, or the North Creek regional activity center, in accordance with BMC 12.56.080;

E.    Deleted;

F.    Primary and secondary schools in the R 40,000, R 9,600, R 8,400, R 7,200, R 5,400d, R 5,400a, and R 4,000 zones, through the conditional use permit process, in accordance with the following:

1.    The maximum height for school buildings shall be 35 feet except as provided in subsection (F)(2) of this section.

2.    Architectural elements which do not increase usable floor area, including but not limited to peaked roofs, may extend above 35 feet but in no case shall exceed a height of 55 feet, subject to the following:

a.    For each one foot of building height over 35 feet, the required building setback shall be increased one foot from street property lines and two feet from interior property lines. Such increased setbacks shall apply only to that portion of the building exceeding 35 feet in height.

b.    For each one foot of building height over 35 feet, the required interior lot line landscaping width shall be increased 0.25 foot (three inches) along those interior lot lines from which the portion of the building over 35 feet is visible.

c.    Additional site and building design requirements may be imposed through the conditional use permit process if deemed necessary to mitigate the visual impacts of buildings over the normal height limit and otherwise ensure that such buildings comply with the criteria for approval of conditional use permits, as set forth in BMC 12.28.040. (Ord. 2025 § 2 (Exh. C), 2009; Ord. 1946 § 2, 2005; Ord. 1922 § 1, 2004; Ord. 1876 § 2, 2002; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.130.).

12.14.130 Building limitations – Accessory buildings and structures.

Accessory buildings and structures within residential zone classifications, including but not limited to storage buildings and detached private garages, shall maintain the same residential character of the primary structure, shall cover a maximum of five percent of the lot area, and shall have an exterior height no greater than 20 feet or the height of the primary building or structure, whichever is less.

A.    Accessory buildings shall utilize similar siding, roofing and detailing as the primary structure, and be of a style that complements the primary structure. Metal buildings that are clearly of a different style than the primary structure shall not be allowed for accessory buildings over 120 square feet.

B.    Accessory buildings with a footprint greater than 1,200 square feet shall be set back from the required setback line an additional foot for each 100 square feet of area above 1,200 square feet. A minimum 10-foot-wide Type II landscape buffer shall be installed between any accessory building with a footprint greater than 1,200 square feet and any property line within 50 feet of that structure.

C.    Accessory buildings shall have a maximum height of 10 feet at the five-foot accessory building rear setback line, increasing by one foot for each additional foot of setback to the maximum height allowed for accessory buildings. (Ord. 1995 § 1, 2008; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.140.).

12.14.140 Building and hard surface coverage.

A.    Building coverage shall mean that portion of a lot that is occupied by the principal building and its accessory buildings, including all projections except eaves. Decks are exempted from the building coverage provisions. Building coverage shall be expressed as a percentage of the total lot area.

B.    Hard surface coverage shall mean the ground areas of the entire development site covered by any impervious surface, permeable pavement, or vegetated roof, determined by extending a vertical projection to the ground from the widest points of any hard surface, and expressed as a percentage of total lot area. Permeable pavement and vegetated roofs shall count only 50 percent of their site area as hard surface for the purposes calculating coverage in the Development Standards Tables in BMC 12.14.030 and 12.14.040. (Ord. 2200 § 2 (Exh. B), 2016; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.150.).

12.14.150 Fences and freestanding walls.

Fences may be erected in any zone district as provided below:

A.    Fences and/or freestanding walls approximately six feet or less in height shall be placed behind any landscape buffer required by Chapter 12.18 BMC, or, where no landscape buffer is required, may be allowed without a setback in any front or interior yard; provided, that no fence or wall shall be placed closer than three feet to or obscure vision of any fire hydrant; and provided further, that fences and freestanding walls shall comply with the sight distance triangle requirements of the Bothell Design and Construction Standards and Specifications.

1.    Fences or freestanding walls that exceed approximately six feet in height shall comply with the required front, side, and rear yard setbacks.

2.    Fence and freestanding wall height shall be measured from the horizontal projection of the predominant ground level of either the city-approved finish grade where such grade has been established, or from the horizontal projection of the predominant existing grade in the vicinity of the fence.

3.    Fence height shall be measured to the upper surface of the fence panel.

4.    Where the International Residential Code (IRC) or the International Building Code (IBC) requires a guard on top of a retaining wall, any fence or freestanding wall so located shall meet the minimum guard height and construction requirements of the IRC or IBC, as applicable.

B.    Electric fences shall:

1.    Be permitted only within the R 40,000, R 9,600, R 8,400, R 7,200, R 5,400d, R 5,400a, R 4,000 and R 2,800 zone classifications and only for the raising and keeping of animals for agricultural purposes or pasturing;

2.    Be posted with permanent signs a minimum of two square feet in area at 50-foot intervals stating that the fence is electrified;

3.    Be placed no closer than six feet to any fire hydrant.

C.    Barbed wire fencing is permitted in association with animal husbandry or pasturing or security purposes.

D.    Razor wire fencing is prohibited. (Ord. 1997 § 2, 2008; Ord. 1946 § 2, 2005; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.160.).

12.14.155 Storage space and collection points for recyclables and garbage.

All development other than single-family residential development shall provide storage space for the collection of recyclables and garbage as follows:

A.    The storage space shall be provided at the rate of:

1.    Three square feet per dwelling unit in multifamily developments except where the development is participating in a public agency-sponsored or approved direct collection program in which individual recycling bins are used for curbside collection;

2.    Four square feet per every 1,000 square feet of building gross floor area in office, educational and institutional developments;

3.    Six square feet per every 1,000 square feet of building gross floor area in manufacturing developments and all developments other than those specified in this subsection; and

4.    Ten square feet per every 1,000 square feet of building gross floor area in retail developments.

B.    The storage space for multifamily residential developments shall be apportioned and located in collection points as follows:

1.    The required storage area shall be dispersed among collection points throughout the site when there is more than one building.

2.    There shall be a minimum of one collection point for every 30 dwelling units.

3.    Collection points may be located within residential buildings, in separate buildings/structures without dwelling units, or outdoors. Outdoor collection points shall not be located in any required setback areas.

4.    Collection points located in separate buildings/structures or outdoors shall be no more than 200 feet from a common entrance of a residential building.

5.    Collection points shall be located in a manner so that hauling trucks do not obstruct pedestrian traffic on-site or project into any public right-of-way.

C.    The storage space for nonresidential development shall be apportioned and located in collection points as follows:

1.    Storage space may be allocated to a centralized collection point.

2.    Outdoor collection points shall not be located in any required setback areas.

3.    Collection points shall be located in a manner so that hauling trucks do not obstruct pedestrian or vehicle traffic on-site, or project into any public right-of-way.

4.    Access to collection points may be limited, except during regular business hours and/or specified collection hours.

D.    The collection points shall be designed as follows:

1.    Dimensions of the collection points shall be of sufficient width and depth to enclose containers for recyclables and garbage. The area enclosed in such collection points shall be in accordance with the storage space requirements set forth in subsection A of this section.

2.    Architectural design of any structure enclosing an outdoor collection point or any building primarily used to contain a collection point shall be consistent with the design of the primary structure(s) on the site through all of the following:

a.    Similar architectural style;

b.    Similar exterior finish materials and colors;

c.    Similar architectural details or features.

3.    Collection points shall be identified by signs not exceeding two square feet each.

4.    A seven-foot wall or fence with a gate or gates shall enclose any outdoor collection point, excluding collection points located in industrial developments that are greater than 100 feet from residentially zoned property and not visible from the street right-of-way.

5.    Enclosures for outdoor collection points and buildings used primarily to contain a collection point shall have gate openings at least 12 feet wide for hauling trucks. In addition, the gate opening for any building or other roofed structure used primarily as a collection point shall have a vertical clearance of at least 12 feet. Each enclosure may have more than one gate opening.

6.    Weather protection of recyclables shall be ensured by using weather-proof containers or by providing a roof over the storage area.

7.    No collection point or container shall be visible from the street right-of-way or adjacent single-family development. The collection point or container shall either be located behind the building or shall be adequately screened with Type I landscaping.

E.    Only recyclable materials and garbage generated on-site shall be collected and stored at such collection points. Except for initial sorting of recyclables by users, all other processing of such materials shall be conducted off-site.

F.    No container shall be collected and stored at any location on the site except in a designated storage facility.

G.    The lids of all garbage and recyclables containers shall be maintained in a closed position. (Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000. Formerly 12.14.165.).

12.14.160 Lot divided by zone boundary.

When a lot is divided by a zone boundary, the following rules shall apply:

A.    When a lot contains both residential and nonresidential zoning, the zone boundary between the zones shall be considered a lot line for determining permitted building height and required setbacks on the site;

B.    When a lot contains residential zones of varying density, any residential density transfer within the lot shall only be allowed from the portion with the lesser residential density to that of the greater residential density; and

C.    Uses on each portion of the lot shall only be those permitted in each zone pursuant to Chapter 12.06 BMC. (Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.170.).

12.14.170 Site and exterior building design, generally.

Design of sites and buildings shall comply with BMC 12.14.180 through 12.14.230 and other applicable regulations in this code which implement the goals and policies of the urban design element of the Imagine Bothell... Comprehensive Plan. In addition to compliance with these regulations, persons interested in developing property are required to consult the illustrations and written guidelines in the urban design element and in the Residential Development Handbook for Snohomish County Communities, which is incorporated by reference in the comprehensive plan as Appendix H. As an appendix to the plan, the residential development handbook is an adopted SEPA policy of the city of Bothell. (Ord. 1946 § 2, 2005; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.180.).

12.14.180 Site design.

A.    Residential Development Access Design. The access design of residential developments shall comply with the following:

1.    Streets shall be located and configured in such a manner as to not promote residential neighborhood cut-through traffic. Improvements to the existing street network shall be planned to restrict through traffic to arterials and to reduce the amount of through traffic on residential neighborhood streets. Neighborhood cut-through traffic shall mean motor vehicle traffic which neither originates nor terminates within the neighborhood, but travels through the neighborhood for the purposes of avoiding arterial traffic and/or saving time between an origin and a destination outside the neighborhood. Whether a proposed street network promotes or does not promote residential neighborhood cut-through traffic will be determined on the basis of the required traffic impact analysis submitted with the development application.

2.    Connections to surrounding streets and developments shall be provided for pedestrians and bicyclists as warranted for safe and efficient nonmotorized travel within and between neighborhoods, and in particular to provide access to activity centers, parks, schools, transit stops and other gathering places. Such connections shall include but are not limited to bicycle lanes, sidewalks and dedicated pedestrian/bicycle paths, and shall be provided in accordance with BMC 12.16.120 and this section.

3.    Connections to surrounding streets and developments shall be provided for police, fire and emergency medical services vehicles as warranted to minimize response times to, from and within the neighborhood. Where such connections are determined on the basis of the required transportation impact analysis to promote residential neighborhood cut-through traffic, emergency vehicle-only access ways shall be provided.

B.    Commercial and Mixed-Use Development Access Design. In conjunction with new development or redevelopment in areas zoned for commercial or mixed commercial and residential uses, proposed streets shall be located and configured in such a manner as to create an interconnected network which facilitates motorized and nonmotorized travel; provided, however, that proposed streets or connections which are determined to promote residential neighborhood cut-through traffic, as defined in subsection A of this section, are not allowed.

C.    Development on Hillsides. Development on hillsides shall blend visually and functionally into the natural environment to the maximum extent possible. Such development shall comply with the following:

1.    Changes to the natural topography shall be minimized. Roads, lots, buildings and parking areas shall be located, configured and constructed so as to minimize grading and its consequent impacts on soil stability and surface and groundwater movement.

2.    Clearing of existing native vegetation shall be minimized. Existing vegetation shall be retained in accordance with BMC 12.18.030 and this section to preserve wildlife habitat and natural groundwater recharge functions and promote soil stability.

3.    Retaining walls and high foundations on the underside of buildings shall be screened by vegetation.

D.    Location of Buildings and Parking. In any development in the OP, NB, CB, and GC zoning classifications, and in any zone which combines one or more of these classifications with an R zoning classification, parking shall not be located between any building to which the general public has access and the front lot line, subject to the following:

1.    Parking shall be prohibited in the area between the front lot line and a line running parallel to the front lot line and tangent to the closest point of the building to the front lot line, and extending along the front lot line that distance by which the building faces the front lot line, as measured between points projected from the most distant points of the building at right angles to the front lot line. Examples of how this regulation applies are provided in Figures 12.14-1, 12.14-2 and 12.14-3.

Fig. 12.14-1

Fig. 12.14-2

Fig. 12.14-3

2.    Corner Lots. A corner lot is defined as a lot at the junction of and having frontage on two or more intersecting streets. On a corner lot, each lot line abutting a street right-of-way is considered a front lot line.

a.    A building on a corner lot shall be placed at the intersection of the front lot lines so that there is no parking between the building and either front lot line.

b.    When a corner lot has frontage on more than one street intersection, the regulation in subsection (A)(2)(a) of this section shall apply only to one of the intersections. An example of how this regulation applies is provided in Figure 12.14-4.

c.    Buildings on a corner lot shall be located so as not to interfere with sight distance at intersections.

Fig. 12.14-4

3.    A through lot is defined as a lot which has frontage on two parallel or approximately parallel streets. In such a case, the requirements in subsection A of this section shall apply to only one of the frontages. An example of how this regulation applies is provided in Figure 12.14-5.

Fig. 12.14-5

4.    Where a development consists of two or more buildings on one property, the requirement in this subsection D shall apply to only one of the buildings in the development. Buildings containing less than 1,000 square feet of gross floor area shall not be counted as satisfying this requirement.

5.    The area between the building and the front lot line may be utilized for landscaping, outdoor pedestrian activities, critical areas and their buffers, or storm water detention facilities.

6.    Where it can be demonstrated that one or more site characteristics make compliance with these regulations unfeasible, the community development director may allow an alternative building location. Such site characteristics include but are not limited to:

a.    Parcel shape;

b.    Topography;

c.    Existing shared access with adjacent properties;

d.    Existing significant trees which might be saved by locating a building elsewhere.

7.    Where an overall site plan has been adopted, through a subarea plan and implementing regulations, a planned unit development, a binding site plan, a conditional use permit, or other mechanism requiring approval by the hearing body, planning commission and/or the city council, the adopted site plan shall control the location of buildings and parking.

8.    These regulations shall not apply to location of single-family dwellings.

E.    Community Gathering Place. To encourage public interaction and promote a sense of community, proposed developments of five acres or more shall provide a community gathering place or places at a ratio of 20 square feet of improved space per acre, with a minimum of 100 square feet per gathering place. For the purposes of these regulations, “community gathering place” shall mean an informal, small-scale, hard-surfaced area intended for use by the general public. The community gathering place may be located adjacent to public right-of-way, for example, as a plaza connected to the sidewalk, or internal to the development. Adjacent developments may combine to form one or more community gathering places. Each community gathering place shall include one or more features to encourage public interaction. Such features include but are not limited to the following:

1.    Benches;

2.    Fountains;

3.    Sculpture or other art forms;

4.    Kiosks for posting neighborhood items;

5.    Links to transit and pedestrian and bike trails;

6.    Bandstands or gazebos;

7.    Pedestrian-scale lighting.

F.    Retaining Walls. Where retaining walls or high foundation walls are required and would be visible from a public right-of-way or residentially zoned property, the following shall apply:

1.    Walls shall be constructed of or faced with brick, stone, split-face or fluted concrete block, textured poured-in-place concrete, or other materials with texture to reduce the apparent mass of the wall, as illustrated in Figure 12.14-6;

Fig. 12.14-6

2.    In order to soften the appearance of the wall, hanging and/or climbing vegetation shall be planted, and/or bas-relief sculpture or other art forms shall be incorporated, as illustrated in Figure 12.14-7;

Fig. 12.14-7

3.    Where the difference in elevation to be retained is more than eight feet, the following shall apply:

a.    The retaining wall shall be stepped back in segments of approximately equal height;

b.    Vegetation to overhang the segment below shall be planted between segments, at a 3:1 maximum slope to minimize erosion and maximize plant retention;

c.    Where public safety or engineering requirements dictate a non-segmented wall higher than eight feet, the community development director may waive this regulation;

d.    This regulation is illustrated in Figure 12.14-8.

Fig. 12.14-8

G.    Exterior Lighting. Exterior lighting shall be an integral part of the site and building design and shall serve the purposes of enhancing safety and security, defining on-site pedestrian and bicycle paths and connections with off-site paths, and encouraging safe nighttime pedestrian activity and public interaction. Such lighting shall accomplish one or more of the following:

1.    Illuminate landscaping elements such as tree foliage and shrubs;

2.    Illuminate building elements such as entryways, canopies, cornices or other architectural features;

3.    Illuminate parking lots;

4.    Illuminate pedestrian and bicycle pathways with fixtures such as lighting bollards or low pole lights.

H.    Design of Parking Lots, Parking Structures, Transit Stops and Shelters and Pedestrian Sidewalks and Pathways. The design of these facilities shall be in accordance with BMC 12.16.080 through 12.16.120. (Ord. 2171 § 3 (Exh. C), 2015; Ord. 2140 § 2 (Exh. B), 2014; Ord. 1946 § 2, 2005; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000. Formerly 12.14.190.).

12.14.190 Exterior building design.

A.    Overall Design. The exterior of each non-single-family building shall be designed so as to have a visually distinct base, main section and roofline, to provide visual references to the scale of the building, and to help the building fit in with its context, in accordance with the following:

1.    The base may comprise the foundation itself; the nonstructural use of materials such as brick, stone or textured concrete which convey an impression of permanence and support; or a contrast in materials or colors between the base and the main section.

2.    The main section shall incorporate architectural features and detailing to create visual interest. In addition to the requirements of BMC 12.14.200 and 12.14.210, such features and detailing may include but are not limited to windows, columns, pilasters, belt courses, brackets, arches, decorative molding, quoins and similar architectural devices. Any architectural decoration shall be part of a unified design.

3.    The design of the roof shall employ at least one of the following:

a.    A gable, gambrel or hipped roof;

b.    A broken or articulated roofline;

c.    A prominent cornice or fascia that defines and emphasizes the top of the building;

d.    Any other roof element that emphasizes a building’s unifying architectural concept and helps it to fit in with its context.

    Examples of how these regulations apply are illustrated in Figures 12.14-9, 12.14-10 and 12.14-11.

Fig. 12.14-9

Fig. 12.14-10

Fig. 12.14-11

B.    Pedestrian Entries. The building design shall clearly define and emphasize the pedestrian entries. Any primary pedestrian entry to a building shall be designed so as to be visually predominant over parking lot driveways or garage entrances. Pedestrian entries shall be emphasized by one or more of the following methods:

1.    Landscaping the entry and approach to the entry in a manner which is consistent with and extends the building design theme;

2.    Incorporating a formal entry;

3.    Utilizing modulation to emphasize by indentation or protrusion the portion of the building containing the entry;

4.    Incorporating a porte-cochere or other cover providing weather protection for the entry.

    Examples of how these regulations apply are illustrated in Figure 12.14-12.

Fig. 12.14-12

C.    Exterior Building Materials. Building exteriors shall be constructed of durable and easily maintainable materials, to enhance the overall appearance, community character and long-term economic vitality of the area in which the building is located. The use of various types of materials in exterior building design shall be in accordance with the following:

1.    Metal siding shall have visible corner moldings and trim, and a matte finish;

2.    Mirrored glass is allowed only in the LI zone and above the street level story in the OP, NB, CB and GC zones;

3.    Concrete walls shall be enhanced by texturing, coloring with paint or an admixture, or by incorporating embossed or sculpted surfaces, mosaics or artwork.

D.    Screening of Roof-Mounted Mechanical Devices. Mechanical devices, such as exhaust fans, vents, air conditioning units, heating equipment, electrical devices, mechanical, electrical and other equipment located on the roof of any structure shall be screened to avoid unsightly roof appearance as viewed from surrounding property, including hillsides. The design of the screening shall be incorporated as an integral part of the overall building design. Screening materials shall be consistent with subsection C of this section. Roof-mounted solar or wind equipment is exempt from screening requirements, provided the installation is consistent with BMC 12.14.250(D). (Ord. 2107 § 2 (Exh. B), 2012; Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000. Formerly 12.14.200.).

12.14.200 Exterior building design – Multiple-family residential.

A.    Multiple-family residential building design shall promote public interaction and a sense of community within each development by incorporating one or more of the following features:

1.    Balconies;

2.    Porches;

3.    Rooftop terraces;

4.    At-grade patios;

5.    Courtyards;

6.    Formal or informal gardens.

B.    Where a building containing residential dwelling units would be located in close proximity to a public right-of-way, the design shall create a transition between the public realm of the street and the private realm of the residences by incorporating one or more of the following:

1.    Screening and buffering with trees, shrubs, fences and/or walls to create a physical separation between pedestrians and the windows of residential units;

2.    Construction of the first story of units so that they are above the level of the sidewalk a sufficient height to prevent a direct view into the dwelling units;

3.    Partially enclosed porches and other outdoor living areas which front onto the street;

4.    Courtyards fronting on the street and defined by landscaping and/or fences.

    Examples of how these regulations apply are illustrated in Figure 12.14-13.

Fig. 12.14-13

C.    Building Facade Modulation. Modulation is a measured and proportioned inflexion or setback in a building’s face. Multifamily residential buildings shall provide modulation on facades as follows:

1.    The maximum wall length without modulation shall be 40 feet;

2.    The sum of the modulation depth and modulation width shall be no less than eight feet. The modulation depth shall be not less than two feet and the modulation width shall be not less than six feet.

    An example of how these regulations apply is illustrated in Figure 12.14-14.

Fig. 12.14-14

D.    Roofline Variation. Multifamily residential buildings shall provide roofline variation as follows:

1.    The maximum roof length without variation shall be 40 feet;

2.    The minimum horizontal or vertical offset shall be three feet;

3.    The minimum variation length shall be six feet;

4.    Roofline variation shall be achieved using one or more of the following methods:

a.    Vertical offset in ridge line;

b.    Horizontal offset in ridge line;

c.    Variations of roof pitch;

d.    Gables;

e.    Any other technique approved by the community development director which avoids the appearance of a continuous unrelieved monolithic roofline.

    An example of how these regulations apply is illustrated in Figure 12.14-15.

Fig. 12.14-15

(Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.210.).

12.14.210 Exterior building design – Commercial and industrial.

A.    Where pedestrian activity is present, windows are preferable to blank walls because windows create visual interest both for the passerby and for the building occupant. Windowless walls shall not be oriented to the street unless necessary for the use conducted in the building, mandated by the fire code, or otherwise required by city codes. Where a windowless wall is oriented to the street, the appearance of the wall shall be softened by application of BMC 12.18.080(C) and one or more of the following:

1.    Installation of trellises and vines;

2.    Use of brick, stone, split-face or fluted concrete block, textured poured-in-place concrete, or other materials with texture to reduce the scale of the wall;

3.    Incorporation of artwork, such as a mural, sculpture, or bas-relief, on the wall surface;

4.    False windows.

    An example of how these regulations apply is illustrated in Figure 12.14-16.

Fig. 12.14-16

B.    Buildings at the corners of street intersections shall incorporate design features to create or reinforce the appearance and feeling of the intersection as an outdoor community “room.” Such design features include but are not limited to:

1.    A change of wall plane;

2.    A change of roofline;

3.    A major pedestrian entry;

4.    Balconies;

5.    Turrets;

6.    Sculpture, mosaic, or other artwork.

    An example of how these regulations apply is illustrated in Figure 12.14-17.

Fig. 12.14-17

(Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000. Formerly 12.14.220.).

12.14.220 Exterior building design – Multifamily residential, commercial or industrial development abutting single-family residential zoning.

Where multifamily residential, commercial or industrial development abut single-family residential zones, design compatibility shall be achieved through a combination of measures including but not limited to the following, in addition to other requirements of this title:

A.    The minimum setback from adjacent single-family zoned property shall be 25 feet;

B.    At a minimum, a Type II landscaping buffer shall be required along the single-family property line(s); this and other landscaping within the development shall reinforce the existing landscape character of the area to the maximum extent possible;

C.    Multiple-family and mixed use building design shall incorporate a repetitive articulation and modulation which reflects the character of development in the adjacent single-family zones, as illustrated in Figure 12.14-18, unless a majority of the houses within one street of the proposed development do not share a common style or a different character has been identified and adopted under subarea regulations;

Fig. 12.14-18

D.    The following design features of adjacent single-family residential development shall be incorporated in multiple-family and mixed use developments unless a majority of the houses within one street of the proposed development do not share a common style or a different character and scale has been identified and adopted under subarea regulations:

1.    Siding materials and styles;

2.    Window arrangement, spacing and sizing;

3.    Roof materials and styles; and

4.    Proportions of architectural elements;

    Examples of how the above regulations apply are illustrated in Figure 12.14-19.

Fig. 12.14-19

E.    Building design shall respect and preserve the privacy of adjacent single-family development by minimizing the quantity and size of windows oriented to the single-family residential zone. Any decks and balconies overlooking neighboring single-family yards are prohibited;

F.    Parking lots shall be designed so as to least impact the character of the single-family neighborhood;

G.    Heating, cooling, kitchen and other mechanical equipment, conduits, service panels, meters and other electrical equipment, and refuse collection facilities shall be located and screened so as not to be visible or audible above ambient noise levels from adjacent single-family development or the street. (Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1629 § 1, 1996. Formerly 12.14.230.).

12.14.230 Design of developments on or adjacent to historic register or historic inventory properties.

Where a proposed development would be on or adjacent to a property on the local, state or national historic register or local historic inventory or within an historic district on the register, the following regulations shall apply:

A.    If the proposed development would entail any changes to a structure on an historic register or demolition of a structure on the local historic inventory, such proposed changes or demolition shall be subject to the procedures and criteria set forth in Chapter 22.28 BMC, Changes to Property on Register or Inventory.

B.    The proposed development shall reflect the architectural character of adjacent and nearby historic properties by one or more of the following measures:

1.    A similar unifying design concept which organizes a building’s architectural elements into a harmonious composition;

2.    Similar building proportions, scale and roof line;

3.    Similar architectural style and exterior finish materials;

4.    Similar patterns and proportions of windows;

5.    Similar entry configuration and relationship to the street;

6.    Similar architectural details or features (such as cornices or trellises). (Ord. 1815 § 1, 2000; Ord. 1798 § 1, 2000. Formerly 12.14.240.).

12.14.240 Exterior lighting.

A.    Purpose. The purpose of this section is to regulate exterior lighting by promoting the principles of good lighting design, including:

1.    Permit reasonable amounts of exterior lighting for night-time safety, utility, security, productivity, enjoyment and commerce;

2.    Minimize adverse off-site impacts including light trespass, glare, and night glow;

3.    Conserve energy and resources to the greatest extent possible; and

4.    Curtail light pollution and preserve the night-time environment.

B.    Definitions. The following definitions are listed in alphabetical order for the purpose of exterior lighting regulations, and shall apply to the administration of this section. In addition, except as otherwise provided in this section, those definitions as contained in Chapter 11.02 BMC are adopted and incorporated into this section by reference.

“Adjacent grade” means the grade directly below a luminaire (light fixture) on a plumb line or nearest grade thereto based upon city-approved finish grade.

“Astronomic time switch” means an automatic lighting control device that operates as an on/off switch for outdoor lighting relative to the time of solar day with time of year correction.

“Canopy” means a covered, unconditional structure with at least one side open for pedestrian and/or vehicular access.

“Common outdoor areas” means one or more of the following: a common parking for three or more domiciles or buildings; a common parking garage or covering entrance intended to be used by three or more domiciles or buildings; a common entrance for three or more domiciles or buildings.

“Curfew” means a time defined by the authority when outdoor lighting is reduced to a specified maximum level or extinguished.

“Emergency conditions” means a loss of electrical power, fire, security alarm, or other situation requiring uninterrupted illumination for the path of egress.

“Fully shielded luminaire” means a luminaire typically with opaque top and sides, capable of only emitting light in the lower photometric hemisphere as installed.

“Glare” means a light entering the eye directly from luminaires that causes visual discomfort or reduced visibility.

“Hardscape area” means area in square feet of all hardscape including any medians, walkways, landscape areas 10 feet or less in width within the hardscape area.

“Hardscape perimeter” means a perimeter in linear feet of all hardscape outside perimeter plus perimeter around buildings and structures greater than 10 feet in width.

“IDA” means the International Dark-Sky Association.

“IESNA” means the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America.

“Illuminated area” means an exterior area for which lighting of reasonable uniformity and illumination is provided; not incidentally lighted or partially lighted.

“Improved area” means the area of a specific use, measured in plain view.

“Initial lamp lumens” means the lumen rating of a lamp when the lamp is new and has not depreciated in light output (rated lamp lumens). Lamp lumen depreciation equals 1.0.

“Intended manner” means the manner of use of the product generally as listed, advertised and/or per manufacturer’s standard installation instructions.

“Lamp” means a generic term for a source created to produce optical radiation (i.e., “light”), often called a bulb or tube.

“Lamp watts” means the rated watts of the lamp, not including the watts of external auxiliaries.

“Landscape lighting” means lighting not mounted to poles or buildings, for the purpose of illumination of trees, shrubbery and other natural external elements.

“Light pollution” means light trespass, and excessive light levels, beyond what is necessary to perform the defined task.

“Light trespass” means unwanted light that falls on neighboring properties.

“Lighting equipment” means equipment specifically intended to provide electric illumination, including, but not limited to, luminaire(s), poles, posts, and related structures, electrical wiring, and other necessary or auxiliary components.

“Lighting system” means on a site, all exterior manmade lighting sources, associated infrastructure and controls.

“Lighting zone (LZ)” means a designation assigned by the city for specified parcels, areas or districts defining allowable ambient lighting levels, operational characteristics and other control criteria.

“Low voltage landscape lighting” means electric lighting powered at less than 24 volts and limited to lamps of 50 watts or less, not mounted to poles or buildings, for the purpose of illuminating trees, shrubbery and other natural external elements.

“Lumens (lm)” means an international unit of luminous flux; light power corrected for Vλ, the human photopic sensitivity function.

“Luminaire” means the complete lighting unit assembly (entire fixture), consisting of a lamp, or lamps and ballast(s), drivers or transformers (when applicable), together with the parts designated to distribute the light (reflector, lens, diffuser), to position and protect the lamps, and to connect the lamps to the power supply.

“Mounting height” means the height of a luminaire above finished grade level. The horizontal spacing of poles is often measured in units of “mounting height.” Example: “The luminaires can be spaced up to four mounting heights apart.”

“New lighting” means lighting for areas not previously illuminated; newly installed lighting of any type except for replacement lighting or lighting repairs.

“Nontradable surface” means those surfaces where lighting power allowance amounts may be used only for the specific application identified within subsection F of this section and Table 12.14-2 and cannot be transferred to other surfaces or be used as a group.

“Opaque” means a solid material not allowing light to pass through.

“Ornamental lighting” means lighting that is not a sign and does not impact the function and safety of an area but is purely decorative, or used to illuminate architecture and/or landscaping, and installed for aesthetic effect.

“Partly shielded luminaire” means a luminaire in which the lamp is shielded by a translucent shade as to prevent light from being directly emitted by the lamp or reflector into the upper photometric hemisphere.

“Photoelectric switch” means a control device employing a photocell or photodiode to detect daylight and automatically switch lights off by day.

“Project” means installation of a lighting system under a single electrical permit or for a specific construction project, multiple permits when required for phased construction.

“Property line” means the boundary line, or lot line between platted or unplatted lots or both, defining the edges of a legally defined piece of property.

“Replacement lighting” means lighting installed specifically to replace existing lighting equipment that is sufficiently inoperable to be beyond repair(s).

“Repair(s)” means the reconstruction or renewal of any part of an existing luminaire for the purpose of its ongoing operation, including but not limited to relamping or replacement of components such as capacitor, ballast, or photoelectric control.

“Residential luminaire” means luminaires used solely for compliance with Section V.

“Right-of-way” means the land, property, or interest therein acquired for or devoted to transportation purposes.

“Sales area” means exterior areas used for sales of retail goods and materials, including but not limited to automobiles, recreational vehicles, trailers, boats, building supplies, and gardening and nursery products.

“Seasonal lighting” means temporary lighting installed and operated in connection with holidays, community celebrations or traditions.

“Service yard” means uncovered exterior area specifically used for vehicular, marine or aviation service or for outdoor storage and/or loading of goods and materials.

“Shielded directional luminaire” means a fully shielded luminaire with an adjustable mounting device allowing aiming in a direction other than straight downward.

“Sign” is a communication device, structure, or fixture which incorporates graphics, symbols, or written copy for the purpose of conveying a particular message to public observers.

“Site” means a geographical area delineated by specific dimensions and coordinates or a complete land parcel defined by designated property boundaries as recorded by the authority.

“Sky glow” means the illumination of clouds, moisture and airborne matter by lighting.

“Temporary lighting” means lighting installed and operated for periods not to exceed 60 days, completely removed and not operated again for at least 30 days.

“Third party” means a party contracted to provide lighting, such as a utility company.

“Time switch” means an automatic lighting control device that operates as an on/off switch for outdoor lighting according to time of day.

“Tradable surface” means those surfaces where lighting power allowances may be traded or transferred from one surface to another surface resulting in an increase of the power allowance on one surface and a decrease of power allowance on other surfaces. Tradable surface power allowances may be added together used as a group. See subsection F of this section and Table 12.14-1.

“Translucent” means a material allowing light to pass through while obscuring or diffusing the lamp.

“Uplight” means, for an exterior luminaire, light emitted in the hemisphere at or above the horizontal plane.

“WS NREC” means the Washington State Non-Residential Energy Code (current version).

C.    Applicability. These regulations shall be applicable to all exterior lighting whether attached to structures, poles, the earth, or any other location, installed in conjunction with development applications, including building permits, grading permits, utility permits, shorelines substantial development permits, conditional use permits, tenant improvement permits, and right-of-way invasion permits except as provided in subsection D of this section. Provided, however, that different land uses and development scale may be subject to specific exterior lighting provisions as provided below. Where the exterior lighting regulations within this section are in conflict with exterior lighting provisions of a subarea zoning regulation, or the conditions of approval for a conditional use permit or planned unit development, the subarea zoning regulations or conditions of approval shall control.

D.    Exemptions. The following exterior lighting is exempt from the provisions of this section:

1.    City-sponsored lighting equipment placed within public rights-of-way;

2.    Lighting equipment used exclusively for signs;

3.    Lighting equipment necessary for emergency situations and law enforcement actions;

4.    Temporary lighting installed for holidays and celebrations; provided, that individual lamps are 10 watts or less;

5.    Traffic control signals and devices;

6.    Low voltage landscape lighting equipment controlled by a photoelectric switch or astronomic time switch;

7.    Lighting equipment in swimming pools, spas, fountains, and other water features;

8.    Temporary lighting equipment for theatrical, television, performance areas and construction sites;

9.    Repairs to existing lighting equipment; provided, all light fixtures repaired or replaced shall comply with basic light glare and light pollution standards as detailed within subsection H of this section;

10.    Lighting equipment for public monuments, flags, and statuary; and

11.    Existing lighting equipment installed on or before January 22, 2011, for the following minor building or site alterations:

a.    Tenant improvements that do not alter the building exterior;

b.    Alterations or remodels that do not alter the building exterior;

c.    Improvements to parking lots that do not increase the number of parking stalls;

d.    Changes in use when the change is for uses listed within the same use table within Chapter 12.06 BMC. For example, BMC 12.06.050, Business and personal services, lists a number of similar uses, including architectural/engineering and banking and financial services. When the change in use is from one business and personal use to another business and personal use the change in use is exempt from these lighting regulations.

E.    Lighting Zones. The city of Bothell has established lighting zones (LZ) which limits the amount of electrical energy used for exterior lighting as specified in subsection F of this section and Tables 12.14-1 and 12.14-2 (see Figure 12.14-20 for a map of zone locations). The descriptive criteria for each lighting zone shall be as follows:

1.    Lighting Zone 1 (LZ1). Low ambient lighting including developed areas of national parks, state parks, forest land, and rural areas. No Lighting Zone 1 areas have been identified within the city of Bothell;

2.    Lighting Zone 2 (LZ2). Moderate ambient lighting areas including lands predominately consisting of residential zoning, neighborhood business districts, light industrial with limited night-time use and residential mixed use areas. These areas are depicted on Figure 12.14-20 and include the following zoning classifications: R 40,000; R 9,600; R 8,400; R 7,200; R 5,400a; R 5,400d; R 4,000; R 2,800; OP; R 5,400a, OP; R 2,800, OP; MHP; SSHO; R 40,000 (LID); R 9,600 (LID), R 5,400a (LID); C; SVV; PPOS; DT; and OP, LI;

3.    Lighting Zone 3 (LZ3). Moderately high ambient lighting areas such as commercial districts. These areas are depicted on Figure 12.14-20 and include the following zoning classifications: CB; R 4,000, OP, CB; R 4,000, OP, NB; R-AC, OP, CB, LI; R-AC, OP, CB, MVSO; OP, CB, MVSO; OP, CB, LI, MVSO; SR-522; and GDC; and

4.    Lighting Zone 4 (LZ4). High ambient lighting including high activity commercial districts in major metropolitan areas. No Lighting Zone 4 areas have been identified within the city of Bothell. However, pursuant to subsection (I)(2)(b) of this section, an applicant of a large development may request Lighting Zone 4 high ambient lighting energy levels;

5.    Lighting zone power allowances shall be based upon subsection F of this section and Tables 12.14-1 and 12.14-2.

F.    Exterior Lighting Power Allowances (ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1). The city of Bothell is utilizing the exterior lighting power allowances as promulgated by the American National Standards Institute/American Society of Hearing Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Engineers/Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA) Standard 90.1 to promote energy efficiency and reduce power consumption associated with exterior lighting. Certain modifications to the standard have been incorporated to accommodate lighting zones as described in subsection E of this section.

1.    The total exterior lighting power allowance for exterior areas shall be the sum of the individual lighting power densities specified in Tables 12.14-1 and 12.14-2 plus the base power allotment specified for the lighting zone of the subject property.

2.    Transference or trade-offs of lighting power densities may only occur between exterior surfaces listed as tradable surfaces in Table 12.14-1.

Table 12.14-1 Lighting Power Allowances Tradable Surfaces 

 

 

Zone 2

Zone 3

Zone 4

Base Site Allowance (All properties are allowed the base site allowance and may use the base site allowance for either tradable or nontradable surfaces but cannot be combined)

 

600 W

750 W

1300 W

 

Building Grounds

 

 

 

 

Walkways less than 10 feet wide

0.7 W/linear foot

0.8 W/linear foot

1.0 W/linear foot

 

Walkways 10 feet wide or greater

0.14 W/ft2

0.16 W/ft2

0.2 W/ft2

 

Plaza areas

 

 

 

 

Special feature areas

 

 

 

 

Uncovered Parking Areas

 

 

 

 

Parking areas and drives

0.06 W/ft2

0.10 W/ft2

0.15 W/ft2

Tradable Surfaces (Lighting power densities for uncovered parking areas, building grounds, building entrances and exits, canopies and overhangs and outdoor sales areas may be traded)

Building Entrances and Exits

 

 

 

Main entries

20 W/linear foot of door width

30 W/linear foot of door width

30 W/linear foot of door width

Other doors

20 W/linear foot of door width

20 W/linear foot of door width

20 W/linear foot of door width

Entry canopies

0.25 W/ft2

0.4 W/ft2

0.4 W/ft2

 

Sales Canopies

 

 

 

 

Freestanding and attached

0.8 W/ft2

0.8 W/ft2

1.0 W/ft2

 

Outdoor Sales

 

 

 

 

Open areas (including vehicle sales lots)

0.5 W/ft2

0.5 W/ft2

0.5 W/ft2

 

Street frontage for vehicle sales lots in addition to open area allowance

10 W/linear foot

10 W/linear foot

10 W/linear foot

 

Table 12.14-2 Lighting Power Allowances Nontradable Surfaces 

 

 

Zone 2

Zone 3

Zone 4

Base Site Allowance (All properties are allowed the base site allowance and may use the base site allowance for either tradable or nontradable surfaces but cannot be combined)

 

600 W

750 W

1300 W

Nontradable Surfaces (Lighting power density calculations for the following applications can be used only for the specific application and cannot be traded between surfaces or with other exterior lighting. The following allowances are in addition to any allowance otherwise permitted in the “Tradable Surfaces” section of this table)

Building Facades

0.1 W/ft2 for each illuminated wall or surface or 2.5 W/linear foot for each illuminated wall or surface length

0.15 W/ft2 for each illuminated wall or surface or 3.75 W/linear foot for each illuminated wall or surface length

0.2 W/ft2 for each illuminated wall or surface or 3.75 W/linear foot for each illuminated wall or surface length

Automated teller machines and night depositories

270 W per location plus 90 W per additional ATM per location

270 W per location plus 90 W per additional ATM per location

270 W per location plus 90 W per additional ATM per location

Entrances and gate-house inspections at guarded facilities

1.25 W/ft2 of covered and uncovered area

1.25 W/ft2 of covered and uncovered area

1.25 W/ft2 of covered and uncovered area

Loading areas for law enforcement, fire, ambulance and other emergency service vehicles

0.5 W/ft2 of covered and uncovered area

0.5 W/ft2 of covered and uncovered area

0.5 W/ft2 of covered and uncovered area

Drive-up windows/doors

400 W per drive-through

400 W per drive-through

400 W per drive-through

Parking near 24-hour retail entrances

800 W per main entry

800 W per main entry

800 W per main entry

Figure 12.14-20 Lighting Zones Map

G.    Exterior Lighting Controls and Curfews. Exterior lighting shall be equipped with automatic controls and, for the specific uses identified below, curfews and automatic lighting reduction controls as consistent with the following:

1.    Automatic Control Requirements. All exterior lighting shall have controls that automatically extinguish all exterior lighting during daylight hours using a switching device such as a photoelectric switch, astronomic time switch or a control system such as a programmable lighting controller, building automation system, lighting energy management system or equivalent, per the requirement of WS NREC.

2.    Curfew and Automatic Lighting Reduction Requirements. The city of Bothell has established curfew time(s) specific to business and/or use types, for all lighting systems installed after January 22, 2011, whereupon the total outdoor lighting lumens shall be uniformly reduced by a specified amount. Individual light fixtures shall not be extinguished to meet this curfew lighting reduction requirement. The following uses and project types shall have curfews as follows:

a.    Office, warehouse, manufacturing, light industrial and similar use exterior parking lots – 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. or 30 minutes before opening. The lighting system must be uniformly reduced to a maximum of 25 percent of normal output during curfew times.

b.    Retail and mixed use without residential uses exterior parking lots – two hours after close of business hours. Lighting system must be uniformly reduced to a maximum of 25 percent of normal output during curfew times.

c.    Mixed use containing residential uses, exterior parking lots – 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. or 30 minutes before opening. The lighting system must be uniformly reduced to a maximum of 50 percent of normal output during curfew times.

d.    Parking structures or garages and other types of covered parking areas – no curfew; provided, that all light fixtures are fully shielded or obscured by building components such that the fixture is not visible from surrounding properties.

e.    Sports Fields.

(1)    Located on lands with detached residential zoning classifications of R 40,000, R 9,600, R 8,400, R 7,200, and R 5,400d – 10:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. unless a game is in progress. Games may not start after 8:00 p.m. Spectator, parking lot, and other non-sports field areas may remain fully illuminated for up to two hours after completion of the event.

(2)    Located on lands with all other zoning classifications – 11:00 p.m. to 6:00 a.m. Spectator, parking lot, and other non-sports field areas may remain fully illuminated for up to two hours after completion of the event.

H.    Illumination Standards. The city of Bothell requires that all exterior lighting satisfy the illumination level recommendations as established within the latest edition of the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA) Lighting Handbook and associated recommended practice documents.

I.    Requirements for Exterior Lighting.

1.    The following exterior lighting requirements are applicable to all proposed development applications and existing developments, except outdoor performance, sport and recreation facilities and playfield lighting, which must comply with subsection H of this section, and individual single-family residential structures, which must comply with subsection J of this section.

a.    Submittal Requirements:

(1)    A site plan showing the proposed location, mounting height, aiming point, type, and size of all exterior lighting including building mounted, landscape, roadways, and parking lot lighting drawings should include property line or project limit line if part of a larger campus.

(2)    Manufacturer fixture specification sheets or cut-sheets for all fixture types. Fixture cut sheets must be labeled with fixture type and all fixture features and accessories must be defined and an image of the fixture included.

(3)    A fixture schedule including quantity and type of lamps.

(4)    If building elevations are to be illuminated, submit building elevation drawings showing the location and type of all fixtures, the area of the building elevation to be illuminated, the illumination levels, and the aiming point for all light fixtures.

(5)    If building mounted fixtures are used, submit building elevations showing the location of each fixture.

(6)    All drawings must have fixture type indicators.

(7)    The community development director may require submittal of additional information demonstrating the objectives of the lighting design including:

(A)    A brief written narrative; and/or

(B)    Supplemental drawings.

b.    Fixture Requirements.

(1)    All fixtures must be similar to those identified as acceptable within Figures 12.14-21, 12.14-22, and 12.14-23;

(2)    The maximum mounting pole height of exterior light fixtures shall be consistent with the following schedule:

(A)    Within Lighting Zone 2: 15 feet above city-approved finish grade.

(B)    Within developments classified as large under subsection (I)(2) of this section located within Lighting Zone 2: 20 feet above city-approved finish grade.

(C)    Within Lighting Zone 3: 20 feet above city-approved finish grade.

(D)    Within developments classified as large under subsection (I)(2) of this section located within Lighting Zone 3: 25 feet above city-approved finish grade.

(E)    Within properties which have been assigned a Lighting Zone 4 classification by the community development director per subsection (I)(2)(b) of this section: 25 feet above city-approved finish grade.

(3)    All light fixtures within two mounting pole heights of any adjacent property (excluding public rights-of-way) that are not building mounted must be facing in toward the project and have house-side shields consistent with Figure 12.14-25 installed on the side of the fixture nearest the adjacent property. (See Figure 12.14-25).

 

Figure 12.14-21 Acceptable and unacceptable light fixtures 

Acceptable fixtures

Comments

Not acceptable fixtures

Comments

Example of ceiling mounted fixture

Surface mounted square fixture with exposed lamp and lens

Lamp concealed in opaque upper portion. Clear flat glass lens

Translucent white lens with decorative metal grill work is not acceptable

Solid, opaque sides and top. Flat clear glass lens

Vertical lamp with dropped lens is not acceptable

Flat lens and horizontal top is acceptable

Clear, translucent, white or clear textured with or without an internal refractor is unacceptable

Clear flat lens. Lamp concealed within opaque portion of fixture at less than 5 degrees above the horizontal

Fixture aimed above the horizontal is not acceptable

Bollard lamp concealed by opaque louvers aimed in a downward direction

Bollards with translucent lens with decorative grill-work directed horizontally are not acceptable

Fixture has opaque shields with flat lens

Standard yard or barn light

Flat lens fixtures with lamp concealed in top opaque portion

Lamp below opaque portion of fixture is not acceptable

Full cut-off wall pack fixture

Perimeter wall pack with exposed lens or lamp

Flat glass lens. Lamp completely concealed within opaque fixture

Compact refractor wall pack with exposed lens or lamp

Figure 12.14-22 Acceptable fixtures subject to special requirements 

Fixtures acceptable subject to specific requirements

Requirements

Pole-mounted fixtures limited to 6,600 lumens. Fixture must not have more than two percent of lumens above 90 degrees

Floodlights aimed above the horizontal to illuminate flags and building elements are acceptable only when the fixture is shielded or aimed such that people on the ground cannot see into the fixture or the lamp from normal viewing angles. See Figure 12.14-26 for information regarding other options for illuminating building elements

Wall sconces with opaque fronts that are limited to 6,200 lumens. Uplighting is acceptable only when fixture is located beneath building overhangs, cantilevers, or canopies. Arrows indicate direction of light

Horizontal lamp completely contained inside opaque portion of housing. Lamp limited to 6,200 lumens. Clear or translucent lens acceptable

Wall mounted fixtures with translucent, white lens up to 12 inches in diameter and limited to 1,250 lumens

Decorative wall sconce with translucent white lens. If using metal halide lamp, lamp must be concealed in upper or lower opaque portion of fixture. Limited to 3,300 lumens. If using fluorescent lamp, limited to one T8 or T5 standard output lamp mounted vertically within the fixture

 

Figure 12.14-23 Acceptable fixtures for individual single-family residential 

Acceptable fixtures (may be similar)

Requirements

Clear glass with a maximum of 345 lumens per lamp. Two lamps per fixture maximum

Translucent lens up to 1,220 lumens per lamp maximum. One lamp per fixture maximum

Post top with clear glass with maximum lamp lumens of 345 with a three lamp maximum

Bare bulbs with motion sensor

Light completely concealed within opaque housing. All light aimed in a downward direction

Shielded lamps with motion sensors

Figure 12.14-24 Unacceptable fixtures 

Unacceptable light fixtures

Comment

Commonly called a yard or area light, these fixtures are not acceptable under any circumstances

Bare bulbs with no shielding and no motion sensor

Flood light fixtures with no shielding and no motion sensors

Figure 12.14-25 Example of house-sided shielding

 

Figure 12.14-26 Illustration demonstrating building uplight requirement

Acceptable flood light use for architectural uplighting

Unacceptable flood light use for architectural uplighting

Figure 12.14-27 Illustration demonstrating shielding requirement for pole-mounted fixtures located within two pole heights of adjacent properties

Figure 12.14-28 Illustration demonstrating when pole-mounted fixtures are located two or more pole heights away from adjacent properties house-side shielding not required

2.    The following additional requirements are applicable to development applications for projects that include: buildings covering 10,000 square feet or more of gross floor area; parking lots containing 40 or more parking stalls; and residential developments of 20 or more dwelling units shall comply with subsection (G)(1) of this section except outdoor performance, sport and recreation facilities and playfield lighting, which must comply with subsection H of this section, and individual single-family residential structures, which must comply with subsection J of this section.

a.    Submittal Requirements.

(1)    All of the submittal items required for general requirements plus provide site lighting calculations showing:

(A)    Illumination points at maximum 10 foot intervals for all parking and on-site roadways measured at finish grade;

(B)    Pathways, stairs, entrances, under canopies, and other pedestrian areas must be at five-foot maximum intervals. Include any areas intended for human use; and

(C)    The grid shall extend to the points surrounding the property line to the point where the light levels fall below 0.2 footcandles. The calculations shall include any existing or proposed ROW lighting that will contribute light onto the property.

b.    Lighting Standards for Larger Developments.

(1)    Maximum fixture pole height shall be 20 feet above city-approved finish grade, including height of pole base;

(2)    Lighting power density shall not exceed the limits established within Table 12.14-1 for the applicable lighting zone;

(3)    The community development may allow increases from the established lighting zone to the next highest zone, if any, if safety and security is an issue. This may include instances where:

(A)    The parking facility is used during all hours of the day and night; where the police chief has identified special security needs exist;

(B)    High vandalism or crime rates have been documented by the Bothell police department; or

(C)    The community development director may consider specific site characteristics, level of vehicle and pedestrian conflict, special security needs, and history or likelihood of crimes in making a determination.

J.    Lighting of Exterior Performance, Sport and Recreation Facilities and Playfields. The following requirements shall be applied to all illuminated exterior performance, sport and recreation facilities and playfields:

1.    Lighting levels for outdoor performance areas, sport and recreation facilities, and playfields shall be Class III and Class IV as determined by the IESNA RP-6 (Recommended Practice for Sports and Recreational Area Lighting). The community development director may allow increases in designed lighting levels for venues hosting higher classes of sports play (collegiate/professional) and/or for stadiums with seating capacities in excess of 2,500 spectators.

2.    Where exterior playing fields or other exterior activity areas are to be illuminated, lighting fixtures shall be mounted, aimed and shielded such that light is directed only to the primary playing area and immediate surroundings associated with the playing area, such as spectator seating, concessions, ingress/egress areas, pedestrian aisles, maintenance facilities, and general pedestrian use areas. Direct illumination of adjacent nonplaying and immediate surroundings associated with the playing areas is prohibited.

3.    Floodlight shielding shall consist of one of the following:

a.    Full cutoff shoebox style floodlights aimed a maximum of five degrees above the horizontal mounting height of the luminaire. (See Figure 12.14-25). This is the only light fixture acceptable for tennis or similar hardcourts.

b.    Spun parabolic floodlights with external shielding consisting of a visor attached to the front of the floodlight. The visor shall extend beyond the upper hemisphere of the fixture a minimum of 12 inches and wrap a minimum of 170 degrees around the upper hemisphere of the floodlight. All surfaces of the fixture shall be nonreflecting and the external visor shall have a dull powder coat factory finish.

4.    Areas used for ingress/egress, pedestrian aisles, and general pedestrian use not associated with the playing or activity area shall be illuminated with separate lighting fixtures and shall provide an average horizontal illumination level at grade of no more than 1.0 footcandle average.

5.    In facilities with a seating capacity of 2,500 or more spectators, circulation areas around the concessions and restroom areas shall be no more than 10.0 footcandles average at three feet above grade, and shall be no more than 5.0 footcandles average at three feet above grade for facilities with a seating capacity of less than 2,500 spectators. The uniformity ratio (average horizontal illumination to minimum illumination) shall not exceed 4:1 within pedestrian aisles and walkways.

6.    Light trespass levels shall be a maximum of one and one-half footcandles when measured on either a horizontal surface (three feet above grade) or a vertical surface (five feet above grade) at all residential property lines.

7.    Applicants shall submit lighting plans for all outdoor sports courts and playing fields for review and approval. The following plans and information shall be included:

a.    Pole locations;

b.    Pole heights (poles used for exterior performance, sport and recreation facilities and playfields may exceed the height maximum established within the lighting zone requirements);

c.    Pole types;

d.    Luminaire quantities;

e.    Luminaire types;

f.    Luminaire mounting heights;

g.    Aiming points;

h.    Fieldcourt boundaries; and

i.    Site property lines.

j.    Computer generated vertical and horizontal illumination grids for the field or court shall be provided with the plans showing:

(1)    Horizontal footcandle levels calculated on a 15-foot grid three feet above the playing surface. The horizontal grid shall extend to the points surrounding the lighted field/court to the point where the light levels fall below 0.2 footcandles including lands beyond the subject property when necessary.

(2)    Vertical footcandle illumination levels at 15-foot increments, five feet high facing into the field at all property lines.

8.    Measurement and Verification. Prior to issuance of occupancy permit, the applicant shall provide the city with confirmation of compliance with regulations. Applicant shall measure lighting along residential property lines at a minimum of 30 feet on center. Documentation shall be submitted in writing and signed by the engineer of record.

Figure 12.14-29 Illustration of spun parabolic floodlight with shields

Figure 12.14-30 Example of full-cut-off shoe box floodlight

Figure 12.14-31 Illustration of five degree maximum tilt

K.    Requirements for Single-Family Residential Lighting. Individual single-family residential structures shall be subject to the following requirements:

1.    Decorative building mounted lighting (porch lights and sconces) are acceptable with the following limitations:

a.    Fixtures with clear glass lenses are limited to up to two 345 lumen lamps (equivalent to 25 watt incandescent).

b.    Fixtures with translucent lenses are limited to a total of 1,220 lumens (equivalent to 75 watt incandescent).

c.    Fully shielded fixtures (see example in Figure 12.14-21) can be up to 2,700 lumens (equivalent to 150 watt incandescent).

d.    Low voltage fixtures up to 50 watts and/or 1,500 lumens.

e.    Fixtures shall comply with Figures 12.14-23 and 12.14-24 or be consistent with the above standards.

2.    Pole-mounted light fixtures are acceptable with the following limitations:

a.    Fixtures’ lumen output shall be consistent with subsection (K)(1) of this section;

b.    Fixtures shall be mounted a maximum of 12 feet above finish grade;

c.    Fixtures used for hardscape sports courts, such as tennis, basketball, pickleball and other courts shall be consistent with subsection J of this section. (Ord. 2055 § 2 (Exh. B), 2011).

12.14.250 Alternative energy infrastructure.

A.    Purpose and Intent. This section is established to:

1.    Promote clean energy production by citizens and businesses;

2.    Ensure that alternative energy infrastructure is compatible with the development and development on adjacent properties;

3.    Provide options to traditional energy use; and

4.    Promote reduction of energy use within the city.

B.    General Criteria. Alternative energy infrastructure shall meet all of the following criteria:

1.    Setbacks. Alternative energy infrastructure shall not be located within any building setback or required setback, unless below grade or as allowed in BMC 12.14.070(E) for pad-mounted equipment and BMC 12.14.090(D) for panels that are components of roof structures.

2.    Compliance with International Building Code. Any installation of an alternative energy system shall comply with any and all applicable provisions of the International Building Code.

3.    Compliance with National Electrical Code. Any installation of an alternative energy system shall comply with any and all applicable provisions of the National Electrical Code.

4.    Utility Notification. No alternative energy system shall be installed unless evidence has been provided to the city of Bothell that the utility company has been informed of the customer’s intent to install an interconnected customer-owned power generation system. Off-grid systems shall be exempt from this requirement.

5.    Compliance with Environmental Regulations. Any installation of alternative energy infrastructure shall comply with all applicable environmental regulations.

C.    Geothermal Infrastructure Criteria. In addition to the approval criteria established in subsection B of this section, geothermal alternative energy systems are encouraged and shall comply with the following standards:

1.    Location. Geothermal infrastructure shall be located entirely within the subject property, or within appropriate easements.

2.    Installation. Installation of geothermal infrastructure shall comply with all building department requirements, and applicable state laws and codes.

D.    Solar and Wind Infrastructure. Alternative energy facilities, including solar and wind equipment, are encouraged, subject to the following provisions:

1.    Solar and Wind Infrastructure Requirements.

a.    Building-mounted solar and wind equipment shall be integrated into the structure’s architectural design. Techniques for achieving this include, but are not limited to, aligning equipment with a building’s structural or functional articulation, coordinating panel placement with other building features or using equipment to enhance a building’s architectural expression.

b.    Roof-mounted solar and wind equipment may extend above the building height limit without screening, but shall be designed to avoid creating glare or blocking views and solar access to surrounding properties.

2.    Solar and Wind Infrastructure Guidelines.

a.    Use of solar panels to serve other functions, like weather protection, shading, building articulation and place-making, is encouraged.

b.    Exposing solar and wind equipment in a way that enhances architectural design and demonstrates the viability of alternative energy is encouraged. (Ord. 2107 § 2 (Exh. B), 2012).