Chapter 31.06
WESTERN REGIONAL COMPREHENSIVE PLAN

Sections:

31.06.010    RPC vision statement.

31.06.020    RPC belief statements.

31.06.030    Mission statement.

31.06.040    Vision.

31.06.050    Transportation – Inventory and analysis.

31.06.060    Transportation policies.

31.06.070    Public facilities and services.

31.06.080    Public facilities and services – Policies.

31.06.090    Rural land – Vision.

31.06.100    Rural land – Principles.

31.06.110    Rural land – Classifications.

31.06.120    Rural land – Definitions.

31.06.130    Rural land – Use matrix.

31.06.140    Rural land – Private property rights and critical area protection.

SOURCE:    ADOPTED:

Ord. 583    11/07/95

AMENDED SOURCE:    ADOPTED:

Ord. 725    08/06/02

Ord. 804    12/19/06

Ord. 852    07/21/09

31.06.010 RPC vision statement.

The Western Clallam County Regional Planning Commission (RPC) is a planning commission formulated by joint agreement of Clallam County and the City of Forks. Its mandate is to create a comprehensive land use plan for an area in Western Clallam County that is defined by the borders of the Quillayute Valley School District, as detailed in the attached map. This comprehensive plan will be submitted directly to the Clallam County Commissioners and the Forks City Council. The RPC serves as the first cooperative planning venture between Clallam County and the City of Forks.

31.06.020 RPC belief statements.

The residents of the RPC planning area believe that:

(1) Independence, private property rights and freedom from government intrusion are strongly valued within the RPC planning area. Land use regulation should incorporate these values and only compromise them when: (a) highly significant objectives essential to the public health, safety or welfare cannot be attained in any other manner, or (b) the other beliefs expressed herein cannot be furthered in any other manner.

(2) Development should be encouraged and facilitated by land use regulation that is simple, user friendly, and inexpensive in application for both government and property owners.

(3) The rural character of the RPC planning areas should be encouraged.

(4) Regulations that reduce the value or use of private property shall be minimized. All land owners shall be fully compensated for any such regulation.

(5) Proper planning should promote the efficient construction and use of capital facilities.

(6) Large development projects can place a strain on municipal services to the detriment of other users. Large developments should mitigate these impacts.

(7) Segregation of land uses into generally defined and flexible Residential, Commercial and Industrial zoning classifications is a desirable means of preventing incompatible adjacent land uses and stabilizing property values.

(8) Home-based industries are an essential part of the economic vitality of the planning area and should be permitted in all zoning classifications to the extent compatible with surrounding land uses.

(9) Land use regulation should not impose burdens upon existing land uses due to the subsequent development of adjacent, incompatible land uses.

(10) The “grandfathering” of land uses is fundamental to the protection of private property rights and is of the highest importance to the people of the RPC planning area. Existing land uses shall not be rendered invalid nonconforming uses by changes in land use regulation.

(11) Public lands make up a large part of the RPC planning area. How this land is managed impacts the citizens and communities of the area significantly. Local citizens shall be entitled to full participation and representation on the uses of public lands in their region in order to help ensure a more stable economy and environment for the local communities to preserve the local culture, heritage and customs.

31.06.030 Mission statement.

The Regional Planning Commission’s mission is to formulate a comprehensive land use plan that strikes a responsible balance between private property rights, economic diversity and the quality of the environment.

31.06.040 Vision.

The Regional Planning Commission Comprehensive Plan will serve as the foundation for land use regulation that will be simple, minimally intrusive and inexpensive to apply. This regulation will facilitate economic development. The Comprehensive Plan will also serve to encourage the rural character of the RPC planning area and to segregate the planning area into residential, commercial and industrial uses in a manner that is compatible with existing land uses but also stabilizes property values and promotes compatibility of adjacent land uses. The Comprehensive Plan will promote the efficient construction and use of local government capital facilities and the availability of affordable, quality housing for all. The Comprehensive Plan shall also serve as a tool to increase local input in the federal land use decision making process.

31.06.050 Transportation – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals.

(a) Encourage efficient multimodal transportation systems that are based on regional priorities and coordinated with County and City comprehensive plans.

(b) Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards.

(2) Definition. The transportation system is composed of air, water, and land transportation facilities and services, including highways and streets, paths, trails and sidewalks, transit, airports, and ports.

(3) Circulation System. The transportation and circulation system should function to serve the land use patterns established by the Comprehensive Plan. For example, rural areas should be served by a transportation system designed for rural uses while urban areas should be served by a circulation system designed to serve urban uses. The transportation system should also focus on connections, either between urban centers such as from Forks to Port Angeles, or from Clallam Bay to Forks, or between different “modes” of travel, such as automobiles to public transit. Some parts of the circulation system in this area serve County-wide and State-wide interests, such as Highway 101, Burnt Mountain Road, LaPush Road, and the Quillayute Valley Airport. It is imperative that the County-wide and State-wide interests are considered when making land use or facility decisions affecting these systems.

(4) Land Use Coordination. In the past, land use planning and transportation planning were not always coordinated. Impacts from growth on transportation facilities were seldom considered. Transportation planning was little more than remedying existing conditions rather than preventing deterioration of service. Conversely, roads and highways were built in rural areas which encouraged the conversion of these areas into higher densities or commercial centers. The Clallam County Comprehensive Plan indicates that the transportation system should be consistent with the land use plan.

(5) Level of Service. Level of service standards measuring the degree of traffic congestion are used to serve as a gauge to judge the performance of the transportation system. Level of service is ranked from “A” (free flowing, uncongested) to “F” (highly congested, failing). When land use assumptions are made based on expected population growth and subsequent traffic demand, transportation engineers determine whether the transportation system can accommodate the increased demand by using level of service (LOS) standards. Level of service standards are based on average daily traffic (ADT), posted speed limits and characteristics of the area that the road serves (rural, suburban, and urban).

The minimum level of service established in the County-wide Comprehensive Plan for County roads is LOS “C.” Minimum level of service for State Highways is LOS “D,” as prescribed by the Peninsula Regional Transportation Planning Organization (PRTPO)1 These minimum standards indicate a traffic condition where flow of traffic is generally stable, but speeds are controlled by volume of traffic. This condition confines the drivers speed and freedom to maneuver and results in a poor level of comfort for the driver. Figure 2 indicates that all County roads are currently operating at or above these standards.

The forecast of future traffic on County roads in this Plan are based on two (2) methods: projected population growth2 and build-out3 potential based on proposed land use designations and their corresponding allowed densities. The latter is determined by first, examining the number of existing residences, businesses and other traffic generating entities within the region, and relating this to the average daily traffic counts for the road(s) serving the area. Next, using Clallam County Assessor records, the number of potential residences, business and other traffic generating entities are determined by figuring out how many “potential” parcels may exist under the allowed minimum lot sizes of the proposed land use designations. The increase from existing developments to potential developments directly correlates with the potential increase in average daily traffic. The forecast of traffic and its potential impact on adopted LOS standards is used to determine if the transportation system is capable of handling the demand. If the system is not capable of handling the demand, the Comprehensive Plan must identify how the system will be improved and financed, or the land use plan must be revised to ensure that the minimum “level of service” standards are met.

Figure 3 indicates that the current system is designed to handle the projected twenty (20) year population growth of this region for rural County roads. Even at build-out, only Highway 101 near the Forks Urban Growth Area would experience demand placing it below adequate level of service. Table 1 lists those rural County roads which will approach the minimum standard (C) by the year 2010 or if full build-out is to be realized.

Table 1
– Rural County Roads Level of Service (Marginal or Failing)

Road Name

Current LOS

LOS Year 2010

LOS Based on Build-out

Current ADT

ADT Year 2010

ADT Based on Build-out

From Mile Post

To Mile Post

Burnt Mountain Rd.

B

C

C

1,931

5,314

5,314

1.92

5.82

Hwy 101

D

D

E

9,300

19,654

19,654

189.55

191.69

Hwy 101

B

C

D

4,950

10,461

10,461

191.69

192.67

LaPush Rd.

B

C

C

1,344

3,865

3,865

0.00

13.86

Mora Rd.

B

B

C

694

925

2,914

2.17

2.22

Shadow Lane

A

C

C

0

6,763

6,763

0.00

0.45

(6) Road Standards. Level of service standards are an essential part of transportation planning, but they fail to provide a complete inventory of transportation needs and deficiencies. Design standards relating to road and lane width are set forth in RCW 35.83.030 and RCW 43.32.020. Those standards are as follows:

Table 2
– Design Standards for County Roads

ADT

Below 150

150 400

401 750

751 1,000

1,001 2,000

2,001 plus

Road Width

20 – 24 ft.

24 ft.

26 ft.

28 ft.

34 ft.

40 ft.

Lane Width

10 ft.

10 ft.

10 ft.

10 ft.

11 ft.

12 ft.

Table 3 lists County roads with standard width deficiencies. As demonstrated, most of the roadways with width deficiencies have acceptable or better LOS ratings. This clearly describes the discrepancy between LOS standards and road width standards. For example, although Erickson Road is currently at LOS “A” and would remain that way even at full build-out, it is clearly deficient in road width (fourteen (14) feet). LOS measures how free-flowing a roadway segment is, but fails to recognize whether the road meets minimum safety standards.

Table 3
– Deficient Road Widths with Corresponding LOS

Road Name

Pavement Width

Current ADT

Current LOS

LOS Based on Build-out

Road Width Deficiency

David Mansfield Rd.

11

15

A

A

13

Erickson Rd.

10

10

A

A

14

Heckle Rd.

10

2

A

A

14

Lucken Rd.

12

29

A

A

12

Magnolia Rd.

12

11

A

A

12

Moriarty Rd.

12

17

A

A

12

Walgren Rd.

12

159

A

A

12

(7) Private Roads. The transportation system in the West End Planning Region also includes private streets and easements, often unimproved, design to serve lots within short plats and surveys. A mechanism to upgrade these roads to land division and fire protection minimum standards should be in place to assist property owners developing property which does not directly abut a public street.

(8) Alternative Solutions. Solutions to transportation deficiencies may include incentives to change patterns of transportation behavior, such as car pooling rather than single occupancy vehicles, and enhancements to alternative modes of transportation that would be efficient and less costly to maintain, such as transit or bicycle lanes.

31.06.060 Transportation policies.

(1) Highway 101. Preserve and enhance the Highway 101 corridor for regional mobility to improve its functionality for business, area residents, tourists, nonmotorized transportation, freight and services.

(a) Encourage the Washington State Department of Transportation to retain all of their properties adjoining Highway 101 for future use as rest stops, scenic pullouts, roadside parks and future transit pullouts.

(b) Work with the Washington State Department of Transportation and other agencies to ensure that Highway 101 meets the goal that the corridor function regionally for the mobility of goods, services and passengers. Included in this goal would be review of State access policy to ensure the direct access to the highway from individual properties is minimized.

(c) Adopt regulations prohibiting access to Highway 101 when access to County/City roads is available or when shared access points are available.

(d) Highway 101 should have adequate shoulders for bicyclists. Current deficiencies should be corrected to encourage bicycle commuting. Storage facilities for bicycles should be available in conjunction with transit shelters along the corridor.

(e) Park-and-ride lots and transit shelters should be conveniently located along the Highway 101 corridor in the Forks Urban Growth Area and at intersections of County arterials and Highway 101.

(f) Passing lanes should be planned along the highway corridor in rural areas.

(g) The proliferation of stoplights on Highway 101 should be discouraged. New development should be encouraged to locate at existing intersections where stoplights are already in place.

(2) Rural Roads. The County has agreed to allow the City of Forks to plan for the Forks Urban Growth Area. This includes establishing goals and policies for the transportation system. In lieu of this, the following policies will deal with rural County roads in the West End Planning Region and those arterial roads that connect the UGA with the rural areas of the region.

(a) The County should not pursue new County roads outside of the Forks Urban Growth Area except in those circumstances where roads are built within subdivisions with private funds and then turned over to the County for maintenance.

(b) Road systems in rural and resource areas should be at rural and resource land standards which preserve the essential character of the land use.

Improvements should be made to regionally significant roads such as LaPush Road, Burnt Mountain Road, Mora and Quillayute Road, in order to accommodate alternative modes of transportation including bicycles and transit, thus encouraging the reduction of single occupancy vehicle use and enhancing recreational opportunities in the West End Planning Region.

(c) The following road improvements have been identified based on LOS standards, improved circulation, and road width safety standards.

(i) Quillayute Road (Sol Duc River Bridge painting, engineering, construction);

(ii) Quillayute Road (Quillayute Weather Station to Mina Smith Road – regrade, drain, widen existing road and pave, engineering, right-of-way, construction).

(3) Road Standards. Improvements to County roads should consider the rural character of the West End Planning Region. Needed safety improvements should be the minimum necessary to address the safety problem, particularly in rural areas where country roads enhance the character of the area, as well as being a deterrent to speeding. In rural areas, limit the number of access points to County roads in order to limit impediments to traffic and to maintain open space qualities.

(a) When County roads are rebuilt in this area, forecasts of future traffic should be based on the following principles:

(i) If the road is on the regional transportation network (see Peninsula Regional Transportation Planning Organization – PRTPO), the road should be designed to accommodate transportation growth rates within the PRTPO plan.

(ii) If the County road is not on the regional transportation network, the road should be designed based on 50 percent of the potential build-out as indicated in the land use plan.

(b) Private road standards should allow for flexibility while meeting minimum safety requirements for emergency vehicles, except in those circumstances where it is in the best public interest to develop a public road. Right-of-way standards, improved widths, and surfacing of private roads should not be required at the same standard as public roads. The use of Road Improvement Districts (RIDs) should be encouraged to equitably share the cost of upgrading private roads to land division and fire protection standards.

(4) Paths, Trails and Sidewalks.

(a) Non-motorized travel should be promoted within the West End Planning Region for multipurpose recreation, when it is determined to be cost effective. The County should continue work on the design, construction, and maintenance of the Olympic Discovery Trail (ODT) and other trail systems, including Kugel Creek Bicycle Loop, the Snyder-Jackson Trail connecting the Forest Service ranger stations via Rugged Ridge, the Pacific Northwest Trail, Elk Creek Mountain Bike Loop, Clallam Bay-Sekiu Trail, Sekiu to Owens Park, the Coastal Tsunami Evacuation Route, and other trails as identified by community members and other trail groups and work to provide connector trails between the ODT and these systems to provide companion facilities such as rustic campgrounds.

(b) The following are the designated bicycle routes. All roads on a designated bicycle route should have a minimum improved shoulder width of three to five feet, depending on the speed limit of the road. However, in all such improvements, the additional costs associated with meeting bicycle requirements should only be funded if the benefits of such improvements outweigh the costs when compared to both current and projected bicycle use.

Highway 101    Burnt Mountain

LaPush Road    Sol Duc Valley, Cooper Ranch and Clark Road Loop

Mora Road    Sol Duc Hotsprings Road

(5) Multimodal.

(a) First priority for transit service and facility improvements should be for designated urban growth areas, rural centers (including tourist commercial designations), and routes along the regional transportation system.

(b) Park-and-ride lots and transit shelters should be conveniently located along the Highway 101 corridor in Forks, Beaver, Sappho and Quillayute Prairie Airport, and at the intersections of County arterials or collectors and Highway 101. Design park-and-ride lots with transit shelters and bicycle storage facilities on site.

(6) Airports.

(a) Ensure that land uses adjacent to the Quillayute Prairie Airport are compatible with the continued use of the airport for air transportation needs of the region.

(b) If developed for commercial use, provide adequate roadway connections between the Quillayute Prairie Airport and the existing major arterial streets, roads and highways serving the airport. Ensure that there are public transportation connections to the Quillayute Prairie Airport.

(7) Level of Service. The minimum acceptable level of service (LOS) standard for County roads in both rural and urban areas shall be LOS “C,” using standard rating methodology.4

(8) Financing.

(a) Place high priority on investment and expenditure of limited public funds on the transportation system in urban growth areas and limit investment and expenditure in rural areas to arterial development connecting communities and neighborhoods.

(b) The existing transportation system should be maintained before expenditure of limited public funds on expanded facilities.

(c) Traditional funding sources should continue to be the primary funding source pay for improvements to County roads in the region.

(d) The County shall require new development to rectify and/or compensate for impacts to transportation facilities not meeting minimum safety standards or for developments expected to increase demand, such as average daily traffic (ADT), by more than 50 percent over current demand.

(9) Emergency Transportation Planning. The Clallam County Emergency Officer should coordinate with State and private timber land owners to draft an emergency road use compact. The intent of such a compact would be to provide alternative routes in the case of bridge failure or other road system failures that could potentially leave West End residents stranded from road access to the rest of the County and State.

31.06.070 Public facilities and services.

(1) GMA Goals.

(a) Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards.

(b) Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner.

(c) Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks.

(2) Overview. It is more cost efficient to provide some public facilities and services when the population is concentrated, such as in an urban growth area. Through the designation of urban growth areas, Clallam County and other service providers can plan more cost effective and efficient services.

Growth increases the demand for new and/or improved public facilities and services. New residential growth may impact school facilities by having more school aged children without a corresponding increase in school facilities. Development can increase traffic levels on County roads and transit systems. Connections to water and sewer systems diminish the available capacity for future growth.

The overall purpose of this growth management plan is to identify urban areas where public facilities and services keep pace with growth so that service levels are not diminished; and plan for where facilities and services will be located.

(3) Definition. The Growth Management Act defines public facilities as streets, roads, highways, sidewalks, street and road lighting systems, traffic signals, domestic water systems, storm and sanitary sewer systems, parks and recreation facilities, and schools. Public services include fire protection and suppression, law enforcement, public health, education, recreation, environmental protection, and other governmental services.

(4) Schools. The West End regional planning area is serviced by the Quillayute Valley School District No. 402. Facilities include one elementary school with grades kindergarten through five, one middle school which includes grades six to eight, one high school with grades nine through twelve, and one alternative school. These facilities are currently located within the incorporated City of Forks. With 1,680 students currently being instructed and a projected annual growth rate of two (2) percent,5 there may be a need for future increases in school capacity over the twenty (20) year planning period. Due to the large rural nature of the West End Planning Region, location of future facility sites may need to be considered outside of the Forks urban growth area.

(5) Water. The City of Forks provides water for the City and some outlying residents in the immediate vicinity. The City’s reservoir storage capacity is 1.9 million gallons. With an estimated peak load of 800,000 gallons, the City has the capability to expand service to over twice its current customers. This exceeds the requirements of the Forks urban growth area far beyond the twenty (20) year planning period.

(6) Sewer. Only a small portion of the City of Forks is serviced by a municipal sewer system. Rural areas in the West End Region are served by both community and private septic systems.

(7) Parks and Recreation. Recreational opportunities are abundant in the West End Planning Region. The Olympic National Park forms the eastern boundary of the region and includes a strip along the Pacific Coast to the west. The Sol Duc, Calawah and Bogachiel Rivers all have boat launch facilities located throughout these river systems. Resort facilities like the ones located at Bear Creek and Three Rivers provide sports fishermen and recreationalists with ample opportunities to enjoy the outdoors in a resort type atmosphere. However, it is believed that these will be insufficient to meet the growing demand for such facilities as the tourist oriented sector of the economy continues to grow. Ball parks and other sports facilities are located at Beaver and within the incorporated City of Forks. Tillicum Park within the City of Forks provides fifteen (15) acres of ball fields, tennis courts and other recreational facilities serving the local community. There are no golf courses in the region. Resort facilities and golf courses are recognized as the only significant deficiencies over the twenty (20) year planning period.

(8) Fire Protection and Suppression. Fire protection in the West End Planning Region is provided by Clallam County Fire Protection District #1. Volunteer forces operate from stations in Forks, Beaver and Three Rivers. Response to emergency medical calls is provided by the hospital district which operates from Forks Community Hospital. The fire district has a mutual aid agreement with District #6, the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, and the U.S. Forest Service. The district also provides structure protection for Olympic National Park. Fire protection districts, like hospital and library districts, are junior taxing districts. Funding for these junior taxing districts comes from property taxes.

(9) Public Health. The Forks Community Hospital located in the City of Forks provides a broad range of basic health services in the West End planning area. However, no transitional senior care facilities exist on the West End. Additional care is provided through Clallam County’s Home Health Care Program and the Quillayute Tribal Indian Health Services. These facilities are needed to care for area residents through the twenty (20) year planning period. It is foreseeable that the projected growth will require further expansion in this area of service.

(10) Other Governmental Services. Clallam County provides no other direct governmental facilities within the West End planning area. Due to remote geographic conditions, consideration has been made in the past for satellite offices for some of the County’s services, such as law enforcement, health and community development. At this time, the most efficient use of these facilities is to continue basing them within Port Angeles.

One alternative to facility expansion is to pursue electronic networking technology as a means of expanding governmental resources and services to the residents of the West End and enhance interaction between those residents and the County seat in Port Angeles. As the population grows in the West End, the need for satellite facilities and increased services needs to be closely monitored.

(11) Financing. New development often pays for the cost of extending new public facilities and services. For example, if a development is proposed on a County road that is not adequate to handle additional traffic, the County is able to require the developer to pay the costs of improving the County road (called “mitigation”). Water and sewer systems are similarly financed. If a developer proposes to extend water and sewer to a property, it is the responsibility of the developer to pay the costs for extending those services.

Another way that development pays for the cost of extending new public facilities is through development fees. For example, the City of Forks requires anyone who hooks up to the sewer or water system to pay a connection fee. This fee is put into a special account for the eventual planning and upgrade of the system. This connection fee is in addition to requiring the developer to extend the actual collection or distribution lines.

This method of payment for public facilities and service extension is based on three (3) principles: (a) setting level of service standards for public facilities and services; (b) ensuring that public facilities and services necessary to support development are adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use (called “concurrency”); and (c) requiring development to pay fees for the new facilities rather than rely solely on property taxes or grants to fund development of these public facilities.

31.06.080 Public facilities and services – Policies.

(1) Schools.

(a) Expansion of existing school facilities should be encouraged within the Forks urban growth area where public facilities and services (e.g., water, sewer, transportation, fire and police) can be provided in an efficient manner.

(b) School facilities necessary to support development should be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use, or a financial commitment is in place to complete the improvements within six years without decreasing current service levels below established minimum standards.

(c) The County, City of Forks, State of Washington and the Quillayute Valley School District should work cooperatively to identify funding sources needed for improvements to school facilities caused by new development.

(2) Water.

(a) Public water systems should be provided within designated urban growth areas, rural centers, and tourist commercial areas. Public or municipal water systems (i.e., PUD and the City of Forks) should be limited in rural lands to those areas that can demonstrate water quantity limitations, water quality problems or hydraulic continuity to rivers and streams.

(b) Extension or existence of public water service in designated rural areas or resource lands shall not result in or be justification for higher density than that anticipated by a regional or subarea comprehensive plan.

(c) Level of service and facility standards should be developed by the water service provider, with standards set based on expected land use densities established by this Plan.

(d) Water systems necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use.

(3) Sewer. Please see County-wide Comprehensive Plan policies for specific reference to sanitary waste disposal within and outside of urban growth areas.

(4) Parks and Recreation.

(a) Identify and provide for increased recreational and public access opportunities to natural resource lands and water where appropriate.

(b) Encourage further development of public access to freshwater areas, particularly the Quillayute, Sol Duc, Bogachiel and Calawah Rivers.

(c) Methods of ensuring public access to public lands should be developed that do not adversely impact private land owners and commercial forestry operations.

(d) Parks and recreational facilities necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development as identified in the County Capital Facilities Plan, as now or hereafter amended.

(5) Fire Protection and Suppression. Fire protection and suppression facilities in urban areas should receive first priority. Fire flow (e.g., fire hydrants) in rural areas should not be required of new development or extension of public water systems except for commercial/industrial uses and public facilities.

(6) Other Governmental Services.

(a) Clallam County and other governmental service providers should continually monitor the population growth, age and other demographic characteristics of the population to determine the need for new or expanded services.

(b) Clallam County should work cooperatively with the City of Forks in pursuing a suitable location for a County courthouse annex should the need arise.

(c) Clallam County should actively pursue electronic networking technology as an alternative means of providing extension of public services and expanding the availability of governmental resources to the residents of the West End.

31.06.090 Rural land – Vision.

The mission of the Regional Planning Commission is to formulate a comprehensive land use plan that strikes a responsible balance between private property rights, economic diversity and the quality of the environment. The plan will serve as the foundation for land use regulations that will be simple, minimally intrusive, and inexpensive to apply. These regulations will facilitate economic development within the Forks urban growth area. The Comprehensive Plan will also serve to maintain the rural character of the areas outside of the urban growth area.

The characteristics of rural areas that residents currently enjoy should be maintained in the Plan. Large lot sizes and minimal nuisances like noise, lights, odor or traffic should be found in rural areas. Small, home-based businesses and industries should be supported and encouraged.

The land base for private land use in this region is limited. Table 4 below demonstrates the actual acreage and percentage of lands within the planning area (Note: commercial forest lands in these tables indicate State and private lands. The Olympic National Forest has also been designated as commercial forest lands).

Table 4
– Acreage and Percentage of General Land Use Designations

Designation

Acres

Percent

Rural Lands

15,133

5

Commercial Forest Lands

142,892

48

National Forest Lands

118,884

40

National Park Lands

15,323

5

Forks UGA

4,767

2

Table 5
– Acreage and Percentage of Rural Land Use Designations

Designation

Acres

Percent

Rural

1,052

7

Rural Neighborhood Conservation

2,591

17

Rural Low

7,543

50

Quillayute Residential

1,268

8

Tourist Commercial

59

0.4

Rural Center

1,671

11

Tribal

949

6

31.06.100 Rural land – Principles.

The following principles guide the designation of rural lands and the permitted uses within the Western regional planning area:

(1) Tourist-related businesses should be supported throughout rural areas, including such uses as bed and breakfast inns, tourist shops, recreational activities and convenience services;

(2) Home-based business and home-based industry should be supported throughout rural areas;

(3) Timber harvesting and agriculture are traditional activities and should be permitted throughout rural areas;

(4) Recognize the limited amount of private land for development and allow for greater flexibility in development regulations while still protecting adjacent landowners from impacts caused by land uses which may be objectionable;

(5) Residential structures should allow all types of housing opportunities with rural character protected by minimum lot size and maximum residential densities;

(6) Mini-day care centers or home schools should be permitted throughout rural areas;

(7) Commercial uses which are normally associated with rural areas should be permitted, such as horse arenas, commercial greenhouses, kennels and veterinarian clinics;

(8) Nuisances, e.g., noise, light, or odor, created by commercial or industrial uses in rural areas should be contained on-site through protection measures such as fencing, limited hours, reduction in traffic volumes, lighting standards, etc.;

(9) Accessory uses to the principal uses should be permitted in all zones;

(10) Planned unit developments or cluster subdivision options, where density of a parcel is transferred to a portion of a property, should be allowed in those circumstance where property is limited by natural constraints, such as wetlands, shoreline setbacks, geologic hazardous areas, and in areas designated rural low; provided, that lot sizes are not reduced below 2.4 acres;

(11) Major industrial and commercial development should be primarily focused into the Forks urban growth area, with some development as outlined allowed in rural areas;

(12) Rural centers and tourist commercial zones should be designated to allow for a mixture of commercial and residential uses in rural areas. These zones are where communities have been established historically and allowed for a variety of land uses.

31.06.110 Rural land – Classifications.

The following land use classifications outside of the Forks urban growth area and commercial forest designations are proposed:

(1) Rural Center. A land use classification intended for areas with a mixture of land uses, including commercial, residential and industrial.

(a) Standards.

Minimum Lot Size – One-half acre;

Maximum Residential Density – Based on health regulations;

Setbacks – Per existing Zoning Code;

(b) Permitted Uses. See matrix in CCC 31.06.130;

(c) Location. Proposed for Sappho, Beaver, Three Rivers, Quillayute Prairie Airport.

(2) Tourist Commercial. A land use classification intended for areas primarily devoted to providing services to the traveling public.

(a) Standards.

Minimum Lot Size – One-half acre;

Maximum Residential Density – Based on health regulations;

Setbacks – Per existing Zoning Code;

(b) Permitted Uses. See matrix in CCC 31.06.130;

(c) Location. Proposed for Bear Creek, Bogachiel River Bridge.

(3) Quillayute Residential. A land use classification intended primarily for areas with existing lots less than one acre in size outside of the Forks urban growth area.

(a) Standards:

Minimum Lot Size – One-half acre;

Maximum Residential Density – Based on health regulations;

Setbacks – Per existing Zoning Code;

(b) Permitted Uses. See matrix in CCC 31.06.130;

(c) Location. Proposed for Salmon Drive area, Whitcomb-Diimmel, Lake Pleasant and Quillayute River, and Quillayute Prairie.

(4) Rural. A land use classification in areas where residential one-acre lots in rural areas are either currently the predominant land use or are proposed.

(a) Standards.

Minimum Lot Size – One acre;

Maximum Residential Density – One dwelling unit per 2.4 acres;

(b) Permitted Uses. See matrix in CCC 31.06.130;

(c) Location. Proposed for various areas.

(5) Rural Neighborhood Conservation. A land use classification intended for those areas and persons who desire to live in a low density rural setting with limited encroachment of commercial and industrial activities.

(a) Standards.

Minimum Lot Size – One acre (one-half acre if clustered);

Maximum Residential Density – One dwelling unit per five acres subject to optional innovative zoning techniques triggered either by the size of the parcel (cluster technique) or by the varying character of the many existing neighborhoods found within this zoning district (overlay technique);

(b) Permitted Uses. See matrix in CCC 31.06.130;

(c) Location. Proposed for various areas.

(6) Rural Low. A land use classification intended to provide homesites in rural forestry areas with limited encroachment of commercial and industrial activities.

(a) Standards.

Minimum Lot Size – 2.4 acres (flexible zoning allowed);

Maximum Residential Density – One dwelling unit per 4.8 acres;

(b) Permitted Uses. See matrix in CCC 31.06.130;

(c) Location. Proposed for various areas.

31.06.120 Rural land – Definitions.

For the purpose of this chapter, certain terms or words herein shall be interpreted as specifically defined in this chapter. All other words in this chapter shall carry the meanings as specified in Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary of 1980.

(1) “Accessory dwelling unit” means a separate dwelling unit within a single-family dwelling that complies with the standards set forth in this chapter and is accessory in nature to the main dwelling on the property. Accessory dwelling units are not computed when calculating density or minimum lot size.

(2) “Accessory improvements” means an improvement which is subordinate to or incidental to the main use of a parcel. Such improvements shall be, but are not limited to, fences, garages, storage sheds, walkways, driveways, utilities, sewage disposal systems, landscaping, off-street parking, guest houses and small buildings for workshop. Improvements which are detached from a dwelling unit located on the parcel and intended for overnight sleeping uses are an accessory improvement to a residential use.

(3) “Accessory uses” means a use which is normally subordinate to or incidental to the main use on the lot.

(4) “Agriculture” means improvements and activities associated with the raising and harvesting of crops and livestock.

(5) “Bed and breakfast inns” means a dwelling which is constructed or converted partially or entirely into an overnight, short-term boarding house which does not detract from the residential appearance of the structure.

(6) “Church” means a building or buildings intended for religious worship including ancillary activity and improvements such as religious education, assembly rooms, kitchen, reading room, recreation hall and may include a residence for church staff. This definition does not include schools devoted primarily to nonreligious education.

(7) “Club” means an association of persons for a common object, jointly supported and meeting periodically in a given place.

(8) “Commercial use” means any premises devoted primarily to the wholesaling or retailing of a product or service for the purpose of generating an income.

(9) “Conditional use” means an activity or structure which is allowed by this chapter in one or more land use classifications. Conditional uses are those uses often not compatible within the zone in which they might be located because at times they may create a nuisance which might not be capable of being mitigated. A conditional use permit requires a public hearing, notice to adjacent property owners and is either approved, approved with conditions or denied by the County Board of Adjustment (or Hearing Examiner), appealable to the Board of County Commissioners.

(10) “Day care center” means a person or agency that provides care for thirteen (13) or more children during part of the twenty-four (24) hour day.

(11) “Density” means the number of dwelling units per gross acre of land.

(12) “Duplex” means a building containing two (2) dwelling units and not otherwise defined as an accessory dwelling or guest house.

(13) “Dwelling unit” means any building or any portion thereof which is intended or designed to be used, rented, leased, let or hired out to be occupied for living purposes having independent living facilities for one family including permanent provisions for living, sleeping, eating, cooking, sanitation and including accessory structures and improvements.

(14) “Greenhouse or nursery” means a structure or land devoted to the cultivation and sale of plants.

(15) “Grocery store” means a structure devoted primarily to the sale of staple foodstuffs and household commodities.

(16) “Guest house” means living quarters which are located on the same parcel with a principal single-family dwelling for the impermanent use by personal guests of the occupants of the principal single-family dwelling and which may not be rented or used as a permanent residential dwelling.

(17) “Home-based industry” means a commercial, manufacturing or processing business located on a parcel together with an existing dwelling. The industry is located in a fully enclosed building separate from the dwelling and no larger than 2,000 square feet, limited to no more than two (2) part-time or full-time employees other than the owner. An attached garage is considered as a building separate from the dwelling.

(18) “Home enterprise” means a revenue-generating enterprise which is located in a dwelling and is subordinate to and incidental to the residential use of the dwelling.

(19) “Home school” means a person or agency providing instruction during part of the twenty-four (24) hour day to twelve (12) or fewer persons in a home.

(20) “Horse arena” means an outside area or facility greater than 2,000 square feet in area for the commercial boarding, care, instruction or riding of horses.

(21) “Industrial use” means any premises devoted primarily to the manufacturing of semi-finished products, finished products and the processing of materials, to a degree that exceeds the definitions of home-based industries and home enterprises. This definition includes accessory facilities such as, but not limited to, storage facilities, transfer facilities, warehousing, heavy vehicular storage and repair, log storage and sorting.

(22) “Kennels” means an establishment which is designed to accommodate the temporary boarding of six (6) or more household pets owned by persons other than the owner of the premises.

(23) “Labor camp” means facilities which are designed to provide overnight sleeping, waste disposal and one cooking facility to serve the entire facility for the construction industry, timber management, etc.

(24) “Medical service facility” means a medical physicians clinic or outpatient care clinic where overnight accommodations are not provided.

(25) “Mineral extraction” means activities involved in the extraction of minerals from the earth for industrial, commercial, or construction uses, excluding water. For the purpose of this chapter, removal of solid materials from the earth is not deemed mineral extraction until the activity collectively results in more than three (3) acres of land being disturbed or that results in pit walls more than thirty (30) feet high and steeper than one horizontal to one vertical. This definition does not include disturbances greater than three (3) acres of land if the accumulative area that has not been rehabilitated according to the State’s reclamation requirements outlined in Chapter 78.44 RCW is less than three (3) acres. Farming, road construction, mineral exploration testing and site preparation for construction shall not be deemed mineral extraction activities.

(26) “Mini-day care center” means a person or agency providing care during part of the twenty-four (24) hour day to twelve (12) or fewer children in a facility.

(27) “Minimum lot size” means the smallest parcel size upon which a dwelling may be placed or constructed; provided, that roads and open spaces, dedicated to the public, and tidelands shall be excluded when calculating lot size.

(28) “Mobile home park” means a lot or parcel of land occupied by two (2) or more mobile homes on a rent or lease basis, and approved by Clallam County pursuant to County regulations.

(29) “Motel” means a structure which provides overnight, short-term boarding to transient guests and not defined as a bed and breakfast inn facility.

(30) “Multiple-family dwelling” means a building containing three (3) or more dwelling units.

(31) “Outdoor oriented recreation use” means improvements and land use activities which are intended to provide for recreation activity which is carried on outside of buildings or which involves the use and enjoyment of features of the surrounding environment to include but not be limited to campgrounds, boat launching facilities, golf courses, and ballfields.

(32) “Permitted use” means an activity or structure which is allowed in a zone pursuant to this chapter without conditions or formal action by the County, except as required by other chapters of the Clallam County Code. A permitted use includes uses and improvements which are customarily accessory to the use.

(33) “Professional offices” means a structure accommodating the following professional offices: medical, dental, chiropractic; accounting, consulting, cosmetologist, real estate offices or such other offices of persons required to be licensed by the State of Washington following completion of required training.

(34) “Public building” means a building which is used or owned by a governmental agency.

(35) “Race track” means an area devoted to the racing of motor and nonmotorized vehicles or animals, and all improvements normally associated with racing such as off-street parking, patron seating, and a fixed race track.

(36) “Recreational vehicle park” means a lot occupied by two (2) or more recreation vehicles as defined by State health laws for the purpose of lease or rent for overnight occupation.

(37) “Research facility” means an improvement devoted to or supporting research activities and having minimal nuisance characteristics related to odor, noise, glare and radiation. Research is an activity devoted to the obtaining of knowledge and does not include any product retailing or wholesaling activity. Testing for surface and subsurface minerals is not a research activity.

(38) “Retail use” means a land use devoted primarily to the sale of a product or service to the general public.

(39) School. For the purposes of this chapter, a “school” is a building where instruction is given to persons to enhance their knowledge or skills. Buildings where instruction is given primarily on religious matters are not deemed to be schools.

(40) “Single-family dwelling” means a dwelling unit detached from any other dwelling unit and intended for occupation by one family and including accessory improvements and uses. This definition includes manufactured homes such as mobile homes, modular homes and other homes manufactured in components or as one complete dwelling unit.

(41) “Solid or liquid waste disposal” means a facility typically owned and operated by a public entity for disposal of solid or liquid waste, including transfer stations, sewage facilities and biosolids.

(42) “Special use” means an activity, use or structure which is allowed in one or more land use classifications. Special uses are those uses normally compatible within the zone in which they are located but may at times create a nuisance which might be mitigated through issuance of the special use permit or denied if: (a) unable to be mitigated; or (b) found to be incompatible with other uses in the zone in which it is locating; or (c) is inconsistent with this chapter; or (d) is inconsistent with the comprehensive plan. A special use permit requires notice to adjacent property owners and is either approved, approved with conditions or denied by County planning staff, appealable to the Board of County Commissioners.

(43) “Storage facility” means a building or fenced open yard used solely for the storage of goods and materials; provided, that automobile wrecking or salvage facilities are excluded from this definition.

(44) “Tavern” means any establishment with special space and accommodation for sale by the glass and for consumption on the premises, of beer and/or wine.

(45) “Timber harvesting” means limited improvements and activities associated with the growing and harvesting of trees that will have only minimal impact on neighboring residential uses when undertaken in rural land use zones. Such activity includes timber harvesting; land preparation for tree planting; road construction; tree thinning; brush control; temporary storage of logs, materials, vehicles and equipment supporting timber growing on-site; temporary chipping and barking of timber harvested on site utilizing portable equipment; and minor extraction of gravel and rock necessary to support timber management activity on-site (and not otherwise defined as mineral extraction).

(46) “Timber management activity” means improvements and activities associated with the growing and harvesting of trees. Such activity includes land preparation for tree planting, road construction, tree thinning, brush control, log storage and sorting yards, tree nursery facilities, research activity related to timber growing, improvements required for environmental impact mitigation, temporary chipping and barking activity utilizing portable equipment, storage of materials, vehicles and equipment supporting timber growing, harvesting and transportation activities, staging areas and facilities, timber transshipment facilities, log scaling facilities, the extraction of gravel and rock necessary to support timber management activity and all other silviculture and associated practices which are recognized by and consistent with the regulations of the Washington State Forest Practices Act of 1974.

(47) “Tourist shop” means a facility devoted primarily to the sale of a product or service to the traveling public, including antique or curio shops, crafts, memorabilia.

(48) “Unclassified use” means an activity or land use not listed as permitted, special or conditional use, or prohibited in this Plan.

(49) “Utility” means a fixed, conveyance type improvement serving two or more ownerships. Said improvement conveys power, gas, water, sewage, surface drainage, and communication signals. This definition does not include intercounty or interstate transmission facilities.

(50) “Vehicular repair” means a structure or land use devoted to the repair of motor vehicles and not otherwise defined as a home-based industry.

(51) “Wrecking yard or junk yard” means an open area where scrap materials or motor vehicles are bought, sold, exchanged, recycled, stored, disassembled or handled, but which cannot be used again for the purpose for which it was originally intended.

31.06.130 Rural land – Use matrix.

The attached rural land use matrix identifies a range of land uses which may be permitted within one of the rural land use zones. Although there are six rural land use zones, the three zones of rural, rural moderate and rural low have been identified as similar in nature and therefore the permitted uses are proposed to be identical. There are three types of permitted land uses: permitted outright, special use, and conditional use. See definitions in CCC 31.06.120 for explanation of these terms.

Table 6
– Rural Land Use Matrix

Use

Rural Center

Tourist

Commercial

Quillayute

Residential

Rural Neighborhood Conservation

Accessory dwelling units

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Agriculture

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Bed and breakfast inn

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Cemetery

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Churches

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Clubs

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional (Lodges)

Commercial greenhouse

Special

Special

Special

Conditional

Commercial storage facility

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Prohibited

Day care center

Permitted

Permitted

Special

Family day care Permitted; Child day care center Conditional

Duplex dwellings

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Gas stations

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Prohibited

Grocery stores

Permitted

Permitted

Special

Prohibited

Home enterprise

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Home-based industry

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Horse arena

Special

Special

Conditional

Permitted

Labor camps and staging areas

Special

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Industrial use

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Medical service facility

Permitted

Permitted

Special

Prohibited

Mineral extraction

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Mini-day care center or home school

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Private schools with less than 50 students Conditional

Mobile home parks

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Motel

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Prohibited

Multiple-family dwelling

Special

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Outdoor-oriented recreation use

Permitted

Special

Special

Conditional

Planned unit developments

Permitted

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Power generation facilities greater than five megawatts

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Professional office

Permitted

Permitted

Special

Prohibited

Public buildings and facilities

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Race track

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Research facilities

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Restaurant

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Prohibited

Retail store

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Prohibited

Rock crushing and asphalt plants

Special

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

RV parks

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Conditional

Schools

Special

Special

Conditional

Prohibited

Single-family dwellings

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Solid or liquid waste disposal

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Tavern

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Timber harvesting

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Timber management activity

Special

Special

Conditional

Conditional (small scale); otherwise Prohibited

Tourist shops

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Prohibited

Unclassified use

Conditional

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited unless authorized as a similar use

Utilities and fire protection

Permitted

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Vehicular repair

Permitted

Permitted

Conditional

Prohibited

Veterinarian clinic and kennels

Special

Special

Special

Conditional

Wrecking yard

Conditional

Conditional

Prohibited

Prohibited

31.06.140 Rural land – Private property rights and critical area protection.

Residents in the West End Planning Region have historically enjoyed a rural lifestyle that, due to their remote location and traditional occupations, has been largely free from government regulations and intrusion. Industries such as commercial forestry and cattle farming have helped to foster a strong sense of independence throughout the West End community. This sense of independence is further strengthened by the remoteness of the region. The opportunities and options available in more metropolitan areas are not as readily available in the West End, making self-sufficiency more of an imperative.

In recent years, regulations aimed at protecting environmentally sensitive areas from degradation have been implemented throughout the region. While there is little debate over the need to protect environmentally sensitive areas, the methods employed to achieve this end are considered by many to be excessive and burdensome to affected property owners.

The West End Planning Commission feels it is both possible and necessary to strike a balance between the protection of valuable environmental amenities and private property rights. The following policy is designed to help achieve this goal:

Zoning ordinances, when applied to real property subject to the Clallam County Critical Areas Ordinance, the Shoreline Management Act, or the Floodplain FIRM Map/Management Plan (e.g., wetlands, steep slopes, floodplains, etc.), shall permit the transferring of densities from that portion of the parcel subject to the applicable ordinance to the remaining non-critical area portion of the property. However, no density will be allowed on the noncritical area acreage that would exceed the density allowed for the entire parcel (both critical area portions and noncritical area portions). In addition, all densities shall be subject to prevailing health codes.

While this policy shall apply to all land use designations, it will only be utilized with lands designated as being subject to the Clallam County Critical Areas Code, the Shoreline Management Act, and/or the Floodplain FIRM Map/Management Plan.

An example of this transferring of densities would be as follows:

Developer owns a parcel of land that consists of a total of 15 acres in a zoning district that allows a maximum residential density of one dwelling unit per five acres. Under the zoning code, the property could be divided to create three lots for future single-family development. However, 10 acres are located within the FIRM 100-year floodplain, and one acre is designated as steep slopes (i.e., landslide hazard areas). Transferring of densities would allow the developer to still create three lots; provided, that each lot contains adequate potential building sites outside of the floodplain and steep slope areas, and that the land division complies with all applicable public health codes.


1

The PRTPO consists of representation from four (4) counties (Clallam, Jefferson, Kitsap and Mason), nine (9) cities, four (4) transit agencies, eighteen (18) port districts, ten (10) Tribal Nations, the Washington State Department of Transportation, and the private sector. The PRTPO has been working for the last four (4) years to develop a Regional Transportation Plan (RTP). The goal of the PRTPO is to coordinate the regional transportation planning activities for the Olympic and Kitsap Peninsulas.


2

Based on 1990 U.S. Census information.


3

Build-out analysis indicates what would happen if development was to occur at the maximum allowed density. It is useful in determining the adequacy of a facility in a “worst case scenario,” but does not represent conditions likely to occur.


4

The standard rating methodology for Clallam County roads is the Highway Capacity Manual – Florida Model.


5

Based on 1990 U.S. Census figures.