CAPITAL FACILITIES ELEMENT

I. INTRODUCTION

Land Use & Capital Facilities

Incorporated in 1960, Mercer Island is a “mature” community. Approximately 95% of the community’s residential lands have already been developed and its commercial centers are now experiencing increasing redevelopment pressures. The remaining lands to be developed are all commercial and residential infill where public facilities have long been established.

As a “mature community”, Mercer Island has made substantial investments in public infrastructure over the last forty years. As a result, the community largely has sufficient capacity in water and sewer systems, parks, schools, local streets and arterials, and public buildings (City Hall, library, fire stations, and community center) to handle projected growth. However, additional investments may be considered for park improvements as well as open space acquisition and trail development. In addition, improvements will be needed to maintain adopted transportation Level of Service (LOS) standards and to maintain existing infrastructure.

The following sections of the Capital Facilities Element inventory Mercer Island’s existing public facilities in terms of their capacity (quantity) to serve current and forecasted populations through 2035. The Element continues with a discussion of existing “Levels of Service” standards and expenditure requirements to meet those standards. This is followed by a discussion of the City’s overall capital planning and financing strategy as well as the revenues available for capital investment. The Element concludes with policies that will guide development of the City CIP and capital investments.

Sustainability

Sustainability is a Mercer Island value. It is a process of ensuring the wise use and management of all resources within a framework in which environmental, social, cultural and economic well-being are integrated and balanced. It means meeting the needs of today without adversely impacting the needs of future generations.

In 2006, a grassroots effort of Island citizens led the City to modify the vision statement in its comprehensive plan to include language embracing general sustainability, and in May 2007 the Council committed to a sustainability work program as well as a specific climate goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80% from 2007 levels by 2050, which was consistent with King County and Washington State targets. Later in 2007, the Council set an interim emissions reduction goal (often called a “milepost”) for City operations of 5% by 2012.

In recent years, the City has pursued a wide range of actions focusing on the sustainability of its internal operations. These measures began with relatively humble recycling and waste reduction campaigns, and then expanded into much larger initiatives such as energy-efficiency retrofits and cleaner-burning fleet vehicles. More recently, the City has installed its own on-site solar PV project at the Community and Event Center, and has now purchased several commercial-grade electric utility vehicles for Water Department and Parks Maintenance purposes. Approximately 35% of the City’s internal electricity use is offset through the purchase of green power REC’s from Puget Sound Energy. The City tracks several metrics in its annual “Dashboard Report” that evaluate progress made in energy consumption, fuel use, green power purchasing, solid waste diversion, and overall carbon footprint of City operations.

In 2012, activities were expanded further with the hiring of the City’s first dedicated Sustainability Manager, who designs, implements, and then oversees much of the internal sustainability project work. In addition, the Mayor and Council have increasingly addressed or supported specific regional and state-level climate commitments or legislation.

Due to the 20-year horizon envisioned by this comprehensive plan, it is especially appropriate to include internal measures that address the long-term actions needed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, ideally in collaboration with other local governments. Actions that the City will implement with the entire community’s sustainability in mind are addressed in the Land Use Element of this plan. Various City Departments, such as Parks and Recreation and Maintenance, prepare functional plans that directly implement some sustainability programs.

These Capital Facilities measures, and others under consideration, are identified in more detail in a rolling 6-year Sustainability Plan, to be adopted in 2016, which will guide the City’s internal and external actions while taking into account the interrelated issues of climate change, population change, land use, public infrastructure, natural resources management, quality of life, public health, and economic development.

II. CAPITAL FACILITIES INVENTORY

Listed below is a brief inventory of Mercer Island’s public capital facilities. Detailed descriptions of facilities and their components (e.g. recreational facilities in public parks) can be found in the 2014-2019 Parks and Recreation Plan, the Comprehensive Parks and Recreation Plan and Transportation and Utilities Elements.

Public Streets & Roads

Mercer Island has over 75 miles of public roads. Interstate 90 runs east-west across the northern end of Mercer Island, providing the only road and transit connection to the rest of the Puget Sound region. Most of the road network on the Island is comprised of local streets serving the Island’s residential areas; arterials comprise approximately 25 miles, or one third, of the system.

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

Mercer Island has over 55 miles of facilities for non-motorized travel. In general, non-motorized facilities serve multiple purposes, including recreational travel for bicycles and pedestrians as well as trips for work and other purposes. On-road facilities for non-motorized travel include sidewalks and paths for pedestrians and bicycle lanes for cyclists. Regional access for non-motorized travel is provided by special bicycle/pedestrian facilities along I-90. Additional detail is provided in the 2010 Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities Plan.

Parks & Open Space

Mercer Island has 472 acres of City parks and open space lands. This acreage comprises about 12% of the Island. Eleven City parks, open spaces and playfields are over 10 acres in size. Three parks exceed 70 acres (Luther Burbank, Pioneer Park, and Aubrey Davis Park). Island residents enjoy 20.8 acres of publicly-owned park and open space lands per 1,000 population. This compares with neighboring jurisdictions as follows: Bellevue – 21.8 acres/1000 pop.; Kent – 15.5 acres/1000 pop.; Redmond – 28.0 acres/1000 pop.; Kirkland - 19.1 acres/1000 pop. In addition to City park lands, approximately two-thirds of the Mercer Island School District grounds are available to Island residents. And, an additional 40 acres of private open space tracts are available for residents of many subdivisions on the Island. See Figure 1 for the locations and geographical distributions of the community’s parks, open space lands, street end parks, school district lands, I-90 facilities and private/semi-public facilities.

Public Buildings

Mercer Island is served by seven City-owned public buildings, the Mary Wayte Pool owned by the Mercer Island School District and operated by Olympic Cascade Aquatics, one Post Office and one King County (KCLS) Branch Library. Facility uses, locations and sizes are listed in Table 1.

During 2001, construction of a new Main Fire Station and a sizable remodel of the Thrift Shop were completed. The City became the owner of Luther Burbank Park in 2003 after transfer of the property by King County. The Mercer Island Community and Events Center was completed in 2006. The construction of Fire Station 92 at the south end of the Island began in 2014 and was completed in 2015.

Table 1. Facility uses, locations and sizes

Facility

Use

Location

Approx. Size

City

Hall

Police, Dispatch &

General Admin.

North MI

9611 SE 36th St.

32,000 s.f.

Maintenance Shop

Parks, Water, Sewer, Streets, Fleet & Bldg. Maint.

North MI

9601 SE 36th St.

15,000 s.f.

Community and Events Center

Comm. Mtgs., Recreation Programs Gymnasium and Fitness

Senior adult and Youth Programs

North MI

8236 SE 24th St.

42,500 s.f.

Main Fire Station

Fire & Emergency Aid Response & Admin.

Central Business District

3030 - 78th Ave. SE

16,600 s.f.

South Fire Station

Fire & Emergency

Response

South End Shopping Center

8473 SE 68th St.

7,940 s.f.

Youth and Family Services Thrift Shop

Sales-Fundraising:

Recycled Household Goods

Central Business District

7710 SE 34th St.

5,254 s.f.

Luther Burbank Park Admin. Bldg.

Mercer Island Parks and Recreation

Youth and Family Services Depts.

Luther Burbank Park

2040 – 84th Ave. SE

5,000 s.f.

Mary Wayte

Pool (Northwest Center)

Indoor

Swimming Facility

Mid-Island

8815 SE 40th St.

7,500 s.f.

U.S.

Post Office

Postal Service

Central Business District

3040 78th Ave. SE

10,000 s.f.

King County

Library (KCLS)

Public Library -

Branch of KCLS

Mid-Island

4400 88th Ave SE

14,600 s.f.

Public Schools

The Mercer Island School District owns and operates one high school, one middle school and three elementary schools. A fourth elementary school is scheduled to open in 2016. Altogether, the School District owns 108.6 acres of land, including those lands dedicated to parks, open space and recreational uses. The District served a 2014 school population of 4,316 students in approximately 461,000 total square feet of “educational” space.

In 1994, the voters approved a $16.4 million bond issue to modernize the three Elementary Schools. All these schools underwent $6 million remodels that were completed in September 1995. In 1996 voters approved a bond issue to modernize the High School. The total cost of the renovation, which included some new construction, was $37.2 million. In February 2010, the community approved a six year capital levy for nearly $4.9 million per year, targeting minor capital replacement costs and improvements at each school site. Included in the levy were funds for the addition of music and orchestra rooms at Mercer Island High School, portable classrooms for elementary and middle schools, hard play area resurfacing at the elementary schools, replacement of the turf field and repair of the track at Mercer Island High School, painting, re-roofing, pavement overlays, security improvements, and other improvements.

After months of public discussions, meetings and work by the Mercer Island community, school board and district, a bond proposal was approved by the board in September 2013 to address overcrowding in Mercer Island schools. It was then approved by more than 74 percent of Mercer Island voters in February 2014. The targeted facilities projects include:

building a fourth elementary school on the district-owned North Mercer campus;

expanding Islander Middle School, including 14 new classrooms and lab spaces, commons and cafeteria, gymnasiums, music rooms and administrative space; and

building 10 additional classrooms at Mercer Island High School, including four lab spaces and six general education classrooms.

Annually, the District develops projections primarily utilizing the historical enrollment trends tracked each October for the past five years. In addition to the cohort derived from that historical database, the District looks at much longer “real growth” trends as well as birth rates and female population patterns. Current enrollment projections show an anticipated increase of approximately 356 students over the next six years, in addition to an increase of approximately 250 students over the last six years.

Provision of an adequate supply of K-12 public school facilities is essential to enhance the educational opportunities for our children and to avoid overcrowding. A variety of factors can contribute to changes in K-12 enrollment, including changes in demographics, the resale of existing homes, and new development. The District is engaged in an ongoing long-range planning process to maintain updated enrollment projections, house anticipated student enrollment, and provide adequate school facilities. Future needs, including proposed improvements and capital expenditures are determined by the District, which has prepared a separate Capital Facilities Plan.

Water System

The City’s Water Utility consists of 115 miles of water mains and transmission lines which serve over 7,640 water meters. In addition, the system includes two 4 million gallon storage reservoirs, two pump stations, 86pressure reducing valve stations and an emergency well completed in 2010. The City purchases water from Seattle Public Utilities and Tolt River watersheds.

Sewer System

The Mercer Island sewer utility is made up 104 miles of collection lines which serve over 7,200 customers. The collection system is linked to 17 pump stations, 2 flushing stations, and more than 113 miles of gravity and pressure pipelines, ranging in diameter from 3 to 24 inches which ultimately flow into King County Department of Natural Resources (KCDNR) facilities for treatment and disposal at the South Treatment Plant in Renton.

Storm Water System

The Island’s storm water system is made up of a complex network of interconnected public and private conveyances for surface water. The system serves 88 separate drainage basins. The major components of the system include more than 15 miles of natural watercourses, 60 percent of these are privately owned; 26 miles of open drainage ditches, 70 percent of which are on public property; 58 miles of public storm drains; 59 miles of private storm drains; more than 4,500 City owned catch basins; and over 3,300 non City owned catch basins.

III. LEVEL OF SERVICE & FORECAST OF FUTURE NEEDS

In analyzing capital financing over twenty years, the City must make estimates in two areas: Cost of New Facilities and the Cost to Maintain Existing Facilities. To estimate the former, the City must evaluate its established levels of service (LOS) for the various types of facilities - streets, parks, recreational facilities, open space, trails, and public buildings -- and project future needed investments to reach those service targets. In this case, “Level of Service” refers to the quantitative measure for a given capital facility. See Table 2. In establishing an LOS standard, the community can make reasonable financial choices among the various “infrastructure” facilities that serve the local population.

Fortunately, Mercer Island has already acquired and/or built most of the facilities needed to meet its LOS goals (e.g. parks acreage, recreational facilities, water and sewer system capacity, street system capacity, police, fire and administration buildings). As a result, while a few “LOS deficiencies” must be addressed over the next twenty years (open space, new trail construction, some street capacity improvements), most capital financing projections for Mercer Island involve reinvesting in and maintaining existing assets.

Listed in Table 2 below is a summary of level of service and financial assumptions (by facility type) used in making a twenty year expenditure forecast. In looking at the assumptions and projections, the reader should bear in mind two things: 1) No detailed engineering or architectural design has been made to estimate costs. The numbers are first level estimates; and, 2) the objective of the analysis is to predict where major financing issues may arise in the future. The estimates should be used for long range financial and policy planning; not as budget targets.

Table 2 – Level of Service & Financial Forecasts

Capital Facility

Level of Service Standard

Capital Needs

New Capital Cost (To address deficiency)

Annual Reinvestment Cost

Streets-Arterials

-    Residential

-    CBD

LOS “D”

None

LOS “C”

4 locations identified

None

4 locations identified

$3,322,900

$0

$1,712,900

$1,061,000

$684,000

$166,000

Parks & Open Space

Expenditure per capita

Dock Infrastructure, Safe Facilities, Open Space, Trails and Athletic Fields

$8 million

$1.3 million. Parks & Open Space CIP

Recreational Facilities

See Park & Open Space Plan

None

None

None

Existing and New Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities Plan

Shoulder improvements, 78th Ave. pedestrian and bike improvements, safe routes to school

$8 million

$375,000

Open Space

Expenditure per capita

Standard to be set

To be assessed

None

Water System Supply

Storage

Distribution

Fire Flow

6.7 mill. Gal/day

8.0 mill. Gal

> 30 psi

Multiple

None

None

None

None

None

$121,500,000

None

None

$4.8 million

Storm & Surface Water System

Washington DOE

Stormwater Manual

Multiple

$425,000 from Utility Rates on average goes to one major basin improvement project annually

$1.1 million

Sanitary Sewer System

0 - Sewer Overflows

Inflow & Infiltration Sewer Lakeline-portion of reaches

$26 million

$1 million

Schools

Established in the

Mercer Island School

District No. 400 Six

Year Capital Facilities

Plan as may be amended.

Maintenance of existing buildings, new elementary school, middle school and high school expansions

$98.8 million bond

$9 million levy passed February 2010

Parking Facilities*

To be assessed*

To be assessed*

To be assessed*

To be assessed*

*An analysis is in progress, capital needs and costs to be evaluated pending completion of studies, after completion of light rail.

[Note: More detailed LOS standards for capacity, operational reliability, and capital facilities needs can be found in the following documents: Transportation Improvement Plan, Water System Plan, General Sewer Plan, Comprehensive Storm Basin Review, Park and Open Space Plan, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities Plan, Open Space Vegetation Plan, Parks and Recreation Plan 2014-2019, Luther Burbank Master Plan, Ballfield Use Analysis, and the Transportation Element of this Comprehensive Plan.

IV. CAPITAL FACILITIES FINANCING

The community should expect most funding for future capital improvements to come from local public sources. Substantial investments in transportation facilities-- including parking, sewage collection and conveyance, and stormwater facilities will be needed over the 20 year planning period. Funding for open space acquisition and parks improvements may also be needed to meet community expectations. Private development will finance some minor new capital improvements, such as stormwater facilities, sewage conveyance improvements, and transportation improvements where proposed development will exceed adopted levels of service. Impact fees on new development will also generate some revenue to offset the impact of such growth on Mercer Island’s public schools, parks and open space, and transportation facilities.

Revenue Sources

The City’s capital program is funded by a variety of revenue sources ranging from largely unrestricted, discretionary sources like General Funds and REET 1 to very restricted sources like fuel taxes and grants. Listed below is a description of the major capital funding sources used by the City.

General Fund Revenues - Revenues from property, sales and utility taxes as well as licenses and permit fees, other user fees, and state shared revenues. Funds can be used for any municipal purpose and are generally dedicated to the operation of the City’s (non-utility) departments and technology and equipment upgrades.

Real Estate Excise Taxes (1 & 2) - Taxes imposed on the seller in real estate transactions. Both REET 1 & 2 taxes are levied at 1/4 of 1% of the sale price of the property. Revenues must be used on the following types of projects:

REET 1 - only to projects identified in the City’s Capital Facilities Element. Funds can be used for planning, acquisition, construction and repair of streets, roads, sidewalks, streets and road lighting, traffic signals, bridges, water systems storm and sanitary sewer systems, parks, recreational facilities, trails and public buildings.

REET 2 - planning, acquisition, construction and repair of streets, roads, sidewalks, streets and road lighting systems, traffic signals, bridges, water systems, storm and sanitary sewer systems, parks, and planning, construction, repair or improvement of parks.

Fuel Taxes - City’s share of fuel taxes imposed and collected by the state. Revenues must be used for maintenance and construction of the City’s arterial and residential streets.

Voted Debt - General Obligation bonds issued by the City and paid for by a voter-approved increase in property taxes.

User Fees - Utilities Fee for the purchase of a City-provided service or commodity (e.g. water, storm and sanitary sewage collection/treatment). Fees usually based on quantity of service or commodity consumed. Revenues (rates) can be used for any operating or capital project related to the delivery of the utility service or commodity.

Impact Fees – The Growth Management Act (GMA) authorizes cities to impose certain types of impact fees on new development. These fees should pay for the development’s proportionate share of the cost of providing the public facilities needed to serve the development. Impact fees can be collected for schools, streets, parks and open space, and fire protection.

The Capital Improvement Program

The City of Mercer Island separates the Capital Improvement Program into two parts: The Capital Reinvestment Program (CRP) and the Capital Facilities Program (CFP). The CRP contains all major maintenance projects for existing public assets. The CFP consists of proposed new capital facilities.

Capital Reinvestment Plan (CRP)

The CRP’s purpose is to organize and schedule repair, replacement and refurbishment of public improvements for the City of Mercer Island. The CRP is a six-year program setting forth each of the proposed maintenance projects, the cost and funding source. These capital projects are generally paid for from existing City resources.

The program emphasis in a reinvestment plan is timely repair and maintenance of existing facilities. To this effect, while new equipment and improvements are made to some older fixed assets, the intent is to design a program which will preserve and maintain the City’s existing infrastructure. The maintenance and enhancement of the taxpayer’s investment in fixed assets remains the City’s best defense against the enormous cost of the replacement of older but still very valuable public improvements.

The CRP is intended to be a public document. For this purpose, it is organized by functional area. Hence, any individual who wishes to gain knowledge about a project need not know the funding source or any other technical information but only needs to know the general type of improvement in order to find the relevant information. The Capital Reinvestment Program is divided into four functional programmatic areas: streets and pedestrian and bicycle facilities, park and recreational facilities, general government (buildings, equipment and technology), and utilities - water, sewer and storm water drainage.

CRP projects are typically “pay as you go,” which means that they are funded from the current operations of the, City Street Fund, CIP Funds, and the utilities funds.

Capital Facilities Plan (CFP)

The CFP is a six-year plan to outline proposed new capital projects. The CFP is also divided into four component parts: streets and pedestrian and bicycle facilities, parks and recreation facilities, general government (buildings, equipment and technology), and utilities - water, sewer and storm water drainage. Like the CRP, the plan for new facilities provides easy access for the public. Each project in the plan is described briefly and the total cost and appropriation for the next six years is stated.

Funding for CFP projects will be identified in the Capital Facilities Element. However, final funding strategies will be decided simultaneously with the approval of the projects. This may involve a bond issue, special grant or a source of revenue that is outside the available cash resources of the City.

    

CIP Project Summary

Capital Reinvestment Plan

Parks, Recreation and Open Space

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - No Changes

23

Recurring Park Projects

Parks Repairs and Maintenance

0

120

120

130

130

130

130

760

760

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

24

Luther Burbank Park Minor Improvements

Parks Improvements

0

110

110

110

110

110

110

660

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

660

0

0

Funded - Modified

25

Open Space - Vegetation Management

Open Space

421

428

456

444

458

473

488

2,697

1,845

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

852

0

0

26

Aubrey Davis Park Improvements

Parks Repairs and Maintenance

0

0

0

291

165

100

40

596

446

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

150

27

Homestead Field - Minor Improvements

Parks Repairs and Maintenance

0

0

0

114

0

0

0

114

114

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

28

MICEC Master Plan

Parks Repairs and Maintenance

0

25

0

79

0

0

0

104

79

0

0

0

25

0

0

0

0

0

0

29

Swim Beach Repairs and Renovations

Parks Repairs and Maintenance

0

935

55

16

110

0

110

1,226

1,226

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - New Project

30

Mercerdale Park Improvements

Parks Improvements

0

0

0

0

134

104

0

238

238

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Unfunded or Partially Funded Modified

31

Small Parks, Street Ends and Other Improvements

Parks Improvements

0

0

0

40

150

325

189

704

229

0

0

0

300

0

100

75

0

0

0

32

Island Crest Park Improvements

Parks Repairs and Maintenance

0

0

0

400

64

0

0

1,264

214

0

0

0

0

0

550

500

0

0

0

33

South Mercer Playfields Park Improvements

Parks Repairs and Maintenance

0

100

0

112

570

0

0

782

139

0

0

0

0

0

0

73

0

0

570

34

Luther Burbank Major Improvements

Parks Improvements

0

35

85

424

52

152

38

786

434

0

0

0

0

0

0

200

0

0

152

35

Island Crest Park Ballfield Lights Replacement

Parks Repairs and Maintenance

0

500

0

0

0

0

0

500

455

0

0

0

0

0

0

45

0

0

0

Total Parks, Recreation and Open Space costs

421

2,253

 

826

2,160

1,943

1,394

1,105

10,431

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Streets, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - No Changes

36

Arterial Preservation Program

Annual Street Maintenance Program

80

70

90

70

70

70

70

440

0

440

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

37

Pavement Marking Replacement

Annual Street Maintenance Program

47

66

70

72

75

78

81

442

0

442

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

38

Island Crest Way Resurfacing Phase 2

Arterial Street Improvements

0

0

1,355

0

0

0

0

1,355

0

1,355

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

39

SE 40th Street (76th Ave. to ICW)

Arterial Street Improvements

0

692

0

0

0

0

0

692

0

692

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - Modified

40

Residential Street Overlays

Annual Street Maintenance Program

496

738

477

806

516

872

558

3,967

0

3,967

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

41

Town Center Streets - South

Town Center Street Reconstruction

0

170

0

223

0

0

0

393

0

393

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

42

Arterial Street Improvements (2017 - 2020)

Arterial Street Improvements

0

0

0

538

539

1,378

520

2,975

0

2,975

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

43

Town Center Streets - North

Town Center Street Reconstruction

0

0

0

468

0

0

0

468

0

468

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - New Project

44

Island Crest Way Crosswalk Enhancement - SE 32nd

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

0

25

0

0

0

0

0

25

0

25

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Unfunded or Partially Funded Modified

45

SE 40th St Corridor (East of ICW)

Arterial Street Improvements

50

0

0

0

759

0

0

759

0

759

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Streets, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities costs

673

1,761

1,992

2,177

1,959

2,398

1,229

11,516

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Government

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - No Changes

46

Computer Equipment Replacements

Technology

207

112

105

142

131

122

122

734

0

0

0

0

0

734

0

0

0

0

0

47

High Accuracy Orthophotos

Technology

0

30

0

0

30

0

0

60

0

0

0

60

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

48

Firefighting Equipment

Small Technology/Equipment

29

36

35

32

40

30

36

209

0

0

0

209

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

49

Website Redesign

Technology

0

0

0

0

39

0

0

39

0

0

0

39

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

50

Financial System Upgrades

Technology

67

0

0

0

0

93

0

93

0

0

19

74

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

51

Server Software Updates

Technology

120

0

0

0

0

120

120

240

0

0

0

240

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

52

Mobile Asset Data Collection

Technology

0

0

84

0

0

84

0

168

0

168

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

53

City Information via Web Based GIS

Technology

0

0

0

55

0

0

55

110

0

0

0

110

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

54

Fuel Clean Up

Other Equipment

79

80

80

82

82

0

0

324

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

324

55

Self Contained Breathing Apparatus Replacement

Other Equipment

0

0

0

0

306

0

0

306

0

0

0

306

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

56

Police In-Car Video System Replacement

Technology

0

0

0

0

0

63

0

63

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

63

Funded - Modified

57

City Hall Building Repairs

Public Buildings

97

186

143

350

206

128

131

1,144

1,144

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

58

Maintenance Building Repairs

Public Buildings

35

50

64

94

108

204

72

592

147

0

445

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

59

Thrift Shop Repairs

Public Buildings

55

63

46

49

32

37

35

262

0

0

0

0

0

0

262

0

0

0

0

60

North Fire Station Repairs

Public Buildings

58

56

46

60

77

112

142

493

493

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

61

South Fire Station Repairs

Public Buildings

0

0

0

30

30

42

42

144

144

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

62

Luther Burbank Admin Building Repairs

Public Buildings

103

95

79

145

31

199

78

627

627

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

63

MI Community and Event Center Building Repairs

Public Buildings

110

175

192

191

218

180

346

1,302

1,257

0

0

0

45

0

0

0

0

0

0

64

Fire Apparatus Replacements

Other Equipment

0

338

0

0

745

0

0

1,083

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1,083

0

65

Maintenance Management System

Technology

0

0

0

199

0

0

0

199

0

0

150

49

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

66

Fleet Replacements

Other Equipment

414

684

539

1,136

661

262

973

4,255

0

0

0

0

0

4,255

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - New Project

67

Disaster Recovery

Technology

0

85

38

0

0

0

0

123

0

0

0

123

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

68

Public Infrastructure Data Projects

Small Technology/Equipment

0

67

68

0

0

0

0

135

0

0

0

135

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

69

Recreation and Facility Booking System

Technology

0

0

186

0

0

0

0

186

0

0

0

186

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

70

Telemetry Communications Replacement

Technology

0

47

0

0

0

0

0

47

0

0

47

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

71

Dedicated EOC Space

Public Buildings

0

138

0

0

0

0

0

138

138

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Unfunded or Partially FundedModified

72

MICEC Technology & Equipment Replacement

Small Technology/Equipment

0

175

58

93

50

43

51

470

0

0

0

470

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total General Government costs

1,374

2,417

1,763

2,658

2,786

1,719

2,203

13,546

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sewer Utility

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - No Changes

73

General Sewer System Improvements

Sewer System Improvements

0

300

350

400

400

400

400

2,250

0

0

2,250

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

74

Sewer System Emergency Repairs

Sewer System Rehabilitation

50

50

50

50

50

50

50

300

0

0

300

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

75

Sewer System Generator Replacement

Sewer System Rehabilitation

0

0

160

0

170

0

0

330

0

0

330

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

76

Sewer System Pump Station Improvements

Sewer System Rehabilitation

60

65

65

65

65

65

65

390

0

0

390

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

77

Street Related Sewer CIP Projects

Sewer System Improvements

50

30

30

30

30

30

30

180

0

0

180

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - Modified

78

East Mercer Way Sewer Replacement

Sewer System Improvements

0

0

0

500

0

0

0

500

0

0

500

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

79

General Sewer Plan - 20 year Capital Plan Update

Sewer System Improvements

50

75

0

0

0

0

0

75

0

0

75

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - New Project

80

Backyard Sewer System Improvements

Sewer System Improvements

0

25

175

25

175

25

175

600

0

0

600

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

81

Sewer System Special Catch Basins

Sewer System Rehabilitation

0

150

150

0

0

0

0

300

0

0

300

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

82

Sewer Main Repair in Sub-Basin 27 Watercourse

Sewer System Rehabilitation

0

315

0

0

0

0

0

315

0

0

315

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

83

Reach 4 Lake Line Replacement - Feasibility & Assess

Other Sewer System Projects

0

0

0

0

0

0

150

150

0

0

150

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Sewer Utility costs

210

1,010

980

1,070

890

570

870

5,390

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storm Drainage Utility

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - No Changes

84

Neighborhood Spot Drainage Improvements

Neighborhood Drainage Improvements

80

85

85

90

90

95

95

540

0

0

540

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

85

Watercourse Condition Assessments

Watercourse Projects

25

15

25

15

25

15

25

120

0

0

120

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - Modified

86

Drainage System Replacements (2017-2020)

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

0

0

0

125

125

125

125

500

0

0

500

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

87

Watercourse Minor Repairs/Maintenance

Watercourse Projects

15

20

20

20

20

20

20

120

0

0

120

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

88

Watercourse Stabilization Projects (2017-2020)

Watercourse Projects

0

0

0

289

427

416

329

1,461

0

0

1,461

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

89

Sub-Basins 51a.1/52.1 Watercourse Stabilization Project

Watercourse Projects

0

0

183

0

0

0

0

183

0

0

183

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

90

Sub-Basin 49b Watercourse Stabilization Project

Watercourse Projects

0

0

256

0

0

0

0

256

0

0

256

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

91

Sub-Basin 27a Ph. 1- Watercourse Stabilization

Watercourse Projects

0

341

0

0

0

0

0

341

0

0

341

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

92

Drainage System Video Inspection Program

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

30

60

0

0

0

0

0

60

0

0

60

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

93

Drainage System Emergency Repairs

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

15

20

20

20

20

20

20

120

0

0

120

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - New Project

94

Sub-Basin 18c Drainage System Extension

Watercourse Projects

0

175

0

0

0

0

0

175

0

0

175

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

95

Sub-Basin 6 Drainage System Extension

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

0

100

0

0

0

0

0

100

0

0

100

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

96

Sub-Basin 14 Drainage System Extension

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

0

115

0

0

0

0

0

115

0

0

115

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

97

Sub-Basin 27a Culvert Replacement- 4900 ICW

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

0

0

150

0

0

0

0

150

0

0

150

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Storm Drainage Utility costs

165

931

739

559

707

691

614

4,241

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Utility

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - No Changes

98

Water Model Updates/ Fire Flow Analysis

Other Water System Projects

25

0

25

0

25

0

25

75

0

0

75

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

99

Water System Plan Update

Other Water System Projects

60

0

0

0

0

0

60

60

0

0

60

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

100

ICW & 85th Ave. Water System Improvements

Water System Improvements

0

1,747

0

0

0

0

0

1,747

0

0

1,747

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

101

SE 29th Street Water System Improvements

Sub-standard Water Main Replacement

0

0

0

0

54

314

0

368

0

0

368

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

102

93rd, 89th, & 90th Ave SE Water System Improvement

Sub-standard Water Main Replacement

166

971

0

0

0

0

0

971

0

0

971

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

103

Street Related Water CIP Projects

Water System Improvements

200

150

200

200

200

200

200

1,150

0

0

1,150

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

104

Water System Components Replacement

Water System Improvements

30

35

35

35

35

35

35

210

0

0

210

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

105

3838 WMW Water System Improvements

Sub-standard Water Main Replacement

0

0

65

377

0

0

0

442

0

0

442

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - Modified

106

Hydrant Replacements

Water System Improvements

0

0

300

0

300

0

300

900

0

0

900

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

107

Meter Replacement Program

Other Water System Projects

45

100

100

100

100

100

100

600

0

0

600

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

108

EMW 5400 to 6000 Block Watermain & PRV Stations

Water System Improvements

0

0

219

1,276

0

0

0

1,495

0

0

1,495

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

109

Madrona Crest West Addition Water Sys Improvements

Sub-standard Water Main Replacement

0

280

1,622

0

0

0

0

1,902

0

0

1,902

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - New Project

110

82nd Ave & Forest Ave Water System Improvements

Water System Improvements

0

0

0

120

695

0

0

815

0

0

815

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

111

SE 22nd St - SE 22nd Pl Water System Improvement

Sub-standard Water Main Replacement

0

0

0

0

142

823

0

965

0

0

965

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

112

9700 Block SE 41st St Water System Improvemts

Sub-standard Water Main Replacement

0

80

461

0

0

0

0

541

0

0

541

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

113

76th Ave SE Water System Improvements

Sub-standard Water Main Replacement

0

0

0

0

68

394

0

462

0

0

462

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

114

Madrona Crest East Addition Water Sys Improvements

Sub-standard Water Main Replacement

0

0

0

0

0

285

2,092

2,377

0

0

2,377

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

115

Reservoir Generator Replacement

Other Water System Projects

0

0

100

0

0

0

0

100

0

0

100

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

116

Water Advisory Action Plan Follow-up

Other Water System Projects

0

550

578

0

0

0

0

1,128

0

0

1,128

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Water Utility costs

526

3,913

3,705

2,108

1,619

2,151

2,812

16,308

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Capital Reinvestment Plan

 

3,369

12,285

10,005

10,732

9,904

8,923

8,833

61,432

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Parks, Recreation and Open Space

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - No Changes

117

Recreational Trail Connections

Open Space

0

89

90

91

93

95

0

458

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

458

0

0

Funded - New Project

118

Luther Burbank Playground Mosaic

Parks Improvements

0

26

0

0

0

0

0

26

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

26

119

Wall Mural at I-90/West Mercer Way on ramp

Parks Improvements

0

25

0

0

0

0

0

25

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

25

Total Parks, Recreation and Open Space costs

0

140

90

91

93

95

0

509

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Streets, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - No Changes

120

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities Plan Implementation

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

45

0

0

45

45

45

45

180

0

180

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

121

Safe Routes to New Elementary School

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

0

454

0

0

0

0

0

454

0

454

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - Modified

122

East Mercer Way Roadside Shoulders, Phases 9-11

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

0

0

358

0

303

0

406

1,067

0

1,067

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - New Project

123

Safe Routes - Madrona Crest (86th Ave) Sidewalk

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

0

170

0

0

340

0

0

510

0

510

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

124

West Mercer Way Roadside Shoulders (7400-8000 blk)

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

0

0

417

0

0

0

0

417

0

417

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

125

84th Ave Path (SE 39th to Upper Luther Burbank Park)

Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities

0

70

0

0

0

0

0

70

0

70

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Streets, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities costs

45

694

775

45

688

45

451

2,698

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

General Government

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - No Changes

126

Small Technology/Equipment Items

Small Technology/Equipment

25

25

25

50

50

50

50

250

0

0

0

250

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - Modified

127

Car Port (Patrol Vehicles)

Public Buildings

0

76

0

0

0

0

0

76

38

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

38

128

Sustainability Project Investment

Public Buildings

0

25

0

0

0

0

0

25

0

0

0

25

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - Modified

129

Light Rail Station Planning

Planning and Design

0

0

0

50

0

0

0

50

0

0

0

0

50

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total General Government costs

25

126

25

100

50

50

50

401

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Storm Drainage Utility

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - Modified

130

Basins 10 & 32b Dissolved Metals Source Identification

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

40

40

40

20

20

0

0

120

0

0

120

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

131

Water Quality Treatment Improvements

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

75

0

0

75

0

75

0

150

0

0

150

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

132

Street Related Drainage Improvements

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

75

95

95

100

100

105

105

600

0

0

600

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Funded - New Project

133

Drainage System Extensions (2017-2020)

Other Storm Drainage System Projects

0

0

0

125

125

125

125

500

0

0

500

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Storm Drainage Utility costs

190

135

135

320

245

305

230

1,370

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Water Utility

Project Costs

Source of Funds

Project Description

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Total

REET

Street

Utilities

General

Beautif

Fees

Contrib’s

Grants

Levy

Debt

Other

Funded - Modified

134

New Pressure Reducing Valve (PRV) Stations

Other Water System Projects

0

0

0

0

0

50

400

450

0

0

450

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total Water Utility costs

0

0

0

0

0

50

400

450

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Capital Facilities Plan

260

1,095

1,025

556

1,076

545

1,131

5,428

260

1,095

1,025

556

1,076

545

1,131

5,428

 

 

 

Grand Total

3,629

13,380

11,030

11,288

10,980

9,468

9,964

66,110

3,629

13,380

11,030

11,288

10,980

9,468

9,964

66,110

 

 

 

 

 

V. CAPITAL FACILITIES GOALS AND POLICIES

Together with the City’s Management and Budget Policies contained in the City’s Budget (and Capital Improvement Program), the following goal and policies guide the acquisition, maintenance and investment in the City’s capital assets.

GOAL 1:

Ensure that capital facilities and public services necessary to support existing and new development are available at locally adopted levels of service.

1.1The Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) shall identify and plan for projects needed to maintain adopted levels of service for services provided by the City.

1.2The City shall schedule capital improvements in accordance with the adopted six-year Capital Improvement Program. From time to time, emergencies or special opportunities may be considered that may require a re-scheduling of projects in the CIP.

1.3The CIP shall be developed in accordance with requirements of the Growth Management Act and consistent with the Capital Facilities Element of the City’s Comprehensive Plan.

1.4If projected expenditures for needed capital facilities exceed projected revenues, the City shall re-evaluate the established service level standards and the Land Use Element of the Comprehensive Plan, seeking to identify adjustments in future growth patterns and/or capital investment requirements.

1.5Within the context of a biennial budget, the City shall update the six-year Capital Improvement Plan (CIP).

1.6The City’s two-year capital budget shall be based on the six-year CIP.

1.7The Capital Facilities Element shall be periodically updated to identify existing and projected level of service deficiencies and their public financing requirements, based on projected population growth. Capital expenditures for maintenance, upgrades and replacement of existing facilities should be identified in the biennial budget and six-year Capital Improvement Program.

1.8The City shall coordinate development of the capital improvement budget with the General Fund budget. Future operation costs associated with new capital improvements should be included in operating budget forecasts.

1.9The City shall seek to maintain its assets at a level adequate to protect capital investment and minimize future maintenance and replacement costs.

1.10Highest priority for funding capital projects should be for improvements that protect the public health and safety.

1.11The City will adopt a Hazard Mitigation Plan. This plan will be updated periodically and shall guide City efforts to maintain reliability of key infrastructure and address vulnerabilities and potential impacts associated with natural hazards.

1.12Maintenance of and reinvestment in existing facilities should be financed on a “pay as you go” basis using ongoing revenues.

1.13Acquisition or construction of new capital assets should be financed with new revenues (such as voter approved taxes or external grants).

1.14Water, sanitary sewer and storm water capital investments should be financed through utility user fees.

1.15The City shall coordinate with other entities that provide public services within the City to encourage the consistent provision of adequate public services.

1.16Develop and adopt new impact fees, or refine existing impact fees, in accordance with the Growth Management Act, as part of the financing for public facilities. Public facilities for which impact fees may be collected shall include public streets and roads; publicly owned parks, open space and recreation facilities; school facilities; and City fire protection facilities.

1.17In accordance with the Growth Management Act, impact fees shall only be imposed for system improvements which are reasonably related to the new development; shall not exceed a proportionate share of the costs of system improvements reasonably related to the new development; and shall be used for system improvements that will reasonably benefit the new development.

1.18The City adopts by reference the “standard of service” for primary and secondary education levels of service set forth in the Mercer Island School District’s capital facilities plan, as adopted and periodically amended by the Mercer Island School District Board of Directors.

1.19The School District’s capital facilities plan, as amended yearly, is adopted by reference as Appendix C of this Comprehensive Plan for the purpose of providing a policy basis for collection of school impact fees.

1.20City operations should be optimized to minimize carbon footprint impacts, especially with respect to energy consumption and waste reduction. New Capital Facilities should incorporate and encourage the sustainable stewardship of the natural environment, and consider the benefit of creating cutting-edge, demonstration projects.

1.21City procurement should include consideration of total lifecycle costs, recycled content, and other common measures of product sustainability.

1.22Current City facilities are operated in an energy-efficient manner, and opportunities for improvement are implemented when feasible. New City facilities should explore meeting public and private-sector sustainable building certification standards, such as the ‘BuiltGreen’ system and the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) system.

1.23Parks & Open Space – Implement sustainability measures identified within the City’s Parks and Recreation Management Plan, including special attention to direct sustainability measures, such as tree retention, preference for native vegetation and habitat creation, minimized use of chemicals, and reductions in energy and fuel use.

1.24Implement proposed projects in the City’s Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities Plan (PBF), with emphasis placed on quick and affordable early fixes that demonstrate the City’s progress in providing safe alternative transportation modes to the public.

VI. CAPITAL FACILITIES FINANCIAL FORECAST

In analyzing the City’s existing and projected expenditure and revenues for its capital facilities in light of the City’s established Levels of Service standards (LOS) and capital financing policies (City Budget), a sustainable twenty-year forecast emerges. Figure 2 and Table 3 below shows the-twenty year impacts of capital investments the City’s infrastructure.

Figure 2 - Capital Facilities Forecast

 

Table 3 - Capital Facilities Forecast

 

Streets and Trails (PBF)

Parks & Open Space

Public Buildings

Water

Sewer

Storm Drainage

CAPITAL COSTS

20-year est. capital expenditures

60,300,600

43,613,471

19,039,743

121,593,481

26,280,635

28,072,472

REVENUE SOURCES

REET 1

 

28,564,570

14,644,728

 

 

 

REET 2

43,209,298

 

 

 

 

 

Grants

1,000,000

3,292,500

3,292,500

 

 

150,000

Fuel Taxes

7,081,833

 

 

 

 

 

Water Rates

 

 

 

247,137,290

 

 

Sewer Rates

 

 

 

 

216,381,050

 

Storm Rates

 

 

 

 

 

50,135,809

Levy

 

458,000

 

 

 

 

Debt

 

 

1,560,000

 

 

 

TBD

7,000,000

 

 

 

 

 

Other

2,009,469

14,410,753

2,835,015

 

 

 

VII. PROCESS FOR SITING PUBLIC FACILITIES

Background - State & County

The Growth Management Act requires that jurisdictions planning under its authority develop and adopt a process for identifying and siting essential public facilities, including those facilities typically difficult to site.

The State Office of Financial Management maintains a list of those essential State facilities that are required or likely to be built within the next six years. The list includes: airports; state education facilities; state or regional transportation facilities; state and local correctional facilities; solid waste handling facilities; in-patient facilities including substance abuse facilities, mental health facilities and group homes; waste water treatment facilities; utility and energy facilities; and parks and recreation facilities.

King County Policies also identify the parameters for the siting of new public capital facilities of a county- or state-wide nature. The facilities shall be sited so as to support countywide land use patterns, support economic activities, mitigate environmental impacts, provide amenities or incentives, and minimize public costs. Public facilities development projects are also to be prioritized, coordinated, planned and sited through an inter jurisdictional process.

Interstate 90 represents the community’s largest essential public facility of a regional or statewide nature. Given the lack of available land, the residential nature of Mercer Island and the comparatively high land and development costs, future siting of major regional or state facilities on Mercer Island is most likely unrealistic and incompatible with existing land uses.

Mercer Island Facilities

At the local level, the City of Mercer Island identifies facilities as essential to the community: public safety facilities (fire and police), general administration and maintenance (City Hall), public library, public schools and facilities housing human services and recreation/community service programs. These facilities are not generally classified as “essential public facilities” as they do not have the same level of regional importance and difficulty in siting. Though not “essential” under GMA, these public facilities provide public services that are important to the quality of life on Mercer Island and should be available when and where needed.

The City of Mercer Island employs many methods in the planning for and siting of public facilities: land use codes, environmental impact studies, and compliance with state and federal regulatory requirements. In addition, the Transportation, Utilities and Capital Facilities Elements of the Comprehensive Plan identify existing and future local public facilities and require substantial public involvement in the siting of those facilities.

However, because the vast majority of Mercer Island’s available land has been developed for residential uses (over 95%), siting most public facilities that are generally regarded as not compatible with residential land uses becomes problematic.

In the past, siting local public or human services facilities has produced a wide range of responses within the community. Community acceptance is a significant issue and nearly always has a strong influence on final site selection. Developing a basic framework for community involvement early in the facilities development process clearly enhances the whole siting process. The City should establish a public participation plan that involves the community during the siting and development processes and, if necessary, after operations begin at the facility.

In large part, the most effective facilities siting approaches include early community notification and ongoing community involvement concerning both the facilities and the services provided at the site. Use of these strategies creates opportunities to build cooperative relationships between the City, the adjacent neighbors and the broader community who use the services. They also help to clearly define the rights and responsibilities of all concerned.

Policies for Siting Public Facilities and Essential Public Facilities

The purpose of the Essential Public Facilities Siting Process is to ensure that public services are available and accessible to Mercer Island and that the facilities are sited and constructed to provide those services in a timely manner. Site selection is an important component in facilities development and should occur within a process that includes adequate public review and comment and promotes trust between City and the community.

2.1Essential public facilities should be sited consistent with the King County Countywide Planning Policies.

2.2Siting proposed new or expansions to existing essential public facilities shall consist of the following:

a.An inventory of similar existing essential public facilities, including their locations and capacities;

b.A forecast and demonstration of the future need for the essential public facility;

c.An analysis of the potential social and economic impacts and benefits to jurisdictions receiving or surrounding the facilities;

d.An analysis of the proposal’s consistency with County and City policies;

e.An analysis of alternatives to the facility, including decentralization, conservation, demand management and other strategies;

f.An analysis of alternative sites based on siting criteria developed through an inter-jurisdictional process;

g.An analysis of environmental impacts and mitigation; and

h.Extensive public involvement consistent with the Public Participation Principles outlined in the Introductory section of the Comprehensive Plan.

2.3Local public facility siting decisions shall be consistent with the Public Participation Principles outlined in the Introductory section of the Comprehensive Plan.

2.4Local public facility siting decisions shall be based on clear criteria that address (at least) issues of service delivery and neighborhood impacts.

2.5City departments shall describe efforts to comply with the Essential Public Facilities Siting process when outlining future capital needs in the Capital Improvements Program budget.

2.6City departments shall develop a community notification and involvement plan for any proposed capital improvement project that involves new development or major reconstruction of an existing facility and which has been approved and funded in the biennial Capital Improvement Program budget.