Chapter 18.05A
URBAN VILLAGE, NEIGHBORHOOD VILLAGE, NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER

AND COMMUNITY ORIENTED SHOPPING CENTER DESIGN CRITERIA

18.05A.000    Chapter Contents

Sections:

18.05A.010    How to use design criteria.

SITE DESIGN AND ORIENTATION

18.05A.020    Site design - Streets, trails and open space.

18.05A.030    Site design - Location and use of centers and common open spaces.

18.05A.040    Site design - Gateways and focal points.

18.05A.050    Site design - Pedestrian/sidewalk orientation.

18.05A.060    Site design - Fences and walls adjacent to pedestrian scale streets.

COMMERCIAL AND MIXED USE BUILDING DESIGN, LANDSCAPING, AND SIGNS

18.05A.070    Building design - Commercial and mixed use.

18.05A.080    Building design - Creation of human scale.

18.05A.090    Building design - Building wall finishes for stand alone and corner site buildings.

18.05A.095    Building design - Drive-through facilities.

18.05A.100    Landscape design for villages, commercial and mixed use areas.

18.05A.110    Landscape design - Screening.

18.05A.120    Landscape design - Existing trees.

18.05A.130    Signs - Attached to the building.

18.05A.140    Signs - Freestanding.

MULTIFAMILY PROJECTS (INCLUDING TOWNHOUSES OF 5 UNITS OR MORE)

18.05A.150    Site design - Orientation.

18.05A.160    Site design - Parking location and design.

18.05A.170    Site design - Mailboxes, site lighting, and bus stops.

18.05A.180    Site design - Screening.

18.05A.190    Building design - Neighborhood scale.

18.05A.200    Building design - Privacy.

18.05A.210    Building design - Facade, footprint, and roof articulation.

18.05A.220    Building design - Entries.

18.05A.225    Building design - Windows.

18.05A.230    Building design - Materials and colors.

18.05A.240    Signs.

DUPLEX, TRIPLEX, FOURPLEX, TOWNHOUSE PROJECTS (4 UNITS OR LESS), COTTAGE HOUSING AND SINGLE FAMILY HOUSING, INCLUDING DESIGNATED MANUFACTURED HOUSING (6 UNITS PER ACRE OR MORE)

18.05A.250    Duplex, triplex, etc. - Applicability.

18.05A.260    Building design - Roof form and architectural detail.

18.05A.270    Building design - Entries.

18.05A.280    Building design - Garage design.

18.05A.290    Building design - Materials and colors.

ACCESSORY DWELLING UNITS (ADU)

18.05A.300    Site and building design - Privacy.

18.05A.310    Building design - Entry features.

18.05A.320    Building design - Materials and colors.

COTTAGE HOUSING

18.05A.330    Site design - Cottage housing.

(Ord. 7061 §4, 2017; Ord. 6581 §5, 2008).

18.05A.010 How to use design criteria

The Requirement Sections in the following Design Criteria for the City of Olympia are the requirements each project shall meet. These design criteria are intended to supplement the development standards of each zoning district. Where the provisions of this chapter conflict with the provisions of the zoning district, the provisions of the zoning district shall apply. The Guidelines which follow each Requirement Statement are suggested ways to achieve the design intent. Each guideline is meant to indicate the preferred conditions, but other equal or better design solutions will be considered acceptable by the Board and/or staff, so long as these solutions meet the intent of these sections. Where a requirement and/or guideline is followed by the abbreviations found in the Legend on each page - these requirements and/or guidelines are applicable to that particular zone found in Chapter 18.05. Nothing in these Design Criteria shall be construed to create a duty on the part of the City or its officers, agents and employees with respect to the health, safety or welfare of the users of the structures and surroundings mentioned herein.

(Ord. 5967 §9, 1999; Ord. 5830 §49, 1998; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.020 Site design –Streets, trails and open space

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Arrange the streets and trails on the site so that the central internal open space and other community facilities can be accessed from all areas of the development without using an arterial street. The street layout shall be a modified grid street pattern adapted to the topography, unique natural features, and environmental constraints of the site. The street layout shall provide direct convenient access to the village center, community focus areas, and internal open space areas, and shall showcase gateways and vistas. When making connections with adjacent neighborhoods use traffic calming techniques where necessary. Public access shall be provided to water bodies that fall within the jurisdiction of the Shoreline Management Act. (Examples of such access may be an arboretum or swimming, if possible). Public access types include: UV, NV, COSC.

1.    Type I: Provides direct physical connection to the water’s edge including floats, docks, and boat launches. Access itself is located either up to the shoreline or floating over-the-water.

2.    Type II: Provides immediate proximity to the water’s edge, but does not provide the physical ability to touch the water.

3.    Type III: Provides unobstructed and proximate (very near) view of waterward side of the project.

4.    Type IV: Provides visual access to the waterfront (but not the waterside of the project) and shoreline interpretation.

Ownership and type of access will be determined during the Master Planned Development Process.

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Street layout should have a minimum of two (2) interconnections with the existing public street system rated as an arterial or collector. (UV, NV, COSC)

2.    The modified grid street pattern should define blocks that are two hundred fifty (250) to three hundred fifty (350) feet long. (UV, NV, COSC)

3.    When a block face is longer than three hundred fifty (350) feet, an alley should be provided with through access to another street or alley. (UV, NV, COSC)

4.    Street layout that includes access from alleys to development is preferred. (UV, NV, COSC)

5.    Blocks should be designed to have a maximum length of six hundred (600) feet from street to street and should either continue through the intersection or terminate in a "T" intersection directly opposite the center of a building, an internal open space area, or a view into a peripheral open space area. (See Figure 5A-2)(UV, NV, COSC)

6.    A majority of the streets should be curved or terminated so that no street vista is longer than one thousand two hundred (1,200) feet. (UV, NV)

7.    Provide a connected system of recreation areas, trails, and natural open spaces that are linked to the village center and to natural features by streets or foot paths. (UV, NV, COSC)

8.    Provide street linkages, including pedestrian and bike facilities to adjacent developments and neighborhoods where possible. (UV, NV, COSC)

9.    Encourage pedestrian accessibility from adjacent residential neighborhoods by the use of through-block connections or other accessibility methods. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

10.    Where there are wildlife habitat areas on a village or center site, connect them to adjacent habitat areas to facilitate wildlife movement. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Diagram of a modified grid street pattern built around a village center. Note the three (3) connections to the surrounding street system. Each village or community oriented shopping center must have at least two (2) peripheral attachments.

FIGURE 5A-1

Diagram of an internal street pattern defining geometrically shaped blocks.

FIGURE 5A-2

(Ord. 6517 §18, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.030 Site design –Location and use of centers and common open spaces

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Common open space shall be used for social, recreational, and/or natural environment preservation purposes. It shall include at least one internal open space (such as a village center park) which will serve as a center and around which commercial mixed use and some higher density housing may be located. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    An internal open space should be designed as a center park, town square, or urban park, should be an active gathering place in both day and evening, and should include places for strolling, sitting, social interaction, and recreation.(UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    The core area or center of the site should contain a greater intensity of development than outlying areas. Smaller lots and higher density dwellings should be located closer to the center park and commercial area. (UV, NV, COSC)

3.    All commercial development in villages and centers should be within approximately six hundred (600) feet of an existing or planned transit stop. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

4.    Surround the urban village center park with a concentration of high density development which may include commercial, residential, public and semi-public uses, community clubs, and community facilities. (UV)

5.    A village center park should have a distinct geometric shape, and be bounded by streets with curb side parking on a minimum of fifty (50) percent of its perimeter. (NV, COSC, NC)

6.    The center park should be landscaped using elements such as formal gardens, walkways, monuments, statues, gazebos, fountains, park benches, children’s play equipment, small playfields and pedestrian-scale lamp posts. (NV, COSC, NC)

7.    Internal open spaces should be landscaped with trees and shrubs that do not visually obstruct scenic vistas. (NV, COSC, NC)

FIGURE 5A-3

FIGURE 5A-4

A village center park can take many forms but should serve as an active gathering place surrounded by medium and high density housing.

A neighborhood center, not part of a village, may be located in some existing neighborhoods to provide some small scale convenience service to adjacent neighborhoods.

Small scale neighborhood centers outside of villages should use the same Pedestrian/Sidewalk Orientation, Building Design, Landscape Design and Sign Guidelines as Urban and Neighborhood Villages.

FIGURE 5A-5

A neighborhood center park, village center park or a community oriented shopping center park can serve a variety of functions. Its size and shape should accommodate the anticipated use.

FIGURE 5A-6

(Ord. 6517 §19, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.040 Site design –Gateways and focal points

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Distinct or prominent buildings shall be located at gateways within a village, or community oriented shopping center, at focal points, such as corner sites, or at points of visual termination. (UV, NV, COSC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Prominent, monumental buildings or structures should mark gateways, focal points, or points of visual termination. This can be accomplished by using:

a.    distinct massing (such as the use of recessed entries, contrasting materials and architectural features that identify a bottom, middle and top of a building),

b.    additional height or the appearance of enhanced height (such as with the use of roof pitches and shapes, or cornice detail),

c.    distinct architectural embellishments or ornamentation that break up and create variety on flat facades.

Focal points should terminate views down streets.

Gateway buildings should mark transition areas.

FIGURE 5A-7

(Ord. 6517 §20, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.050 Site design –Pedestrian/sidewalk orientation

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Create an interesting street that is visually attractive, and easy to use for pedestrians who will live, work or shop in the area. Buildings internal to a village or center shall generally face and be located on pedestrian streets. This will allow entries, display windows, and building facades to create a continuous row of store fronts and residences. Parking shall be clustered and/or located on the side or behind buildings and be designed in a way that gives pedestrians access to building entrances that are as direct as possible. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Exceptions to building and parking orientation may be made for a grocery store in an urban village, or a community oriented shopping center. (UV, COSC)

The orientation and facade of a building adjacent to an arterial or major collector shall be designed to enhance the adjacent neighborhood. Buildings and parking lots located adjacent to an arterial or major collector on the edge of a village or center shall be designed and oriented to (1) maximize the presence and prominence of the building on village corners and at gateways and (2) minimize the presence and prominence of parking lots. Where a building entry faces a parking lot, pedestrian linkages to the internal street network must be as pleasant, visible, well lit, and direct as possible. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Orientation

a.    Store fronts should face the core area, center park, and/or sidewalk of the streets on the site. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Buildings fronting on a village or center park, green or plaza should be at least two (2) stories high. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Corner lots at major street entry points or village center areas should be occupied by buildings or structures designed to emphasize their prominent location. (UV, NV, COSC)

d.    Locate service and delivery away from the main streets where possible. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

e.    Avoid and/or minimize curb cuts on streets. Use alleys or side streets for vehicle access where possible. (UV, NV, COSC)

f.    Require the site design to accommodate transit on transit routes:

i.    bordering the site, and

ii.    within a core area that may have transit service. (See Figure 5A-5.)(UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Enhanced Pedestrian Access

a.    Direct pedestrian access should be provided from sidewalks and parking lots to building entrances, to bus stops, and to adjacent buildings. Where practical and consistent with the other provisions of the district, parking isles should be aligned perpendicular to the building and pedestrian access should be separate from vehicular travel lanes. (See Figure 5A-9.)(UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Where a parking lot separates a building entrance from a sidewalk in the rights-of-way, a pedestrian walkway at least six (6) feet in width should be provided connecting the street, the sidewalk and the building entrance. Such crossings should be clearly marked. (See Figure 5A-9.)(UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Define walkways with vertical plants, such as trees or shrubs and with lighting. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

d.    Place signs where they clearly direct customers to the building entrances and the parking areas. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

e.    Motor vehicle wheel stops or extended curbs should be installed or sidewalk widths should be increased as necessary to ensure that pedestrian walkways within the site have a passable width of at least four (4) feet and sidewalks in rights-of-way are not encroached upon. Street lights, utility poles, benches, trees, trash receptacles and similar streetscape fixtures should, to the greatest extent practical, be situated such that sidewalks in the rights-of-way have a passable width of at least five (5) feet. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

f.    A walkway or shared bike/pedestrian network should be provided throughout the site that interconnects all dwelling units with other units, nonresidential uses, and common open space. Bike and pedestrian ways should be on the street and alley network but additional connections may be provided. (UV, NV, COSC)

Parking isles perpendicular to a building entrance are preferred to allow easy and safe connection to building entrances. A convenient pedestrian walkway should be provided between a sidewalk and the building entrance where a sidewalk is separated by a parking lot.

Provide a clear sense of entry upon arrival to the building.

FIGURE 5A-9

3.    Enhanced Pedestrian Amenity

a.    Walkway materials and patterns and pedestrian amenities such as benches, shelters, trash receptacles, street trees, pedestrian lighting, and drinking fountains should be coordinated to provide some uniformity of design throughout the site. Such improvements should comply with any applicable, adopted streetscape plan and should be incorporated into the core area. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

4.    Possible amenities include:

a.    Walls and planters that can be used for seating. (UV, NV, COSC)

b.    Seating in a variety of locations such as places which are sunny, sheltered from the rain and wind, or shaded in the summer. (UV, NV, COSC)

c.    Fountains or sculpture incorporated into small under-utilized areas. (UV, NV, COSC)

d.    Seating that allows users to observe the activities of the street or enjoy a scenic view. (UV, NV, COSC)

e.    Plazas and courtyards with fountains, sculpture, mobiles, flower boxes, kiosks, banners, etc. (UV, NV, COSC)

f.    Street vendor stations where allowed. (UV, COSC)

g.    Bike racks. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

FIGURE 5A-10

5.    Add Character and Visual Diversity to Walkways.

a.    Use a change in color and materials such as pavers, brick, stone, and exposed aggregate set in geometric or free form patterns to add interest and variety to walking surface. (UV, NV, COSC)

b.    Identify street crossings through changes in color, materials, or patterns. (UV, NV, COSC)

c.    Separate the pedestrian from the street by placing planters, street trees and planter strips, bollards, or similar elements at the street edge of the sidewalk. (UV, NV, COSC)

d.    Encourage the use of alleys by pedestrians by providing alleys with lighting, plantings, and paving materials in areas of the site where the alley is or may be used as a pedestrian link. (See Figure 5A-4.)(UV, NV, COSC)

Pavers can be used to clearly identify pedestrian areas.

FIGURE 5A-11

6.    On-Site Parking

a.    Avoid placing parking lots on corners because the goal is to have buildings as the dominant feature especially on corner lots. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Off street parking should have access from alleys or from streets at locations that don’t conflict with pedestrian circulation in the center park or main street area. (See Figure 5A-3.)(UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Minimize the apparent width of parking lots which are located adjacent to the street by minimizing curb cuts and through landscaping and screening. (See 5A-12.)(UV, NV, COSC, NC)

d.    Limit parking lots on the street frontage to thirty (30) percent of the street frontage of the property. Exceptions may be considered for the grocery store parking lot in an urban village, or community oriented shopping center. An exempted grocery store parking lot should not face a center park or plaza. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

e.    Maintain the building line by screening parking lots which abut the street. Hedges, fences, raised planters, and low walls combined with plantings are possible solutions. However, these cannot obscure vehicular sight lines as a safety requisite. Another solution is to extend the facade of a building with parking located behind it. (UV, NV, COSC)

f.    Where parking structures or covered parking faces the street at least sixty (60) percent of the parking structure facing the street between two (2) and eight (8) feet above the sidewalk should incorporate at least one of the treatments listed: (UV, NV, COSC)

i.    transparent windows (with clear or lightly tinted glass) where pedestrian-oriented businesses are located along the facade of the parking structure;

ii.    display windows;

iii.    decorative metal grille work or similar detailing which provides texture and covers the parking structure opening;

iv.    art or architectural treatment such as sculpture, mosaic, glass block, opaque art glass, relief art work, or similar features; or

v.    vertical trellis or other landscaping or pedestrian plaza area.

g.    Vehicle entries to garages should be recessed at least six (6) feet from the primary facade plane in order to minimize their prominence.

On-Site Parking Placement

Curb cuts should be minimized as much as possible.

FIGURE 5A-12

7.    Lighting

a.    Accent structures, conserve energy and provide visibility and security with lighting. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Use lighting to accent key architectural elements or to emphasize landscape features. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Provide well lighted pedestrian sidewalks and alleys in accordance with Olympia Street Standards. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

d.    Locate lighting so as not to have a negative impact on adjacent properties such as shining off site into adjacent buildings. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

e.    Decorative street lights should be placed at regular intervals throughout the development. (UV, NV, COSC)

Lighting should be designed so that it does not adversely intrude on neighboring property.

FIGURE 5A-13

FIGURE 5A-14

8.    Physical Context

a.    Conform floor elevations to sidewalk grades where possible, except for residential units where first floors may be elevated two to four (2-4) feet above grade to provide privacy. (See Figure 5A-15.)(UV, NV, COSC, NC)

9.    Consolidation

a.    Use common wall side by side development with continuity of facades (as allowed by Table 5.04 sideyard setbacks). (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Consolidate required parking for several businesses on one (1) parking lot, wherever possible. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

FIGURE 5A-15

Entries to residential units with small setbacks are raised two to four (2-4) feet above the sidewalk grade to provide privacy for residents.

FIGURE 5A-16

(Ord. 6517 §20, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995)

18.05A.060 Site design –Fences and walls adjacent to pedestrian scale streets

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Design the site to minimize the need for fences and walls which inhibit or discourage pedestrian use of sidewalks or paths, isolate neighborhoods, or separate neighborhoods from main roads. Allow exceptions where necessary to reduce noise, provide buffers or create private yards. (UV, NV, COSC, NC, UC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Front and side yards which abut a street should be visually open to the street. (UV, NV, COSC, NC, UC)

2.    Where a fence, wall or landscaped area separates a sidewalk from a building or one development from another, pedestrian breaks and/or crossings should be placed at regular intervals. (UV, NV, COSC, NC, UC)

3.    Where fences or walls are necessary to reduce noise, provide buffers, or create private yards, consider the guidelines below to maintain a pedestrian scale along the street: (UV, NV, COSC, NC, UC)

a.    Provide art (mosaic, mural decorative masonry pattern, sculpture, relief, etc.) over a substantial portion of the blank wall surface. (UV, NV, COSC, NC, UC)

b.    Employ small setbacks, indentations, stepped fence heights, or other means of breaking up the wall or fence surface and height. (UV, NV, COSC, NC, UC)

c.    Employ different texture, colors, or materials (including landscape materials) to break up the wall’s surface. (UV, NV, COSC, NC, UC)

d.    Provide special lighting, a canopy, awning, horizontal trellis or other pedestrian oriented feature that breaks up the size of the blank wall’s surface and adds visual interest. (UV, NV, COSC, NC, UC)

e.    If fencing is required, repeat the use of facade building materials on fence columns and/or stringers. (UV, NV, COSC, NC, UC)

Alternative to solid, or blank-looking fence.

FIGURE 5A-17

FIGURE 5A-18

(Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.070 Building design –Commercial and mixed use

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Maintain interest at the street level in buildings which abut the street by orienting active uses (such as retail storefront window displays or restaurants) to the street and center park where possible. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Commercial and mixed use buildings shall appear to create a pedestrian shopping street with a clearly defined street edge and clearly defined entries. The rear of these buildings shall be designed so that they are approachable from rear yard parking where necessary and are not obtrusive to adjacent neighbors. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Buildings shall avoid long, monotonous uninterrupted walls or roof planes. Buildings shall use articulation and/or modulation on all walls that are visible to pedestrians. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Buildings occupying corners shall be designed as more dramatic structures to emphasize their prominent locations. (UV, NV, COSC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Building materials and colors may include any of the following:

a.    Masonry, wood, stucco, concrete, stone, and tile, each broken into small modules. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Accent or trim colors are encouraged. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

These elements help to create an active street that is human scale and attractive to pedestrians.

FIGURE 5A-19

2.    Building elements should employ:

a.    Vertical and horizontal relief in the facade that identifies a bottom, middle and top of the building. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    A clearly defined pedestrian entry facing the street. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Window systems grouped together to form larger areas of glass separated by moldings or jambs. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

d.    Awnings, canopies, marquees, building overhangs, or similar form of pedestrian weather protection at least four and one half (41/2) feet wide provided along at least eighty (80) percent of the frontage of buildings which abut a pedestrian street. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Building Proportions - Size, Height and Bulk

a.    Use design techniques that minimize the apparent size of the building such as:

i.    Building stepbacks on upper levels, (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

ii.    Curved or articulated surfaces, (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

iii.    Recessed entries, (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

iv.    Roof lines, pitches and shapes, (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

v.    Cornices, (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

vi.    Bldg. ornamentation, (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

vii.    Overhangs & soffits, (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

viii.    Dormers, balconies and porches that clearly define street facing entries to residential properties, (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

ix.    Building fenestration and detailing (store front or multi-paned windows for residential units), and (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

x.    Awnings and marquees. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Buildings on corner lots may be designed with additional height and architectural embellishments such as corner towers to emphasize their location. (See Figure 5A-21.)(UV, NV, COSC)

Align the bottom edge of awnings, canopies or marquees when appropriate on a group of buildings so that the unity of the store front line is maintained with adjacent buildings.

FIGURE 5A-20

Corner buildings should be designed as more dramatic structures to emphasize their prominent location.

Traditional style building with a clearly defined bottom, middle and top.

FIGURE 5A-21

Modern style building with a bottom, middle, and a top cornice detail. Use of a variety of materials helps to add interest to the building facade.

FIGURE 5A-22

4.    Exterior Wall Treatments

a.    Provide frequent views and access into interior activities of office and commercial buildings from the street. For example, use a high proportion of clear glass at the street level or have displays or services directly available from the street where appropriate. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    In mixed use buildings, the difference between ground floor commercial uses and entrances for upper level commercial or apartment uses should be reflected by differences in facade treatment. Differentiation can be achieved through distinct but compatible exterior materials, signs, awnings and exterior lighting. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    One or more of the following wall treatments should be required for building faces fronting on a sidewalk. In total, such wall treatments should cover or comprise at least sixty (60) percent of the building face between two (2) and eight (8) feet in elevation above the sidewalk. Except as provided for in (d), wall segments without such treatments should not exceed thirty (30) feet in length: (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

i.    Clear or lightly tinted windows which are transparent when viewed from the sidewalk; (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

ii.    Ornamental and structural architectural details, a mosaic, decorative masonry or tile, surface texture, relief art work, sculpture or murals; (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

iii.    Climbing plants, vines, trees, or other vegetation; or (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

iv.    A pedestrian area located along the southern, eastern, or western exposure of a building face at a transit stop, intersection corner, or other location identified in an adopted streetscape plan may substitute for the wall treatments listed above. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Ground floor commercial uses should be differentiated by the facade treatment.

FIGURE 5A-23

(Ord. 6517 §21, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.080 Building design –Creation of human scale

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Use design elements that result in buildings with a perceived size that maintains a human scale street that is comfortable for pedestrians and attractive to them. See Figure 5A-43 and Figure 5A-44. These techniques are also useful when commercial buildings abut residential development. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Use rooflines to maintain apparent scale and reinforce or create architectural character on a street. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Use architectural features such as cornices or other details that lower the apparent height. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Use modulation (stepping back and stepping forward) and articulation on building facades to reduce the bulk of buildings. (Figure 5A-24)(UV, NV, COSC, NC) Articulation methods include:

a.    Broken rooflines

b.    Building elements such as balconies, chimneys, porches or other entry details, and landscaping.

4.    Place display windows and retail shops at the street level around the exterior of larger buildings. (UV, NV, COSC)

This building is articulated into intervals. Articulation methods include modulation, broken rooflines, buildings elements (chimneys, entries, etc.) and landscaping.

FIGURE 5A-24

Rooflines can reinforce the architectural character of a street.

Architectural features like cornices can relate to adjacent buildings, lowering the apparent, conflicting height of a building.

FIGURE 5A-25

Sometimes an area has a number of buildings that feature a distinctive architectural concept or style. In these cases, using that organizational concept can achieve compatibility at a deeper level.

FIGURE 5A-26

(Ord. 6517 §22, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.090 Building design –Building wall finishes for stand alone and corner site buildings

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Ensure buildings have consistent visual identity from all sides visible to the general public. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Continue exterior materials, architectural detailing, and color scheme around all sides of the building visible to the general public. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

a.    Avoid having building fronts or backs which do not look related to the remainder of the building where more than one wall plane can be viewed at the same time. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

FIGURE 5A-27

(Ord. 6517 §23, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.095 Building design –Drive-through facilities

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT 1: Locate the main pedestrian entry towards the pedestrian-oriented street. Orient drive-through facilities in a way that makes minimal disruption on the street edge. See also Section 18.05.060(A) Use Standards. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

REQUIREMENT 2: Locate the drive-through facility on the side or behind the building as viewed from the street. Drive-through facilities shall not be located between the building and the street frontage, nor between the primary parking and building entry unless the proposed drive-through location provides equivalent or better pedestrian access to the building. For all drive-through facilities, uninterrupted pedestrian access to the main building entry shall be provided.

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Design the drive-through window so that it is clearly subordinate to the main building. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Where the drive-through is a separate structure, use architectural details that conform to those used on the main building. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Minimize curb cuts and the disruption of a sidewalk by:

a.    Making the width of the lane approaching the window as narrow as possible, and

b.    Using landscaping and planters to provide a street edge adjacent to the sidewalk. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

(Ord. 7061 §5, 2017; Ord. 6517 §24, 2007; Ord. 5714 §11, 1997; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.100 Landscape design for villages, commercial and mixed use areas

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Treat plantings and other landscape elements as enhancements to the more dominant built environment. Street trees shall be planted along each side of all streets. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Employ any of the following planting techniques for landscape design:

a.    Small planting areas with flowering shrubs. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Trimmed hedges, window boxes, hanging flower baskets. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Use of shrubs or vines trained to grow upright on wires or trellises (espaliers) next to blank walls with narrow planting areas. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

d.    Isolated trees installed in pavement cutouts. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

e.    Street trees should be massed at critical points such as at focal points along a curve in a roadway. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

f.    Low maintenance, low chemical dependent drought-tolerant plant materials should be used. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

g.    Repeat similar tree and shrub types to coordinate old and new phases of development and provide visual continuity. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

h.    Limit varieties of plant types, use shrubs in multiples of similar types, and avoid a haphazard mixture of textures, colors and plant types. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

i.    Include a well landscaped surface stormwater treatment area in the landscape design where surface stormwater treatment is provided. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

j.    Retain natural greenbelt vegetation that contributes to greenbelt preservation. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

k.    The owner should provide regular maintenance to ensure that plant materials are kept healthy and that dead or dying plant materials are replaced (see Landscaping and Screening Chapter of the Olympia Unified Development Code 18.36). (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

l.    Landscape open areas created by building modulation. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

m.    Incorporate upper story planter boxes or roof plants into facades that can be seen by pedestrians. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

n.    Emphasize entries with special planting in conjunction with decorative paving and/or lighting. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

FIGURE 5A-28

(Ord. 6517 §25, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.110 Landscape design –Screening

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Use landscaping to help define, break up and screen parking areas. Landscaping shall provide a separation between incompatible land uses or activities (such as a parking lot next to the bedrooms of a residential structure). Landscaping shall provide a physical or visual barrier for service areas, mechanical equipment, loading docks or similar areas. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Canopy trees (able to spread and shade) should be added to parking areas - there should be no more than six (6) parking spaces in a row without a landscape peninsula within the parking area having a two (2) inch caliper tree, shrubs, and ground covers. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Wheel stops, curbs, or walkways should be used to protect landscaping from being run over by vehicles in the parking lot. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Screening can be provided by hedges, densely planted shrubs, evergreen trees, or combinations of these. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

4.    Screen parking from the street with low walls or fencing that maintain building facades, but also maintain vehicular sight lines at the corners and security for customers. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

5.    If fencing is required, repeat the use of facade building materials on fence columns and/or stringers. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

6.    Berms, walls and fences are encouraged in combination with trees, shrubs and vines to screen parking lots. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

7.    Raised planter boxes of concrete, stone, wood, brick or other compatible materials can provide useful separation and screening. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

8.    Locate appropriate landscape materials near building walls or service areas where screening is needed. Large planters may be used as alternative solutions. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

9.    Planters may be placed at the end of bays, on the interior or between rows of parking stalls, providing linear strips for plantings. Use of compact parking spaces as allowed provides some flexibility in design. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

10.    Unrelieved blank walls with narrow planting areas can be softened with espaliered shrubs or vines. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Vines, hardy shrubs and columnar trees used to landscape a narrow planting bed.

FIGURE 5A-29

FIGURE 5A-30

FIGURE 5A-31

(Ord. 6517 §26, 2007; Ord. 5661§4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.120 Landscape design –Existing trees

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Healthy existing trees, that are appropriate to the site at their mature size, shall be incorporated into the landscaping whenever possible where they are unique because of size, species, historical association or other factors and are appropriate to the site at their mature size. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Retain healthy mature trees where possible. (See also the Olympia Tree Protection and Replacement Chapter OMC 16.60). (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Design the site to preserve unique specimens. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Minimize site alteration, soil disturbance, and compaction within the drip line of existing trees. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

4.    Provide a tree well or other form of protection where the surrounding grade must be raised. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

5.    Fence around drip line during construction. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

6.    Incorporate the tree plan into the landscape plan. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

FIGURE 5A-32

(Ord. 6517 §27, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.130 Signs –Attached to the building

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Provide adequate signs for businesses while maintaining the building’s architectural integrity, by locating signs so that building details shall not be covered or obscured. (UV, NV, COSC, NC). Signs will conform to the Olympia Zoning Ordinance Sign Code (OMC Chapter 18.42, Signs).

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Use sign panel shapes that accentuate the building’s architectural forms. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Use window signs where wall signs would detract from architectural elements of the building facade. Symbols for the business such as a pair of eyeglasses can be used to add detail that can be viewed from the sidewalk. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Keep signs subordinate to the building design. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

4.    Coordinate colors with the colors of the building. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

5.    When several businesses share the same building, use directory signs where possible and use similar sizes and types of signs. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

6.    Addresses must be clearly visible from the street edge, in accordance with OMC Section 12.48.120C. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Examples of preferred ways to attach signs to building.

FIGURE 5A-33

FIGURE 5A-34

(Ord. 6517 §28, 2007; Ord. 6093 §23, 2001; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.140 Signs –Freestanding

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Provide adequate signage for businesses when building mounted signs cannot be used because they will obscure the architectural details of the building. (UV, NV, COSC, NC). Signs will conform to the Olympia Zoning Ordinance Sign Code (OMC Chapter 18.42, Signs).

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    A key design feature should be a compact building pattern with buildings located close to and behind the sidewalks and street trees separating the sidewalk from moving vehicles. In an effort to reduce the number of view obstructions in villages or centers, signs should be attached to the building. However, where buildings are set back from the sidewalk and/or property line, freestanding signs would be an appropriate second choice using the following guidelines:

a.    Freestanding signs should be limited in size and height. The maximum height should be four (4) feet above grade. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    For visual clarity, the lettering style and colors should be limited to two (2) lettering styles and three colors. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Incorporate signs in planters or as screening walls. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

FIGURE 5A-35

(Ord. 6517 §29, 2007; Ord. 6093 §24, 2001; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.150 Site design –Orientation

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Design multifamily projects to be oriented to the center park, green, or plaza or to other streets in the village or center. (See Figure 5A-36.) (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Use a modified street grid system with most buildings fronting on a street. (UV, NV, COSC)

a.    Parking areas should be located behind or under buildings and accessed from alley-type driveways. If driveway access from streets is necessary, minimum width driveways meeting the Fire Access Standards should be used. (UV, NV, COSC)

b.    Each building should have direct pedestrian access from the street fronting the building and from the back where the parking is located. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Another alternative may be to orient the buildings into U-shaped courtyards where the front door/main entry into the building is from a front courtyard. Access to the courtyard from the rear parking area should be through a well lighted breezeway or stairway. This alternative will work where projects abut an arterial or major collector street where the quality of living could be enhanced with buildings facing into the courtyard. The buildings would still be located between the street and the parking lot. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Examples of preferred site planning which creates usable open space, adding value and identity to the complex, by siting parking behind or to the side of the buildings.

FIGURE 5A-36

(Ord. 6517 §30, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.160 Site design –Parking location and design

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Minimize the impact of driveways and parking lots on pedestrians and neighboring properties by designing and locating parking lots, carports, and garages in a way that creates few interruptions on the street, sidewalk or building facade. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Locate surface parking at rear or side of lot; (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Break large parking lots into small ones; (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Minimize the number and width of driveways and curb cuts; (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

4.    Share driveways with adjacent property owners; (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

5.    Locate parking in areas that are less visible from the street; (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

6.    Locate driveways so they are visually less dominant; and (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

7.    Berm and landscape parking lots when they are visible from the street. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

8.    Screen parking lots abutting single family residences with landscaping and/or fencing. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

9.    Limit parking lots on street frontages to thirty (30) percent of the street frontage. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

(Ord. 6517 §31, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.170 Site design –Mailboxes, site lighting and bus stops

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Provide adequate lighting and pedestrian access to mailboxes, and bus stops. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Mail Boxes. If common mailbox services are used, they should be located near the project entry or near any recreational facilities. The architectural character should be similar in form, materials, and colors to the surrounding buildings. Mail boxes should be well lighted and pedestrian accessible. Mailboxes and their locations must be approved by the U.S. Postal Service. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Site Lighting

a.    Site lighting should be provided throughout and should be pedestrian scale low level lighting located at the walkways. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Security lighting should be provided in the parking areas, play areas and at bus stops. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Lighting should not shine into the dwelling units on the site. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

d.    Lighting should be directed away from neighboring development. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

(Ord. 6517 §32, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.180 Site Design –Screening

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Provide adequate screening for support facility needs associated with multifamily developments. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE: Support areas should be located adjacent to parking areas and should be fully screened with a minimum six (6) foot high fence. The screening material should match the main buildings and the perimeters be planted with shrubs and ornamental trees. (See Landscaping and Screening Chapter of the Olympia Zoning Code 18.36.) (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Service elements located away from the street edge and not generally visible from the sidewalk.

FIGURE 5A-37

(Ord. 6517 §33, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.190 Building design –Neighborhood scale

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Architectural scale of those portions of a multifamily building facing a neighborhood with a different scale shall use design techniques that minimize the difference in scale. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Use house size building elements when locating a multifamily project adjacent to a single family neighborhood by employing any of the following techniques:

a.    Place one (1) and two (2) story units adjacent to existing one story houses, and two (2) and three (3) story units adjacent to existing two (2) story houses. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Use wall plane articulation/modulation to break a multifamily building into house size building elements, especially where there is a building height transition. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Design the exterior of multifamily buildings to appear as a single building, such as a large single family detached dwelling. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

At zone transitions, special care should be taken to reflect the articulation intervals of adjacent development.

Good use of articulation could result in a form like this.

This higher density multifamily building "steps back" to conform to the abutting lower density property. This use of modulation helps the multifamily building fit into the neighborhood. In Olympia, the multifamily building would be restricted to three (3) stories, since it is within one hundred (100) feet of a residential zone.

FIGURE 5A-38

FIGURE 5A-39

(Ord. 6517 §34, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.200 Building design –Privacy

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Orient buildings to provide for privacy, to the extent practical, both within the multifamily project and for the neighborhood. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Locate windows so that residents from one unit cannot look directly into another unit. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Locate parking lots so that they do not impose on the ground floor units’ privacy. If this is not feasible, locate buildings so that adequate landscaping can be planted to provide privacy. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Reducing windows and decks overlooking neighboring residential property or increasing side setbacks can increase privacy.

FIGURE 5A-40

This apartment located in the entry court adjacent to the neighboring residence and arranged interior spaces so the views into the neighboring properties were minimized.

FIGURE 5A-41

(Ord. 6517 §35, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.210 Building design –Facade, footprint and roof articulation

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Avoid the barracks-like quality of flat walls and roofs by separations, changes in plane and height, and the inclusion of elements such as balconies, porches, arcades, dormers, and cross gables. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Buildings should be divided and given human scale by using articulation and/or modulation at least every thirty (30) feet. (See Figure 5A-24 and 5A-43.) Ways to do this include:

a.    Facade modulation - stepping back or extending forward a portion of the facade at least six (6) feet (measured perpendicular to the front facade), for each interval. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Articulating each interval with architectural elements like porches, balconies, bay windows and/or covered entries. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

c.    Articulating the roof line by stepping the roof and by emphasizing dormers, chimneys, gables. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

d.    Providing a ground or wall mounted light fixture, a trellis, a tree, or other site feature within each interval. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Reduce the apparent size of multifamily buildings by using:

a.    Roof design that employs

i.    gable, gambrel or hipped roof,

ii.    broken or articulated roof line,

iii.    prominent cornice or fascia that emphasizes the top of the building, or

iv.    other roof element that emphasizes a building’s concept and helps it to fit in with neighboring structures with prominent roofs. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Using architectural details that are well proportioned to achieve human scale such as:

i.    entry details like covered porches and recesses;

ii.    occupiable spaces like bay windows and balconies;

iii.    window details like vertically proportioned window openings which are recessed into the face of the building and broken up with smaller panes of glass;

iv.    roof details like brackets, chimneys, roof overhangs of at least 16" (measured horizontally), or roof cornice elements at least 12" in width (measured vertically);

v.    windows which are trimmed to create relief in the facade by being detailed to appear to recede into the building face. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Where parking structures or covered parking faces the street at least 60 percent of the parking facade facing the street between two (2) and eight (8) feet above the sidewalk shall incorporate at least one of the treatments listed: (UV, NV, COSC)

a.    transparent windows (with clear or lightly tinted glass) where pedestrian-oriented businesses are located along the facade of the parking structure,

b.    display windows,

c.    decorative metal grille work or similar detailing which provides texture and covers the parking structure opening,

d.    art or architectural treatment such as sculpture, mosaic, glass block, opaque art glass, relief art work, or similar features, or

e.    vertical trellis or other landscaping or pedestrian plaza area.

4.    Vehicle entries to garages should be recessed at least six (6) feet from the primary facade plane in order to minimize their prominence. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Three attached units appear as one large custom home.

Articulated facade gives appearance of a collection of smaller structures.

FIGURE 5A-42

Covered entries, like porches help achieve human scale. Human scale is derived from a building’s architectural details and elements whose size people are familiar with.

Vertically proportioned divided windows help achieve human scale. Bay windows which protrude from the building wall and windows detailed to appear to recede into the building face help to reduce the apparent size of buildings and break up blank walls.

FIGURE 5A-43

Window details are important to give a sense of human scale.

Building details which can reinforce the articulation interval.

FIGURE 5A-44

Modulation of the principal building facade adds interest to a long building.

These two (2) projects point out the importance of architectural elements. They are essentially the same building except that the project below employs varied rooflines, window details, facade articulation, a trellis, chimneys, entry details and other features to add interest and a greater sense of quality.

FIGURE 5A-45

(Ord. 6517 §36, 2007; Ord. 5967 §10, 1999; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.220 Building design –Entries

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Provide clearly defined building or courtyard entries which face the street, are well lighted, easily accessible, and satisfy the Washington State Barrier Free Regulations. (UV, NW, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE: The entrances should be plainly visible from the fronting street and walkway. The use of distinctive architectural elements and materials to denote prominent entrances will be encouraged. The entries should include a transition space from the sidewalks such as steps, a terrace, or a landscaped area. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Dark, hidden corridors or stairways and long entry balconies are discouraged. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Avoid the use of exterior stairways when porches and front doors can be used as a primary building entry. If exterior stairways are used, they should be simple, clean, bold projections of stairways to fit with the architectural massing and form of the multifamily structure. Thin-looking, open metal, prefabricated stairs are discouraged. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

The entries along this street are accented by portals, grand staircases and balconies.

The design of the street front determines the amount of resident’s privacy and security.

FIGURE 5A-46

Where the setback from the sidewalk is small, raising the floor level up above the sidewalk and/or providing a planting bed can provide a transition.

Low walls, fences and iron gates can enclose private open space while still allowing social interaction.

FIGURE 5A-47

Lack of clear entries on the street can create an unfriendly streetscape.

Clear entries to the sidewalk encourage pedestrian circulation.

FIGURE 5A-48

(Ord. 6517 §37, 2007; Ord. 5967 §11, 1999; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.225 Building design - Windows

A.    REQUIREMENT: Provide relief, detail, and variation on the facade by employing well-proportioned openings (as defined in Guideline #1 below) that are designed to create shade and shadow detail. Use high-quality window products that contribute to the richness and detail of the facade.

B.    GUIDELINE: Provide horizontal and vertical variation in windows. Bay and projecting windows are encouraged.

1.    Use vertically proportioned windows. Vertically proportioned windows will generally have a height one and one-half times their width.

2.    Use multiple paned windows.

3.    Build windows either recessed or protruding (such as bay windows).

4.    Use significant trim (drip cap, sill, trim).

5.    Provide ground floor windows that have a greater vertical height than upper story windows.

(Ord. 5967 §12, 1999).

18.05A.230 Building design –Materials and colors

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Use exterior building materials that have texture or pattern, which are of human scale, or lend themselves to a high level of quality and detailing. Use subdued colors, especially on large walls or buildings. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    The selection and use of exterior materials and colors are key ingredients in determining how a building will look. Some materials, by their nature, can give a sense of permanence or can provide texture or human scale that helps new buildings fit better in their surroundings. (UV, NV, COSC, NC). Provide exterior materials which are durable, easily maintainable and that are attractive even when viewed up close.

2.    Preferred materials in Olympia include:

a.    Clear/painted horizontal or lap siding

b.    Shingles

c.    Brick

d.    Stone

e.    Stucco

f.    Stucco-like exterior insulation finish systems, used in small modules

g.    Ceramic or terra cotta tile

3.    Bright or intense colors should be reserved for accent or trim. Colors should be chosen to visually reduce the size of buildings that are larger than others in the neighborhood. Changes in wall colors should differentiate the ground floor from the upper floors.

4.    Changes in materials on larger buildings should be coordinated with articulation and modulation within the building’s architecture. Changes in the building materials should also be used to differentiate the ground floor from upper floors of the building and should vary from building to building in multi-building projects. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

(Ord. 6517 §38, 2007; Ord. 5967 §13, 1999; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.240 Signs

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Minimize the amount of signage needed to identify the multifamily development. (UV, NV, COSC, NC). Signs will conform to the Olympia Zoning Ordinance Sign Code (OMC Chapter 18.42, Signs).

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Multifamily projects should have a sign at each entry from the street to identify the project. The sign should also include the street address. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Internal directional signs showing the building locations and building numbers are encouraged. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Each building will have clearly displayed street numbers, building numbers, and building name, if applicable (in accordance with OMC 12.48.120(c) &(d)).

Choose materials for the signs which are used in the architectural details of the buildings. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Figure 5A-49

(Ord. 6517 §39, 2007; Ord. 6093 §25, 2001; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.250 Duplex, triplex, etc.-Applicability

Design Guidelines for Duplexes, Triplexes, Etc. apply to duplexes, triplexes, fourplexes, high density single family, including designated manufactured housing (6 units/acre or higher), townhouse projects of 4 units or less and cottage housing.

(Ord. 6581 §6, 2008; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.260 Building design –Roof form and architectural detail

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Design residences to reinforce the architectural character of the village or center. In neighborhood centers or in a community oriented shopping center, create architectural character that respects adjoining properties. UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Create architectural character in the village or centers through the use of:

a.    Roof design. Pitched or articulated roof line, or other roof elements such as eyebrow roof forms or dormers that emphasize building form and help it to fit in with neighboring structures with prominent roofs. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

b.    Architectural details that are well proportioned to achieve good human scale such as: (a) entry details like porches and recesses, (b) occupiable spaces like bay windows and balconies, (c) window details like vertically proportioned window openings which are recessed into the face of the building and broken up with smaller panes of glass, (d) roof details like brackets, chimneys, roof overhangs of at least sixteen (16) inches (measured horizontally), (e) windows which create relief in the facade by being detailed to appear to recede into the building face. (UV, NV, COSC)

Achieving variety on a residential street when units are built at the same time requires the use of some variety in setback, articulated facades, and the use of varied roof design and other architectural details. Achieving diversity of character should not rely solely on subtle changes in color, material or detailing.

On narrow lots, use of stepbacks and varied roof forms can help a tall skinny building fit in with its neighbors.

FIGURE 5A-50

(Ord. 6517 §40, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.270 Building design –Entries

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Provide clearly defined building entries or entry courtyards which face the street, are well lighted, and easily accessible. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    The entries should include a transition space from the sidewalks such as steps, a covered porch, a terrace, or a landscaped area. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Entries should include at a minimum eave overhangs extending at least 16 inches (measured horizontally) and covered porches. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Avoid the use of exterior stairways when porches and front doors can be used as a primary building entry. If exterior stairways are used, they should be simple, clean, bold projections of stairways to fit with the architectural massing and form of the multifamily structure. Thin-looking, open metal, prefabricated stairs and railings are discouraged. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

Covered entries, like porches need to be of substantial materials.

FIGURE 5A-51

Rooflines can reinforce the architectural character of a street.

FIGURE 5A-52

(Ord. 6517 §41, 2007; Ord. 5967 §14, 1999; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.280 Building design –Garage design

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Design garages and carports in a way that does not dominate the dwelling’s front facade. If an alley exists, the garage or carport shall be located off the alley. Otherwise, garages and carports shall be located behind the residence with or without a partial view from the street, or stepped back from the facade of the building, or located below sidewalk grade. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    The entrance to a residence should be plainly visible from the fronting street and the walkway and should not be dominated by a garage or carport. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Driveways should be as narrow as possible and shared where possible to minimize disruption of the sidewalk and planting strip by curb cuts. The use of wheel tracks or a grass/concrete porous pavement system is encouraged. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Garage sidewalls that face the street (e.g., as a result of garages being aligned at an angle or perpendicular with the house - see illustration f. below) should appear to contain habitable space. This can be accomplished by incorporating windows and other design elements into the garage wall that are in character with the remainder of the dwelling. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

A Variety of Garage Placements

FIGURE 5A-53

(Ord. 6517 §42, 2007; Ord. 5967 §15, 1999; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.290 Building design –Materials and colors

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: To use building materials on exteriors which are durable, easy to maintain, are of human scale and that are attractive even when viewed up close. These include materials that have texture, pattern, or lend themselves to a high level of quality and detailing. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Preferred materials typical to Olympia that could be used in a village, neighborhood center or community oriented shopping center include: (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

a.    Clear/painted/stained horizontal lap siding

b.    Shingles

c.    Brick

d.    Stone

e.    Stucco

f.    Stucco-like exterior insulation finish systems, used in small modules

g.    Ceramic or terra cotta tile

2.    Preferred roofing materials include: composition or wood shake shingles, standing seam non-glare metal, or tile. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    In multi-building projects materials and colors should be varied from structure to structure to provide variety and interest to the streetscape. Bright or intense colors should be reserved for accent or trim. Colors should be chosen to visually reduce the size of buildings that are larger than others in the neighborhood. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

(Ord. 6517 §43, 2007; Ord. 5967 §16, 1999; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.300 Site and building design –Privacy

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: To the extent practical, maintain privacy of adjoining residences, and the primary residence. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Use a combination of landscape screening, fencing and window and door placement so that ADU residents cannot look directly into the windows, porches and decks of adjoining residences. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

(Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.310 Building design –Entry features

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Provide a clearly defined building entry, which is well lighted, easily accessible and integral to the building structure. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Entries should be plainly visible from the fronting street sidewalk. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    If the entry cannot be seen from the fronting street sidewalk, a well defined walkway (e.g., constructed of contrasting materials or lined with a pattern of shrubbery) should be used to "lead" the visitor to the entry of the ADU. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    Where an ADU is added within an existing primary residence, entry may be off an existing foyer. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

4.    Where there is a separate entry, an identifying feature, such as a portico, porch, stoop and/or eave overhang or a similar entry structure shall be constructed that is designed to be integral to the structure. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

5.    Walkways, entry porches, or stairways which are dark or hidden are to be avoided. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

6.    Where an exterior stairway to the main entrance to the ADU is needed or a porch, portico, or eave overhang constructed, it should be constructed of wood, or the most common material used in the construction of the primary residence. Thin looking, open metal, prefabricated stairs are discouraged. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

(Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.320 Building design –Materials and colors

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Ensure that ADUs conform to the design theme of the village or center, and contribute to the livability of the neighborhood. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Use a roof form and roof pitch, and window and door form and arrangement that looks like the primary residence. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

2.    Use the same exterior materials (roof, siding, and trim) and a color that matches the primary residence. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

3.    In general, the roof ridge of the primary residence should be higher than the ADU. An obvious exception is when the ADU is built onto the second story of an existing unit. (UV, NV, COSC, NC)

(Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).

18.05A.330 Site design –Cottage housing

LEGEND

UV = Urban Village

COSC = Community Oriented Shopping Center

NV = Neighborhood Village

NC = Neighborhood Center

A.    REQUIREMENT: Design cottage housing to use shared off street parking, orienting the cottages to the street edge and to the shared interior courtyard. (UV, NV, COSC)

B.    GUIDELINE:

1.    Entryways should be oriented to the public street, with secondary entries oriented to the shared courtyard. (UV, NV, COSC)

2.    Parking should be shared and accessed off an alley or secondary street wherever possible. (UV, NV, COSC)

3.    The width of the driveway curb cut entry to the parking areas should be minimized to prevent as much pedestrian/sidewalk disruption as possible. (UV, NV, COSC)

4.    Provide pedestrian connections from the interior courtyard to the shared parking area and to the street and sidewalk. (UV, NV, COSC)

Cottage Housing

FIGURE 5A-54

(Ord. 6517 §44, 2007; Ord. 5661 §4, 1996; Ord. 5517 §1, 1995).