Chapter 9 Implementing the Plan

The Plan is organized around seven Goals, with one to three Objectives identified for each. The Goals respond to the question, "What do we hope to achieve in the long term?" Objectives answer "What will we do to achieve these Goals within a shorter time frame?" Strategies answer the question "How will we go about accomplishing our Objectives?"

These Objectives and Strategies do not encompass the entire range of wastewater responsibilities and day-to-day work. Rather, they focus on the challenges that are in the forefront of Utility and community needs.

This chapter emphasizes the specific Strategies, elaborating on how we are currently implementing them, or how we intend to implement them within the six-year context of this Plan. Many of the Plan’s associated financial and capital components have a 20-year perspective.

The Goals are:

1. Water Quality - Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act standards for nitrogen, fecal coliform and other constituents of concern in groundwater and surface water are met.

2. Public Health - No one is exposed to sewer overflows and excessive odors.

3. Water Use - Potable water use and greywater flows into the sewer collection system are minimized.

4. Energy - The Utility is more energy efficient and uses cleaner energy sources.

5. Rates and Fees - Utility rates and fees are equitable and affordable, minimizing rate increases while maintaining consistent levels of service.

6. Integrated Water Resources - Water resource utilities are planning together for long-term environmental, economic and social changes.

7. Information - Customers and community are informed about and involved in wastewater management activities.

At the end of the chapter, Table 9.2 summarizes the 33 Strategies of this Plan. For each strategy, the table indicates relative priority and whether or not we are currently implementing it.

Goals and Objectives are summarized in Table 9.1, showing how they respond to the Challenges described in Chapter 8, and to the Comprehensive Plan vision summarized in its draft Goal GU2:

Reliable [utility] service is provided at the lowest reasonable cost, consistent with the City’s aims of environmental stewardship, social equity, economic development and the protection of public health.

At the end of the chapter, Table 9.2 summarizes the 33 Strategies of this Plan. For each strategy, the table indicates relative priority and whether or not we are currently implementing it.

Table 9.1

Relationships between the Comprehensive Plan and Wastewater Plan

Wastewater Challenge

Comprehensive Plan Mandate

Wastewater Goal

Wastewater Objective

1.

Existing infrastructure

Public health

Environmental stewardship

1. Water quality

2. Public health

1A-Eliminate illicit discharges

1B-Manage OSS

2A-Reduce overflows

2B-Reduce odors

2C-Manage assets

2.

Onsite sewage systems

Public health

Environment stewardship

1. Water quality

1B-Manage OSS

1C-Encourage OSS Conversions

3.

Extending sewers to new development

Economic development

5. Water quality

1D-Facilitate orderly expansion of sewers

4.

Sea level rise

Economic development

6. Integrated water resources

6A-Integrate water resource activities

5.

Use of drinking water resources

Environmental stewardship

3. Water use

3A-Reduce water use

6.

Use of energy resources

Environmental stewardship

4. Energy

4A-Reduce energy use

4B- Replace generators

7.

Overlapping agency responsibilities

Environmental stewardship

2. Public health

6. Integrated water resources

2A-Reduce overflows

6A-Integrate water resource activities

8.

Equitable and predictable rates and fees

Social equity

Economic development

1. Water quality

3. Water use

5. Rates and fees

1A-Manage OSS

3A-Reduce water use

5A-Coordinate management of water resource utilities

5B- Manage rates and fees

9.

Public education and involvement

Social equity

7. Information

7A-Provide adequate staff and resources

9.1 Water Quality

GO1

Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act standards for nitrogen, fecal coliform and other constituents of concern in groundwater and surface water are met.

Protecting and improving local waters is a core responsibility of the Wastewater Utility. This responsibility necessitates the management of existing as well as future sewer systems. Problematic discharges of wastewater-related contaminants often occur over many years. These include discharges from illicit connections and onsite sewage systems (OSS). Meanwhile, future sewer extensions need to accommodate both new development and OSS conversions. The following objectives and strategies are aimed at reducing wastewater-related contaminants in receiving waters while encouraging urban development and re-development.

Objective 1A Identify and eliminate at least two illicit discharges of wastewater into stormwater conveyance pipes and receiving waters each year.

Strategy 1A1 In partnership with the City’s Storm and Surface Water Utility, detect and eliminate illicit discharges using water quality testing, GIS analysis, remote video inspection and funding assistance.

Nutrient and bacteria loading from cross connections of sewer pipes with stormwater pipes is a point source that can be identified and eliminated. The associated reductions in wastewater-related contaminants can be measured in terms of the volume of wastewater removed from Budd Inlet and its tributaries. For example, based on industry research, residences generate approximately 21 pounds of wastewater-related nitrogen per year.

In this strategy we will use water quality sampling of stormwater outfalls in concert with GIS land use and infrastructure analysis to efficiently and thoroughly locate cross connections between sewer and stormwater pipes. Further field investigations that incorporate dye testing, smoke testing, and televising of pipe systems will identify specific problems. Work to improve utility mapping is ongoing. Operations and Maintenance staff provide key services in accomplishing this work.

The City’s Wastewater and Storm & Surface Water Utilities have been coordinating this work since 2011, in order to meet requirements established by their respective NPDES permits.

Objective 1B Manage existing and potential new OSS so there is no net annual increase in the total number of OSS in Olympia’s sewer service area.

Strategy 1B1 Refine regulations regarding new OSS and repairs of existing OSS in order to accommodate the limited use of new OSS systems in appropriate circumstances.

Under the 2007 Wastewater Management Plan, the City established restrictive regulations on where a new OSS could be permitted and where limited repairs to an existing OSS would be allowed. Based on recent OSS and water quality information, staff recommends revising these regulations to allow for new OSS if some specific conditions are met.

Proposed permitting criteria would consider (1) the extent of current OSS use in the vicinity of the proposed new OSS; (2) the degree to which the existing right-of-way between proposed new OSS and existing public sewer is developed; (3) whether or not the proposed OSS is to be located in an infill lot; and (4) the surface and ground water risk of existing OSS in the vicinity of the proposed OSS as evaluated by Thurston County Environmental Health Department (See Section 4.2).

These revised OSS regulations will be developed within 18 months of Plan adoption and potentially adopted as revisions to the Olympia Municipal Code.

Objective 1C Encourage OSS conversions through the Septic to Sewer Program.

The Olympia City Council approved revisions to the municipal code establishing the Septic to Sewer program, effective August 17, 2009. This voluntary program provides technical assistance and financial incentives for residential connection of onsite systems to sanitary sewer as well as cost recovery mechanisms for the City.

Under the program, the City waives the sewer general facility charge (GFC) if a resident using OSS makes a connection to the sewer system within two years of being notified of the sewer’s availability.

The Utility has funding available to construct a limited number of neighborhood sewer extension projects. Property owners who choose to connect under the Septic to Sewer Program are required to reimburse the City some portion of the cost of constructing the sewer infrastructure. In selected neighborhoods, the City provides (1) a fixed construction cost to help property owners prepare financing; (2) a payment plan ($200 per month) for properties that connect to the sewers; and (3) Utility subsidy for half of the construction costs over $20,000.

Neighborhood sewer extension projects are selected based on established criteria and City Council approval.

Strategy 1C1 Provide Utility funding for sewer extensions associated with individual OSS conversions.

This proposed strategy will facilitate minor sewer service extensions into areas where OSS are prevalent. Costs for extending sewer to individual parcels converting to public sewer can be high. Under this strategy, the Utility will provide limited funding to help cover the cost of the minor sewer extensions. This strategy and its implementation criteria will be developed over the next 18 months with implementation by the end of 2014.

Strategy 1C2 Allow payment of wastewater connection fees for OSS conversions over longer periods of time.

Wastewater general facility charges (GFCs) and LOTT’s capacity development charges (CDC) are one-time permitting fees charged new construction at the time of connection to the public system. The financial burden of these fees for residences converting from OSS to public sewer can be substantial ($7,900 in 2013). With this strategy we will evaluate options for paying GFC and potentially CDCs over a long period (e.g. 15 years). The GFC option would be implemented in the Olympia Municipal Code.

Strategy 1C3 Provide technical assistance and public education for individual and neighborhood OSS conversions to municipal sewer.

Converting OSS to municipal sewer is technically and financially challenging. The Utility has been providing one-on-one consultations with individual property owners and distributing information on OSS conversion through various media since 2008.

Objective 1D Facilitate the orderly expansion of the public sewer system.

Strategy 1D1 Evaluate the use of alternative sewer technologies for appropriate sewer extensions.

Under most circumstances, a traditional gravity sewer collection system with a lift station and force main if topography warrants it, will continue to be the required method of sewer collection in areas to be developed, regardless of the source of funding or type of development.

However, we acknowledge that alternatives, such as pressurized grinder pump systems, are viable and appropriate for certain limited locations with unique constraints. There is, for example, an existing policy (see the Appendices) allowing for grinder pump systems in limited areas.

With this strategy, we will refine criteria for allowing grinder pump systems and potentially other technologies as they become technically available and suitable for use in Olympia. This strategy will be implemented through the municipal code estimated to occur two to four years after adopting this Plan.

Strategy 1D2 Allow the limited use of STEP systems for OSS conversions and infill development in neighborhoods currently served by STEP systems.

This strategy continues existing policies that prohibit the use of STEP systems for new subdivision and commercial development, while accepting that STEP may be the appropriate technology for OSS conversion and infill lot development within areas that are currently served by STEPS. Current restrictions on STEP systems will be evaluated. Potential criteria for allowing STEPS include only allowing them in small areas where the only possible access to public sewer within 1,000 feet is via an existing STEP main, documentation that the existing STEP main has adequate capacity, and ensuring that odor control needs are addressed.

Under State regulations, existing and potential future STEPs are the operational responsibility of the Wastewater Utility rather than the property owner. Implementation of this strategy must therefore continue to be highly restrictive of STEP use.

Strategy 1D3 Implement a green infrastructure project evaluation process for wastewater capital projects.

Tools are available to identify project-specific sustainability issues/challenges/opportunities (e.g. ISI’s Envision program); encourage collaboration among staff across disciplines, Lines of Business and Departments; and help to refine and define elements.

This Strategy will ensure that the scope of projects identified in the Wastewater Utility’s Capital Facilities Plan is sustainably defined on a consistent basis. The intent is to implement this process on several projects within two years of adoption of this plan, with full implementation within six years.

9.2 Public Health

GO2

No one is exposed to sewer overflows or excessive odors.

Managing the public health risks of sewage is a long-standing responsibility of the Wastewater Utility. Often sewer overflows and odors affect both public health and environmental quality.

Objective 2A Reduce the number of sewer pipe blockages and the volume of sewer overflows annually.

Strategy 2A1 Continue to improve City preventive maintenance activities such as pipe cleaning, root control and minor repairs.

Regular and focused maintenance helps prevent sewer overflows by ensuring adequate capacity in the pipe system. Related work is a key responsibility of the Utility.

Increasing use of condition rating and asset management techniques will support refinements to this strategy over the next four years. Efforts to increase the capacity of asset management to help manage wastewater systems will be pursued.

In recent years, our in-house maintenance ability has increased to meet current needs. Wastewater operations and engineering staff discuss preventive maintenance issues bi-weekly. We document needs and track them until the issue is resolved. We implement emerging technologies as appropriate.

As the infrastructure system grows, so will the need to adequate support operations and maintenance work.

Strategy 2A2 Continue to provide adequate resources for improved mapping and documentation of the wastewater pipe system.

Efforts to improve our knowledge of the wastewater systems need to be maintained in the long-term. Efficiencies and effectiveness increase as our understanding of the complex pipe and pump systems improve. Additional resources may be needed in the long term to maintain this work effort.

Strategy 2A3 Implement education and enforcement efforts to reduce preventable blockages due to fats, oils and grease (FOG) build-up, with assistance from LOTT.

This strategy emphasizes the need for enhanced coordination between City wastewater and LOTT staff regarding the enforcement of pre-treatment regulations (OMC 13.20) and educational efforts associated with FOG. Both educational and regulatory measures will be refined and implemented by both entities within the next two years. Additional resources may be needed to accomplish this strategy.

Strategy 2A4 Reduce infiltration and inflow of groundwater and stormwater in prioritized areas so that pipe capacities are not exceeded.

Wastewater pipe capacities in Olympia are generally adequate regardless of infiltration and inflow. While infiltration and inflow (I&I) do not currently generate sewer overflows in the wastewater collection system, they do have an impact on the capacity of LOTT’s wastewater treatment facilities. Therefore, we will continue ongoing efforts to manage and reduce these unnecessary flows to avoid future capacity problems. For example, needed repairs to leaking pipes and manhole structures also reduce groundwater inflows.

Long-term refinements to I&I management will be developed as needed, in partnership with LOTT. Tools for reducing I&I include targeted construction projects and the separation of stormwater and wastewater flows from buildings. The 20-year capital facilities plan includes several projects that will reduce I&I.

Strategy 2A5 Separate combined wastewater/stormwater pipes in conjunction with stormwater and road improvements or residential repairs, when economically feasible.

Older areas of the City, especially downtown, combine storm and waste water flows in one pipe system that flows to the Budd Inlet treatment facility. Potential separation projects are identified and evaluated during redevelopment and street retrofit projects. In general, separation projects are pursued based on ease of implementation and costs. Several modest separation projects have been completed in recent years. While separation is not a Utility priority, coordination with LOTT’s long-term capacity planning may result in future capital projects that have mutual benefits.

The City will continue to work with LOTT to identify important project and associated funding options.

Strategy 2A6 During sewer spills and other emergencies, take advantage of available regional resources through the LOTT Mutual Aid Agreement.

Access to readily available resources is important during emergencies. The existing LOTT agreement can be implemented as needed. Agreements and relationships will be updated and maintained.

Strategy 2A7 Coordinate public education activities with the City’s Waste ReSources Utility to reduce use of under-sink garbage disposal units.

The Waste ReSources and Wastewater utilities share an interest in reducing the volume of compostable solid wastes that are introduced into the wastewater collection system through kitchen garbage disposal units. Compostable solid wastes can negatively impact the ability of STEP systems to function properly, and use of these disposal units may introduce solids and liquids that trigger pretreatment regulations covered under Olympia Municipal Code Chapter 13.20. Pretreatment regulations are jointly managed by the City and LOTT.

Strategy 2A8 Improve operations and maintenance capacity by continuing to incorporate new field technologies and providing adequate staff resources.

Technologies to increase the effectiveness of field operations and maintenance continue to emerge. An important recent example includes the use of trenchless pipe lining technology to substantial reduce the costs of pipe retrofits and the use of oxygen generation to manage hydrogen sulfide odors. As these technologies emerge, the Utility will help foster their development and use.

Objective 2B Reduce odors from public sewer systems to acceptable levels.

Strategy 2B1 Resolve odor issues in a timely manner.

Staff respond to odor complaints, quantify the extent of the problem, and implement projects to retrofit pipe and pump systems with odor control technology through the capital facility planning process. Often, these mitigations efforts are iterative, culminating in an acceptable level of odor control. Odor management can be a critical neighborhood concern.

Objective 2C Use computer-based asset management systems in order to achieve low infrastructure life-cycle costs at a consistent level of service.

Strategy 2C1 Continue pipeline condition rating using the Pipeline Assessment Certification Program (PACP), which tracks the physical integrity of the wastewater pipe system. In the longer term, evaluate staffing and equipment options for inspecting privately-owned sewer laterals.

After eight years of implementation, the first comprehensive round of prioritized system inspections will be completed in early 2014. In future years, condition rating will continue for pipes according to their current condition and criticality, supporting the identification of pipes needing repairs or replacement. In doing so, the rating system will help determine financial and resource needs for the Utility.

Additional work is needed to evaluate the private pipe systems connecting residences to the public pipes in the streets. Staff will evaluate options for expanding the asset management program to incorporate other needs.

Strategy 2C2 Inspect manholes consistent with the Manhole Assessment Certification Program (MACP) for condition rating.

With the first round of prioritized PACP inspections soon to be completed, we will plan for wastewater manholes inspections using the MACP standards. In general, the wastewater system incorporates a manhole, or ground-level access structure, into every 300-400 feet of pipe. These structures are six to 20 feet deep with multiple pipes entering and exiting. Deterioration of these structures results in leaks, both out of and into, the wastewater system. Modest repairs can often appreciably extend the life of manholes. Resources needed to complete this work will be evaluated.

Strategy 2C3 Based on pipe and manhole condition rating outcomes, complete priority repairs and replacements of pipes and structures.

System repairs are currently incorporated into operation and maintenance work plans as well as capital facility projects. At this time, available resources are adequate. However, project needs will evolve over time. Refer to Chapter 10 for additional information regarding capital facility project planning.

Strategy 2C4 Inspect and condition rate lift stations and commercial STEP systems on a regular basis.

Lift stations and force mains present a high level of risk and vulnerability. Malfunctions in complex pumped systems can result in appreciable sewer overflows. Emergency responses can be extensive and may last more than a few hours. We emphasize the need to proactively track the life cycle of these systems and complete needed retrofits prior to system failures. We have made substantial progress in updating lift stations and force main in the past six years. Refer to Chapter 10 for additional information.

9.3 Water Use

GO3

Potable water use and greywater flows into the sewer collection system are minimized.

In terms of long-range capital facilities planning, reducing unnecessary wastewater flows is financially advantageous to the Wastewater Utility, the Drinking Water Utility, the LOTT Clean Water Alliance and ratepayers.

Objective 3A In concert with the Drinking Water Utility, reduce non-irrigation residential water use.

Strategy 3A1 Implement a volume-based residential rate structure for the Wastewater Utility.

Basing wastewater rates on the volume of drinking water consumed should result in improved water use efficiencies for both the Wastewater and Drinking Water utilities. Rates for commercial customers are already flow-based.

Additionally, this strategy addresses potential financial inequity issues associated with the current flat monthly rate for residential wastewater. As Utility revenues will need to be maintained through the rate re-structuring, rates for some customers will inevitably increase. A financial analysis has been completed as part of this Plan and we will initiate an effort to implement a volume-based rate structure in 2014. Also see Strategy 5B1.

Strategy 3A2 Coordinate public education activities with the Drinking Utility.

The Drinking Water Utility supports extensive public education efforts focused on water conservation and reuse. Beginning in 2014, we will better coordinate public messages regarding the linkage between water conservation and wastewater generation.

Strategy 3A3 Allow and promote greywater subsurface irrigation alternatives in concert with Thurston County.

Consistent with building codes and public health expectations, we will advocate for the voluntary use of greywater systems. The Thurston County Health Department is the local regulatory authority for establishing greywater standards. We will address this strategy sometime during the six-year planning period, anticipating initial action by Thurston County.

9.4 Energy

GO4

The Utility is more energy efficient, and uses cleaner energy sources.

City-wide policies mandate measures to reduce energy consumption.

Objective 4A Reduce the Wastewater Utility’s energy use by 5% within six years of adopting this Plan.

Strategy 4A1 Complete an energy audit for all lift stations.

Lift stations are the primary consumers of electrical energy in the wastewater system. With guidance from available industry and/or Washington state energy self-assessment programs, we will evaluate wastewater system energy use. Other potential efficiencies (e.g., vehicles, buildings) are currently addressed by City-wide policies and practices.

Strategy 4A2 Increase frequency of sewer force main cleaning.

This strategy employs the use of modern "pigging" technology for thoroughly cleaning the interior of high priority pipes. Use of the technology reduces friction and increases pipe flow capacity, reducing pump run hours and energy use. Maintenance staff will implement this strategy beginning with a demonstration project planned for the year 2016.

Strategy 4A3 Minimize the number and energy use of new lift stations as part of wastewater basin planning.

This strategy involves a more detailed look at "basin build-out" in areas within the Sewer Service Area for which sewer infrastructure is not currently available. While this and earlier plans have generated needed information regarding planned sewer extension projects in the various watersheds, more detailed efforts that define potential efficiencies. The work will be completed within the six-year planning period.

Objective 4B Reduce diesel emergency generator emissions by replacing the two oldest generators in the system within six years of adopting this Plan.

Strategy 4B1 Strategy - Pursue federal and State grant programs to assist in financing clean diesel fuel retrofits for generators.

The intent of this strategy is to replace older diesel generators with new ones that not only are more fuel efficient, but produce significantly less air pollution.

9.5 Utility Rates and Fees

GO5

Utility rates and fees are equitable and affordable, minimizing rate increases while maintaining consistent levels of service.

A utility can best provide consistent levels of service by managing revenue and expenditures to minimize changes in rates and fees in the short term, and predict them accurately in the long term. While the following Goal and Objectives work towards achieving this balance, other strategies particularly under Water Quality and Water Use Goals, will significantly impact how the Wastewater Utility determines and collects rates and fees.

Objective 5A Coordinate the financial management of the three water-based utilities so that utility rate increases are distributed over time.

Strategy 5A1 Conduct regular financial studies, coordinated with other water resource utilities and potentially including LOTT.

We evaluate rates and other financial needs during the annual rate analysis and in updating the Wastewater Management Plan. These evaluations consider management needs, levels of service, and growth assumptions. Balancing rate increase among the utilities is an ongoing emphasis.

Objective 5B Manage utility rates and connection fees consistent with the City’s guiding principle of growth paying for growth.

Strategy 5B1 Update utility rates and general facility charges (GFCs) to reflect costs of providing needed services, while looking for opportunities to improve the equitable distribution of charges.

The financial evaluation associated with this Plan evaluates the potential for basing wastewater monthly rates on drinking water consumption. Instead of the current flat rate for all residential wastewater customers, rates would be partially based on wastewater generation as measured by drinking water consumption (See Strategy 3A1).

Similar work in 2011 responded to community interest in acknowledging the limited generation of wastewater by small accessory dwelling units. Connection fees for the units were reduced. Strategy 1B4 of this Plan will allow the payment of GFCs for OSS conversions to be spread over time. Similar efforts will continue with this Strategy as part of a regular review of rates and fees.

9.6 Integrated Water Resources

GO6

Water resource utilities are planning together for long-term environmental, economic and social changes.

Water resource needs and issues are increasingly managed collaboratively among various City entities. A proactive management approach will not only minimize the adverse impacts of changes over time, but guide us toward achieving our community’s sustainability goals.

Objective 6A Integrate Water Resource activities that share common goals, resources and/or assets.

Strategy 6A1 Enhance watershed-based planning with input from Storm & Surface Water, Drinking Water, and Wastewater staff.

This strategy emphasizes the intent to identify and act upon goals common to all three water resource utilities. Commonalities between work groups are increasingly apparent. For example, the Wastewater and Storm & Surface Water programs share an interest in water quality improvement. Similarly, the Wastewater and Drinking Water programs share common interests in water conservation and reuse.

Strategy 6A2 Plan for the anticipated impacts of sea level rise.

With this strategy we will build upon ongoing work by the City Storm & Surface Water Utility and LOTT, by incorporating sea rise into wastewater infrastructure planning for the downtown area and other parts of the sewer service area adjacent to Budd Inlet and Deschutes River.

We will also quantify the threats of sea rise to the wastewater collection system through vulnerability assessments (e.g., EPA’s CREAT software) and site specific investigations. A clearer understand of long-range infrastructure needs may result in specific capital projects.

9.7 Information

GO7

Customers and the community are informed about and involved in wastewater management activities.

Instant availability of information in society today has changed customer expectations.

Objective 7A Provide adequate staff and resources to keep customers and the community informed and involved.

Strategy 7A1 Maintain technical staff capacity for one to one discussion and problem-solving with wastewater customers; wastewater planning and troubleshooting; and design review.

Wastewater technical and regulatory issues are complex. Maintaining our capacity to be helpful and responsive is a key service to the community. Resolving various concerns from the development community and both commercial and residential customers requires detailed knowledge about the wastewater infrastructure.

Decisions about gravity sewer and STEP system availability and potential extensions, onsite sewage system permitting, and problem troubleshooting are financially important to those effected by wastewater policies. Code enforcement, environmental monitoring and public education on specific issues are also important. Communicating this information often requires detailed and site specific interactions with customers.

Strategy 7A2 Update and expand the Utility’s website and other media to disseminate information consistent with the objectives of this Plan.

With the exponential increase in use of electronic media, customer and community expectations are high concerning access to digital information associated with the Utility.

Other efforts will include increasing the amount and type of information available through the City’s website, and actively approaching the utility’s customer base to determine their concerns.

Strategy 7A3 Coordinate customer and community education efforts with the other water resource utilities and LOTT.

Currently, there are a variety of methods that the four water resource utilities and LOTT provide information and educate their customers. Under this strategy we will look at what these other utilities are doing to approach their customers, separate from information available on their respective websites, and identify partnership opportunities that promote a deeper understanding off the relationship between water resources and our local communities.

9.8 Summary Table of Strategies

Table 9.2 summarizes the 35 Strategies, showing for each one its relative priority, whether or not we are currently implementing the Strategy, if not when is it going to be implemented, whether the Strategy has an existing program associated with it, and whether capital project(s) are associated with it.

Table 9.2

Status of Strategies

No.

Strategy

Relative Priority

Existing or New Program

When1

Capital Project

Water Quality

1A1

Illicit discharge reduction

High

Existing

Ongoing

Maybe

1B1

Modify OSS regulations

High

Both

Ongoing

No

1C1

Fund limited sewer extensions

Moderate

New

2014/15

Yes

1C2

Connection fee payment plan

Moderate

New

2014

No

1C3

OSS technical assistance

High

Existing

Ongoing

No

1D1

Support alternative technologies

High

New

2014

No

1D2

Modify STEP regulations

High

New

2014

No

1D3

Implement evaluation process

Medium

New

2014-19

No

Public Health

2A1

Preventive pipe maintenance

Medium

Existing

Ongoing

Yes

2A2

Mapping and documentation

Medium

Existing

Ongoing

No

2A3

FOG management

Medium

Both

2015

No

2A4

I&I reduction

Low

Both

2017

Yes

2A5

Combined sewer separation

Low

Existing

2020

Yes

2A6

LOTT mutual aid agreement

Low

Existing

Ongoing

No

2A7

Reduce solid wastes into sewer

Low

New

2015

No

2A8

New field technologies

Medium

Existing

Ongoing

No

2B1

Odor control

Medium

Both

Ongoing

Maybe

2C1

Pipe condition rating

High

Existing

Ongoing

No

2C2

Manhole condition rating

Medium

New

2016

No

2C3

Priority repairs

High

Existing

Ongoing

Yes

2C4

Lift station improvements

High

Existing

Ongoing

Yes

Water Use

3A1

Volume-based rates

High

New

2014

No

3A2

Education with Drinking Water Utility

Medium

New

2014

No

3A3

Greywater irrigation

Low

New

2016

No

Energy

4A1

Energy self-assessment

Medium

New

2015

Maybe

4A2

Cleaning force mains

Low

New

2016

No

4A3

Minimize new lift stations

Medium

Existing

2017

Maybe

4B1

Replace older diesel generators

Medium

New

2017

Yes

Rates and Fees

5A1

Regular rate studies

High

Existing

2014

No

5B1

Equitable rates

High

New

2014

No

Integrated Water Resources

6A1

Watershed-based planning

Medium

New

2013

No

6A2

Sea level rise

Medium

Existing

Ongoing

Maybe

Information

7A1

Maintain technical staff

High

Existing

Ongoing

No

7A2

Update & expand website

Medium

Existing

Ongoing

No

7A3

Partnerships with other utilities

Medium

New

2014

No