CHAPTER 4 – Source of Supply Program

As described in Chapter 1, Olympia depends on groundwater to meet its drinking water needs, drawing on sources within the Nisqually and Deschutes Watersheds. McAllister Wellfield is the City’s primary supply, serving all Utility customers from September through May. In the spring and summer, when outdoor water use increases, the City supplements this source with six wells in East Olympia and the Allison Springs area of West Olympia. The City is extending the supply resource through aggressive water conservation and the use of reclaimed water strategies (Chapter 5 and Chapter 6).

Goal

The Utility’s Goal 1 is: Adequate supplies of water are available for the Olympia community while protecting in-stream flows and sustaining the long-term capacity of aquifers.

This goal is consistent with Olympia’s Comprehensive Plan Goal GU5, and associated policies, PU5.1-PU5.5.

The last planning period focused on securing the transfer of McAllister Springs/Abbott Springs water rights to the McAllister Wellfield. This planning period will focus on fulfilling mitigation requirements associated with the McAllister Wellfield water rights, as well as further evaluating the timing and sequencing of the City’s undeveloped water rights.

The Program will focus on three objectives during this planning period:

•    Maintain water rights that ensure sufficient supply for at least 50 years, so sources can be protected from contamination or commitment to lower priority uses.

•    Encourage multi-jurisdictional approaches to water rights and source development.

•    Monitor water levels in all pumped aquifers and maintain numerical groundwater models to better understand aquifer characteristics and evaluate the impacts of the City’s withdrawals used for water supply.

4.1 Source of Supply Regulations

A number of legal mechanisms limit the use of water. The basic laws governing water rights and withdrawals from groundwater and surface water in Washington are the Water Code (Chapter 90.03 RCW) and Regulation of Public Ground Water (Chapter 90.44 RCW). These laws are implemented by the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology). Water rights rules are in Chapter 173-152 WAC. Each water right includes specific withdrawal limits and often includes other conditions that may limit water use.

In addition, legal constraints can result from Endangered Species Act recovery plans, interlocal agreements, watershed plans, water resource management plans and court decisions.

The City draws water from the Nisqually and Deschutes watersheds, where salmon species are listed under the Endangered Species Act. Watershed planning activities are underway, but no specific legal constraints limit the City’s use of its water rights.

4.2 Source Description

This section focuses on the interactions between surface and groundwater in the two regional watersheds from which Olympia withdraws water, and the basic hydrology of the aquifers that supply each of Olympia’s drinking water wells.

This information has been used to assess the ability of these sources to continue to reliably supply the City’s water needs. The additional information needed to complete the reliability assessment is in several other chapters. Chapter 7 gives details on hydrogeology of the Drinking Water (Wellhead) Protection Areas; Chapter 8 provides an analysis of source infrastructure and describes planned improvements; and Chapter 11 describes treatment methods.

Regional Water Resources

Olympia views its water system from the perspective of the full hydrologic cycle. This perspective recognizes the connection between groundwater and surface water, and the effect that a groundwater-dependent water system may have on surrounding surface water bodies.

The City withdraws water from aquifers in two watersheds. McAllister Wellfield is located in the Nisqually Watershed. The other six wells and future Briggs and Brewery Wells are in the Deschutes Watershed. The State of Washington designates these watersheds as Water Resource Inventory Area (WRIA) 11 and 13, respectively.

Analysis indicates relatively active interaction between the City’s aquifers and surface water bodies in these watersheds. This work includes the groundwater modeling that was done to assess the impact of transferring the McAllister Springs/Abbott Springs water rights to the McAllister Wellfield, delineate Drinking Water Protection Areas (DWPAs) and to support watershed planning efforts in the Nisqually and Deschutes watersheds.

Olympia’s 2009 Water System Plan Chapter 5 provides more detailed information about streamflow and groundwater interaction, as well as fish stocks, in both the Nisqually and Deschutes River watersheds.

Drinking Water Supply Sources

This section briefly summarizes the basic hydrology of areas around McAllister Wellfield, Olympia’s other six supply wells, and the future Briggs and Brewery wells. The most recent hydrogeological information is in two reports prepared by Golder and Associates to support the 2009 revisions to delineations of the City’s Drinking Water Protection Areas (DWPA) (Golder, 2008a and 2008b), referred to in this Plan as the Golder reports. In Chapter 7, findings of these reports are described in detail for each DWPA.

Although hydrogeological information is somewhat limited, the interaction between surface water and groundwater in the McAllister numerical model area, which includes the East Olympia wells, is generally well understood. The surface water-groundwater interaction is less understood in the Allison Springs area of West Olympia because less supporting hydrogeological data is available to calibrate the model.

The McAllister groundwater modeling work simulated the impacts of McAllister Wellfield operation and conservatively predicted the long-term impacts on surface water. These impacts are being addressed in mitigation plans prepared by the cities of Olympia, Lacey and Yelm and the Nisqually Indian Tribe (see Section 4.4).

No studies have been completed to determine the long-term impacts of Olympia’s existing six supply wells. However, with numerical groundwater models in place for all of Olympia’s water sources, the Utility now has the basic analytical tools to predict the impacts of withdrawals from these wells on surface water and groundwater.

State regulations require aquifer pumping tests to establish the capacity of wells used for public water supply. For information about the wells and their pumping capacities see Chapter 8, Section 8.1.

McAllister Wellfield

The City’s major source, McAllister Wellfield (S16), is located approximately eight miles east of Olympia at the southern edge of the Nisqually Valley in WRIA 11 (see Map 1.4). The City of Olympia and Nisqually Indian Tribe have developed the McAllister Wellfield as a more protected source of supply than the previously used McAllister Springs surface water withdrawal site.

The McAllister Wellfield taps into the McAllister Gravel Aquifer three-quarters of a mile up-gradient of McAllister Springs. According to the Golder report (2008a), recharge is primarily from infiltration of precipitation and subsurface inflow from the up-gradient area to the south. Groundwater discharge occurs through natural springs and seeps, groundwater pumping, seepage from shallow aquifers to rivers, lakes and streams, and subsurface outflow to the north.

Manual and electronic groundwater level monitoring data for the McAllister Springs area has been collected for over a decade. The quantity of electronic data-logger information is enormous because of the number of readings taken, on a daily basis at most locations. The Utility has formatted these data to allow meaningful analysis. Although some of the McAllister Springs groundwater level data is pertinent to the McAllister Wellfield, the Utility is in the process of revising the monitoring strategy for the entire McAllister Wellfield Drinking Water Protection Area.

East Olympia Wells

The City uses three wells in the East Olympia area: Hoffman Well 3 (S08) located off Hoffman Road, Shana Park Well 11 (S10) along Yelm Highway, and the Indian Summer Well 20 (S12) located in the Indian Summer gated community development, all shown in Map 1.4. No large-scale aquifer pumping tests have been completed to determine the long-term impacts of these specific wells on surrounding groundwater and surface water bodies. The Utility does have several years of monitoring well water level data surrounding Shana Park Well 11 (S10), which was used to delineate the Drinking Water Protection Area for the 2009 Plan (see Chapter 7, Section 7.4).

The Golder report (2008a) provides some information on historical groundwater levels. The report found typical annual reductions and recovery in shallow groundwater levels, but overall water levels were relatively unchanged throughout the periods of study. Hoffman Well (S08), completed in a deep, confined aquifer, is not connected to local shallow groundwater or surface water, but is recharged several miles to the south. Indian Summer Well 20 (S12) is recharged more locally and is completed in a confined aquifer.

The report identifies a potential connection between the Shana Park Well 11 (S10) and nearby surface water when an “extended” capture zone is manually added to the results of the modeled wellhead protection area. The report reflects a conservative evaluation of possible connection between surface water and the shallow aquifer system suggesting Shana Park Well 11 (S10) may be considered groundwater under the influence of surface water (GWI). The City is not conducting a GWI evaluation of Well 11 because the well depth and distance from surface water do not meet the regulatory definition of GWI. (Shana Park Well 11 is about 2,000 feet from Smith Lake.) However, the City plans to assess the long-term viability of the Shana Park source well in 2016 and 2017 given its susceptibility to elevated nitrate levels in the area. Our Capital Improvement Program (Chapter 13) includes funding for Project WS-10 Shana Park Source Contingency Plan to evaluate future options for the well in support of our long-term supply development and diversification efforts (Chapter 11).

West Olympia Wells

Olympia has three wells in the West Olympia area: Allison Springs Well 13 (S09) and Allison Springs Well 19 (S11), located near Mud Bay Road, and Kaiser Well 1 (S03) near Kaiser Road and Louise Lake (see Map 1.4).

No large-scale aquifer pumping tests have been completed to determine the long-term impacts of these wells on surrounding groundwater and surface water bodies. However, the Golder report (2008a) found that the primary source of water for this aquifer is vertical seepage from the overlying aquifer. The main discharge occurs at Eld Inlet and Budd Inlet. Analysis of water levels by Golder and City staff for monitoring wells in the Allison Springs area shows that groundwater levels typically vary by less than 15 feet (as measured between 2007 and 2014).

Future Briggs Well

A new Briggs Well (S13) is planned in the Briggs Village development west of the East Olympia wells and immediately west of the former Briggs Nursery.

This well would draw from the Deschutes Valley Aquifer (DVA) system. Golder (2008a and 2008b) reported that the main sources of groundwater in the well area are infiltration of precipitation and underflow from the southeast. The primary discharge features are underflow to the northwest, withdrawals at groundwater wells, and seepage to surface water, including the Deschutes River, and Ward and Hewitt Lakes.

Future Brewery Wellfield

The cities of Olympia, Lacey and Tumwater are investigating joint development of the former Olympia Brewery wellfield to meet future demand. The wellfield is located next to the Deschutes River, north of Custer Boulevard.

In 2012, the cities evaluated existing infrastructure and assessed aquifer conditions through pumping tests and water quality sampling at selected wells. The testing revealed the presence of separate shallow and deep aquifer systems, in both upland and lowland areas. The three cities are continuing evaluations to better understand potential alternatives for wellfield operation.

4.3 Water Rights

Water rights granted by the State can establish limits on withdrawal of water from the environment in two ways: by establishing specific limits on annual and instantaneous withdrawals and by establishing other conditions. Appendix 4-1 includes the final and most recent water rights documents for all City of Olympia water sources.

This section compares Olympia’s existing water rights with current and projected demand.

Total Water Rights

The City currently has water rights totaling:

•    26,552 gallons per minute (gpm) instantaneous withdrawal

•    29,649 acre-feet annual (AFY) withdrawal

These totals reflect changes in water rights status since completion of the City’s 2009 Water System Plan, as a result of Ecology’s approval of two blocks of water rights:

•    McAllister Wellfield. Ecology approved change applications to transfer existing water rights for McAllister Springs and a water right permit for Abbott Springs, totaling 26 Mgd, to the McAllister Wellfield (three Reports of Examination dated October 21, 2011). These water rights were shown in the 2009 Water System Plan as pending applications to change water rights.

•    Brewery Wellfield Water Rights. Ecology approved water right transfer applications for the former Olympia Brewery water rights, to be shared jointly by the cities of Olympia, Lacey and Tumwater for municipal supply use. These water rights were shown as pending in the 2009 Water System Plan. Olympia received one-third of the approved water rights for a total of 2,172 gpm and 761 acre feet per year (Reports of Examination dated July 20, 2009).

Individual Source Analysis

The individual source analysis shows that the existing maximum instantaneous and maximum annual quantities used are within the limits of the water rights for the City’s sources.

The City’s forecasted 20-year demand totals are also within the City’s existing water rights, so with proper management of each source, the City’s projected 20-year demands should not exceed the water rights for individual source.

Table 4.1 shows the City’s existing water rights compared with existing consumption (based on 2013 data). The difference between these amounts is shown as the City’s current excess in water rights. Table 4.2 and Table 4.3 show the same information for the City’s forecasted six-year and 20-year demands, as well as the forecasted excess. This assessment demonstrates that the City has sufficient water rights to meet demand throughout the 20-year planning period with current sources.

Existing water rights also allow for further development of the McAllister Wellfield, and development of the planned Briggs and Brewery wells. These new sources support the City’s intent to secure a 50-year supply of water, as stated in the City’s Comprehensive Plan. Bringing them online will assure sufficient supply through 2064. (See Chapter 3, Section 3.3 for 50-year demand forecast.) Also, because they are geographically dispersed the new sources will provide additional system reliability.

Maintaining Compliance with Water Rights

This section reviews how the City is complying with conditions included in recently acquired water rights.

McAllister Wellfield

In the early 1990s, the City began moving to replace McAllister Springs with a new, more protected and productive water source known as the McAllister Wellfield. The Springs were vulnerable to contamination, had limited productivity, and would have required extensive treatment under new federal Safe Drinking Water Act regulations.

In May 2008, the City of Olympia and the Nisqually Indian Tribe signed an historic Memorandum of Agreement to jointly pursue the development of the McAllister Wellfield as a water source for both communities (Appendix 4-2). The agreement also calls for permanent protection of the culturally and environmentally important McAllister Springs and nearby Abbott Springs.

Water Rights. Ecology approved a transfer of the City’s water rights from McAllister and Abbott Springs to the McAllister Wellfield on January 3, 2012. The three-phase plan for developing the water rights is described in in Chapter 8, Section 8.1.

Three wells, with a combined maximum capacity of 10,500 gpm or 15 Mgd, have been installed at the new wellfield and began pumping in October 2014. After a test period, the pumps at the McAllister Springs facility were retired and the pipe connecting McAllister Springs to the distribution system was cut in January 2015.

Under the Memorandum of Agreement with the Nisqually Indian Tribe, the City will develop an additional 2,403 gpm or 3.46 Mgd under the Abbott Springs water right permit, and lease and/or deed up to 3 Mgd of water rights to the Tribe.

The Cities of Lacey and Yelm also acquired water rights for development of new sources in their service areas.

Mitigation Plan. Pumping of the new wells is expected to impact surface waters in the Nisqually and Deschutes watersheds. As part of their applications for transfer of water rights, the Cities of Olympia, Lacey and Yelm jointly developed a Mitigation Plan outlining how they will compensate for these impacts. Each city submitted a Mitigation Plan covering the aspects of the overall plan pertinent to their jurisdiction. Olympia’s Mitigation Plan was submitted jointly with the Nisqually Indian Tribe (see Appendix 4-3). The plan includes a collaborative approach to mitigation, including joint acquisition of water rights, land purchase and habitat restoration, and a reclaimed water infiltration facility.

The overall plan includes several documents that formalize the agreements between various jurisdictions. These agreements are included in Appendix 4-3:

•    McAllister Wellfield Mitigation. Memorandum of Agreement between Olympia and the Nisqually Indian Tribe (Mitigation Plan Appendix A). The Tribe agrees to mitigate impacts on the Nisqually River, and the City agrees to mitigate impacts on Woodland Creek, Lake St. Clair, Tri-Lakes and Deschutes River. (Olympia to share these responsibilities with the Cities of Lacey and Yelm.) (Mitigation Plan Appendix A)

•    Woodland Creek/Tri-Lakes Mitigation. Interlocal Agreement between Olympia and Lacey to use reclaimed water from the LOTT’s Martin Way Wastewater Treatment facility for groundwater recharge and instream flow enhancement in the Woodland Creek Basin (Mitigation Plan Appendix D). (See Chapter 6, Section 6.3.)

•    Deschutes River Mitigation Actions. Interlocal Agreements between Olympia, Lacey and Yelm for water rights acquisitions, property acquisition and habitat restoration actions in the Deschutes basin. (Mitigation Plan Appendix E).

In November 2011, Olympia City Council approved another agreement focusing on a mile-long Deschutes riverfront property jointly owned by the cities of Olympia, Lacey and Yelm:

•    Deschutes River Mitigation. Memorandum of Understanding between the Squaxin Island Tribe and the cities of Olympia, Lacey and Yelm to participate in a Budd Inlet/Deschutes Watershed Environmental Coalition. The Coalition will pursue short- and long-term solutions towards restoration of a healthy watershed.

Mitigation activities are currently underway and progress on implementing the approved Mitigation Plan is reported to Ecology annually.

Briggs Well

In April 2005, Ecology approved the City’s purchase of water rights associated with the former Briggs Nursery. A well on this site that provided irrigation water for the nursery has been abandoned.

A new City well was scheduled to be completed by December 2009, but in response to the City’s April 2009 request, Ecology extended the Construction Notice date to May 2014. In July 2013, Ecology granted the City another extension until May 2019. The delay is pending evaluation of how this new source would be used in conjunction with the Brewery Wellfield. The current schedule anticipates construction of this new well to begin in 2019, with the source considered to be online sometime between 2020 and 2034.

Development of the Briggs Well would add 1.58 Mgd of daily supply.

Brewery Wellfield

In 2008, the cities of Olympia, Tumwater and Lacey jointly acquired the infrastructure and most of the water rights for the historic Olympia Brewery’s wellfield, located north of Custer Way next to the Deschutes River.

Infrastructure and Water Rights. For nearly 100 years, the wellfield had been used for potable, commercial and industrial supply by a succession of beer manufacturers. Olympia Brewery closed in 2003. The wellfield consists of 30 wells, some of which are equipped with pumps, a one-million gallon tank, and a distribution system of pipelines that connects most of the wells to the storage tank and all of the wells to the former brewery facility.

The water rights, shared equally among the three cities, authorize a maximum instantaneous combined rate of 6,515 gallons per minute and an annual combined withdrawal of 2,283.53 acre-feet per year. Olympia’s share of the rights is approximately 2,171 gpm and 761 acre-feet per year.

Wellfield Evaluation. In November 2010, Olympia signed an Interlocal Agreement with the cities of Tumwater and Lacey to conduct a preliminary engineering evaluation of the former Olympia Brewery property.

The first evaluation phase of this project was completed in November 2012, and included well evaluations and aquifer pumping tests, water quality testing and assessment of the need for water quality treatment, and evaluation of the existing storage tank and other acquired water facilities.

The second phase (underway at the time this Plan was written) will create a strategic planning document to support each city in considering the ownership structure, operational structure, and anticipated shared costs associated with municipal development of the wellfield.

Pending Water Right Applications

The City has no pending water right applications at this time.

4.4 Alternate Sources

The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) and Ecology both require public water systems to include an alternate source of supply analysis in water system plans if they are seeking new water rights within 20 years.

The DOH Water System Planning Guide identifies five categories of alternate supply strategies that should be explored before pursuing new water rights and developing new sources:

•    Water conservation

•    Reclaimed water

•    Water right changes/transfers

•    Interties

•    Aquifer storage and recovery (artificial aquifer recharge)

As described in Section 4.3, the City has sufficient water rights to meet demand throughout the 20-year planning period and beyond. Nevertheless, the City is engaged in two of the alternate supply strategies: water conservation and use of reclaimed water. These are discussed briefly below. Olympia does not obtain water through interties with other purveyors, and does not anticipate doing so in the future. Using interties as a source is not necessary or technically feasible since adjacent water systems operate at lower pressures than Olympia‘s system. Also, the neighboring cities of Lacey and Tumwater do not have excess supply for wholesale purchase by Olympia. The City has not conducted any analysis to determine whether aquifer storage and recovery is a feasible supply alternative.

Water Conservation

Since 1996, Olympia has been seen as a regional leader in water conservation. The Utility will continue to implement a robust Water Conservation Program, described in detail in Chapter 5. By 2020, implementation is expected to reduce water consumption indoors by an additional 100,000 gallons per day, and outdoors by an additional 5 percent. This means that Olympia will use over 100,000 gallons per day less water than predicted by the demand forecast presented in Chapter 3.

Reclaimed Water

Olympia began distributing Class A reclaimed water in 2005. Reclaimed water used in the downtown Olympia area is generated at the LOTT Clean Water Alliance Budd Inlet Reclaimed Water Plant. LOTT also generates reclaimed water at its Martin Way Reclaimed Water Plant, and has long-term plans to construct other satellite facilities in Thurston County. Olympia has negotiated with LOTT for distribution rights to a total of 1,060,000 gallons per day from the Budd Inlet, Martin Way and planned satellite facilities.

The City has agreements with four customers who use reclaimed water for direct beneficial use (mostly irrigation). Between 2006 and 2013, they used an average of about 9.1 million gallons per year, or about 5.4 percent of Olympia’s allotment of reclaimed water from the Budd Inlet plant. Although this use of reclaimed water has reduced outdoor use of potable water, developing reclaimed water further has not proven to be a cost-effective strategy.

The City also has a joint project with the City of Lacey to infiltrate reclaimed water from the Martin Way plant for groundwater recharge in the Woodland Creek basin, as part of the McAllister Wellfield water rights mitigation plan. See Chapter 6 for details about Olympia’s Reclaimed Water Program.

4.5 2015-2020 Source of Supply Program

The source of supply program aims to meet the Utility’s Goal 1:

Goal 1

Adequate supplies of water are available for the Olympia community while protecting in-stream flows and sustaining the long-term capacity of aquifers.

The objectives and strategies for 2015-2020 are listed below.

Objective 1A Maintain water rights that ensure adequate supply for at least 50 years, so sources can be protected from     contamination or commitment to lower priority uses.

Strategy 1A.1 Evaluate existing water rights and forecasted demand every six years.

Strategy 1A.2 Continue implementing required mitigation actions associated with McAllister water rights.

Performance Measures

1.    Submit an annual report to Ecology describing progress toward meeting required mitigation for the McAllister Wellfield water rights.

Objective 1.B Encourage multi-jurisdictional approaches to water rights and source development.

Strategy 1B.1 Through agreements and in consultation with neighboring tribes and cities, take a cooperative, regional approach to mitigating aquifer pumping impacts on water bodies in the Deschutes and Nisqually WRIAs (11 and 13, respectively).

Strategy 1B.2 Continue to evaluate future operational strategies for development of the former Olympia Brewery water rights.

Performance Measures

1.    Continue to implement mitigation actions jointly with the cities of Lacey and Yelm and the Nisqually Tribe, as required by the McAllister Wellfield Mitigation Plan.

2.    Participate with the cities of Tumwater and Lacey in an engineering and operational evaluation of the Brewery wellfield.

Objective 1.C Monitor water levels in all pumped aquifers and maintain numerical groundwater models to better understand aquifer characteristics and evaluate the impacts of the City’s withdrawals.

Strategy 1C.1 Continue to monitor water level data and update numerical models as needed for all water sources.

Strategy 1C.2 Continue to expand the long-term water level monitoring protocol for implementation in all water supply areas to better understand impacts of the City’s withdrawal on the water bodies used for water supply.

Strategy 1C.3 Evaluate whether aquifer pumping tests are needed in certain water supply aquifers and conduct tests as needed.

Strategy 1C.4 Maintain numerical models for all water sources. Use these models to predict future water supply impacts from climate, development, and additional withdrawals.

Performance Measures

1.    Continue to download water level pressure transducer data quarterly from monitoring wells in each DWPA.

2.    Continue to use new groundwater level management database as part of the internal annual groundwater report to evaluate accuracy of the new DWPA delineations.

3.    By 2017, compare measured groundwater levels with numerical model output and evaluate potential for future impacts to water supply from low-water conditions.

4.    Within the planning period, use measured groundwater levels in numerical models to simulate aquifer pumping tests; results could be used to determine whether to conduct full-scale aquifer pumping tests in the field.

4.5 Implementation and Staffing

Having obtained new water rights in the last planning period that secured a 50 year supply, focus has now shifted toward evaluation of the timing of putting new sources online and toward fulfilling mitigation actions associated with the McAllister Wellfield water rights. Staffing to oversee this work is accomplished by a number of staff in the Utility’s Planning and Engineering section.

The 2015-2020 Capital Improvement Program includes ongoing funds for McAllister Wellfield Mitigation as described in Section 4.3. Future projects beyond 2020 include the Briggs Well construction and Brewery wellfield engineering analysis.

Table 4.1 Status of Existing Water Rights

Through September 2014, prior to using the McAllister Wellfield.

Permit, Certificate, or Claim Number

Rightholder or Claimant

Priority Date

Source Name

Primary or Supplemental Quantity

Existing

Water Rights

Existing

Consumption

Current Water Right Status

Excess (positive) Deficiency (negative)

Max

Instant.1 Flow Rate (Qi)

Max

Annual Volume (Qa)

Max Instant.1 Flow Rate (Qi)

Max2 Annual Volume (Qa)

Max Instant.1 Flow Rate (Qi)

Max2

Annual Volume (Qa)

 

 

 

 

 

gpm*

AFY*

gpm*

AFY*

gpm*

AFY*

8030

(certificate)

City

of Olympia

1/10/1941

McAllister Springs

Primary

25 cfs*
(11,250 gpm3)

18,099

11,250

8,143 (2007)

0

9,956

(2007)

S2-01105

(certificate)

City

of Olympia

1/10/1949

McAllister Springs

Primary

5.33 cfs*
(2,400 gpm4)

782

0

0

2,400

782

Supplemental

0

3,088

0

0

0

3,088

10191

(permit)

City

of Olympia

6/8/1955

Abbott Springs

Primary

10 cfs*
(4,500 gpm5)

7,240

0

0

4,500

7,240

8030

(certificate)

City

of Olympia

1/10/1941

McAllister Wellfield

Primary

11,220

18,099

0

0

11,220

18,099

CS2-01105

(certificate)

City of Olympia

1/10/1949

McAllister Wellfield

Primary

2,392

782

0

0

2,392

782

Supplemental

0

3,088

0

0

0

3,088

CS2-SWP10191

(certificate)

City of Olympia

6/8/1955

McAllister Wellfield

Primary

4,488

7,240

0

0

4,488

7,240

G2-00979

G2-01116

G2-00213

G2-23683 (certificates)

City

of Olympia

3/7/1969

4/30/1971

10/12/1971

1/28/1975

Indian Summer Well 20
(S12)

Primary

850

329

850

333

(2009)

0

-4

(2009)

G2-24052

(certificate)

City

of Olympia

1/29/1976

Kaiser Road

Well 1 (S03)

Primary

380

450

380

217

(2011)

0

233

(2011)

G2-27217

(certificate)

City

of Olympia

8/13/1986

Shana Well 11
(S10)

Supplemental

900

1143

900

925

(2011)

0

218

(2011)

G2-27225

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Hoffman Well 3 (S08)

Supplemental

900

720

900

18

(2007)

0

702 (2007)

G2-274266

(certificate)

City Of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Allison Springs Well 13 (S09)

Primary

900

800

900

540

(2009)

0

260

(2009)

G2-279416

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Allison Springs Well 19 (S11)

Primary

1,200

900

1,200

687

(2010)

0

213

(2010)

60

2643

S2-21810

S2-21811

G2-26836

(certificates)

City of

Olympia

4/20/1929

10/30/1945

1/23/1974

1/23/1974

11/26/1985

Briggs Nursery Well

Primary

1,100

288

0

0

1,100

288

785-D7

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

7/20/1936

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

203

328

0

0

203

328

784-D7

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

7/15/1937

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

200

323

0

0

200

323

34-A7

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

5/22/1946

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

500

800

0

0

500

800

453-A7

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

3/23/1950

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

700

228

0

0

700

228

4587-A7

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

1/22/1960

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

2,250

1,723

0

0

2,250

1,723

G2-01073C7

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

1/23/1967

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

900

1,440

0

0

900

1,440

G2-01072C7

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

4/22/1971

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

900

1,440

0

0

900

1,440

G2-20844C7

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

3/13/1973

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

862

1,379

0

0

862

1,379

G2-26058C7

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

1/12/1982

Brewery Wellfield (Well 39)

Primary

0

604

0

0

1,500

604

Supplemental

1,5008

604

Olympia’s 1/3rd share of Brewery rights9

2,172

761

0

0

2,172

761

Total9

 

 

 

 

26,552 gpm9

29,649 acre ft/yr9,10

16,380 gpm

9,44911 acre ft/yr

(2006)

10,1729 gpm

20,2009

acre ft/yr (2006)

Table 4.2 Status of Water Rights Forecast for 2020

Permit, Certificate, or Claim Number

Rightholder or Claimant

Priority Date

Source Name

Primary or Supplemental Quantity

Existing

Water Rights

Forecasted Water Use (6 Year Demand)

Forecasted Water Rights Status

(6 Year Demand)

Excess (positive) Deficiency (negative)

Max

Instant.1 Flow Rate (Qi)

Max

Annual Volume (Qa)

Max Instant.1 Flow Rate (Qi)

Max Annual Volume (Qa)

Max Instant.1 Flow Rate (Qi)

Max

Annual Volume (Qa)

 

 

 

 

 

gpm*

AFY*

gpm*

AFY*

gpm*

AFY*

8030

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

1/10/1941

McAllister Wellfield

Primary

11,220

18,099

See totals below

See totals below

See totals below

See totals below

CS2-01105

(certificate)

City of Olympia

1/10/1949

McAllister Wellfield

Primary

2,392

782

Supplemental

0

3,088

CS2-SWP10191

(certificate)

City of Olympia

6/8/1955

McAllister Wellfield

Primary

4,488

7,240

G2-00979

G2-01116

G2-00213

G2-23683 (certificates)

City of

Olympia

3/7/1969

4/30/1971

10/12/1971

1/28/1975

Indian Summer Well 20
(S12)

Primary

850

329

G2-24052

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

1/29/1976

Kaiser Road

Well 1
(S03)

Primary

380

450

G2-27217

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Shana Well 11
(S10)

Supplemental

900

1143

G2-27225

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Hoffman Well 3 (S08)

 

Supplemental

900

720

G2-274262

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Allison Springs Well 13 (S09)

Primary

900

800

G2-279412

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Allison Springs Well 19 (S11)

Primary

1,200

900

60

2643

S2-21810

S2-21811

G2-26836

(certificates)

City of Olympia

4/20/1929

10/30/1945

1/23/1974

1/23/1974

11/26/1985

Briggs Nursery Well

Primary

1,100

288

785-D3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

7/20/1936

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

203

328

784-D3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

7/15/1937

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

200

323

34-A3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

5/22/1946

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

500

800

453-A3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

3/23/1950

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

700

228

4587-A3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

1/22/1960

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

2,250

1,723

G2-01073C3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

1/23/1967

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

900

1,440

G2-01072C3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

4/22/1971

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

900

1,440

G2-20844C3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

3/13/1973

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

862

1,379

G2-26058C3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

1/12/1982

Brewery Wellfield (Well 39)

Primary

0

604

Supplemental

1,5004

604

Olympia’s 1/3rd share of Brewery rights5

2,172

761

Total5

 

 

 

 

26,552 gpm5

29,649 acre ft/yr5,6

9,360 gpm

15,008 acre ft/yr

17,1925 gpm

14,6415

acre ft/yr

Table 4.3 Status of Water Rights Forecast for 2034

Permit, Certificate, or Claim Number

Rightholder or Claimant

Priority Date

Source Name

Primary or Supplemental Quantity

Existing

Water Rights

Forecasted Water Use (20 Year Demand)

Forecasted Water Rights Status

(20 Year Demand)

Excess (positive) Deficiency (negative)

Max

Instant.1 Flow Rate (Qi)

Max

Annual Volume (Qa)

Max Instant.1 Flow Rate (Qi)

Max Annual Volume (Qa)

Max Instant.1 Flow Rate (Qi)

Max

Annual Volume (Qa)

 

 

 

 

 

gpm*

AFY*

gpm*

AFY*

gpm*

AFY*

8030

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

1/10/1941

McAllister Wellfield

Primary

11,220

18,099

See totals below

See totals below

See totals below

See totals below

CS2-01105

(certificate)

City of Olympia

1/10/1949

McAllister Wellfield

Primary

2,392

782

Supplemental

0

3,088

CS2-SWP10191

(certificate)

City of Olympia

6/8/1955

McAllister Wellfield

Primary

4,488

7,240

G2-00979

G2-01116

G2-00213

G2-23683 (certificates)

City of

Olympia

3/7/1969

4/30/1971

10/12/1971

1/28/1975

Indian Summer Well 20
(S12)

Primary

850

329

G2-24052

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

1/29/1976

Kaiser Road

Well 1
(S03)

Primary

380

450

G2-27217

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Shana Well 11
(S10)

Supplemental

900

1143

G2-27225

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Hoffman Well 3 (S08)

Supplemental

900

720

G2-274262

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Allison Springs Well 13 (S09)

Primary

900

800

G2-279412

(certificate)

City of

Olympia

8/13/1986

Allison Springs Well 19 (S11)

Primary

1,200

900

60

2643

S2-21810

S2-21811

G2-26836

(certificates)

City of

Olympia

4/20/1929

10/30/1945

1/23/1974

1/23/1974

11/26/1985

Briggs Nursery Well

Primary

1,100

288

785-D3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

7/20/1936

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

203

328

784-D3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

7/15/1937

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

200

323

34-A3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

5/22/1946

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

500

800

453-A3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

3/23/1950

Brewery Wellfield

Primary

700

228

4587-A3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

1/22/1960

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

2,250

1,723

G2-01073C3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

1/23/1967

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

900

1,440

G2-01072C3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

4/22/1971

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

900

1,440

G2-20844C3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

3/13/1973

Brewery Wellfield

Supplemental

862

1,379

G2-26058C3

(certificate)

Cities of Lacey, Olympia, and Tumwater

1/12/1982

Brewery Wellfield (Well 39)

Primary

0

604

Supplemental

1,5004

604

Olympia’s 1/3rd share of Brewery rights5

2,172

761

Total5

 

 

 

 

26,552 gpm5

29,649 acre ft/yr5,6

10,555 gpm

17,024 acre ft/yr

15,9975 gpm

12,6255

acre ft/yr