700-21
HAZARDOUS ENERGY CONTROL

POLICY & PROCEDURE

Subject:

HAZARDOUS ENERGY CONTROL

Index: SAFETY

Number: 700-21

Effective Date:

4/18/2011

Supersedes:

N/A

Page:

1 of 20

Staff Contact:

Nancy A. Carlson

Approved By:

Denis Law

1.0 PURPOSE:

The purpose of this policy is to establish the requirements for servicing and maintaining machinery and equipment which may pose a hazard through the release of stored energy or sudden start-up. This program applies to City-authorized and affected employees and contractors and complies with WAC 296-803. The Hazardous Energy Control procedures shall provide personal protection from injury due to unexpected energization, startup or release of stored energy. It is designed to protect persons who might be working in, on or around equipment or machinery when it is being maintained, operated, repaired or serviced. The procedures require all energy isolating devices for equipment, machinery and processes to be properly labeled or otherwise identified, and when required, shall have the appropriate approved, substantial Lock-Out / Tag-Out device attached. Each affected department utilizing lockout/tagout procedures will maintain a written copy of the policy, procedures, program and permit and shall make it available for inspection by authorized and affected employees and by the director and his or her authorized representatives.

2.0 ORGANIZATIONS AFFECTED:

All departments/divisions

3.0 REFERENCES:

WAC 296-803

4.0 POLICY:

It is the policy of the City of Renton to ensure that all authorized and affected employees exposed to the hazards of energized equipment/machinery, will be provided with the means to effectively de-energize the equipment to perform the work safely.     

5.0 DEFINITIONS:

5.1    Affected Person: A person whose job requires that they operate or use a machine or equipment on which maintenance or service is being performed; or whose job requires that they work in an area in which maintenance or service is being performed

5.2    Authorized Person: A knowledgeable individual to whom authority and responsibility to perform a specific assignment has been given by the employer or designee.

5.3    “Capable of being locked out”: An energy isolating device which has, either by design or other attachment or integral part through which a lock can be affixed. Lock-out should be possible without dismantling, rebuilding or replacing the energy isolating device or permanently alter the energy control capacity.

5.4    Energized: Connected to an energy source that does or may contain residual or stored energy.

5.5    Energy Isolating Device: A physical device that prevents the transmission or release of energy, including but not limited to; circuit breakers, disconnect switches, manually operated switches, slide gates, slip blinds, line valves, blocks and similar devices used to block or isolate energy.*
*Push buttons, light switches, selector switches and timers are not energy isolating devices.

5.6    Energy Isolation Verification: The operation or testing of the equipment, machine or process (push buttons, switches, timers, etc.) that will determine whether or not the energy isolation was effective. This process will detect, relieve, disconnect, or restrain any residual or stored energy.

5.7    Energy Source: Any source of chemical, electrical, hydraulic, mechanical, nuclear, pneumatic, radioactive (laser or x-ray), thermal, or other type of energy.

5.8    Hot Tap: A procedure used in the repair, maintenance and service activities which involves welding on a piece of equipment (pipelines, vessels, tanks, etc.) under pressure in order to install connections or appurtenances. It is commonly used to replace or add sections of pipeline without interruption of air, chemical, gas, steam or water distribution systems. This may include an electrical tap to an existing live electrical feeder, using piercing connectors.

5.9    Lock-Out: Placement of a lock on an energy isolating device, which insures that the energy isolating device and the equipment, machine and/or process being controlled, cannot be operated until the lock has been removed by the qualified person who initially installed it.

5.10    Lock-Out Device: An approved device which may or may not include a hasp capable of withstanding the environment it shall be exposed to, and that incorporates a lock and a key that will hold an energy isolating device in the safe position, to protect all affected personnel.

5.11    Maintenance and Servicing: Activities including but not limited to; adjusting, constructing, inspecting, installing, maintaining, modifying or setting up equipment, machines or processes. This can include adjusting, cleaning, lubricating or unjamming of equipment or machines, where the employee may be exposed to unexpected energization or start-up of the equipment, machines or processes, or the release of any type of hazardous energy.

5.12    Qualified Person: An individual who has the appropriate education, experience and training to work in and around the equipment, machinery or process, and knows the effect of operating the controls or equipment.

5.13    Primary Authorized Employee: An employee who has overall responsibility for meeting the requirements of the lock-out/tag-out procedures.

5.14    Substantial: Applies to the physical integrity of both Lock-Out and Tag-Out devices. These devices shall meet the following criteria: Lock-out devices shall be strong enough to prevent removal without the use of excessive force or unusual techniques, such as with the use of bolt cutters or other metal cutting tool. Tag-out devices shall be strong enough to prevent inadvertent or accidental removal. The attachment of these devices shall be of a non-reusable type, attachable by hand, self-locking, and non-releasable with a minimum unlocking strength of 50 lb. force. String affixed to a tag-out device shall be deemed not acceptable.

5.15    Tag-Out: Placement of a tag on an energy isolating device that indicates that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled must not be operated until the tag has been removed by the qualified person who initially installed it.

5.16    Tag-Out Device: A prominent warning device, such as an approved tag and a means of attachment which can be securely fastened to the energy isolating device. The tag shall be a two part, perforated tag with the word “Danger” prominently displayed. The tag shall indicate the energy isolating device and equipment being controlled. The tag-out device shall also be capable of withstanding the environment to which it is exposed, exterior or interior

6.0     PROCEDURES: See Hazardous Energy Control Program, Attachment A.

CITY OF RENTON HAZARDOUS ENERGY CONTROL PROGRAM

The purpose of this policy is to establish the requirements for servicing and maintaining machinery and equipment which may pose a hazard through the release of stored energy or sudden start-up. This program applies to City authorized and affected employees and contractors and complies with WAC 296-803.The Hazardous Energy Control procedures shall provide personal protection from injury due to unexpected energization, startup or release of stored energy. It is designed to protect persons who might be working in, on or around equipment or machinery when it is being maintained, operated, repaired or serviced. The procedures require all energy isolating devices for equipment, machinery and processes to be properly labeled or otherwise identified, and when required, shall have the appropriate approved, substantial Lock-Out / Tag-Out device attached. Each affected department utilizing lockout/tagout procedures will maintain a written copy of the policy, procedures, program and permit and shall make it available for inspection by authorized and affected employees and by the director and his or her authorized representatives.

I.    DEFINITIONS:

Affected Person - A person whose job requires that they operate or use a machine or equipment on which maintenance or service is being performed; or whose job requires that they work in an area in which maintenance or service is being performed

Authorized Person - A knowledgeable individual to whom authority and responsibility to perform a specific assignment has been given by the employer or designee.

“Capable of being locked out” - an energy isolating device which has, either by design or other attachment or integral part through which a lock can be affixed. Lock-out should be possible without dismantling, rebuilding or replacing the energy isolating device or permanently alter the energy control capacity.

Energized - Connected to an energy source that does or may contain residual or stored energy.

Energy Isolating Device - A physical device that prevents the transmission or release of energy, including but not limited to; circuit breakers, disconnect switches, manually operated switches, slide gates, slip blinds, line valves, blocks and similar devices used to block or isolate energy.
*Push buttons, light switches, selector switches and timers are not energy isolating devices.

Energy Isolation Verification - The operation or testing of the equipment, machine or process (push buttons, switches, timers etc.) that will determine whether or not the energy isolation was effective. This process will detect, relieve, disconnect, or restrain any residual or stored energy.

Energy Source - Any source of chemical, electrical, hydraulic, mechanical, nuclear, pneumatic, radioactive (laser or x-ray), thermal, or other type of energy.

Hot Tap - A procedure used in the repair, maintenance and service activities which involves welding on a piece of equipment (pipelines, vessels, tanks etc.) under pressure in order to install connections or appurtenances. It is commonly used to replace or add sections of pipeline without interruption of air, chemical, gas, steam or water distribution systems. This may include an electrical tap to an existing live electrical feeder, using piercing connectors.

Lock-Out - Placement of a lock on an energy isolating device, which insures that the energy isolating device and the equipment, machine and/or process being controlled, can not be operated until the lock has been removed by the qualified person who initially installed it.

Lock-Out Device - An approved device which may or may not include a hasp capable of withstanding the environment it shall be exposed to, and that incorporates a lock and a key that will hold an energy isolating device in the safe position, to protect all affected personnel.

Maintenance and Servicing - Activities including but not limited to; adjusting constructing, inspecting, installing, maintaining, modifying or setting up equipment, machines or processes. This can include adjusting, cleaning, lubricating or unjamming of equipment or machines, where the employee may be exposed to unexpected energization or start-up of the equipment, machines or processes, or the release of any type of hazardous energy.

Qualified Person - An individual who has the appropriate education, experience and training to work in and around the equipment, machinery or process, and knows the effect of operating the controls or equipment.

Primary Authorized Employee –an employee who has overall responsibility for meeting the requirements of the lockout/tagout procedures.

Substantial - applies to the physical integrity of both Lock-Out and Tag-Out devices. These devices shall meet the criteria identified below;
Lock-out devices shall be strong enough to prevent removal without the use of excessive force or unusual techniques, such as with the use of bolt cutters or other metal cutting tool.
Tag-out devices shall be strong enough to prevent inadvertent or accidental removal. The attachment of these devices shall be of a non-reusable type, attachable by hand, self-locking, and non-releasable with a minimum unlocking strength of 50 lb. force. String affixed to a tag-out device shall be deemed not acceptable.

Tag-Out - Placement of a tag on an energy isolating device that indicates that the energy isolating device and the equipment being controlled must not be operated until the tag has been removed by the qualified person who initially installed it.

Tag-Out Device - a prominent warning device, such as an approved tag and a means of attachment which can be securely fastened to the energy isolating device. The tag shall be a two part, perforated tag with the word “Danger” prominently displayed. The tag shall indicate the energy isolating device and equipment being controlled. The tag-out device shall also be capable of withstanding the environment to which it is exposed, exterior or interior

II. PROCEDURES:

Responsibilities

Each Department has a named Lock Out/Tag Out Administrator.

The lock-out/tag-out program administrator is responsible for:

•    Implementation of this program;

•    Ensuring each employee is trained in the requirements of this program;

•    Approving all lockout tagout procedures; and

•    Assigning and maintaining lockout/tagout locks and equipment

Lock Out/Tag Out Administrators:

Golf - Golf Course Superintendent

Parks- Parks Maintenance Supervisor

Public Works-Water Manager

Facilities- Facilities Maintenance Supervisor

III. MACHINE DESIGN

The City is required to ensure that all machines and equipment that are newly installed or have undergone major replacement, repair, renovation or modification after July 2, 1990 are designed to accept a lockout energy-isolating device.

IV. ENERGY CONTROL

The City is required to provide appropriate lockout and tagout devices and means to control energy by 1) providing appropriate means to control energy; 2) assure all lockout and tagout devices meet all of these requirements; and 3) provide the means necessary to isolate, secure, or block machines and equipment from energy sources.

Examples of means to control energy include:

1.    Locks;

2.    Tags;

3.    Chains;

4.    Wedges;

5.    Key blocks;

6.    Adapter pins;

7.    Self-locking fasteners;

8.    Blank flanges;

9.    Cribbing;

10.    Create no additional hazards;

11.    Have a distinctive design or appearance;

12.    Are the only devices used for controlling energy;

13.    Are not used for any other purpose;

14.    Are durable enough to withstand the environment they’re used in for the maximum time they’re expected to be used;

15.    Are standardized within the facility by color, shape, or size; or

16.    That identifies the person applying the device.

V. TEMPORARY ENERGIZATION

If it is necessary to temporarily energize a machine, equipment, or component for testing or positing, follow normal energy control procedures to:

1.     Remove the lockout or tagout devices;

2.     Energize the machine, equipment, or component; and

3.    Reapply the lockout or tagout devices when testing or positioning is completed.

VI. EMPLOYEE PROTECTION

Authorized and affected employees must be protected at all times. For a shift or personnel change, ensure there is continuous lockout or tagout protection during the change and provide for the orderly transfer of lockout or tagout device protection between authorized and affected employees.

Each piece of equipment or system with the potential to injure an employee through the unexpected release of energy must have a written energy control procedure, unless all of the following conditions are met:

1.     The machine or equipment has no potential for stored or residual energy or reaccumulation of stored energy after shut down which could endanger authorized and affected employees

2.    The machine or equipment has a single energy source which can be readily identified and isolated.

3.     The isolation and locking out of that energy source will completely deenergize and deactivate the machine or equipment.

4.     The machine or equipment is isolated from that energy source and locked out during servicing or maintenance.

5.    A single lockout device will achieve a locked-out condition.

6.     The lockout device is under the exclusive control of the authorized employee performing the servicing or maintenance.

7.     The servicing or maintenance does not create hazards for other authorized and affected employees.

8.     There have been no accidents involving the unexpected activation or reenergization of the machine or equipment during servicing or maintenance.

VII. GROUP LOCKOUT OR TAGOUT

Group lockout must be done so that each member of a crew or department is given the same level of protection as that provided by an individual lockout or tagout device. One employee will be designated to coordinate the procedure and checklist.

Assign a primary authorized employee who has overall responsibility for the service or maintenance and attaches their own lockout or tagout device to the energy-isolating device when the equipment is deenergized and before any work begins and is the last person to remove their lockout or tagout device when the job is complete

Each authorized employee shall put a personal lockout or tagout device on the group lockout device, lockbox or comparable mechanism before beginning work and does not remove it until they have finished work on the machine or equipment.

When a contractor is exposed under a group lockout, they shall have an identified lock in the system that provides full protection to their authorized and affected employees.

If more than one group works on a machine or equipment that has to be locked or tagged out follow these steps:

1.     Assign an authorized employee as the group coordinator with overall responsibility to coordinate the different work groups, and maintain continuous lockout or tagout protection

2.     Assign an authorized employee in each group who has responsibility for the group opf authorized and affected employees who are protected by a group lockout or tagout device and can determine which authorized and affected employees of the group exposed to the machine or equipment that’s locked or tagged out.

VIII. CONTRACTORS and OUTSIDE EMPLOYERS

Outside personnel, such as contractors or non-departmental authorized and affected employees, shall not be allowed to lockout equipment without direct supervision of an authorized employee from the affected department. Contractors shall be informed of City of Renton procedures prior to performing work, and must have an effective lockout plan for their authorized and affected employees. They must inform the City of Renton authorized employee of their lockout or tagout procedures and train/confirm that all City of Renton authorized and affected employees understand and will follow the restrictions of their energy control program.

1.    Prior to performing service or maintenance on equipment or machinery that could injure an employee during unexpected energization, the equipment/machinery must be de-energized and a lockout device applied.

2.    When it is not possible to use a lockout device, a tagout procedure must be used. The tag-out procedure must provide full employee protection.

3.     All affected authorized and affected employees, contractors, or other parties entering into an affected area shall be notified by the authorized employee of application and removal of lockout and tagout devices. Notification shall be given before the controls are applied and after they are removed.

4.    Whenever replacement, renovation, major repair or modification of a machine is performed, energy isolating devices for such machines or equipment shall be designed and constructed to accept a lockout device.

5.    Each division utilizing lockout/tagout will perform an annual lockout review or inspection. This may include a procedure check, review of completed lockout checklists for the previous year, correction of deficiencies and a review of authorized employee’s responsibilities.

IX. LOCKOUT/TAGOUT DEVICES

All locks, tags and devices to control energy are provided by the City of Renton for Renton authorized and affected employees. The City must make sure lockout devices are strong enough so that removing them by other than the normal unlocking method requires excessive force or unusual techniques, such as the use of bolt cutters or other metal-cutting tools.

Tag-out devices must meet all of the following requirements:

1.    Create no additional hazards;

2.    Are standardized, or have a distinctive design or appearance to be easily identified;

3.    Are the only devices used for controlling energy;

4.    Are NOT used for any other purpose;

5.    Are durable enough to withstand the environment they are used in for the maximum time they are expected to be used;

6.    Identify the person applying the device; and

7.    Shall warn against hazardous conditions and include specific wording, such as “Do Not Operate, Do Not Open, Do Not Close, Do Not Energize, or Do Not Operate.”

Tag-out devices must be strong enough to prevent unintentional or accidental removal and make sure the means used to attach the tag to the energy-isolating device meets all of the following:

1.    Isn't reusable;

2.    Is self-locking;

3.    Can be attached by hand;

4.    Can't be released with a force of less than 50 pounds; and

5.    Is similar in design and basic characteristics to a one-piece, all-environment-tolerant, nylon cable tie.

All tags must:

Use the same print and format within a location, must be made of materials that will withstand the environmental conditions they will be exposed to, have a warning about not energizing the machine or equipment, be constructed and printed so they won't deteriorate and the message on the tag remains legible when:

•    Exposed to weather

•    Used in wet or damp locations

•    Used in corrosive environments such as areas where acid or alkali chemicals are handled or stored

X. APPLYING LOCKOUT OR TAGOUT DEVICES

When applying lockout/tag-out devices you must make sure a machine or equipment is turned off, and that the authorized employee knows all of the following:

1.    The type and magnitude of the energy;

2.    The hazards of the energy to be controlled; and

3.    The method or means to control the energy.

An orderly shutdown is required to avoid additional or increased hazard to authorized and affected employees as a result of the equipment stoppage:

1.    Turn off or shut down the machine or equipment using established procedures.

2.    Completely isolate the machine or equipment from its energy sources using the appropriate energy–isolating devices after the machine or equipment has been turned off.

3.    An authorized employee must notify other department authorized and affected employees that the machine or equipment is being locked or tagged out before the devices are applied.

Make sure a lockout tagout device is applied:

1.    For each energy isolating device; and

2.    Only by the authorized employee doing the service or maintenance.

Make sure lockout devices hold the energy-isolating device in the “safe” or “off” position.

Make sure a tagout device, when used with an energy –isolating device that can be locked out, is fastened to the device at the same point a lock out would have been attached.

Make sure a tagout device that cannot be attached directly to an energy-isolating device is located as close as safely possible to the energy–isolating device and in apposition that is immediately obvious to anyone attempting to operate the energy–isolating device.

XI. ENERGY CONTROL PROCEDURES

Use energy control procedures to protect authorized and affected employees servicing or maintaining machines and equipment from potentially hazardous energy. Use a lockout system if an energy-isolating device can be locked out.

To protect authorized and affected employees from the hazards of stored energy and residual energy make sure all potentially hazardous stored and residual energy is relieved, disconnected or otherwise rendered safe after the lockout or tagout devices have been put on the energy-isolating devices.

Continue to verify the isolation of machines and equipment that could re-accumulate stored energy to a hazardous level until service or maintenance is completed or the possibility of re-accumulating hazardous energy no longer exists.

The authorized employee must verify the machine or equipment that is being locked out or tagged out has been isolated from all energy sources and is de-energized before starting work.

XII. PROCEDURES FOR REMOVING LOCKOUT OR TAGOUT DEVICES

Make sure only the authorized employee who applied the lockout or tagout removes it.

Restore the machine or equipment to service after the service or maintenance is completed and the machine or equipment is ready to return to its normal operating condition by doing the following steps:

Step 1:        Check the machine or equipment and the immediate area around it to make sure all nonessential items have been removed and that the machine or equipment is in operating condition and ready to energize.

Step 2:        Make sure all authorized and affected employees are safely positioned for starting or energizing the machine or equipment.

Step 3:        Verify that the controls are in neutral.

Step 4:        Check that authorized and affected employees in the area are in positions that make it safe to energize the machine or equipment.

Step 5:        Remove the lockout devices and reenergize the machine or equipment.

Step 6:        Notify affected authorized and affected employees that the servicing or maintenance is completed and the machine or equipment is ready to use.

Note: Some forms of blocking may require re-energization of the machine before they can be safely removed.

Removal Exemption-

A lockout or tagout device can be removed by someone other than the authorized employee who applied it if all of the following are met:

1.     The energy control program has documented, specific procedures and training for this situation

2.     You can show that the specific procedures used are as safe as having the device removed by the authorized employee who applied it

3.     The specific procedures include the following:

a.     Verifying the authorized employee who applied the device is not at the facility

b.     Making all reasonable efforts to contact and inform the authorized employee that the lockout or tagout device is being removed

c.     Making sure the authorized employee is informed before resuming work at the location that the lockout or tagout device has been removed

XIII. TRAINING

1.    All training must be performed and documented prior to assigning an employee to exposure tasks. Post training authorized and affected employees will understand the purpose and function of the energy control program and have the knowledge and skills necessary to carry out their program responsibilities. Training will be documented with the name of the employee, the date, and name of the training and trainer by an attendance sheet/roster and kept on site for 5 years.

2.    All authorized and affected employees shall receive training covering the following elements:

a.    This Lockout/Tagout policy/procedures

b.    Recognition of hazardous energy sources, magnitude of energy available and methods necessary of energy isolation and control in the workplace

c.    Instructed in the purpose and use of energy control procedures

d.    Departmental procedures for specific equipment/machinery

e.    The correct procedure for equipment shutdown and start-up

f.    The limitations of lockout/tagout devices and procedures

g.    Who needs to be part of the lockout/tagout before entering the work area

h.    Prohibition against attempting to restart or reenergize a machine or equipment that is locked out or tagged out.

i.    Opportunity for question and answer period

3.    Affected Authorized and affected employees shall be informed of the meaning of lockout/tagout devices. Training must include a prohibition against any interference with lockout or tagout devices that creates a hazard.

XIV. TAGOUT DEVICE TRAINING

If authorized and affected employees use tagout devices they will be trained that tags are warnings devices and do not provide the same level of physical restraint as a lock.

When attached to energy-isolating devices tags are not to be:

Removed without the approval of the authorized person responsible for it or bypassed, ignored or otherwise defeated.

Tags must be legible and understandable to be effective and must be securely attached to the energy isolating device so they cannot be accidentally detached.

XV. RETRAINING

Retraining must be done whenever inadequacies in knowledge or practice are found, or there are substantial changes in equipment, control methods or procedures or a change in job assignments, machines, equipment, or process that presents a new hazard or a change in energy control procedures. Retraining will occur if the employee is found to deviate from or has inadequate knowledge of, the energy control procedures or the City has reason to believe retraining is necessary.

All affected and authorized and affected employees will receive retraining upon hire and then every three years.

XVI. PERIODIC REVIEWS

The City will do annual periodic reviews of procedures using lockout devices and procedures using tagout devices to make sure employees know and use your energy control procedures. These reviews are performed to verify employees know and follow the energy control procedures, to be certain employees know and can apply the energy control procedures, and to correct any deviations or inadequacies identified. All reviews will be documented and kept on file for a period of 5 years.

1.    Machine or equipment the energy control procedure was used for

2.     Review employee responsibility with lockout devices ( must be done individually with each affected employee)

3.    Review employee responsibility with tagout devices and limitations of tagout devices

4.    Date of review employees attending the review

5.    Trainer’s name

Each Department performing Hazardous Energy Control will have the annual periodic review done by an authorized employee other than the ones using the energy control procedure being reviewed.

Documentation:

It must be documented that periodic reviews have been done. All of the following must be included:

1.    Machine or equipment the energy control procedure was used for

2.    Date of the review

3.    Employees included in the review

4.    Person doing the review.

Periodic reviews of procedures using lockout devices:

For periodic reviews involving lockout devices, the reviewing employee reviews responsibilities with each authorized employee who uses the procedure. Periodic reviews of authorized employees using energy control procedures involving only lockout devices can be done in a group meeting if desired.

Periodic reviews of procedures using tagout devices:

For periodic reviews involving tagout devices, the reviewing employee reviews with each authorized and affected employee the:

– Employee’s responsibilities under the procedure and limitations of tagout device

Note: Periodic reviews of authorized and affected employees using energy control procedures involving tagout devices have to be done with each employee individually.es.

XVII. ELECTRICAL LOCKOUT

1.     General. Safety-related work practices shall be employed to prevent electric shock or other injuries resulting from either direct or indirect electrical contacts, when work is performed near or on equipment or circuits which are or may be energized. The specific safety-related work practices shall be consistent with the nature and extent of the associated electrical hazards.

a.     Deenergized parts. Live parts to which an employee may be exposed shall be deenergized before the employee works on or near them, unless the employer can demonstrate that deenergizing introduces additional or increased hazards or is infeasible due to equipment design or operational limitations. Live parts that operate at less than 50 volts to ground need not be deenergized if there will be no increased exposure to electrical burns or to explosion due to electric arcs.

b.     Energized parts. If the exposed live parts are not deenergized (i.e., for reasons of increased or additional hazards or infeasibility), other safety-related work practices shall be used to protect authorized and affected employees who may be exposed to the electrical hazards involved. Such work practices shall protect authorized and affected employees against contact with energized circuit parts directly with any part of their body or indirectly through some other conductive object. The work practices that are used shall be suitable for the conditions under which the work is to be performed and for the voltage level of the exposed electric conductors or circuit parts. Specific work practice requirements are detailed in WAC 296-24-960.

2.     Working on or near exposed deenergized parts.

a.    Application. This subsection applies to work on exposed deenergized parts or near enough to them to expose the employee to any electrical hazard they present. Conductors and parts of electric equipment that have been deenergized but have not been locked out or tagged according to this subsection shall be treated as energized parts.

b.     Lockout and tagging. While any employee is exposed to contact with parts of fixed electric equipment or circuits which have been deenergized, the circuits energizing the parts shall be locked out or tagged or both according to the requirements of this section. The requirements shall be followed in the order in which they are presented (i.e., b.(i) of this subsection first, then b.(ii) of this subsection.

Note 1: As used in this section, fixed equipment refers to equipment fastened in place or connected by permanent wiring methods.

Deenergizing equipment

a.     Safe procedures for deenergizing circuits and equipment shall be determined before circuits or equipment is deenergized.

b.     The circuits and equipment to be worked on shall be disconnected from all electric energy sources. Control circuit devices, such as push buttons, selector switches, and interlocks, shall not be used as the sole means for deenergizing circuits or equipment. Interlocks for electric equipment shall not be used as a substitute for lockout and tagging procedures.

c.     Stored electric energy which might endanger personnel shall be released. Capacitors shall be discharged and high capacitance elements shall be short-circuited and grounded, if the stored electric energy might endanger personnel.

Note: If the capacitors or associated equipment are handled in meeting this requirement, they shall be treated as energized.

d.     Stored nonelectrical energy in devices that could reenergize electric circuit parts shall be blocked or relieved to the extent that the circuit parts could not be accidentally energized by the device.

Application of locks and tags

a.     A lock and a tag shall be placed on each disconnecting means used to deenergize circuits and equipment on which work is to be performed, except as provided in subitems (C) and (E) of this item. The lock shall be attached to prevent persons from operating the disconnecting means unless they resort to undue force or the use of tools.

b.     Each tag shall contain a statement prohibiting unauthorized operation of the disconnecting means and removal of the tag.

c.     If a lock cannot be applied, or if the employer can demonstrate that tagging procedures will provide a level of safety equivalent to that obtained by the use of a lock, a tag may be used without a lock.

d.     A tag used without a lock, as permitted by subitem (C) of this item, shall be supplemented by at least one additional safety measure that provides a level of safety equivalent to that obtained by the use of a lock. Examples of additional safety measures include the removal of an isolating circuit element, blocking of a controlling switch, or opening of an extra disconnecting device.

e.    A lock may be placed without a tag only under the following conditions:

(i)     Only one circuit or piece of equipment is deenergized; and

(ii) The lockout period does not extend beyond the work shift; and

(iii) Authorized and affected employees exposed to the hazards associated with reenergizing the circuit or equipment is familiar with this procedure.

(iv) Verification of deenergized condition. The requirements of this subsection shall be met before any circuits or equipment can be considered and worked as deenergized.

f.     A qualified person shall operate the equipment operating controls or otherwise verify that the equipment cannot be restarted.

g.     A qualified person shall use test equipment to test the circuit elements and electrical parts of equipment to which authorized and affected employees will be exposed and shall verify that the circuit elements and equipment parts are deenergized. The test shall also determine if any energized condition exists as a result of inadvertently induced voltage or unrelated voltage backfeed even though specific parts of the circuit have been deenergized and presumed to be safe. If the circuit to be tested is over 600 volts, nominal, the test equipment shall be checked for proper operation immediately before and immediately after this test.

h.     Reenergizing equipment. These requirements shall be met, in the order given, before circuits or equipment is reenergized, even temporarily.

(i)    A qualified person shall conduct tests and visual inspections, as necessary, to verify that all tools, electrical jumpers, shorts, grounds, and other such devices have been removed, so that the circuits and equipment can be safely energized.

(ii)     Authorized and affected employees exposed to the hazards associated with reenergizing the circuit or equipment shall be warned to stay clear of circuits and equipment.

(iii)     Each lock and tag shall be removed by the employee who applied it or under his or her direct supervision. However, if this employee is absent from the workplace, then the lock or tag may be removed by a qualified person designated to perform this task provided that:

(a)     The employer ensures that the employee who applied the lock or tag is not available at the workplace; and

(b)    The employer ensures that the employee is aware that the lock or tag has been removed before he or she resumes work at that workplace.

(c)    There shall be a visual determination that all authorized and affected employees are clear of the circuits and equipment.

XVIII. EXEMPTIONS

This lockout/tagout program does not apply if:

1.     Employees performing service/maintenance activities can completely de-energize the equipment by unplugging a power cord. The unplugged power cord must be under the exclusive control of the employee(s) conducting the service and/or maintenance activities.

2.     If the City of Renton can show that continuity of service is essential, shutdown is impractical, and proper protection of the employees has been provided for.

Specific Exemptions

1.    Equipment powered by a cord and plug that is disconnected and under the control of the person performing maintenance is not covered by this policy.

2.    If a hot tap operation is being performed where continuity of service is essential, shutdown of the system is impractical and documented procedures are followed that provide full worker protection, this policy does not apply.

3.    Minor tool changes, servicing or adjustments as part of normal operations are not covered by this policy if they are effectively protected and routine, repetitive and integral to the process.

4.    Exposure to electrical hazards from work on, near or with conductors or equipment in electrical utilization installations are covered under Part L of WAC 296-24. All work must be performed by a qualified employee.

HAZARDOUS ENERGY CONTROL CHECKLIST

Date:____________________ Authorized employee: _____________________________ Department/Division: __________________________

COMPLIANCE WITH THIS PROGRAM: All authorized and affected employees are required to comply with the restrictions and limitations imposed upon them during the use of lockout. Authorized and affected employees will perform lockout as described in this procedure. No employee will attempt to start, energize or use any machine or equipment that is locked out. Failure to comply with this procedure will result in discipline up to and including termination. Use this checklist for every piece of equipment that does not meet the exemption below.

Exemption: You don't have to have written energy control procedures for a particular machine or equipment if all of the following apply:

– The machine or equipment has a single energy source that's easily identified and can be isolated

– The machine or equipment is completely de-energized and deactivated by isolating and locking out the energy source

– There’s no stored or residual energy that could be a hazard to employees, and the machine or equipment can't re-accumulate such energy after it’s been shut down

– The energy source can be locked out with a single lockout device.

– The machine or equipment is isolated from the energy source and locked out during service or maintenance

– The authorized employee doing the service or maintenance has exclusive control of the lockout device

– The service or maintenance doesn't create a hazard for other Authorized and Affected employees

– The machine or equipment has never been unexpectedly energized or activated during service or maintenance.

SPECIFIC PROCEDURAL STEPS:

Step 1:    The authorized employee will identify the type and magnitude of the energy that the machine or equipment uses, understand the hazards of the energy, and the methods to control the energy before using this procedure. Below – List the type and magnitude of the energy, its hazards, and the method to control the energy. Hazardous energy is electricity at 240 volts. For additional information, see WAC 296-803-50010, in this chapter.

_____________________________________________________________            

_____________________________________________________________            

Step 2:    Disable backup energy sources such as generators and batteries. Notify all affected employees that the machine or equipment is to be shut down and locked out for service or maintenance. List the names and job titles of affected employees and how you notify them (such as: J. Brown, Facility Supervisor, via phone X2222) For additional information, see WAC 296-803-50010, in this chapter.

___________________________________________________________    _            

____________________________________________________________            

Step 3:    Shut down the machine or equipment by the normal stopping procedure (such as depressing a stop button, opening switches, or closing valves). List types and locations of machine or equipment operating controls. For additional information, see WAC 296-803-50010, in this chapter.

____________________________________________________________            

____________________________________________________________            

Step 4:    Completely isolate the machine or equipment from its energy sources by using the appropriate energy-isolating devices. List types and locations of energy isolating devices. (such as: circuit breaker, main hall, building D) For additional information, see WAC 296-803-50010, in this chapter.

____________________________________________________________            

____________________________________________________________                

Step 5:    Lock out the energy isolating devices with assigned individual locks. List any additional procedural requirements (such as putting on a tag with amplifying information, necessary for the authorized employee to know.) For additional information, see WAC 296-803-50010, in this chapter.

____________________________________________________________            

____________________________________________________________            

Step 6:    Dissipate or restrain stored and residual energy, such as that in capacitors, springs, elevated machine members, rotating flywheels, hydraulic systems, and air, gas, steam, or water pressure, using methods such as grounding, repositioning, blocking, or bleeding down.

List the types of stored and residual energy and the methods to dissipate or restrain them. For additional information, see WAC 296-803-50025, in this chapter. List any actions necessary to prevent stored energy from re-accumulating to a hazardous level. For additional information, see WAC 296-803-50025, in this chapter____________________________________________________________    

_________________________________________________________________________    

Step 7:    Test equipment and circuitry to make sure they are de-energized. This must be done by a qualified person.

Step 8    Lock out the energy isolating devices with assigned individual locks. See procedure for applying lockout or tagout devices. (List any additional procedural requirements, such as putting on a tag with amplifying information, necessary for the authorized employee to know.) _________________________________________________________________________    

Step 9:    Make sure the equipment is disconnected from the energy sources and stored and residual energy has been made safe. Check that no personnel are exposed, then verify the isolation of the equipment by doing the following: List the method of verifying machine or equipment isolation, (such as operating the push button or other normal operating controls or by testing to make certain the equipment will not operate.) For additional information, see WAC 296-803-50030 in this chapter)

CAUTION: Return the operating controls to the safe, neutral, or off position, after verifying the equipment is isolated from its energy sources.

SUPERVISOR MUST SIGN AFTER REVIEWING FOR ACCURACY

Supervisor Signature            Print Name                    Date

This checklist must be kept on file for five (5) years from the date signed.