Chapter 21.06
DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS

Sections:

21.06.010    Infrastructure standards.

21.06.020    Public and private parks and open spaces.

21.06.030    School land dedication fee.

21.06.040    Landscape, buffering and screening standards.

21.06.050    Off-street parking, loading and bicycle storage.

21.06.060    Subdivision standards.

21.06.070    Sign regulation.

21.06.080    Outdoor lighting.

21.06.090    Site circulation.

21.06.100    Private streets, shared driveways and loop lanes.

21.06.010 Infrastructure standards.

(a)    General.

(1)    Public Improvements. The improvements described in this section must be built by the applicant and constructed in accordance with adopted standards, unless otherwise indicated. No improvements shall be made until the following required plans, profiles and specifications have been submitted to, and approved by, the City:

(i)    Roads, streets and alleys;

(ii)    Street lights and street signs for all street intersections;

(iii)    Sanitary sewer pipes and facilities;

(iv)    Fire hydrants and water distribution system and storage;

(v)    Storm drainage system;

(vi)    Irrigation system;

(vii)    Right-of-way landscaping;

(viii)    Other improvements and/or facilities as may be required by changing technology and the approval process;

(ix)    Permanent survey reference monuments and monument boxes (see § 38-51-101 C.R.S.).

(2)    Guarantee of Public Improvements. No development shall be approved until the City has accepted constructed infrastructure or the developer has executed a development improvements agreement and provided adequate security (see GJMC 21.02.070(m)).

(3)    No planning clearance for any use or activity shall be issued until minimum street improvements have been constructed, paid for or adequately secured.

(4)    City Participation. The City may elect to require the developer to coordinate construction with the City as required in this chapter.

(b)    Streets, Alleys, Trails and Easements.

(1)    Design Standards.

(i)    Streets, alleys, sidewalks, trails and bike paths shall be designed and constructed in accordance with applicable City standards also known as Transportation Engineering Design Standards TEDS (GJMC Title 29).

(ii)    No owner or developer shall propose a site design or plan which could result in the applicant controlling access to a street, alley or right-of-way.

(iii)    Easements shall be provided as required for improvements and utilities. Alleys may be used for placement of utilities and infrastructure.

(iv)    If needed to provide safe and adequate access and circulation for residents, visitors, users and occupants, the applicant shall provide off-site infrastructure.

(v)    Each project with one or more buildings (except detached dwellings) shall provide paved pedestrian walkway/sidewalk connections to nearby rights-of-way. Said connections shall be separate from parking and driveway areas.

(2)    Right-of-Way Dedication.

(i)    A developer shall dedicate to the City such rights-of-way (i.e., streets, sidewalks, trails, bicycle paths and easements) needed to serve the project in accordance with the Grand Junction Circulation Plan, as amended.

(ii)    Required right-of-way dedications shall be at no cost to the City. Such dedications shall not be eligible for transportation impact fee credit.

(3)    Required Improvements.

(i)    The developer shall construct minimum street improvements, local streets, alleys, sidewalks, trails and bike paths as required by this code. The type of improvements and required design (i.e., cross sections) shall be those provided in TEDS (GJMC Title 29).

(A)    Minimum street improvements shall be those required for the safe ingress and egress of traffic to and from the development and include the design and construction of all streets internal to and fronting a development that are designated as local or unclassified in the Grand Junction Circulation Plan.

(B)    Any unbuilt street that is designated in the Grand Junction Circulation Plan as a collector or arterial and is internal to the development shall be constructed to a local street standard by the developer.

a.    The City may require the developer based on the City’s Circulation Plan and input from the Public Works Director to design and construct the street to a collector or arterial standard, thereby requiring the oversizing of streets.

b.    When oversizing is required, the developer may be eligible for a City cost-share agreement in the differential amount between the required local street improvement and the required collector or arterial street improvement.

(C)    All streets connecting the existing street network to the development shall be at least 20 feet wide, serve the development’s traffic demands, meet the Fire Code, and be designed structurally to meet fire equipment load requirements.

(ii)    Commencing January 1, 2021, the developer shall construct improvements necessary for the safe ingress and/or egress of traffic to the development, as required by the Director.

(A)    To achieve safe ingress and/or egress, if turn lanes to and from the development are warranted based on a traffic impact study, the developer will be responsible for the design and construction of said lanes.

(B)    Where a safety improvement is for the benefit of a development but will benefit other future developments, the developer may request the City to provide a reimbursement agreement for a period of up to 20 years to recapture a portion of the improvement costs based on a proportionate usage of the improvement as determined by an approved traffic study. The developer may request extension of the reimbursement agreement term.

(4)    Existing Streets.

(i)    Existing Local Streets.

(A)    General. Many areas of the City were developed in the unincorporated areas of Mesa County without modern urban street and drainage facilities. In many such neighborhoods and areas, the existing local streets do not have curbs, gutters or sidewalks. Given that there are no serious safety or drainage problems associated with these local streets, there is no current reason to improve these streets or to install curbs, gutters and/or sidewalks. When an owner in one of these established neighborhoods chooses to subdivide a lot or parcel or an owner in a commercial or industrial area chooses to develop a lot or parcel, unless such improvements are extended off site to connect to a larger system, the new “short runs” of curbing, gutters and/or sidewalks are of little value as drainage facilities or pedestrian ways until some future development or improvement district extends them to other connecting facilities.

(B)    Instead of constructing “short run” improvements, the owner may apply to the Director to defer full and permanent improvements (“permanent improvements”) by:

a.    Signing an agreement to form an improvement district for the construction of certain required curb(s), gutter(s) and sidewalk(s) and street improvements (“temporary improvements”) in lieu of construction at the time of approval of the development application; and

b.    Constructing, as required by the City, certain temporary curb(s), gutter(s), sidewalk(s), and street improvement(s) required by the City as a condition of approval of the development application. Temporary improvements shall be constructed with the same materials and to the same standards as required of permanent improvements.

c.    The agreement to form an improvement district shall be in a form approved by the City Attorney. The agreement shall run with the land and shall be recorded with the Mesa County Clerk and Recorder.

(C)    The Director may defer for a period and on terms established by the Director residential street improvements if all of the following criteria are met:

a.    The development is for three or less residential lots;

b.    The zoning or existing uses in the block or neighborhood are residential. The Director shall determine the boundaries of the block or neighborhood, based on topography, traffic patterns, and the character of the neighborhood;

c.    The existing local residential street that provides access to the lots or development meets minimum safety and drainage standards, and has a design use of less than 1,000 average daily traffic (“ADT”) based on an assumed typical 10 trips per day per residence and the volume is expected to be less than 1,000 ADT when the neighborhood or block is fully developed;

d.    At least 80 percent of the lots and tracts in the neighborhood or block are already built upon, so that the street and drainage character is well established;

e.    If an existing safety hazard or drainage problem, including pedestrian or bicycle traffic, exists and it can be improved or remedied without the street improvements being built; and

f.    There is at least 250 feet from any point on the development to the nearest existing street improvements (on the same side of the street) that substantially comply with the City standard for similar street improvements.

(D)    The Director may defer, for a period and terms established by the Director, nonresidential street improvements if all of the following criteria have been met:

a.    The development is for a single commercial or industrial lot or parcel that does not create a new lot or parcel;

b.    The proposed development or use of the lot or parcel must be consistent with the allowed uses and requirements of the current zone district;

c.    The lot or parcel size is two acres or less;

d.    The lot or parcel does not have more than 500 feet of frontage on the local nonresidential street;

e.    If an existing safety hazard or drainage problem, including pedestrian or bicycle traffic, exists and it can be improved or remedied without the local nonresidential street improvements being built; and

f.    There is at least 250 feet from any point on the development to the nearest existing street improvements (on the same side of the street) that substantially comply with the City standard for similar local nonresidential street improvements.

(5)    Public Right-of-Way and Private Parking Lot Use.

(i)    No structure, fence, sign, parking lot, detention/retention pond, or other temporary or permanent object or structure shall be constructed, maintained, or erected in any portion of any public right-of-way without first obtaining a revocable permit from the City. The City Engineer or other City official may allow traffic control devices, street signs, public notices, utility poles, lines and street banners consistent with this code.

(ii)    No person shall use, store, display or sell any goods, merchandise or any structure without having first obtained a revocable permit, except that this provision shall not be enforced in a manner which limits unreasonably any person’s freedom of speech or assembly.

(iii)    No commercial vehicle which exceeds one and one-half tons rated carrying capacity shall be parked in a public right-of-way which abuts any residential zone.

(iv)    Parking of an RV or any vehicle for more than 72 hours shall not be allowed in a public right-of-way or on any vacant lot.

(6)    Partially Dedicated Street. Prior to any development or change of use which is projected to increase traffic generation by the greater of five percent or 10 vehicle trips per day, the applicant shall dedicate right-of-way required to bring abutting streets into compliance with the adopted street classification map, or as otherwise approved by the City Engineer. Upon receipt of the appropriate deed, and if all other requirements have been met, the final development permit shall be issued.

(7)    Street Naming and Addressing System. A street naming system shall be maintained to facilitate the provisions of necessary public services (police, fire, mail), reduce public costs for administration, and provide more efficient movement of traffic. For consistency, this system shall be adhered to on all newly platted, dedicated, or named streets and roads. The Director shall check all new street names for compliance to this system and issue all street addresses. Existing streets and roads not conforming to this system shall be made conforming as the opportunity occurs.

(c)    Irrigation Systems and Design. All required landscaped areas shall be irrigated according to GJMC 21.06.040(b). The applicant shall comply with the standards in the SSID manual.

(d)    Potable Water System.

(1)    All development and all uses shall be served by a water treatment and distribution system operated or approved by the City, unless such requirement is deemed unreasonable or impracticable, as determined by the Public Works and Planning Director.

(2)    Fire hydrants shall be placed and have fire flow capabilities in accordance with the City’s ordinances.

(e)    Sanitary Sewer System. All lots and uses must be served by a sewer system connected to a public wastewater treatment facility. Requests for variances to this requirement shall be decided by the City Council, upon recommendation by the Planning Commission, in accordance with GJMC 21.02.200(c)(5). Sewer variance requests shall also be subject to “Permit Application for Sewer Variance” administered by the Manager of the Persigo Wastewater Treatment Plant.

(f)    Utilities. Utilities, including, but not limited to, telephone, cable, television, electric, and natural gas, shall be provided and paid for by the developer and shall be installed underground. All existing overhead utilities along streets contiguous with the development shall be installed underground prior to street construction. When the development has less than 700 feet of frontage along a street, the Director has discretion to accept a payment of cash in lieu of requiring the developer to underground the existing overhead utilities. The payment amount shall be determined as set forth in the adopted fee schedule. Necessary above-ground facilities (e.g., pedestals, transformers, and transmission lines of 50 KV capacity or greater) and temporary overhead lines may be allowed if deemed necessary by the Director.

(g)    Stormwater Management.

(1)    Requirement. All proposed development must provide for on-site runoff collection and conveyance in accordance with Stormwater Management Manual (SWMM) (GJMC Title 28) and applicable federal and State laws.

(2)    Drainage Fee in Lieu of Providing Drainage Detention/Retention Facilities. Detention/retention and metered outlet facilities shall be required unless the Director of Public Works and Planning, pursuant to the City’s adopted stormwater drainage impact fee ordinance, finds:

(i)    The site runoff to private property will not increase due to development; and

(ii)    The Director determines that off-site public streets or other public drainage conveyance facilities are adequate to receive and convey additional runoff from the proposed development site without adversely impacting the public’s facilities, interest, health, or safety.

(3)    Generally, options will be restricted to proposed developments which are five acres or less for all phases and/or filings. There may be circumstances, however, where the Director may allow an option for larger sites if they are located low in a watershed basin or adjacent to major outfall facilities.

(4)    The Director shall require submittal of certain information on the part of the developer in order to determine if the drainage fee option is allowed or if construction of drainage detention/retention facilities is required. Such information may include but is not necessarily limited to the type and percent of impervious surfaces, measurements of property including elevations, distance to conveyance structure, type of conveyance structure, availability of regional detention facilities, flood control structures and location of the development within the watershed.

(5)    Upon written approval from the Director the developer shall be given the option of paying a drainage fee in lieu of providing drainage detention/retention and metering facilities. The required drainage fee shall be accordance with the adopted fee schedule.

(6)    Developer selection of the drainage fee option, when allowed, does not waive the requirements for:

(i)    Providing an on-site grading and drainage plan; and

(ii)    Construction of on-site collection and conveyance facilities and providing drainage calculations as required therefor. However, payment of the drainage fee, when approved by the Director, shall constitute compliance with City policy regarding development-related increased runoff.

(7)    Drainage fees shall be paid to the City and will be allocated for the construction of drainage facilities at locations, determined by the City, in its sole and absolute discretion, to be of greatest priority. Fees shall be paid prior to the recording of residential plats, or prior to issuance of planning clearance for all other development.

(8)    The City may, from time to time, by resolution of the City Council, change the method or formula of calculating the drainage fee, based upon projections, estimates or opinions of the Director of Public Works and Planning of the need for additional specific facilities, and/or upon the need of the drainage system.

(Ord. 4878, 10-16-19; Ord. 4833, 4-17-19; Ord. 4569, 3-6-13; Ord. 4498, 2-1-12; Ord. 4466, 4-18-11; Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)

21.06.020 Public and private parks and open spaces.

(a)    Open Space Dedication.

(1)    The owner of any residential development of 10 or more lots or dwelling units shall dedicate 10 percent of the gross acreage of the property or the equivalent of 10 percent of the value of the property. The decision as to whether to accept money or land as required by this section shall be made by the Director. Subdivisions with less than 10 lots or residential dwelling units are not required to dedicate 10 percent of the gross acreage of the property or the equivalent of 10 percent of the value of the property unless the developer or owner owns land adjacent to the proposed subdivision, in which case the Planning Commission shall determine the open space requirement.

(2)    For any residential development required to provide open space, the owner shall hire an MAI appraiser to appraise the property. For purposes of this requirement, the property shall be considered the total acreage notwithstanding the fact that the owner may develop or propose to develop the property in filings or phases.

(3)    The appraiser’s report shall be submitted to the City for purposes of determining fair market value and otherwise determining compliance with this section. The owner shall pay all costs of the appraisal. The owner waives any privilege and/or protection that may exist or be asserted to exist over the details of the appraisal. The appraisal is and shall be considered by the City as an open record under the Colorado Open Records Act.

(4)    The required dedication and/or payment shall be subject to and made in accordance with this code. The City Council may accept the dedication of land in lieu of payment so long as the fair market value of the land dedicated to the City is not less than 10 percent of the value of the property.

(5)    As part of any project approval, the owner shall dedicate, at no cost to the City, public trails, rights-of-way and waterfront greenbelts/access as designed on and as needed to implement adopted plans of the City. If such dedication is claimed to exceed constitutional standards, the owner shall so inform the City Attorney who, if he agrees, shall ask the City Council to pay a fair share of the value of such dedication or waive all or part of such required dedication.

(6)    For creation of a homeowners’ association, each subdivision of five or more lots shall record covenants which shall contain provisions for assessments, liens and enforcement of maintenance of all private open space areas and provisions for enforcement by and reimbursement to the City should the homeowners’ association fail to maintain the areas properly and the City elects to do so.

(7)    For subdivisions, the land dedication or open space fee is required and payable at the time of platting, when applicable.

(8)    Private open space and/or recreational area in any development, or outdoor living area required in a multifamily development, shall not be a substitute for the required land dedication.

(b)    Trails. The owner of each project or change of use which will increase pedestrian and/or bicycle use or trips shall dedicate trail easements consistent with the City’s adopted plans, subject to any claims as provided in GJMC 21.06.010(b)(1). Trails shall be constructed in accordance with applicable City standards. If a trail(s) is constructed in addition to the construction of required sidewalks, then the owner may request an offset for the cost of construction of the trail(s) against the project’s open space fee in an amount not to exceed the total open space fee. The amount of the credit or offset will be determined by the City using established and uniform cost for labor and materials for the specific type and width of the trail(s) constructed.

(Ord. 4878, 10-16-19; Ord. 4428, 6-14-10; Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)

21.06.030 School land dedication fee.

(a)    Standard for School Land Dedication. Dedication of suitable school lands for school purposes shall be required of any development if the school district determines that such development includes within it land which is necessary for implementing a school plan. In all other cases, the fee required under subsection (a)(2) of this section shall be paid in lieu of a school land dedication.

(1)    Standard for Fee in Lieu of School Land Dedication. Except in cases where a school land dedication is required in accordance with this chapter, or an exemption under this chapter applies, all development and all projects which contain a new dwelling shall be subject to fees in lieu of school land dedication (SLD fee) in an amount per dwelling unit determined by resolution of the City Council. SLD fees shall be collected by the City for the exclusive use and benefit of the school district in which such development is located, and shall be expended by the school district solely to acquire real property or interests in real property reasonably needed for development or expansion of school sites and facilities, or to reimburse the school district for sums expended to acquire such property or interests. Revenues from such fees shall be used only for such purposes.

(2)    Payment, Prepayment, Exemption, Credit, and Refund of SLD Fee.

(i)    No building permit shall be issued for a dwelling, multiple-family dwelling or multifamily dwelling which is or contains one or more dwelling units until and unless the SLD fee for such dwelling unit in effect at the time such permit is applied for has been paid as required by this section.

(ii)    Nothing in subsection (a)(1) of this section shall preclude a holder of a development permit for a residential development or mixed use development containing a residential development component from prepaying the SLD fees to become due under this section for one or more dwellings, multiple-family dwellings or multifamily dwellings to be constructed in such development. Such prepayment shall be made upon the filing of a final plat for residential development, at the SLD fee rate then in effect and in the amount which would have been due had a building permit application for such dwelling been pending at the time of prepayment. A subsequent building permit for a dwelling, multiple-family dwelling or multifamily dwelling which is or contains one or more dwelling units for which the SLD fees have been prepaid shall be issued without payment of any additional SLD fees. However, if such permit would allow additional dwelling units for which SLD fees have not been prepaid, such permit shall not be issued until the SLD fees for such additional dwelling units have been paid at the rate per dwelling unit in effect at the time the building permit application was made.

(iii)    Any prepayment of SLD fees in accordance with this section shall be documented by a memorandum of prepayment which shall contain, at minimum, the following:

(A)    The legal description of the real property subject to residential development for which an SLD fee is being prepaid;

(B)    A description of the development permit issued concerning such real property, and a detailed statement of the SLD fees owed pursuant to such permit which are being prepaid;

(C)    The notarized signatures of the record owner of the property or their duly authorized agents;

(D)    The notarized signature of the County Manager indicating approval of the prepayment plan, if the fee was paid while the real property was outside the limits of the City; or if the fee was paid at the time the real property was within the limits of the City, of the City Manager, indicating approval of the prepayment plan.

(3)    Exemptions. The following shall be exempted from payment of the SLD fee:

(i)    Alterations or expansion of an existing building except where the use is changed from nonresidential to residential and except where additional dwelling units result;

(ii)    The construction of accessory buildings or structures;

(iii)    The replacement of a destroyed or partially destroyed building or structure with a new building or structure of the same size and use;

(iv)    The installation of a replacement mobile home on a lot or other parcel when a fee in lieu of land dedication for such mobile home has previously been paid pursuant to this section or where a residential mobile home legally existed on such site on or before the effective date of the ordinance codified in this section;

(v)    Nonresidential buildings, nonresidential structures, or nonresidential mobile homes;

(vi)    Nursing homes, adult foster care facilities or specialized group facilities;

(vii)    City- or County-approved planned residential developments that are subject to recorded covenants restricting the age of the residents of said dwelling units such that the dwelling units may be classified as housing for older persons pursuant to the Federal Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988.

(4)    Credits.

(i)    An applicant for a development permit (or a holder of such a permit) who owns other suitable school lands within the school district in which the development is located may offer to convey such lands to the school district in exchange for credit against all or a portion of the SLD fees otherwise due or to become due. The offer must be in writing, specifically request credit against fees in lieu of school land dedication, and set forth the amount of credit requested. If the City and the school district accept such offer, the credit shall be in the amount of the value of the suitable school lands conveyed, as determined by written agreement between the City, the school district and the permit holder or applicant.

(ii)    Credit against SLD fees otherwise due or to become due will not be provided until good and sufficient title to the property offered under this subsection is conveyed to and accepted by the school district. Upon such conveyance, the school district and the City shall provide the applicant with a letter or certificate setting forth the dollar amount of the credit, the reason for the credit, and a description of the project or development to which the credit shall be applied.

(iii)    Credits shall not be transferable from one project or development to another.

(5)    Refund of Fees Paid.

(i)    Any SLD fee which has not been expended by the school district within five years of the date of collection shall be refunded, with interest at the rate of five percent per annum compounded annually, to the person who paid the fee. Prior to such refund, such amount shall be reduced by an amount equal to three percent of the principal amount to be refunded, for the costs incurred by the City in the refund of such fee. The City shall give written notice by U.S. mail to the person who paid the fee at his or her address as reflected in the records of the Mesa County Clerk and Recorder. If such person does not file a written claim for such refund with the City within 90 days of the mailing of such notice, such refund shall be forfeited and shall be retained and used for the purposes set forth in this section.

(ii)    The City Council may, upon the school district’s request, extend the five-year period of time specified in subsection (a)(5)(i) of this section upon a showing that such extension is reasonably necessary in order for the school district to complete or close a purchase transaction entered into in writing by such district prior to expiration of such period, or to give the school district an opportunity to exercise a purchase option it acquired prior to expiration of such period. Such request shall be made at a public hearing of the City Council. In no event shall any extension of time exceed an additional five-year period.

(b)    Fees in Lieu of School Land Dedication (SLD Fees).

(1)    SLD fees shall be collected and held in trust for the use and benefit of the school district containing the residential development for which the fee is collected. Such fees shall be expended by the school district to acquire additional real property for expansion of school facilities and construction of new school facilities necessitated by new residential development in the school district, or to reimburse the school district for sums expended to acquire such property. The amount of the SLD fee shall be based on a methodology which takes into account the student generation rates of new residential development, the quantity of land required to build new school facilities on a per pupil basis, and the anticipated cost of acquiring suitable school lands in the school district to expand existing school facilities and construct new school facilities to accommodate new residential development without decreasing current levels of educational services.

(2)    The SLD fee and the value of the variables in the formula to determine the SLD fee shall be set by resolution of the City Council in accordance with the following formula:

Average Cost per Acre of Suitable School Lands within the School District

X

Student Generation Fee Factor

=

SLD Fee per Dwelling Unit

(For example, if the average cost of suitable school lands within the school district is $15,000 per acre and the student generation fee factor is 0.023, the SLD fee per dwelling unit would be $15,000 x 0.023, or $345.00.)

(3)    The average cost per acre of suitable school lands within the school district (“average cost per acre for SLD fee”) and the student generation fee factor (“SGF factor”) shall be determined by City Council. Before City Council considers modification of either, a 60-day prior written notice shall be provided to the school district. If a written request for a public hearing specifying which factor, the average cost per acre for SLD fee and/or the SGF factor, the school district wants to be heard on is received by the City from the school district at least 30 days before the matter is scheduled to be determined by City Council, a public hearing shall occur. At a hearing where City Council is considering the modification of the average cost per acre for SLD fee, City Council shall consider the school district’s long range capital improvement plans and any other evidence, comments or recommendations submitted by the school district. At a hearing where City Council is considering the modification of the SGF factor, City Council shall consider the school district’s school facilities plan currently in place, the methodology and data supporting the proposed modification, and any evidence, comments or recommendations submitted by the school district.

(4)    The SLD fee in effect as of January 1, 2006, was $460.00. The SGF factor used to determine the SLD fee was 0.023. This SLD fee and SGF factor shall continue until otherwise modified by City Council as set forth in this code.

(Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)

21.06.040 Landscape, buffering and screening standards.

(a)    Purpose and Goals. The purpose of this section is to enhance the aesthetic appeal of new development. Landscaping reduces heat and glare, facilitates movement of traffic within parking areas, shades cars and parking surfaces reducing local and ambient temperatures, buffers and screens cars from adjacent properties, promotes natural percolation of surface waters, improves air quality, buffers and screens potentially incompatible uses from one another, and conserves the value of property and neighborhoods within the City.

(b)    General Landscape Standards.

(1)    All landscaping required by this code shall comply with the standards and requirements of this section. The landscaping requirements of this code shall not apply to a lot zoned for one or two dwellings. Landscaping for new developments shall occur in buffer areas, all interior parking areas, along the perimeter of the property, around new and existing structures, and along street frontages and within any right-of-way not used nor planned to be used for infrastructure.

(2)    Plant Quantities. The amount of landscaping is based on gross area of proposed development.

(3)    Landscaping Standards. All new development must install and maintain landscaping as required by this code. (See subsection (b)(1) of this section for an example of the landscaping requirements of this section.)

(i)    On-site frontage landscaping may not apply in the B-2 zone downtown commercial. (See zone district standards.)

(ii)    Landscaping in the abutting right-of-way is required in addition to overall site landscaping requirements.

(iii)    Buffer landscaping is required in addition to overall site landscaping requirements.

(4)    Acceptable Plant Material. Vegetation must be suitable for Grand Junction’s climate and soils. The Director may allow the use of any plant if sufficient information is provided to show suitability including salt tolerance, sun and shade requirements based on planting locations, growth habit, etc. Noxious weeds are not allowed. (The Director will keep a list of suitable plants.)

(5)    Minimum plant sizes are:

(i)    Shade tree, two-inch caliper (measured six inches above root ball) at time of planting. At maturity, a shade tree has a height and/or spread of 30 feet or greater. If two-inch caliper trees are not available due to seasonal shortages or shortages in desired varieties, the Director may approve the installation of smaller trees, provided the proportional difference in caliper inches is compensated for by installing additional trees. For example, the installation of six one-and-one-half-inch caliper shade trees would result in a shortfall of three caliper inches, which could be compensated for with two additional one-and-one-half-inch trees. However, a minimum caliper of one and one-half inches shall be required.

(ii)    Ornamental tree, one-and-one-half-inch caliper (measured six inches above root ball) at time of planting. At maturity, an ornamental tree has a spread and height between 15 feet and 30 feet.

(iii)    Evergreen tree, six feet tall at time of planting.

(iv)    Deciduous shrub, five-gallon container.

(v)    Evergreen shrub, five-gallon container.

(vi)    Perennials and ground covers, one-gallon container.

(vii)    Turf mix, native grasses and wild flower mix are the only vegetation that may be planted as seed.

(6)    Irrigation. All vegetation and landscaped areas must be provided with a permanent irrigation system.

(i)    Nonpotable irrigation water shall be used unless the Director allows the use of potable water.

(ii)    An underground pressurized irrigation system and/or drip system is required for all landscape areas on the property and in any right-of-way.

(iii)    If connected to a drinking water system, all irrigation systems require State-approved backflow prevention devices.

(iv)    All irrigation for nonpotable irrigation water systems must have adequate filters easily accessible above ground or within an appropriately sized valve box.

(v)    Native grasses must have a permanent irrigation source that is zoned separately from higher water demand landscapes. Once the grasses are established, irrigation to native grass areas can be reduced to a level that maintains coverage typical of the grass mix and to suppress weed growth.

(7)    Landscape Plans and Equivalent Plants.

(i)    Landscape plans must identify the species and sizes of vegetation (SSID manual).

(ii)    All landscaping shall be installed as shown on the approved plan.

(iii)    An equivalent species may be substituted in the field without prior approval of the Director, provided a revised drawing is submitted to the Department. Plants are “equivalent” if they have the same growth habit and rate, same cover, leafing, shade characteristics and function, have similar water requirements, thrive in the same microclimate, soils and water conditions.

(iv)    All other changes to the landscape plan require prior approval from the Director.

(v)    All development plans shall designate required landscaping areas. Subdivision plats shall designate required landscaping areas.

(vi)    The owner shall keep each fire hydrant unobscured by plant material.

(vii)    Landscape plans shall be stamped by a licensed landscape architect. Inspection and compliance with approved landscape plan must be certified by a licensed landscape architect prior to issuance of a certificate of occupancy.

(8)    Preservation of Significant Landscape Features. Existing landscape features such as escarpments, large or old trees or stands, heavy vegetative cover, ponds and bluffs shall be identified by the Director as part of the development review process. To the extent the Director deems practicable, such features shall be preserved by the final plans and to such extent, count toward landscape and open space area requirements. Features to be preserved shall be protected throughout site development. If a significant live feature which was to be preserved dies or is substantially damaged, the developer shall replace it with an equivalent feature as determined by the Director. No person shall kill or damage a landscape feature required to be preserved by this section. The developer shall protect trees from compaction under the canopy drip line of the tree unless the City Forester says otherwise.

(i)    During construction, fencing or similar barriers shall isolate and protect the landscape features to be preserved.

(ii)    All protection measures shall be clearly identified on the construction and landscape plans.

(iii)    No vehicles or equipment shall be driven or parked nor shall any materials be piled within the canopy drip line of any tree to be preserved.

(9)    Protection of Landscape Areas. All landscape areas (except in the right-of-way where a street side curb does not exist) shall be protected from vehicles through the use of concrete curbing, large rocks, or other similar obstructions.

(10)    Utility Lines. If the location of utilities conflicts with the landscaping provisions, the Director may approve an equivalent alternative.

(i)    Utility composite plans must be submitted with landscape plans.

(ii)    Trees which will grow to a height of greater than 15 feet at maturity shall not be planted under electrical lines.

(iii)    Ornamental and evergreen trees planted under an electrical line may count towards the total tree requirement.

(11)    Sight Distance. The owner shall maintain all vegetation, fences, walls and berms so that there is no site distance hazard nor road or pedestrian hazard.

(12)    Soil. Soil in landscape areas must be amended and all vegetation planted in accordance with good horticultural practices.

(i)    Details for the planting of trees, shrubs and other vegetation must be shown on the landscaping plans.

(ii)    Shrub beds adjacent to turf or native grass areas are to be edged with concrete, metal, brick or substantial wood material. Plastic and other light duty edgings are not allowed.

(iii)    Mulch and weed fabric are required for all shrub beds.

(iv)    The minimum square footage of planting area for a five-gallon evergreen or deciduous shrub is 16 square feet. These minimum square footages may be varied by a qualified professional.

(13)    Trees.

(i)    Trees should not be planted near a light pole if eclipsing of light will occur at maturity. Placing light poles in the parking lot, away from landscape area and between parking bays, helps eliminate this conflict and should be considered.

(ii)    Tree canopies may overlap by up to 20 percent of the diameter of the tree at maturity. Tree clustering may be allowed with some species so long as clustering does not adversely affect the mature canopy.

(iii)    At planting, tree trunks must be reasonably straight with minimal doglegs.

(iv)    Wire baskets, burlap wrappings, rope, twine or any similar shipping materials shall be removed before planting.

(v)    The minimum square footage of planting area for a shade tree is 140 square feet. The Director may vary the minimum square footage.

(vi)    Species Diversity. The percent of any one type of tree that can be planted in a development shall be as follows:

(A)    Zero through five trees: No limitation.

(B)    Six to 21 trees: No more than 50 percent of one species.

(C)    21 or more trees: No more than 20 percent of one species.

(14)    Shrubs.

(i)    Twenty-five percent of the required shrubs may be converted to turf based on one five-gallon shrub per 50 square feet of turf.

(ii)    Ten percent of the required shrubs may be converted to perennials and/or ground covers at a ratio of three one-gallon perennials and/or ground covers for one five-gallon shrub.

(iii)    Species Diversity. The percent of any one type of shrub that can be planted in a development shall be as follows:

(A)    Ten through 19 shrubs: 50 percent.

(B)    Twenty through 39 shrubs: 33 percent.

(C)    Forty through 59 shrubs: 25 percent.

(D)    60 or more shrubs: 15 percent.

(iv)    When calculating tree and shrub quantities, any fraction of a shrub or tree or other requirement is rounded up to the next whole number.

(v)    With the approval of the Director, the number of shrubs may be reduced in exchange for additional trees or tree size at a rate of three shrubs per caliper inch.

(15)    Maintenance. The owners, tenants and occupants for all new and existing uses in the City must:

(i)    Maintain landscaping in a healthy, growing, neat and well-maintained condition.

(ii)    Maintenance includes watering, weeding, pruning, pest control, trash and litter removal, replacement of dead or diseased plant material, reseeding and other reasonable efforts.

(iii)    Any plant that dies must be replaced with an equivalent live plant within 90 days of notification or, if during the winter, by the next April 1st.

(iv)    Hay mulch used during the preparation or establishment of landscaping must be certified weed-free by the Colorado Department of Agriculture.

(v)    On his own or based on a citizen complaint, the Director may, without notice and without a warrant, walk on the landscaped portion of the property from time to time to inspect the condition of landscaping.

(vi)    Between one and two years after installation of required landscaping, Code Enforcement shall conduct a site inspection to verify that all required landscaping has been maintained in a healthy, growing, neat and well-maintained condition. Property owners shall be notified of necessary corrective action for failure to comply with the maintenance provisions of this section.

(16)    Public Right-of-Way. Except where a detached sidewalk exists or is proposed and approved (see subsection (b)(16)(iv) of this section), landscaping on public right-of-way shall not be counted toward any landscape or open space requirements of this code, unless specifically provided otherwise in this code.

(i)    All unimproved right-of-way adjacent on the side abutting a development which is not in the City’s one-year capital plan to be improved must be landscaped. All right-of-way landscaping shall be irrigated and maintained by the adjoining private property owner, unless the City agrees to accept it for maintenance. If it is to be maintained by the City, a separate irrigation system shall be provided.

(ii)    At least 75 percent of the unpaved adjacent right-of-way shall be landscaped with turf, low shrubs or ground cover. The Director may vary the required landscaping to obtain a consistent appearance in the area or with existing or planned right-of-way landscaping.

(iii)    The owner of the nearest property shall keep all rights-of-way, which are not hard surfaced, free of weeds, litter, junk, rubbish and obstructions. To prevent weed growth, erosion and blowing dust, right-of-way areas not covered by vegetation or paving shall be covered with mulch, wood chips, bark chips, decorative rocks or cobble or similar natural materials, to be underlain by weed fabric or other barrier.

(iv)    Where detached sidewalks exist, or are proposed, a maximum of 50 percent of the public right-of-way landscaping may be counted toward the total required landscaping. The right-of-way landscaping between the curb and sidewalk shall contain street trees spaced every 40 feet.

(v)    The Director may allow decorative paving in landscaped areas in commercial or other high pedestrian traffic areas if the decorative paving is compatible with nearby right-of-way paving and landscaping.

(17)    Pervious Coverage. Landscaped and buffer areas count toward the pervious area requirement.

(18)    Authority.

(i)    The Director shall decide all questions of soils, plant selection and care, irrigation installation and other vegetation and landscaping questions.

(ii)    The Director may approve an applicant’s request to vary from the required number and types of plants or landscaped area if:

(A)    The number of trees exceeds 25 percent of the minimum number of trees; and/or

(B)    Trees exceed the minimum caliper requirement by one inch or more; and/or

(C)    Additional berming or other attractive buffering, public art, enhanced paving treatments for public plazas (brick or concrete pavers, tinted and stamped concrete, etc.) is provided. The Director may grant up to a 10 percent reduction of the square footage of improved area used to calculate the landscape requirement where these types of enhancements are included in a development.

(D)    Additional trees or larger trees can be exchanged on a per-caliper-inch basis with three shrubs equaling one caliper inch. Credit for using larger trees would be based on a direct exchange of caliper inches. For example: 10 three-inch caliper trees equaling 30 caliper inches is the same as 15 two-inch caliper trees equaling 30 caliper inches; one two-inch caliper tree equals six shrubs. Trees may be substituted for shrubs, but shrubs may not be substituted for trees.

(E)    If the total amount of required landscaping is provided, the Director may allow the owner to place the landscaping on another appropriate part of the lot.

(19)    Water Wise. Because of Grand Junction’s desert environment, water wise design and the use of xeric (low water use) plants are strongly encouraged. Water wise designs shall employ the seven basic principles of xeric design which include “comprehensive planning and design for low water use, creating practical turf areas, selecting low water use plants and organizing plants by water usage, using adequate soil prep, using water conserving mulches, irrigating efficiently and maintaining the landscape appropriately” (source: Denver Water Board).

(i)    Low water use plants are encouraged for use in the “typical” urbanized landscape, especially where the plants can be irrigated (zoned) separately from higher water use plant material. This way of using xeric plants is compatible with any of the requirements of this code.

(ii)    Landscaping designs that mimic the “desert” character of Grand Junction’s setting are also encouraged, but must be carefully designed so that the basic requirements for shade, screening and buffering are met. Because of this, the Director must approve “desert” or xeric landscape plans as well as variances from the required plant coverage ratios. To further encourage xeriscaping, one-gallon xeric plants shall be equivalent to five-gallon traditional plants. Trees shall be installed in accordance with subsection (b) of this section.

(c)    Parking Lots.

(1)    Interior Landscaping Requirement. Landscaping is required in the interior of parking lots to direct traffic, to shade cars and structures, to reduce heat and glare and to screen cars from adjacent properties. The interior of all parking lots shall be landscaped as follows:

(i)    One landscaped island, parallel to parking spaces, is required for each 20 parking spaces. In lieu of the standard landscape island, one “orchard style” landscape island may be used for every six parking spaces. The orchard style landscape islands shall be evenly spaced between end landscape islands. (See subsection (j) of this section.)

(ii)    Landscape islands must be at least 140 square feet. The narrowest/smallest dimension of a parking lot island shall be eight feet, measured from back of curb to back of curb.

(iii)    One landscaped divider island, parallel to the parking lot drive aisles, designed to prevent diagonal movement across the parking lot, shall be located for every three parking lot drive aisles.

(iv)    A landscape island is required at the end of every row of parking spaces, regardless of length or number of spaces.

(v)    Wheel stop barriers on all sides adjacent to the parking lot surface are required to protect landscape islands from vehicles.

(vi)    A corner area (where it is not feasible to park a vehicle) may be considered an end island for the rows on the perimeter of the parking lot.

(vii)    Landscaping of the interior of a parking lot shall include trees and shrubs.

(2)    Parking Lot Perimeter. Landscaping is required around the entire perimeter of a parking lot to assist in the shading of cars, to assist in the abatement of heat and to reduce the amount of glare from glass and metal, and to assist in the screening of cars from adjacent properties. The perimeter of a parking lot is defined as the curb line defining the outer boundaries of the parking lot, including dumpster enclosures, bike racks, or other support facilities that are adjacent to the outer curb. Entry drives between a parking lot and the street, drives connecting two internal parking lots or building entry plazas are not included in the perimeter area.

(i)    Screening shall occur between a street and a parking lot and street frontage landscape shall apply. (See subsections (c)(3) and (l) of this section.)

(ii)    The minimum dimension allowed for the parking lot perimeter landscape strip is six feet. The width of a landscape strip can be modified by the Director, provided the intent of this section is met.

(iii)    Landscaping along the perimeter of parking lots shall include trees and shrubs.

(iv)    Parking lots shared by more than one owner shall be landscaped around the perimeter of the combined lots.

(3)    Screening. All parking lots abutting rights-of-way, entry drives, and adjacent properties must be screened. For this subsection, a “screen” means a turf berm and/or shrubs.

(i)    A 30-inch-high screen is required along 70 percent of parking lots abutting rights-of-way, entry drives, and adjacent properties, excluding curb cuts. The 30-inch screen shall be placed so as to maximize screening of the cars in the parking lot, when viewed from the right-of-way and shall be measured from the ground surface, or the elevation of the roadway if the adjacent road is higher than the property.

(ii)    Screening shall not be required between parking lots on adjoining lots where the two lots are designed to function as one.

(iii)    If a landscape area is 30 feet wide or greater between a parking lot and a right-of-way, the 30-inch-high screen is not required. This 30-foot-wide or greater area must be 100 percent covered in plant material within three years. Turf is allowed.

(iv)    The Director may approve a screen wall between a parking lot and a right-of-way if the lot or parcel is unusually small.

(v)    A screen wall must not be taller than 30 inches, unless the adjacent roadway is higher than the property, in which case the screen wall shall be 30 inches higher than the adjacent roadway.

(vi)    Two five-gallon shrubs may be substituted for four linear feet of wall; shrubs must reach a height of at least 30 inches at maturity.

(vii)    A column or jog or equivalent architectural feature is required for every 25 linear feet of wall.

(viii)    The back of the wall must be at least 30 inches from the face of curb for bumper overhang.

(ix)    Shrubs must be planted on the street side of the wall.

(x)    There must be at least five feet between the right-of-way and the paved part of a parking lot to use a wall as a screen.

(xi)    Wall elevations and typical cross sections must be submitted with the landscape plan at a minimum scale of one-half inch equals one foot.

(xii)    Walls shall be solid masonry with finish on both sides. The finish may consist of stucco, brick, stone or similar material. Unfinished or merely painted concrete block is not permitted.

(xiii)    Shrub plantings in front of a wall are not required in the B-2 downtown district.

(d)    Street Frontage Landscape.

(1)    Within all zones (except single-family uses in single-family, B-2 and form based zone districts), the owner shall provide and maintain a minimum 14-foot-wide street frontage landscape adjacent to the public right-of-way.

(2)    A minimum of 75 percent of the street frontage landscape shall be covered by plant material at maturity.

(3)    The Director may allow for up to 50 percent of the 14-foot-wide street frontage to be turf, or up to 100 percent turf coverage may be allowed if the parking lot setback from the right-of-way exceeds 30 feet. Low water usage turf is encouraged.

(4)    All unimproved right-of-way adjacent to new development projects shall be landscaped and irrigated by the owner and/or homeowners’ association as per subsection (b)(16) of this section.

(5)    Landscaping within the street frontage shall include trees and shrubs. If detached walks are not provided with street trees, street trees shall be provided in the street frontage landscape, including one tree for every 40 feet of street frontage.

(6)    Where detached walks are provided, a minimum street frontage landscape of five feet is acceptable.

(e)    Buffers.

(1)    Buffers shall be provided between different zoning districts as indicated in subsection (k) of this section.

(i)    Seventy-five percent of each buffer area shall be landscaped with turf, low shrubs or ground cover.

(ii)    One medium sized tree is required per every 40 linear feet of boundary between different zones.

(2)    Exceptions.

(i)    Where residential or collector streets or alleys separate zoning districts, the Director can require more landscaping instead of a wall or fence.

(ii)    Where walkways, paths, or a body of water separates zoning districts, the Director may waive a fence or wall requirement provided the buffering objectives are met by private yards.

(iii)    Where a railroad or other right-of-way separates zoning districts, the Director may waive the buffer strip if the buffering objectives are met without them.

(f)    Fences, Walls and Berms.

(1)    Fences and Walls. When a higher density or intensity zoning district abuts a lower density or intensity zone district, it is the responsibility of the higher density or intensity property to buffer the abutting zone district according to subsection (k) of this section. When an existing fence or wall substantially meets the requirements of this section, and subsection (k) of this section requires the same form of buffering, an additional fence on the adjacent developing property shall not be required. However, if the new development requires the placement of a wall, and a fence exists on the adjacent property, the wall shall be required. If a wall is required and a fence is in place, the wall must be placed adjacent to the fence. (Subsection (k) of this section should be referenced to determine when a wall or a fence is required. The more stringent standard shall apply; i.e., if a wall is required and a fence is in place, the wall must be placed adjacent to the fence.) Fences must comply with GJMC 21.04.040(i), any design guidelines and other conditions of approval. Fences and walls required by this section must meet the following:

(i)    Maximum height: six feet (outside of front setback, 30-inch solid height or four feet height if two-thirds open within the front setback and must meet all sight distance requirements).

(ii)    Fence type: solid wood or material with a similar appearance, finished on both sides.

(iii)    Wall type: solid masonry finished on both sides. Finish may consist of stucco, brick, stone or similar material but unfinished or merely painted concrete block is not permitted.

(iv)    Location: within three feet of the property line unless the space is needed to meet landscaping requirements.

(v)    A wall must have a column or other significant architectural feature every 30 feet of length.

(vi)    Any fence or wall over six feet in height requires a building permit.

(vii)    No person shall construct or maintain a fence or a wall without first getting a fence/wall permit from the Director.

(2)    Berms. Minimum requirements for berms are as follows:

(i)    Maximum slope of 4:1 for turf areas and 3:1 for shrub beds; and

(ii)    To control erosion and dust, berm slopes must be stabilized with vegetation or by other means consistent with the requirements for the particular landscape area.

(g)    Residential Subdivision Perimeter Enclosures.

(1)    Intent. The decision-maker may require (where deemed necessary) perimeter enclosures (fences and/or walls) around all or part of the perimeter of a residential development. Perimeter enclosures shall be designed to meet the following objectives of protecting public health, safety and welfare: screen negative impacts of adjoining land uses, including streets; protect privacy; maintain a consistent or complementary appearance with enclosures in the vicinity; maintain consistent appearance of the subdivision; and comply with corridor overlay requirements.

(2)    Specifications. Unless specified otherwise at the time of final approval:

(i)    A perimeter enclosure includes fences, walls or berms, and combinations thereof, located within five feet of the exterior boundary of a development.

(ii)    The maximum height is six feet, including within front setbacks; however, an enclosure constructed on a berm shall not extend more than eight feet above the adjoining sidewalk or crown of road, whichever is lower.

(iii)    New enclosures shall be compatible with existing enclosures in the vicinity, if such enclosures meet the requirements of this code.

(iv)    A perimeter enclosure in excess of six feet is a structure and requires a building permit.

(v)    A perimeter wall must have a column or other significant architectural feature every 30 feet.

(3)    Required Perimeter Enclosures. The decision-maker may require a perimeter enclosure as a condition of the final approval if:

(i)    Use or enjoyment of property within the development or in the vicinity of the development might be impaired without a perimeter enclosure.

(ii)    A perimeter enclosure is necessary to maintain a consistent and complementary appearance with existing or proposed perimeter enclosures in the vicinity.

(iii)    A perimeter enclosure is necessary to control ingress and egress for the development.

(iv)    A perimeter enclosure is necessary to promote the safety of the public or residents in the vicinity.

(v)    A perimeter enclosure is needed to comply with the purpose, objectives or regulations of the subdivision requirements.

(vi)    A perimeter enclosure is needed to comply with a corridor overlay district.

(vii)    The Director will notify applicants of the need for a perimeter enclosure, if required.

(4)    Design of Perimeter Enclosures. A complete landscape plan for the required landscape buffer and a detail drawing of the perimeter enclosure must be submitted at the time of final approval: perimeter enclosure detail at a scale of one-half inch equals one foot.

(5)    Landscape Buffer. On the outside of a perimeter enclosure adjacent to a right-of-way, a 14-foot-wide landscape buffer shall be provided between the perimeter enclosure and the right-of-way for major and minor arterial streets and major or minor collectors. A five-foot-wide landscape buffer for side and rear yard perimeters shall be provided on all other streets between the perimeter enclosure and the right-of-way.

(i)    Vegetation in the sight triangle (see TEDS, GJMC Title 29) shall not exceed 30 inches in height at maturity;

(ii)    In the landscape buffer, one tree per 40 linear feet of perimeter must be provided;

(iii)    All perimeter enclosures and landscape buffers must be within a tract dedicated to and maintained by the homeowners’ association. The perimeter enclosure and landscaping must be installed by the developer and made a part of the development improvements agreement;

(iv)    A minimum of 75 percent of the landscape buffer area shall be covered by plant material at maturity. Turf may be allowed for up to 50 percent of the 14-foot-wide landscape strip, at the Director’s discretion. Low water usage turf is encouraged;

(v)    Where detached walks are provided, a minimum buffer of five feet shall be provided. In which case, the right-of-way parkway strip (area between the sidewalk and curb) will also be planted as a landscape buffer and maintained by the HOA.

(6)    Construction of Perimeter Enclosures. The perimeter enclosure and required landscape buffer shall be installed by the developer and included in the development improvements agreement.

(7)    Ownership and Maintenance. The developer shall refer to the perimeter enclosure in the covenants and restrictions and so that perpetual maintenance is provided for either that the perimeter enclosure be owned and maintained by the owners’ association or by individual owners. The perimeter enclosure shall be identified on the plat.

(8)    Alternative Construction and Ownership. If the decision-maker finds that a lot-by-lot construction, ownership and/or maintenance of a perimeter enclosure landscape strip would meet all applicable objectives of this section and the design standards of GJMC 21.06.060, the final approval shall specify the type and size of materials, placement of fence posts, length of sections, and the like.

(9)    Overlay District Conflicts. Where in conflict, the perimeter enclosure requirements or guidelines of approved overlay districts shall supersede the requirements of this section.

(10)    Variances. Variances to this section and appeals of administrative decisions (where this code gives the Director discretionary authority) shall be referred to the Planning Commission.

(h)    I-1 and I-2 Zone Landscape.

(1)    Parking Lot Perimeter Landscape. Landscaping for the parking lot perimeter shall be per subsection (c)(2) of this section with the following addition:

(i)    Turf may be allowed for up to 50 percent of the parking lot perimeter, at the Director’s discretion. Low water usage turf is encouraged.

(ii)    A minimum of 75 percent of the parking lot perimeter landscape shall be covered by plant material at maturity.

(2)    Street Frontage Landscape. Landscaping for the street frontage shall be per subsection (d) of this section with the following additions:

(i)    Vegetation in the sight triangle in the street frontage must not exceed 30 inches in height at maturity.

(ii)    One tree for every 40 linear feet of street frontage (excluding curb cuts) must be provided, 80 percent of which must be shade trees.

(3)    Public Right-of-Way Landscape. Landscaping for the public right-of-way shall be per subsection (b)(16) of this section.

(4)    Maintenance. Each owner or the owners’ association shall maintain all landscaping.

(5)    Other Applicable Sections. The requirements of subsections (i), (j), (k) and (l) of this section shall also apply.

(i)    Landscaping Requirements.

Zoning of Proposed Development

Landscape Requirement

Location of Landscaping on Site

Single-family residential (R zones)

As required for uses other than single-family residential; and as required in subsections (b)(16) and (g) of this section

As required for uses other than single-family residential; and landscape buffer and public right-of-way

R-5, R-8, R-12, R-16, R‑24, R-0, B-1, C-1, C-2, I-O, CSR, MU

One tree per 2,500 square feet of improved area, with no more than 20 percent of the total being ornamental trees or evergreens. One five-gallon shrub per 300 square feet of improved area

Buffer, parking lot, street frontage perimeter, foundation plantings and public right-of-way

B-2

One tree per 2,500 square feet of improved area, with no more than 20 percent of the total being ornamental trees or evergreens. One five-gallon shrub per 300 square feet of improved area

Parking lot, park strip (in right-of-way)

I-1, I-2

As required in subsection (h) of this section and in other subsections of this section where applicable

Street frontage, parking lots, buffers and public right-of-way

MXR, MXG, MXS, MXOC

One tree per 3,000 square feet of improved area, with no more than 20 percent of the total being ornamental trees or evergreens. One five-gallon shrub per 300 square feet of improved area. Plantings must be evenly distributed throughout the development

Buffer, parking lot, street frontage perimeter, foundation plantings and public right-of-way

Facilities: mining, dairy, vineyard, sand or gravel operations, confined animal feeding operation, feedlot, forestry commercial, aviation or surface passenger terminal, pasture

One tree per 5,000 square feet of improved area. One five-gallon shrub per 600 square feet of improved area

Perimeter, buffer and public right-of-way

(j)    Example Tree Landscape Plan.

(k)    Buffering Between Zoning Districts.

Zoning of Proposed Development

Zoning of Adjacent Property

SF

R-5

R-8

R-12

R-16

R-24

R-O & MXOC

B-1

B-2

C-1

C-2

I-O

I-1

I-2

M-U

CSR

BP

MXR-

MXG-

MXS-

SF (Subdivisions)

-

-

-

-

-

-

F

-

F

W

W

W

F

-

F

-

-

-

R-5

-

-

-

-

-

-

F

-

F

W

W

W

-

-

F

-

-

-

R-8

-

-

-

-

-

F

F

-

F

W

W

W

F

-

F

A

-

-

R-12 & R-16

-

-

-

-

-

-

F

-

W

W

W

W

F

-

F

A

-

-

R-24

-

-

-

-

-

-

F

-

W

W

W

W

F

-

F

A

-

-

RO & MXOC

A

A

A

A

A

-

A or F

-

A or F

W

W

W

A or F

-

A or F

A

-

-

B-1

F

F

F

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

-

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

-

A or F

A

-

-

B-2

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

C-1

A&W

W

W

W

W

W

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

C-2 & I-O

W

W

W

W

W

W

F

-

-

-

-

-

A or F

A or F

A or F

A&W

-

-

I-1

W

W

W

W

W

W

F

-

-

-

-

-

A or F

B&W

A or F

B&W

A or F

A or F

I-2

B&W

W

W

W

W

W

F

-

-

-

-

-

A or F

B&W

A or F

B&W

A or F

A or F

M-U

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

-

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

-

-

-

-

-

-

CSR3 1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

BP

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

A or F

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

A or F

A or F

A or F

MXR-

-

-

-

-

-

-

F

-

-

W

W

W

F

-

F

-

-

-

MXG-

-

-

-

-

-

-

F

-

-

W

W

W

F

-

F

-

-

-

MXS-

-

-

-

-

-

-

F

-

-

W

W

W

F

-

F

-

-

-

Notes

•A berm with landscaping is an alternative for a required fence or wall if the total height is a minimum of six feet.

•Where alleys or streets separate different zone districts, the Director may approve increased landscaping rather than requiring a wall or fence.

•The Director may modify this table based on the uses proposed in any zone district.

1 Gravel operations subject to buffering adjacent to residential.

(l)    Buffer Requirements.

Buffer Types

Landscaping Requirements

Location of Buffers on Site

Type A

Eight-foot-wide landscape strip with trees and shrubs

Between different uses

Type B

15-foot-wide landscape strip with trees and shrubs

Between different uses

Type F, W

Six-foot fence and wall (see subsection (f) of this section)

Between different uses

Note: Fences and walls are required for most buffers.

(Ord. 4646, 11-19-14; amended during 2010 codification; Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)

21.06.050 Off-street parking, loading and bicycle storage.

(a)    Off-Street Parking Standards. New off-street parking (new construction and expansion of or changes to existing uses) standards follow. These are in addition to TEDS standards (GJMC Title 29).

(1)    Uses Not Identified. The Director shall determine the parking requirement for a use which is not listed in subsection (c) of this section. The applicant shall provide adequate information so that the Director can make such decision by including:

(i)    Type of uses;

(ii)    Number of employees;

(iii)    Building design capacity;

(iv)    Square feet of sales area, service area, etc.;

(v)    On-site parking spaces;

(vi)    Proposed off-site parking spaces; and

(vii)    Hours of operation.

(2)    Multiple Uses. If there are accessory or multiple uses within one or more structures, these standards shall apply to each use and structure, resulting in a total parking requirement for the complex or property except as provided in subsection (e) of this section (Alternative Parking Plan).

(3)    General.

(i)    Each parking space must be accessible independently of others.

(ii)    All square feet is gross floor area unless otherwise indicated.

(iii)    Spaces for seats or persons is designed capacity.

(iv)    A minimum of three spaces required for all uses requiring bicycle spaces.

(v)    ADA requirements are listed in GJMC 21.06.090(b).

(b)    Off-Street Parking Design.

(1)    Location. Except as provided in an approved alternative parking plan (see subsection (e) of this section), all parking shall be provided on the same property as the principal structure, unless the Director deems it impracticable. In a business, commercial or industrial district, the off-site parking must either be in a zone that allows parking as a principal use or be in the same zone as the use creating the parking need. Parking spaces in residential zones shall not be in a front yard setback except for parking in driveways for detached single-family or two-family dwelling structures. In no case shall parking be allowed in parkway strips (the area between the sidewalk and curb or edge of pavement).

(2)    Parking Lot Landscaping. Parking lots shall be landscaped (see GJMC 21.06.040(c)). In cases of hardship or to increase safety, the Director may permit a portion of the required landscaping to be relocated or allow other deviation from the parking landscaping requirements.

(3)    Pedestrian Crossings. Pedestrian crossing areas shall be provided for each building egress or for every 125 feet of building which fronts a part of the parking area. Pedestrian crossing areas in parking lots shall be constructed of surface pavers, such as brick, stone blocks, interlocking brick pavers, stamped concrete or other materials as may be approved by the Director which form a smooth surface but contrast with asphalt. For parking lots of less than 50 cars, the Director may accept paint or similar markings.

(4)    Parking Lot Lighting Requirements. Adequate shielded lighting shall be provided for all parking facilities used at night.

(5)    Vehicular Traffic Areas. All driveways and parking areas, except for a single dwelling on one lot, shall comply with the following:

(i)    All required parking and vehicular traffic surfaces shall drain and be surfaced with concrete or bituminous pavement in accordance with City standards. The City Engineer may permit a gravel surface in overflow parking areas, a low-traffic storage yard, or, as in subsection (b)(5)(ii) of this section, if the applicant establishes that very little dust will be generated. “Overflow parking” is defined as “parking in addition to the minimum required by ordinance which is designed not to be used more than 10 times per year.” A “low-traffic storage yard” is defined as “a storage area generating less than 30 average daily trips.” Industrial yards that accommodate large trucks and/or heavy equipment shall be surfaced and maintained with materials to prevent dust, mud and debris from leaving the site and being tracked onto the public right-of-way.

(ii)    All surfaces shall be maintained in good condition free of weeds, dust, trash and debris. All vehicular traffic areas shall be built according to the construction standards established by the City.

(iii)    A temporary parking lot shall be used after the owner has an approved site plan. Temporary parking lots are parking areas which serve during transition of a property during development and shall not be used for more than 24 months from issuance of a City site plan for such parking use.

(iv)    A temporary parking lot:

(A)    Is allowed only in R-0, B-1, B-2, C-1, C-2, I-O, I-1, or I-2 zones and only if a site plan has been approved by the Director;

(B)    Shall be hard surfaced or gravel;

(C)    Shall be graded for drainage;

(D)    Shall be maintained in good condition free of weeds, dust, trash and debris;

(E)    Shall be landscaped and screened;

(F)    Parking spaces within a gravel lot shall be delineated with concrete “bumper blocks”; and

(G)    Only used for a total of 24 months unless a site plan for a permanent lot usage is approved.

(v)    Vehicular traffic areas shall be screened in the same manner as required for parking areas as per GJMC 21.06.040(c).

(c)    Off-Street Required Parking. The table below shows the number of parking spaces required for the uses indicated. The number of spaces required may be modified through the alternative parking plan described.

USE CATEGORIES

SPECIFIC USES

MINIMUM NUMBER OF VEHICLE SPACES

RESIDENTIAL

Group Living

Nursing Homes; Assisted Living Facility; Treatment Facility; Group Living Facilities

1 per 4 beds + 1 per each 3 employees

Fraternities/Sororities

1.5 spaces for each sleeping room plus 1.5 spaces for every 4 active nonresident members of the fraternity/sorority plus 1 space for every 3 staff employed at the facility.

Boarding and Rooming House

1 space for each room available for rent plus 2 spaces

Other Group Living (e.g., dormitory style living)

0.8 parking spaces per bed

Household Living

Business Residence

1 per residence + business parking

Accessory Dwelling Unit

1 per unit

Single-Family, Two-Family

2 per unit

Multifamily – 1 bedroom

1.25 per unit

Multifamily – 2 bedroom

1.5 per unit

Multifamily – 3+ bedroom

2 per unit

INSTITUTIONAL

College, Vocational/Technical Schools

College, Vocational/Technical Schools

1 per 2 students

Community Services

Community Center

1 per 250 square feet

Crematory

Crematory

1 per employee + 1 space per service vehicle

Cultural

Museums, Art Galleries, Opera Houses, Libraries

1 per 1,000 square feet

Day Care

Day Care

1.5 per employee

Detention Facilities

Jails, Honor Camps, Reformatories, Law Enforcement Rehabilitation Centers

1 per employee on maximum shift + 1 per service vehicle

Funeral Home/Mortuary

Funeral Home/Mortuary

1 per 4 seats (one seat = 18")

Hospital/Clinic

Hospital/Clinic

1 per 2 beds + 1 per employee

Parks and Open Areas

Campground

1 space (10' x 30') per campsite

Golf Course

4 per hole

All Other

20 spaces per athletic field or ball diamond or 1 per 4 seats, whichever results in more spaces

Religious Assembly

Religious Assembly

1 per 4 seats (one seat = 18")

Safety Service

Fire or Police Station; Emergency Response Service

1 per employee + 1 per 300 square feet of office space

Schools

Elementary and Junior High

1 per classroom

High Schools

6 per classroom

Utilities, Basic

Utilities, Basic

1 per employee

COMMERCIAL

Office

General Offices; Governmental Offices

1 per 400 square feet

Medical/Dental

1 per 250 square feet

Recreation and Entertainment, Outdoor

Driving Range

1 per 20 feet of driving area

Miniature Golf

2 per hole

All Other Outdoor Recreation

As determined by Director

Recreation and Entertainment, Indoor

Assembly/Auditorium

1 per 4 seats or 1 per 50 square feet if not permanent seat

Bowling Alley

4 per lane

Clubs/Lodges

1 per 500 square feet

Health Club/Fitness Center

1 per 500 square feet

Drive-Through Uses (see TEDS manual (GJMC Title 29) for stacking or vehicle storage requirements)

Automated Tellers

N/A

Bank, Drive-Through Facility

N/A

Drive-Through Cleaners; Drive-Through Liquor

N/A

Fuel: full service no repair/service facility; self-service

1 space per employee on largest shift + 1 space per 200 square feet

Restaurant, Drive-In, no indoor seating

1 per employee on largest shift

Restaurant, Fast-Food with Drive-In Facilities

1 space per 3 seats

Retail Sales and Services

Bars/Nightclubs

1 per 100 square feet

Banks (Branch and Drive-In)

1 per 300 square feet

Convenience Store

1 per 250 square feet

Hotels/Motels; Inns

1 per room + 1 per 250 square feet of restaurants, bars, meeting areas

Funeral Home/Mortuary/Crematorium

1 per 4 seats

Mobile Food Vendor

2.5 spaces per vendor

Mobile Food Vendor Court

2.5 spaces per vendor

Restaurants

1.5 per 100 square feet

Shopping Centers

< 400,000 square feet

400,000 square feet +

with Theater

 

1 per 250 square feet

1 per 200 square feet

1 per 4 seats

Theaters

1 per 4 seats

New & Used Vehicle Sales, including Recreational Vehicles/Boats

1 space for each 5,000 feet of open sales lot area devoted to the sale, display, and rental of said vehicles and 1 space for each 300 square feet of gross floor area

Other Retail Sales, High Volume, Stand Alone (e.g., supermarkets, clothing and department stores, shopping complexes, hardware building supplies, bookstores, big box stores and similar uses)

1 per 300 square feet

Other Retail Sales/Services, Low Volume, Stand Alone (e.g., appliance and sales, repair shops, nurseries, greenhouses and similar uses)

1 per 500 square feet

Other Service Businesses, Stand Alone (e.g., beauty/barber shops, frozen food lockers, laundries, and similar uses)

1 per 500 square feet

Self-Service Storage

Mini-Warehouse

2 per development

Vehicle Repair

Vehicle Repair

2 per service bay + 1 per employee

Vehicle Service, Limited (see TEDS manual (GJMC Title 29) for stacking or vehicle storage requirements)

Car Wash, Self-Service

See TEDS (GJMC Title 29)

Car Wash, Full-Service

1 space per employee

Service Stations; Oil, Lube, Muffler Service

4 per service bay + required stacking spaces

Other Limited Vehicle Service

2 per service bay + 1 per employee

Tire, Batteries, Accessory Retailers

1 per 300 square feet

INDUSTRIAL

Industrial Services and Operations

Industrial Services and Operations (e.g., Asphalt Plants, Concrete, Pipe and Culvert Storage)

1 per each 1,000 square feet of floor area

Manufacturing and Production

Manufacturing and Production

1 per 1,000 square feet

Warehouse and Freight Movement

Warehouse and Freight Movement

1 per 1,000 square feet

Waste-Related Use

Waste-Related Use, Salvage

1 per 1,000 square feet

Wholesale Sales

Wholesale Sales

1 space per 500 square feet of floor area

OTHER

Agriculture

Feed Lots, Farming

None

Aviation, Surface Passenger Terminals

Airport Terminals, Charter Airplane Terminals, Bus Stations, Train Stations

1 per employee + 1 space per peak embarking passengers

Mining

Gravel Extraction or Storage, Oil or Gas Drilling or Production

1 per employee + 1 per facility vehicle

Telecommunications Facilities

Television Station, Radio Station, Cable TV Retailer, Internet Provider, Telephone Switching Station/Offices

1 per employee

(d)    B-2 District. Parking regulations for uses in the B-2 district are:

(1)    There is no parking requirement for the reuse, remodel, or reconstruction of an existing structure that does not increase the available square footage of leasable area.

(2)    Parking shall be provided for any leasable square footage added after the effective date of the ordinance codified in this title.

(3)    Permanent parking available to the public and within 500 feet (1,000 feet for employees) of the proposed construction counts towards the total parking requirement.

(e)    Alternative Parking Plan. Unless an alternative parking plan is approved at the time of site plan approval, the parking ratios above shall apply.

(1)    Applicant-Submitted Parking Data. The required parking ratios may be modified where applicant-submitted parking data illustrates that required parking ratios do not accurately apply to a specific development. The data submitted for an alternative parking plan shall include, at a minimum, the size and type of the proposed development, the mix of uses, the anticipated rate of parking turnover and the anticipated peak parking and traffic loads of all uses.

(2)    Credit for On-Street Parking. Credit may be provided by the Director for any on-street parking spaces abutting the subject property. Such spaces must not be located within a clear sight triangle. No fractional spaces shall be credited.

(3)    Off-Site Parking. Required off-street parking spaces may be permitted on a separate lot from the lot on which the principal use is located if the off-site parking complies with all of the following standards:

(i)    Ineligible Activities. Off-site parking may not be used to satisfy the required parking ratios for residential uses (except for guest parking), as well as convenience stores or other convenience-oriented uses. Required parking spaces reserved for persons with disabilities may not be located off site.

(ii)    Location.

(A)    Off-site parking spaces shall be located within 500 feet (1,000 for employee spaces) from the primary entrance of the use served along the shortest available pedestrian route (measured from the nearest point of the parking area to the nearest point of the building or structure served by such parking lot). Off-site parking may not be separated from the use that it serves by a street right-of-way with a width of more than 80 feet unless a designated pedestrian crosswalk or walkway is provided.

(B)    The off-site parking shall be located wholly within a district that allows commercial parking as principal use, except in the B-2 district.

(iii)    Agreement.

(A)    In the event that an off-site parking area is not under the same ownership as the principal use served, a written agreement between the record owners shall be required.

(B)    An off-site parking agreement may be rescinded only if all required off-street parking spaces are provided in accordance with required ratios above.

(4)    Shared Parking. Shared parking facilities may be permitted if the shared parking complies with all of the following standards:

(i)    Ineligible Activities. Required parking spaces reserved for persons with disabilities may be located off-site with permission of the Director.

(ii)    Location. Shared parking spaces shall be located within 500 feet of the primary entrance of all uses served along the shortest available pedestrian route (measured from the nearest point of the parking area to the nearest point of the building, structure or use served by such parking lot) unless shuttle bus service is provided to the parking area.

(iii)    Shared Parking Study. Applicants wishing to use shared parking as a means of reducing the total number of required spaces shall submit a shared parking analysis using the latest edition of Urban Land Institute’s Shared Parking. The study shall be provided in a form established by the Director and made available to the public. It shall address, at minimum, the size and type of the proposed development, the composition of tenants, the anticipated rate of parking turnover and the anticipated peak parking and traffic loads for all uses that will be sharing parking spaces.

(iv)    Agreement.

(A)    A shared parking plan shall be enforced through written agreement among all owners of record. An attested copy of the agreement between the owners of record shall be submitted to the Director on forms made available by the Director.

(B)    A shared parking agreement may be rescinded only if all required off-street parking spaces are provided in accordance with an approved alternative parking plan. See subsection (e) of this section.

(5)    Valet Parking. Valet parking may be permitted as a means of satisfying otherwise applicable parking requirements where all of the following standards have been met:

(i)    Adequate assurance of the continued operation of the valet parking is provided, such as a contractual agreement for valet services or the tenant’s affidavit agreeing to provide such services.

(ii)    An equivalent number of valet spaces are available to replace the number of required on-site parking spaces. Such valet spaces do not require individual striping, and may take into account the tandem or mass parking of vehicles.

(iii)    The design of the valet parking shall not cause customers who do not use the valet service to park off-premises or cause queuing in the right-of-way.

(iv)    An accessible passenger loading and unloading area meeting ADA standards shall be provided.

(6)    Recording of Approved Plans. An attested copy of an approved alternative parking plan shall be recorded in the deed records for Mesa County on forms made available by the Director. An alternative parking plan may be amended by following the same procedure required for the original approval. The applicant shall provide proof of recording prior to approval of the certificate of occupancy.

(7)    Violations. Violations of an approved alternative parking plan constitute a violation of this code and shall be subject to all applicable enforcement and penalty provisions.

(f)    Loading. A site plan for a proposed business, commercial or industrial use shall identify loading/unloading areas and shall be built and maintained in accordance with TEDS (GJMC Title 29).

(g)    Bicycle Storage.

(1)    Required Spaces. Bicycle spaces shall be provided at a rate of one space per 20 vehicle spaces.

(2)    Alternative Bike Parking. The Director may allow bicycle parking for employees to be located within a structure for security reasons.

(Ord. 4955, 9-2-20; Ord. 4908, 3-4-20; Ord. 4813, 8-15-18; Ord. 4744, 4-5-17; Ord. 4710, 7-20-16; Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)

21.06.060 Subdivision standards.

(a)    Applicability. Unless otherwise provided in a City Council approved development or annexation agreement, the provisions of this section shall apply to all residential, commercial, industrial and other subdivisions. See Chapter 21.02 GJMC for the process of subdivision review and approval.

(b)    Intent.

(1)    The design and layout must incorporate and emphasize unique features of the land. All subdivisions should be designed to:

(i)    Complement neighborhood development and uses;

(ii)    Reinforce the importance of public places such as boulevards, parks, and open spaces;

(iii)    Protect existing natural resources and wildlife habitat;

(iv)    Mitigate erosion from wind and water;

(v)    Avoid development in riverine slide areas, geologically hazardous areas and in floodplains;

(vi)    Preserve stands of existing mature trees and native vegetation;

(vii)    Reduce fire hazards;

(viii)    Promote pedestrian uses, bicycling, and transportation modes other than the private automobile;

(ix)    Reduce long-term service and maintenance costs to the City, its residents and owners in the subdivision; and

(x)    Avoid repetitive building and lot layouts.

(2)    Open space should be integrated with the subdivision and adjacent property to create attractive areas for active and passive use. Open spaces should not be located on peripheral strips of land or isolated corners. Subdivision layout should interconnect streets, open spaces and existing and proposed pedestrian and bicycle trails.

(3)    A subdivision for uses that differ significantly in size or type from contiguous uses and buildings should be organized to avoid or mitigate adverse effects on neighboring properties. Adjacent residential and mixed use projects should be connected, at least for nonvehicular transportation.

(c)    Plans and Specification Standards. The design, construction and perpetual maintenance of all development, including subdivisions, shall be consistent with:

(1)    Adopted plans and policies;

(2)    Rules of the zoning district;

(3)    Other requirements of this code;

(4)    Any previous plans on which the subdivision is based;

(5)    The City’s technical and engineering, design, construction, and inspection criteria, standards, and specifications.

(d)    Standards for Required Reports, Studies and Special Plans. The applicant shall submit to the Director those materials as listed in the SSID manual. All projects shall comply with the applicable requirements in SSID.

(e)    Transportation Engineering Design Standards. All projects shall comply with applicable requirements for the Transportation Engineering Design Standards (GJMC Title 29).

(f)    Lot Layout and Design.

(1)    Access to Public Roads. All lots shall have direct or indirect access to a dedicated public road. If the plat provides for indirect access (i.e., over intervening private drives), access easements or tracts benefiting all lots with indirect access shall be provided on the recorded plat. Easements shall be used to access not more than one lot with no street frontage. All access to public roads shall meet the standards as set forth in TEDS (GJMC Title 29).

(i)    Creation of lots having two parallel property lines abutting a right-of-way (“double frontage lot”) or lots having a rear lot line which is adjacent to or across an alley from the side lot line of another lot (“reverse corner lot”) is discouraged.

(ii)    Double frontage lots shall comply with the subdivision perimeter enclosures provisions of GJMC 21.06.040(g).

(iii)    A dwelling lot which abuts three public streets is discouraged.

(iv)    The rear lot line of a dwelling lot should not abut a residential collector, local or cul-de-sac.

(v)    The decision-maker may increase the required setback from a lot line bordering a collector or arterial street.

(vi)    Single-family attached dwellings and/or multifamily dwellings with no street frontage or limited street frontage may be allowed by the Director provided access is reasonably and readily available for each dwelling unit through the use of private streets, shared drives, parking lots, and/or other specifically identified limited common elements.

(2)    Flag Lots.

(i)    Each flag lot shall have at least 25 feet of street frontage; provided, that the Director may require an access easement 50 feet wide where public right-of-way may be needed to access future development. Said easement and irrevocable offer of dedication of right-of-way 50 feet wide shall run the full depth of the lot or lots.

(ii)    The use of flag lots is discouraged. If no reasonable design alternative exists, the Director may allow one flag lot in a subdivision of four or fewer lots. If no reasonable design alternative exists, not more than 15 percent (round any fraction down to the next whole number) of the lots within a subdivision containing five or more lots are to be flag lots. If allowed, flag lots must be paired with the “poles” abutting to require the use of a common driveway. No more than two flag lots shall be contiguous.

(iii)    The “flag” portion of a flag lot shall meet the minimum lot size of the applicable zone district. For purposes of this area calculation, the area of the “pole” is not counted. The decision-maker may increase the setbacks for the “flag portion” of a flag lot, to be noted on the plat.

(iv)    Driveways shall be designed to allow vehicles to exit driving forward.

(v)    As an alternative to paired flag lots, the Director may require a shared driveway if it meets the shared driveway standards.

(3)    Rear Lot Lines. Each plat shall specifically identify all rear lot lines. Rear lot lines should not abut a residential collector or local street.

(4)    Shared Driveways. No more than five dwelling units may share a single driveway access to a public street if technical requirements of TEDS (GJMC Title 29) are met. See GJMC 21.06.100(c).

(5)    Loop Lane. Single-family lots may be located on a loop lane, subject to compliance with GJMC 21.06.100(d). Special setbacks and lot size reductions for properties located on loop lanes are required.

(6)    Cul-de-Sacs and Dead End Streets. The design of cul-de-sacs and dead end streets shall meet TEDS (GJMC Title 29).

(7)    Alleys.

(i)    Alleys should be included in residential subdivisions, especially when they continue an existing pattern, or allow access to residential properties with garages or parking areas behind a principal structure served by a local or residential collector street.

(ii)    Alleys should be provided in commercial and industrial areas unless alternate service access is provided.

(iii)    TEDS (GJMC Title 29) applies to alleys.

(g)    Circulation.

(1)    General.

(i)    Subdivisions shall be designed to continue or create an integrated system of lots, streets, trails, and infrastructure that provides for efficient movement of pedestrians, bicycles, and automobiles to and from adjacent development, while encouraging the use of mass transit.

(ii)    Subdivisions shall allow for through movement of general traffic thus avoiding isolation of residential areas and overreliance on arterial streets on the edges of the subdivision for traffic movement, except as required by subsection (g) of this section.

(iii)    Street layouts must help emergency providers find their way efficiently and quickly.

(iv)    Residential subdivisions must provide efficient and relatively direct pedestrian and bicycle access to near commercial development.

(v)    Bicycle paths shall connect to the City’s on-street bikeway network and off-road trail system unless the Director determines it is not feasible.

(vi)    The Street Naming and Addressing Manual controls the names of rights-of-way and property addressing.

(vii)    Commercial subdivisions shall provide for vehicular circulation between adjacent lots and must dedicate or grant appropriate easements accordingly.

(2)    Street Layouts.

(i)    Street layouts shall continue streets in adjoining subdivisions or their anticipated locations when adjoining property is not yet developed.

(ii)    Subdivisions shall accommodate a system of major collector, minor/residential collector, and local/residential streets providing multiple direct connections between local destinations such as parks, schools, and shopping, without requiring the use of arterial streets, unless unusual topographic features or existing development prohibits it.

(iii)    Subdivisions containing or next to property designed for retail or commercial uses must be designed to integrate circulation systems among those lots and must avoid the erection of physical barriers between adjacent retail or commercial uses unless necessary for safety reasons.

(3)    Street Widths. TEDS (GJMC Title 29) dictates street widths.

(4)    Other Street Forms. The Director may approve different forms and types of streets if the functional and safety bases of TEDS (GJMC Title 29) are met. Any alternative street must be equal to or better than TEDS (GJMC Title 29) in terms of traffic safety, pedestrian circulation, impacts on adjacent uses, and appearance.

(5)    Private Streets. Private streets are generally not permitted. Only the City Council may authorize any development to be served by a private street. See GJMC 21.06.100(a) and (b).

(6)    Street Reserve Strips. No reserve strip shall be retained on the outer boundary or elsewhere of a development in order to control access to any public way.

(7)    Bikeways, Walkways, and Sidewalks.

(i)    All subdivisions shall provide an integrated system of bikeways, walkways, and sidewalks to allow residents, customers, and the public to safely and directly access all principal uses, public areas, streets, bus stops, parking areas, and trash, recreation, and mail pickup facilities on bicycle and on foot.

(ii)    Unless the Director deems it impractical, pedestrian circulation shall be separated from vehicles and bicycles.

(iii)    The adopted Grand Junction Circulation Plan and the standards in TEDS (GJMC Title 29) show how and where to build bicycle and pedestrian trails.

(iv)    Walkways shall directly connect areas or points of pedestrian origin and destination. A walkway shall not be located or aligned solely based on the outline of a parking lot configuration that does not provide safe and convenient direct pedestrian access. Connecting walkways shall link street sidewalks with building entries, through the parking lots. To provide direct pedestrian connections to these destinations, additional sidewalks or walkways not associated with a street, or the extension of a sidewalk from the end of a cul-de-sac to another street or walkway, may be required.

(v)    Where a development abuts or includes an arterial or collector street, a bicycle and pedestrian access point shall be provided every 1,200 feet from the arterial and collector street or sidewalk into the development.

(8)    Public Transit.

(i)    Streets should be designed to facilitate the use of public bus transit where needed. The public transit authority may be a review agency.

(ii)    The Director may require each subdivision to dedicate and/or construct adequate waiting areas for bus stops in the locations adjacent to arterial or major collector streets identified by a public transit authority; and direct walkways to each bus stop area from each nearby street, commercial, industrial use, and public area.

(iii)    TEDS (GJMC Title 29) shows the design rules for a transit stop.

(9)    Fire Lanes. Fire lanes shall be provided in accordance with the adopted fire code.

(h)    Location and Use of Open and Undeveloped Space.

(1)    The plat for each subdivision shall include and protect as much of the following open space as the Director deems reasonable:

(i)    Natural, geologic or other hazard areas, such as potentially unstable slopes, faults, landslides, rockfalls, expansive soils, and floodplains.

(ii)    Stream beds and corridors, bluffs, ridges, steep slopes, mature trees and/or stands of native vegetation, rock outcroppings, wetlands, native upland ecosystems, riparian areas, and wildlife corridors.

(iii)    Water features such as drainages, waste ditches, washes, canals, ditches, lakes, natural ponds, and retention and detention ponds.

(2)    Location. The open space in each subdivision shall be located to create or enhance:

(i)    Community focal points;

(ii)    Passive recreational opportunities;

(iii)    Active recreational opportunities;

(iv)    Landscaped buffers or visual transitions between different types or intensities of land uses; and/or

(v)    Opportunities to accommodate multiple compatible uses (such as providing scenic vistas, passive recreation opportunities, wildlife habitat, and the prevention of construction on natural hazard areas) rather than a single use.

(3)    Integration. The open space in each subdivision shall be integrated with schools, parks, and other open spaces or public property in or near the subdivision or on neighborhood property.

(4)    Public Access and Visibility.

(i)    Open spaces in each subdivision should be open, accessible, and visible to all residents of the subdivision and to the public using public streets, trails, and open spaces.

(ii)    If the subdivision contains or abuts a publicly owned natural area, the Director may require the subdivision plat to include such easements and rights-of-way as are necessary to allow reasonable access for the public to such natural area. Conveyance to the public requirement or dedication to the City may be credited against any park or open space dedication or fee in lieu of such land required by the City, upon approval of the City Council.

(5)    Isolated Areas Discouraged. Open space should not be located in isolated areas or corners of the subdivision, in peripheral strips along the borders of right-of-way or the subdivision, or in unconnected patterns unless the Director finds such a location would further one of the other goals described above.

(6)    Natural Hazard Areas. If natural or geologic hazards exist within the property, the applicant shall either:

(i)    Identify the limits of development (as defined in subsection (h)(8) of this section) on the plat and include a plat note that those areas are not available for sale nor development;

(ii)    Provide a report from a geotechnical engineer licensed in Colorado designating the specific mitigation measures or engineering precautions necessary to make such areas safe for development and occupancy, and include a plat note stating that development will be subject to those mitigation measures and engineering precautions although the specific design needed as a part of a building permit may occur as a part of the building permit; or

(iii)    Some combination of subsections (h)(6)(i) and (ii) of this section.

(7)    Significant Natural Features. All natural features (such as corridors, bluffs, ridges, steep slopes, stands of mature trees, rock outcroppings, wetlands, native upland ecosystems, riparian areas, and wildlife corridors) and water features (such as drainages, washes, canals, ditches, lakes, natural ponds, and retention and detention ponds) within the property limits shall be identified on the plat as the limits of development (as defined in subsection (h)(8) of this section). The plat shall clearly state that such areas are not available for sale nor development.

(8)    Limits of Development. Each plat shall specify the limits of development (LOD) which are any specific areas of a subdivision within which the development and construction shall be limited or prohibited so that natural hazard areas are avoided and significant natural features are preserved. LODs shall be determined based on:

(i)    Mapping hazard areas and significant natural features;

(ii)    Site topography, including but not limited to steepness of slopes, existing drainage features, rock outcroppings, river and stream terraces, valley walls, ridgelines, and scenic topographic features; and

(iii)    The practical needs to give access to heavy equipment for the developed project and reasonable staging and operational areas.

(9)    Retention and Detention Ponds. Storm drainage, retention and detention ponds shall be located, designed, maintained, planted and managed to serve as visual amenities, entryway features, or opportunities for passive recreation within the subdivision.

(Ord. 4831, 2-6-19; Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)

21.06.070 Sign regulation.

This regulation governs exterior signs on real property. The proliferation and disrepair of signs can deter the effectiveness of signs, cause dangerous conflicts with traffic control signs and signals, and contribute to visual pollution to the detriment of the general public. No sign shall be displayed in any zone district without a sign permit, except where the provisions of this section expressly provide otherwise. Signs placed by a governmental entity are exempt from this section.

(a)    Definitions. As used in this section, the following terms shall have the following meanings:

Digital sign or digital display or electronic sign: A display of a sign message or picture made of internally illuminated components that display an electronic image, which may or may not include text and is capable of changing the message periodically; including but not limited to television screens, holographic displays, programmable ink, LCD, LED or plasma displays.

Illuminated sign: A sign which is illuminated by a light source. Internal illumination or internally illuminated means a sign illuminated by a light source that is concealed or contained within the sign and becomes visible in darkness through a translucent surface. Indirect illumination or indirectly illuminated means a sign that is illuminated with an artificial light located away from the sign and directed onto the sign face so that the message is visible in darkness.

Interactive sign: A sign which contains QR codes or invites the viewer, as the sign is viewed from the street or roadway, to capture an image with a camera or other device or otherwise immediately and physically interact with the sign in order to obtain a benefit, prize or discount.

This section shall mean and refer to GJMC 21.06.070, Sign regulation.

(b)    Prohibited Signs. Prohibited signs are signs which:

(1)    Contain an obscene statement, word, or picture describing or depicting sexual activities or sexual anatomical areas;

(2)    Contain, or are an imitation of, an official traffic sign or signal or contain the words: “STOP,” “GO SLOW,” “CAUTION,” “DANGER,” “WARNING,” or similar words;

(3)    Are of a size, location, movement, content, coloring or manner of illumination which may be confused with, or construed as, a traffic control device or which hide from view any traffic or street sign or signal;

(4)    Contain or consist of portable signs, tent signs, or strings of light bulbs not permanently mounted on a rigid background, except that one portable sign per business will be allowed next to the building in shopping areas where pedestrians circulate, so long as such portable sign is not placed in a parking lot or in any median, does not visually or physically obstruct vehicular or pedestrian circulation, and does not exceed 12 square feet in size and three feet in width;

(5)    Are erected after adoption of this code and do not comply with the provisions of this regulation;

(6)    Do not comply with the laws, rules and regulations of the State of Colorado as now or hereafter enacted and/or amended. See § 43-1-401, C.R.S. et seq.;

(7)    Create a hazard for, or impede safe or efficient movement of, motorists or pedestrians;

(8)    Are placed in whole or in part in, on or over any part of a public right-of-way, except where the sign is placed by a governmental entity. The Director has the authority to remove and dispose of any sign placed in or on or protruding into, onto or over any part of a public right-of-way without compensation to any person or entity; or

(9)    Are interactive signs that are readable with normal vision from the public right-of-way. Interactive signs readable from the public right-of-way are prohibited because they distract drivers and pedestrians so as to constitute a significant safety risk.

(c)    Signs That Do Not Require a Permit. The following signs are allowed on a lot/parcel in any zone district:

(1)    One sign that is integral to or flush-mounted on a building or structure that is no greater than four square feet in area.

(2)    A sign that is not illuminated, not digital or electronic, and not permanent in nature; for example, one that is planted into the ground or affixed to an object or structure by temporary means, does not have a foundation, is made of lightweight and thin materials such as a single sheet of plastic, thin metal, plywood or paper, except for wind driven signs and banners which are regulated separately in subsection (d) of this section, and except for prohibited signs discussed in subsection (b) this section, with the following limitation:

(i)    On a parcel of less than one acre, up to six such signs are allowed, so long as each sign is not greater than six square feet in area, except in that one of these signs may be up to 32 square feet in area when construction is occurring on a parcel or a subdivision of land is being developed.

(ii)    On a parcel of one acre or larger, up to six such signs per acre are allowed, so long as each sign is not greater than six square feet in area, except that one sign per acre can be up to 32 square feet in area.

(d)    Wind Driven Signs and Banners.

(1)    A banner permit shall be required prior to any use of wind driven signs or banners.

(2)    Banners and wind driven signs may be displayed for a up to 30 consecutive days up to four times in a 12-month calendar year. Permit periods may run consecutively.

(3)    All banners must be secured directly to the structure, fence, or post that is permanently affixed to the ground.

(4)    All wind driven signs must be professionally made, must be in good repair and appearance, and must also be so located and installed so as not to pose a safety hazard for motorists or pedestrians. Such signs shall not be attached to any object located in the public right-of-way.

(5)    In addition to other available penalties, failure to comply with the terms of a permit issued under this section shall result in the loss of a permit.

(e)    Nonconforming Signs.

(1)    All signage on site shall be brought into conformance with this code prior to approval of any new sign permit on the property.

(2)    Any nonconforming sign that has been damaged in excess of 50 percent of its replacement cost by fire, wind or other cause except vandalism shall not be restored without conformance with the provisions of this regulation.

(3)    Sign face changes are allowed without a permit, including converting from static display to digital/electronic display, if no other changes are made to the sign size, height or structure. Digital and electronic signs must comply with regulations governing such.

(f)    Digital or Electronic Sign Standards.

(1)    Purpose and Intent. Advancements in technology permit signs to change copy electronically, utilizing LED, LCD and other technologies. The impacts of these may disrupt the peace and quiet enjoyment of other properties in the area and create traffic hazards. Limitations on brightness is necessary in order to mitigate these impacts, protect public health and safety, and preserve the character of areas, especially residential neighborhoods.

(2)    The maximum brightness levels for signs shall not exceed 0.3 (three tenths) footcandles over ambient light levels. Measurements of light are based on the area of the sign versus measurement of the distance. Using a footcandle meter, brightness shall be in conformance with the following distance table:

AREA OF SIGN

(sq. ft.)

MEASUREMENT DISTANCE

(ft. from sign)

0 – 10

30

10 – 24

45

25 – 49

55

50 – 99

90

100 – 149

110

150 – 199

135

200 – 300

150

The measurement shall be conducted at least 30 minutes after sunset or 30 minutes before sunrise. Certification must be provided to the City upon installation that the sign has been preset to automatically adjust the brightness to these levels or lower. Re-inspection and recalibration may be periodically required by the City at the permitee’s expense, to ensure that the specified brightness levels are maintained at all times.

(3)    Interactive signs are prohibited.

(4)    All new electronic display signs shall have photocell technology that will be used to dim the displays for appropriate nighttime viewing from dusk to dawn or when ambient light conditions warrant such changes.

(g)    General Requirements.

(1)    The following requirements shall apply to all signs in all zones unless otherwise indicated:

(i)    A permit is required for placement or display of any new sign, except where otherwise stated or where specifically exempted by the provisions of this section.

(ii)    Touching up, repainting or changing existing letters, text, symbols, graphics, or other content is considered maintenance and repair and does not require a permit.

(iii)    Only a licensed sign contractor can obtain a sign permit.

(iv)    All signs shall be permanent in nature except for those nonpermanent signs allowed under subsection (c) of this section.

(v)    All exterior signs shall be engineered to withstand a minimum wind load of 30 pounds per square foot.

(vi)    No sign shall be placed on any curb, sidewalk, post, pole, hydrant, bridge, tree or other surface located on public property including the posting of handbills except as expressly authorized by this section.

(vii)    Regardless of sign allowances by zone district, no single sign shall exceed 300 square feet in area.

(2)    The following shall apply to the measurement of signs:

(i)    The total surface area of one sign face of freestanding signs and projecting wall signs shall be counted as part of the maximum total surface area allowance. Sign enhancement features such as bases, pillars, and other decorative elements as part of monument signs shall not be counted as part of the maximum square footage of the sign, provided such features do not exceed the size of the sign face.

(ii)    The total surface area of all sign faces of roof signs shall be counted as part of the maximum total surface area allowance.

(iii)    For measurement of different shapes of signs, see the graphics below.

(iv)    The total surface area of three-dimensional figures shall be counted as part of the maximum sign allowance.

(v)    The area of flush wall signs with backing or a background that is part of the overall sign display or when backed by a surface which is architecturally a part of the building shall be measured by determining the sum of the area of each square, rectangle, triangle, portion of a circle or any combination thereof which creates the smallest single continuous perimeter enclosing the extreme limits of each word, written representation (including any series of letters), logo or figure including all frames, face plates, nonstructural trim or other component parts not otherwise used for support.

(vi)    The area of a facade sign shall be determined to be the sum of the area of each of the smallest perimeter enclosing the limits of each work and written or graphic representation, including letter, number, character, and/or logo used for advertising, offering or merchandising a product, or for service identification. The area of a mural painted on a wall shall not be included in the sign area calculation.

Blade Sign

Double Face Sign

(vii)    Only one display face is measured if the sign faces are parallel or form an interior angle of less than or equal to 60 degrees; provided, that the signs are mounted on the same structure. If the faces are of unequal area, then sign area is equal to the area of the larger face.

(3)    No illumination of a sign is permitted unless the following criteria are met:

(i)    The light from any illuminated sign shall be so shaded, shielded and directed that the light intensity or brightness shall not be objectionable to surrounding areas.

(ii)    Neither the direct or reflected light from a light source shall create a traffic hazard to operators of motor vehicles on public thoroughfares or approaches to public thoroughfares.

(iii)    No exposed reflective type bulb or incandescent lamp, which exceeds 40 watts, shall be used on the exterior surface of a sign to expose the face of the bulb, light or lamp to any public street or adjacent property.

(iv)    Electrical service provided to illuminated signs may require an electrical permit from the Building Department.

(4)    Identification and Marking. Each sign requiring a permit shall bear an identification plate stating the following information:

(i)    Date the sign was erected; and

(ii)    Name of person, firm or entity responsible for its construction and erection.

(5)    Sign(s) placed in connection with a temporary use that requires a temporary use permit shall conform to the requirements, conditions and terms of the temporary use permit.

(h)    Sign Standards by Zone. The following restrictions and requirements apply to permanent signs in the given zone districts. Regardless of the zone district, property containing a nonresidential use that abuts an arterial street may be permitted to have one monument style sign on one such frontage that meets the requirements of subsection (h)(3) of this section (business, commercial and industrial zones).

(1)    Residential Zones.

(i)    One permanent sign per residential lot not exceeding six square feet in area is allowed, subject to the standards below.

(ii)    One permanent monument sign up to 32 square feet in area is allowed at a multifamily apartment/condominium building/complex and on each common area parcel that abuts a public right-of-way; for purposes of this subsection, “common area parcel” means a parcel that is owned by a homeowners’ association for the benefit of all lot owners in a planned community, common interest community or condominium.

(iii)    For a nonresidential use in a residential zone, one sign not to exceed 24 square feet in area is allowed per street frontage.

(iv)    Location. Permitted signs may be anywhere on the property. If freestanding, the top shall not be over eight feet above the ground. If building-mounted, the sign shall be flush-mounted and shall not be mounted on a roof of the building or project above the roof line.

(v)    Illumination. Indirect or internal illumination only shall be utilized for letter faces and/or logos.

(2)    Residential Office Zone.

(i)    General. The residential office zone provides a transition from residential to commercial development and consequently requires more restrictive sign regulations to maintain compatibility.

(ii)    Types Allowed. Flush wall signs and monument signs shall be the only sign types allowed.

(iii)    Location and Size. Signs shall be located at least 10 feet behind the front property line. Total sign area shall not exceed 25 square feet per street frontage. The sign allowance for one street frontage may be transferred to a side of a building that has no street frontage, but cannot be transferred to another street frontage. Monument signs shall not exceed eight feet in height.

(iv)    Illumination. Signs may be externally illuminated; no other illumination of signs is allowed. All lights used for illumination of signs shall be arranged so as to confine direct light beams to the lighted sign and away from adjacent residential properties and out of the direct vision of motorists passing on adjacent streets. Illumination of signs shall comply with GJMC 21.06.080, Outdoor lighting, and shall be limited to authorized business hours.

(v)    Sign Area. The area of flush wall signs and monument signs shall be calculated as per the graphics shown under subsection (g)(2) of this section.

(3)    Business, Commercial, Industrial Zones (B-1, B-2, C-1, C-2, I-O, BP, M-U, I-1, I-2, and AE (Formerly PAD)).

(i)    General. This subsection shall apply to all zones designated in Chapter 21.03 GJMC as business, commercial, industrial or any variety of these types.

(ii)    Types Allowed. Signs in the business, commercial, and industrial zones may include facade signs, flush wall signs, freestanding signs, projecting signs and roof signs. All signs allowed in residential zones are also allowed in business, commercial or industrial zones.

(iii)    Location and Size. Permitted signs may be anywhere on the premises except as specifically restricted in this subsection (see specific sign type and pertinent zoning regulation). The total amount of signage to be allowed on any property shall not exceed the sign allowance as calculated in accordance with subsection (h)(3)(v)(B) or (h)(3)(vii)(B) of this section, whichever is greater. No single sign may be larger than 300 square feet. No projecting sign may exceed the allowances in subsection (h)(3)(vi) of this section.

(iv)    Illumination. Unless specifically prohibited, all of the following signs may be illuminated within the limits allowed under subsection (g)(3) of this section and GJMC 21.06.080:

(v)    Facade Signs, Flush Wall Signs and Roof Signs.

(A)    The sign allowance shall be calculated on the basis of the area of the one building facade that is most nearly parallel to the street that it faces. Each building facade which faces a dedicated public street shall have its own separate and distinct sign allowance. The sign allowance for facade signs and flush wall signs on buildings located on interior lots (lots not on a corner) which are oriented perpendicular to the street shall be based on the longer building facade. The total sign allowance, or any percentage thereof, of one frontage may be transferred to a building facade that has no frontage on a dedicated public street, provided the transferred amount does not exceed two square feet of sign area per linear foot of the facade on which it is being placed.

(B)    Two square feet of sign area shall be allowed for each linear foot of building facade for facade signs, flush wall signs and roof signs. The measurement of a roof sign shall be based on the square footage of each sign face. Flush wall signs may extend up to 12 inches from the face of the building if the base of the sign is at least eight feet above ground level. (Show window signs in a window display of merchandise when incorporated with such display will not be considered part of the total sign allowance.)

(C)    On any building which allows facade signs, flush wall signs, roof signs, or projecting signs, a maximum of two of these types may be used. If a flush wall sign and roof sign are used, the sign allowance of two square feet per linear foot of building may be divided between the two types of signs. If either a flush wall sign or roof sign and a projecting sign are used, the allowance for the projecting sign shall be subtracted from the flush wall sign or roof sign allowance.

(D)    Roof signs shall be manufactured such that no guy wires, braces, or secondary supports shall be visible. Maximum height for roof signs shall be such that height of the structure and the sign together do not exceed the maximum height for the zone district.

(E)    One sign that is flush-mounted on the rear facade of a structure that is no more than 16 square feet in area is allowed, which sign does not count toward the total sign allowance for the parcel or building (if there is more than one such sign, the other(s) shall count toward the total sign allowance).

(vi)    Projecting Signs. Signs may project up to 72 inches from the face of the building if located eight feet or more above grade. They shall not project beyond the back of curb, nor within two feet of the edge of the roadway if there is no curb. Total area per sign face shall not exceed one-half square foot per linear foot of building facade. If the projecting sign is the only sign mounted on the building, the minimum sign allowance shall be 12 square feet.

(vii)    Freestanding Signs. Freestanding signs shall comply with the following requirements:

(A)    No more than one freestanding sign shall be permitted for any parcel for each street frontage. The sign allowance per frontage can only be used on that frontage and shall not be transferred to any other frontage, except where otherwise provided.

(B)    Maximum sign allowance shall be calculated by the linear front foot of property on a public street right-of-way in conformance with the following:

a.    Two traffic lanes: Maximum area of sign per face per front foot of property, three-quarters square foot; maximum height, 25 feet.

b.    Four or more traffic lanes: Maximum area of sign per face per front foot of property, one and one-half square feet; maximum height, 40 feet.

(C)    Signs may be installed at street right-of-way line. The sign face may project up to 72 inches into the right-of-way, if located 14 feet or more above grade, but shall not project closer than 24 inches to the back of the curb. If the existing street right-of-way width is less than that required in this code, the distance shall be measured from the line of such right-of-way as required by this code rather than from the existing right-of-way line. Ute and Pitkin Avenues shall be calculated using four lanes.

(D)    On a corner lot, a freestanding sign shall not be placed within the sight distance triangle, as defined in TEDS (GJMC Title 29), unless free air space is maintained as provided in TEDS (GJMC Title 29). A single pipe support with no sign structure or copy shall not be considered a violation of the free air space requirement.

(E)    In addition to freestanding signs as allowed above, up to two additional freestanding signs per street frontage, not greater than three square feet in area and no more than 30 inches in height, are allowed.

(F)    When electrical service is provided to freestanding signs, all such electrical service shall be underground.

(G)    All freestanding signs shall require a building permit in addition to a sign clearance.

(viii)    Flush wall or freestanding sign(s) with text so small as to not be readable with normal eyesight from a public right-of-way are allowed, so long as such sign does not exceed 32 square feet in area. Such signs shall not count toward the total sign allowance or the maximum freestanding sign allowance.

(4)    Outdoor advertising signs erected on ground or wall locations (and roof locations done within the regulations and limitations of roof signs) shall only be permitted in the C-2 (general commercial) and I-1 and I-2 (industrial) zones, subject to the following conditions, limitations and restrictions:

(i)    Height Limitations. No outdoor advertising sign shall be erected higher than 40 feet above the level of the street or road upon which the sign faces, or above the adjoining ground level if such ground level is above the street or road level. No outdoor advertising sign shall have a surface or face area exceeding 300 square feet in area or containing less than 15 square feet in area.

(ii)    Distance. For each square foot of surface or facing of the sign, two feet of space from adjacent outdoor advertising signs shall be maintained. Such distances shall be determined by using the largest sign as criterion. For example, no sign can be erected closer than 600 feet to an existing 300-square-foot sign. A maximum of one outdoor advertising sign shall be allowed per lot or parcel of land.

(iii)    Location. A sketch, drawn to scale, depicting the size and location of the proposed billboard shall be provided. The sketch shall be prepared by a licensed surveyor and shall indicate dimensions from the proposed billboard to the closest adjacent aliquot section line and shall include coordinates. The sketch shall also include the location of the proposed billboard to the nearest adjacent right-of-way line, if applicable. The sketch shall be signed and sealed by the surveyor.

(iv)    Outdoor advertising signs shall not be located within 600 feet from the centerline of the Riverside Parkway as depicted in Figure A.

Figure A

(v)    Illumination. Outdoor advertising signs that are illuminated by indirect or external illumination shall use only downward facing, downcast light to confine direct light beams to the sign and out of the direct vision.

(vi)    Prohibited signs are signs that do not comply with the laws, rules and regulations of the State of Colorado as now or hereafter enacted or amended. See § 43-1-401, C.R.S. et seq.

(5)    CSR. Signage on a property zoned CSR shall be limited to signage allowed in the surrounding zone districts.

(6)    Form Districts. Signage shall conform to subsection (h)(3) of this section except that all freestanding signs shall be monument style signs with a maximum height of 15 feet.

(7)    Planned Developments. No sign other than those permitted in any zone district in subsection (c) of this section (Signs That Do Not Require a Permit) shall be allowed on properties in a planned development zone unless the sign has been approved as part of the development plan. Variance of the maximum total surface area of signs shall not be permitted, but the maximum sign allowance for the entire development or use may be aggregated and the total allowance redistributed.

(8)    Sign Packages. A site or sites that consist of more than one developed parcel of land that are abutting and function as one through the sharing of vehicular access through, across, over, entrance onto, and/or exit from the site and/or parking (such as a shopping center) may be considered for a sign package through a sign package permit. Variance of the maximum total sign allowance shall not be permitted, but the maximum sign allowance for the entire site or sites may be aggregated and the total allowance redistributed for the same type of sign. For example, freestanding sign allowance may be redistributed among freestanding signs, but a freestanding sign allowance may not be redistributed for a facade sign. See GJMC 21.02.070(n).

(i)    Removal and Disposition of Signs.

(1)    Maintenance and Repair.

(i)    No person shall allow, on any premises owned or controlled by him, any sign that is in a dangerous or defective condition.

(ii)    The Director shall require the owner of the sign and/or the owner of the premises upon which it is located to remove or repair any such sign. In cases of immediate danger to the public due to the defective nature of a sign, the Director may have the sign removed and assess the costs of the removal against the property. Such assessment shall constitute a first and prior lien on the property, equivalent to ad valorem taxes, and shall be collected in the same manner as the real estate taxes on the property.

(iii)    All signs shall be safe and maintained in good appearance as well as safety including the replacement of defective parts, painting, repainting, cleaning and other acts required for proper maintenance. Failure to properly maintain a sign shall be a violation of this code.

(2)    Abandoned Signs. Signs are allowed on otherwise vacant property so long as a permit is obtained (unless a permit is otherwise expressly not required) and so long as the sign allowance for the zone district is adhered to. However, a sign structure that has no content or is “blank” and has fallen into disrepair and which is located on property which is unoccupied for a period of 12 consecutive months or more shall be deemed abandoned.

An abandoned sign is prohibited; the owner of the sign or the owner of the premises shall remove the sign and supporting structure. An abandoned sign which is not removed in a timely manner may be removed by the Director under the provisions of this section.

(Ord. 4831, 2-6-19; Ord. 4745, 4-19-17; Ord. 4741, 3-15-17; Ord. 4737, 2-1-17; Ord. 4691, 2-17-16; amended during 2010 codification; Ord. 4420, 4-5-10; Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)

21.06.080 Outdoor lighting.

(a)    Purpose.

(1)    To minimize light pollution, light trespass and glare;

(2)    To conserve energy and resources;

(3)    To provide safe roadways for motorists, cyclists and pedestrians;

(4)    To ensure sufficient lighting can be provided where needed to promote safety and security; and

(5)    To protect and reclaim the ability to view the night sky.

(b)    Applicability. All new land uses, structures or building additions shall meet the requirements of this section for the entire property.

(c)    Outdoor Lighting Standards. All outside light sources shall conform to the standards set forth below.

(1)    Floodlights shall not be used to light all or any portion of any building facade between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m.

(2)    No outdoor lights shall be mounted more than 35 feet above the ground unless as a part of an approved outdoor recreational facility.

 

(3)    All outdoor lights mounted on poles, buildings or trees that are lit between the hours of 10:00 p.m. and 6:00 a.m. shall use full cutoff light fixtures (see graphic).

(4)    All lights used for illumination of signs, parking areas, security or for any other purpose shall be arranged so as to confine direct light beams to the lighted property and away from adjacent residential properties and out of the direct vision of motorists passing on adjacent streets.

(5)    Outdoor lighting for commercial areas is encouraged to be turned off after business hours. Lights on a timer are encouraged.

(6)    Sensor activated lights are encouraged to replace existing lighting necessary for security purposes.

(7)    Canopy lights, such as service station lighting, shall be fully recessed or fully shielded so as to ensure that no light source is visible from or causes glare on public rights-of-way or adjacent properties. Canopy lighting shall have a maximum of 30 foot-candles, with a light loss factor of 1.0. Light loss factor (LLF) is a correction factor used to account for the difference between laboratory test results and real world degradation of the lighting system aging over time resulting in reduced lumen output.

(8)    The operation of searchlights for advertising purposes is prohibited.

(9)    The installation of sodium vapor fixtures that are not color corrected or mercury vapor fixtures is prohibited.

(d)    Parking Lot Lighting.

(1)    Adequate lighting shall be provided for all parking facilities used at night. Lighting sources shall not be directly visible from adjacent roadways or residential uses and shall not interfere with the safe operation of vehicles moving on or near the site. Parking area lighting shall, where possible, be located in landscaped areas. Parking facility lighting shall not exceed an average of three footcandles and a maximum of 10 footcandles.

(2)    The minimum required lighting intensity to be provided in all parking areas is 0.6 footcandle. High activity areas such as near building entrances and pedestrian corridors shall be provided with a greater lighting intensity.

(3)    The maximum height of required lighting is 35 feet, measured from the parking surface to the top of the lighting standard. Lighting located near buildings and adjacent to sidewalks shall not exceed 12 feet in height.

(4)    A lighting plan shall be submitted for all parking lots that contain 30 spaces or more. The lighting plan shall detail the location and specifications of all lighting to be provided on site. An ISO footcandle diagram shall also be provided to indicate the level and extent of proposed lighting.

(5)    Where nonresidential or multifamily parking lots abut a residential zone or use, the Director may require a lighting plan for lots that contain fewer than 30 parking spaces.

(Ord. 4648, 12-3-14; Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)

21.06.090 Site circulation.

On-site circulation shall be given the same attention as is given to the design of public street systems. Poor site design and circulation is detrimental to both the public investment in the street system and the private investment in the property. Access locations, building location, site circulation, and parking are highly interrelated as each one has a dramatic effect on the others. The design of the on-site circulation system shall be an integral part of the overall site and access design process.

(a)    On-Site Roads. On-site vehicular circulation shall occur completely within the limits of the developed property. On-site roads shall be designed with geometric features such as curves, grades, sight distance, turning radii, design vehicle characteristics, drainage, and vehicle storage to the same standards as public streets.

(b)    Parking. Parking facilities shall provide internal vehicular circulation and storage. The use of raised landscaped planting strips in large parking areas is required in this code. All fixed objects within the parking area shall be highly visible by using the appropriate lighting and/or landscaping features.

(1)    Parking Stall and Aisle Design.

(i)    Parking stalls shall be located outside the sight zone at access locations. All parking stalls shall be oriented such that any vehicle exiting a parking stall is not required to back into any public street. Wheel or bumper blocks shall be provided, located, and arranged so that no part of any parked vehicle extends beyond the boundaries of the parking area and to ensure that the vehicle overhang does not obstruct sidewalks or other pedestrian walking areas.

(ii)    Parking stalls may be oriented at zero, 30, 45, 60, 75 or 90 degrees to the parking aisle. Both stall and aisle dimensions and layout will vary depending on the stall orientation. The use of parking stalls oriented 90 degrees to the building face with two-way aisles is generally preferred as this permits the most direct route between the parking stall and the building and minimizes auto/pedestrian conflicts adjacent to buildings.

(iii)    Where larger vehicles may be frequent users of the parking facilities, it is appropriate to increase the parking stall dimensions according to the dimensions and turning characteristics of the vehicle.

(iv)    Parking aisles shall be designed to accommodate the turning characteristics of the vehicles that will most commonly use the parking facilities. Dead-end parking aisles are prohibited without provision of an adequate turn around. Aisles should not exceed 300 to 350 feet in length without a break in circulation.

Parking Stall Dimensions and Layout

Parking Angle

A

B

C

Stall Width in Feet

Stall Length in Feet

Aisle Width in Feet

0

22.0

22.0

22.0

9.0

9.5

10.0

12.0

12.0

12.0

30

9.0

9.5

10.0

18.0

18.0

20.0

11.0

11.0

11.0

45

8.5

9.0

9.5

21.0

21.0

21.0

13.0

12.0

11.0

60

8.5

9.0

9.5

21.1

21.0

21.0

18.0

16.0

15.0

75

8.5

9.0

9.5

19.5

19.5

19.5

25.0

23.0

22.0

90

8.5

9.0

9.5

18.5

18.5

18.5

28.0

25.0

24.0

(2)    Accessible Parking for Physically Handicapped Persons.

(i)    A portion of the required off-street parking spaces shall be specifically designated, located and reserved for use by persons with physical disabilities in accordance with Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines for Buildings and Facilities.

(ii)    Requirements for accessible parking spaces for physically handicapped persons are detailed in the City Standard Street Details and are also in the Federal Register found at http://www.accessboard.gov/.

(iii)    The additional width required for an accessible parking space may be created by reducing the width of an adjacent sidewalk area, provided the clear portion of the sidewalk width is not reduced below five feet, when providing accessible parking spaces in public right-of-way.

(iv)    The required parking spaces are detailed in the table below:

Total Spaces in Lot

Required Accessible Spaces

1 to 25

1

26 to 50

2

51 to 75

3

76 to 100

4

101 to 150

5

151 to 200

6

201 to 300

7

301 to 400

8

401 to 500

9

501 to 1,000

2% of Total

1,001 and over

20 + 1 for each 100 over 1,000

(3)    Maximum Allowable Grades in Parking Lots. Maximum grades allowed in parking lots shall be eight percent.

Typical Parking Layouts
(Alternate dimensions may be approved by Director)

(Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)

21.06.100 Private streets, shared driveways and loop lanes.

Private streets may be considered as an alternative to residential public streets without a specific design exception if the standards in this section are met. Private streets have historically posed problems over time as they deteriorate and property owners do not realize the burden of maintenance is theirs. Application of the criteria established in this section should avoid problems encountered in the past with private streets and provide property owners some protection through a maintenance agreement and funding. The shared driveway (also called an “autocourt”) is a private street. The loop lane is intended as an alternative public street.

(a)    Private Streets. The developer must conclusively demonstrate that a proposed private street:

(1)    Provides flexibility in residential street access due to design or topographic conditions; and

(2)    Encourages more creative design including but not necessarily limited to the clustering of units in residential development; and

(3)    Provides an immediate and continuing public benefit, e.g., by reducing public street maintenance costs; and

(4)    Provides a safe residential environment; and

(5)    Promotes attractive streetscapes that give neighborhoods character and identity, e.g., by allowing alternative street surfaces, finishes and designs.

(b)    Then private residential streets shall be allowed for residential development under the following conditions:

(1)    The maximum annual average daily traffic (AADT) of the proposed private street shall not exceed 250 trips per day as determined by the ITE – Trip Generation publication.

(2)    All traffic, including vehicular and pedestrian, exiting from private streets shall not adversely impact the existing and proposed transportation network. Pedestrian connections accessible by the general public shall be required within the proposed development. Pedestrian facilities shown on the Grand Junction Circulation Plan shall be provided by the developer.

(3)    A turnaround (i.e., cul-de-sac or other applicable and acceptable improvement) shall be required per the City’s or County’s adopted street standard in effect at the time of the development. A “Y” or “T” turnaround may be acceptable if designed according to Fire Department access requirements.

(4)    Street cross sections shall conform to the adopted street standards. Streets with a minimum 20-foot-wide pavement section may be allowed, if on-street parking is prohibited and adequate off-street parking is provided. Streets with no on-street parking shall be signed in accordance with the MUTCD. The developer shall execute and record an irrevocable covenant running with the land granting the City or County the right and power to enter the street for the purpose of enforcing the parking restriction.

(5)    If off-street parking is utilized, it shall conform to the following:

(i)    It shall be provided at a rate of one space per two units plus at least four on-site parking spaces per dwelling. Two of these spaces may be in a garage or carport.

(ii)    Off-street parking shall be located within 200 feet of any unit the private street serves.

(iii)    Off-street parking shall be included within the same tract as the private street and shall be maintained by the homeowners’ association.

(6)    The finished surface of the private street may be composed of variable surfaces such as brick, interlocking pavers, cobblestones or other similar finishes, designed by a professional engineer and as approved by the City or County Engineer.

(7)    Any and all private streets shall include concrete curb and gutter constructed to the City Standard Details.

(8)    A pedestrian trail system may be substituted for an attached sidewalk if adjacent properties could easily access the trail and the trail system links to other transportation and recreational trails or facilities within and outside of the immediate development. Trail width shall be no less than equal to the standard for a two-way off-street bicycle path and shall be designed to the City Standard Details.

(9)    All entrances to garages shall be set back from the private street or pedestrian trail a minimum distance of 20 feet.

(10)    Utility and/or multipurpose easements may be required for a portion of, or the full width adjacent to, the street section when necessary.

(11)    Private streets shall be platted in a tract dedicated to the homeowners’ association.

(12)    A single homeowners’ association for all phases of the development shall be formed and established with the Secretary of State’s Office prior to the recordation of a final plat that contains a private street.

(13)    The homeowners’ association shall establish an annual maintenance fund for the private street in accordance with the attached document titled “Maintenance Agreement.” The agreement shall be recorded by the petitioner, with review and approval by the Public Works Department, prior to the recordation of the final plat.

(14)    The homeowners’ association shall be responsible to maintain a vegetation-free zone along the private street that is 20 feet in width (10 feet each side from the center of the street) and 13 feet, six inches in height as measured from the paved surface of the street.

(15)    Each residential structure accessed from a private street shall have landscaped areas of at least 10 feet in width between the street and the structure except for the driveway to the garage.

(16)    An entrance design feature such as decorative paving, special signage or other conspicuous improvement shall be incorporated into the final design of the private street such that the design clearly distinguishes the private street from the public street.

(c)    Shared Driveway Standards. The shared driveway or autocourt is designed to provide access to lots where a full public street is not practical or economical. The number of shared driveways used in a subdivision is limited due to the undesirable lot layouts they often create, potential conflicts over shared common space, and private versus public maintenance cost issues. Shared driveways shall comply with the following standards.

(1)    A shared driveway shall be owned and maintained by the owners of the parcels or lots that abut the shared driveway. The shared driveway shall be platted in a tract dedicated to the property owners of the parcels that abut the shared driveway.

(2)    Not more than five single-family lots shall abut or touch any portion of the shared driveway and no more than five single-family units may access a shared driveway.

(3)    Shared driveways shall be a minimum of 16 feet wide flowline to flowline and a maximum of 150 feet long.

(4)    Parking on a shared driveway shall be prohibited.

(5)    A shared driveway may be used only where it intersects a street with on-street parking.

(6)    Each lot abutting a shared driveway shall provide four on-site parking spaces. For homes on shared driveways that access a cul-de-sac, five on-site parking spaces shall be provided. These additional spaces may be provided on the shared driveway if it is widened to accommodate such parking.

(7)    Each lot abutting a shared driveway shall access off of the shared driveway unless approved otherwise at the time of subdivision.

(8)    Shared driveways shall be designed to permit the ASHTO “P” design vehicle to back out of an individual driveway and turn 90 degrees in either direction on the shared driveway without any portion of the vehicle:

(i)    Leaving the individual driveway from which the vehicle is exiting or the shared driveway; or

(ii)    Entering on or over the individual driveways of any other residence.

(9)    The building setback adjacent to a shared driveway shall be the minimum setback required for that side of the property by the underlying zoning district or 15 feet, whichever is greater. All entrances to garages shall be set back a minimum distance of 20 feet from the shared driveway.

(10)    No fences or hedging taller than 30 inches shall be located within the setback adjacent to the shared driveway. Open fences are acceptable.

(11)    No gateways, locked entries or other restrictive access constraints are allowed across a shared driveway.

(12)    Finished surface may be composed of variable hard surfaces such as brick, interlocking pavers, cobblestones or similar finishes, designed by a professional engineer and as approved by the City or County Engineer.

(d)    Loop Lane Standards. A loop lane is an alternate street design that provides a turnaround in place of a cul-de-sac. The loop lane is desirable because it allows for additional open space/park area instead of an expanse of asphalt paving found in a standard cul-de-sac. Loop lanes shall comply with the following standards. Any variation from these specifications shall require a design exception as described in Chapter 29.64 GJMC, Design Exceptions.

(1)    A maximum of seven homes may access off the loop.

(2)    The minimum loop lane is 16 feet from flowline to flowline and shall consist of a paved surface with roll-over curb and gutter on at least one side and a roll-over curb or vertical curb on the other side.

(3)    No curve on any portion of the flowline of the loop lane shall have an inside radius of less than 33 feet and an outside radius of less than 48 feet.

(4)    No portion of the loop lane shall extend more than 250 feet from the abutting street right-of-way.

(5)    A minimum separation of 66 feet is required between the right-of-way on each side of the loop.

(6)    Four guest-parking spaces, located in the public right-of-way, are required at the end of the loop. The parking area is reserved for guest parking and shall not be used for the parking of residents’ vehicles and/or recreation vehicles for more than a 24-hour period.

(7)    The loop lane and parking shall be dedicated to and maintained by the City. The right-of-way shall extend one foot beyond the curb on the park side of the lane and one foot beyond curb on outside edge of the lane.

(8)    A 14-foot multipurpose easement shall be dedicated on the outside edge of the lane. The park may be used for stormwater detention.

(9)    The loop shall provide for two-way traffic.

(10)    “No parking” signs shall be installed and maintained so that no parking is allowed between the curbs on any traveled portion of the loop lane, except the guest parking area.

(11)    Corner lots with frontage on the loop lane and the abutting street shall be required to access from the loop lane only.

(12)    Each residence shall provide and maintain four off-street parking spaces, two of which may be within a garage or carport. No front loading garage or carport may be closer than 20 feet to the front lot line. Individual driveways must have a five-foot radius fillet on driveway corners.

(13)    The front yard setback for the house is 15 feet from the right-of-way (16 feet from the curb).

(14)    Lots on the loop lane may be 20 percent smaller and the rear setback can be 10 feet less (10 feet minimum) than as required by the zone district.

(15)    The park shall be owned and maintained by the homeowners’ association, subject to any easements.

(16)    No gateways, locked entries or other access constraints are allowed across the loop lane.

(17)    A sidewalk is required only where the park abuts a street other than the loop.

(18)    The developer shall landscape the park and provide an irrigation system in accordance with the Zoning and Development Code.

(Ord. 4831, 2-6-19; Ord. 4419, 4-5-10)