Chapter 17.14
CHELAN DOWNTOWN LAND USE AND DEVELOPMENT CODE

Sections:

17.14.010    Administration.

17.14.020    Regulating plan – Land use districts and site orientation standards.

17.14.030    Site planning and design elements.

17.14.040    Building design.

17.14.050    Housing type standards.

17.14.060    Definitions.

17.14.010 Administration.

A. Purpose. The downtown code was authorized by the city council as a major implementation tool of Chelan’s downtown master plan. Overall, the code intends to:

1. Provide clear objectives for those embarking on the planning and design of projects in downtown Chelan.

2. To preserve and enhance downtown’s historic resources and character.

3. To ensure that new mixed-use and commercial development is of high quality and appropriate to downtown’s character.

4. To retain the generally small scale residential quality of residential areas.

5. To upgrade the visual appearance of downtown’s principal vehicular corridors.

6. To promote increased pedestrian, bicycling, and transit use downtown.

7. To increase awareness of design considerations among the citizens of Chelan.

8. To maintain and enhance property values within Chelan.

B. Applicability and Compliance. The downtown code provisions herein are intended to supplement other provisions of this title and other existing city codes applicable to developments. Where there is a conflict between the provisions of this chapter and other codes, the provisions herein shall apply as determined by the director.

Unless otherwise noted, code provisions in this chapter apply to all construction within the downtown planning area (see Figure 1). This includes master plans, planned unit developments, subdivisions, and new construction. Different sections within this chapter often apply only to specific types of development (such as commercial or multi-family development) and are thus clearly noted. New construction must comply with the code provisions in this chapter.

For additions and remodels, three different thresholds have been established to gauge how the standards herein are applied to such projects:

1. Level I remodels/additions include all exterior remodels and additions commenced within a three-year period that affect the exterior appearance of the building and/or increase the building’s footprint by up to fifty percent. The requirement for such remodels/additions is only that the proposed addition and improvements meet the standards and do not lead to further nonconformance with the standards. For example, if a property owner decides to replace a building facade’s siding, then the siding shall meet the applicable exterior building material standards, but elements such as building articulation would not be required.

2. Level II additions include all building additions commenced within a three-year period that increase the building’s footprint by more than fifty percent, but not greater than one hundred percent. All standards that do not involve repositioning the building or reconfiguring site development, as determined by the director, shall apply to Level II additions. For example, if a property owner of an existing home on Chelan Avenue wants to convert the home to a business and build an addition equaling seventy-five percent of the current building’s footprint, then the following elements shall apply:

a. The location and design of the addition/remodel shall be consistent with landscape street frontages per Section 17.14.020(D): Provide a landscaped setback, locate parking to side or rear of building addition, provide weather protection over the building entry, and meet minimum facade transparency requirement.

b. Provide clear access to the sidewalk from the building entry and meet other applicable pedestrian access provisions per Section 17.14.030(D).

c. Comply with applicable service area and mechanical equipment, lighting, and parking lot design standards per Sections 17.14.030(F) through (H).

d. Comply with applicable architectural character standards in Section 17.14.040(B).

e. The building addition shall comply with architectural scale provisions of Section 17.14.040(C).

f. The entire building shall comply with building elements/details, materials, and blank wall treatment standards of Sections 17.14.040(D) through (F).

3. Level III additions include all building additions commenced within a three-year period that increase the building’s footprint by more than one hundred percent. Such additions shall conform to all standards.

Figure 1. Downtown planning area.

C. How the Code Is Applied. Most sections contain a list of “Intent” statements followed by “Standards” and/or “Guidelines” specifically:

1. Intent statements are overarching objectives. For example, one of the intent statements for the section on building location and orientation is to “Create an active and safe pedestrian environment.”

2. Standards use words such as “shall,” “must,” and “is/are required” signifying required actions.

3. Guidelines use words such as “should” or “is/are recommended” signifying voluntary measures.

4. Departures are provided for some standards. They allow alternative designs subject to administrative approval by the director provided they meet the intent of the standards and guidelines. The director shall document reasons for approving all departures (to be maintained with project application records) for the purpose of providing consistency in decision-making by the city.

Furthermore, the document contains some specific standards that are easily quantifiable, while others provide a level of discretion in how they are complied with. In the latter case, the applicant must demonstrate to the director, in writing, how the project meets the intent of the standard.

D. Review Process.

1. Development review processes shall be as set forth in Title 19, except that any building permit applicants seeking departures to the provisions in this chapter shall be reviewed as a Type IIA permit approved by the director. The director may request assistance by the planning commission, Historic Downtown Chelan Association (or other similar organization), or design professionals in determining whether projects comply with the standards herein.

2. Verification of Historic Downtown Chelan Association Review.

a. To provide the Historic Downtown Association (HDCA) the opportunity to provide input to the administrator for projects located on storefront streets as identified on the regulating map at Section 17.14.020(B), the developer shall submit the proposed project to the HDCA design committee to verify conformance with this chapter.

b. As a condition to the administrator accepting a project permit application for projects described in subsection (D)(2)(a) of this section, the application shall include (i) HDCA’s verification of its review, (ii) proof that thirty days elapsed after submitting the project to HDCA and that no verification was provided, or (iii) proof the design committee is inactive.

c. Verification of the project permit application by HDCA shall not be determinative of the project’s compliance with this chapter, but is limited to ensuring HDCA has had an opportunity to review a project permit application to provide input to the director regarding a proposed project.

d. For purposes of this chapter, a building permit application shall include applications for exterior remodels, departures, additions and new building(s).

E. How to Use This Downtown Code.

1. First, review Section 17.14.020, Regulating plan – Land use districts and site orientation standards, and map (Figure 2) to determine which land use district your property is within and what type of street your property fronts onto. Then review the standards that apply to the applicable land use district and street type designation within this section. The land use district standards (Sections 17.14.020(C)(2) and (3)) identify permitted uses, maximum building heights, setback requirements, and minimum open space requirements. Site orientation standards (Section 17.14.020(D)) identify what types of building frontages are allowed and where off-street parking is allowed.

2. Next steps depend on what type of development is proposed.

a. Nonresidential and multi-family developments must comply with the following sections unless otherwise noted:

 

17.14.030

Site Planning and Design Elements

(which address design of side and rear yards, open space, walkways, large site development, service areas and mechanical equipment, lighting, parking lot design, and pedestrian amenities)

17.14.040

Building Design

(which address design of buildings, including character, scale, details, materials, etc.)

b. Single-family, duplexes and triplexes, accessory dwelling units, cottage housing, and townhouses shall comply with the applicable subsection of Section 17.14.050.

Townhouses are considered a type of multi-family use, and thus are subject to Sections 17.14.030 and 17.14.040 unless otherwise noted and applicable provisions of Section 17.14.050. (Ord. 1410 § 3 (Exh. B) (part), 2010).

17.14.020 Regulating plan – Land use districts and site orientation standards.

A. Purpose. This section establishes land use districts and street type designations together with standards for each district and street type to guide the development of downtown Chelan properties consistent with the vision of the downtown master plan.

B. Regulating Map.

1. The regulating map (Figure 2) designates the locations for five downtown land use districts, indicates applicable height limits, and designates the locations of four different street types.

Figure 2. Regulating Map.

2. DMR Properties Not Included in Regulating Map. The DMR designated lands on the official zoning map and not included on the regulating map shall be regulated consistent with the DMR District regulations in this chapter.

C. Overlay District Uses and Dimensional Standards.

1. Land Use Districts Defined.

a. Downtown Mixed-Use (DMU). The purpose of the DMU District is to provide for a pedestrian-oriented mix of commercial, mixed-uses, and residential uses.

b. Tourist Mixed-Use (TMU). The purpose of the TMU District is to provide for residential uses and tourist-oriented uses in a pedestrian-friendly setting.

c. Downtown Mixed Residential (DMR). The purpose of the DMR District is to provide for a mix of residential uses that build on the established historical development patterns within the downtown area.

d. Downtown Single-Family (DSF). The purpose of the DSF District is to maintain the established single-family character of these areas.

e. Public. The purpose of the public district is to provide for public uses within the downtown planning area.

2. Permitted Uses.

a. Interpretation of Permitted Use Table (Table 1).

i. If no symbol appears in the box at the intersection of the column and the row, the use is not allowed in that district, except for certain temporary uses.

ii. If the letter “P” appears in the box at the intersection of the column and the row, the use is allowed in that district subject to the review procedures specified in Title 19 and the general requirements of the code.

iii. If the letter “C” appears in the box at the intersection of the column and the row, the use is allowed subject to the conditional use review procedures specified in Title 19, the conditional use standards in Chapter 17.56, and the general requirements of the code.

iv. If a number appears in the box at the intersection of the column and the row, the use is subject to the specific conditions indicated in the development condition with the corresponding number immediately following the land use table.

v. The director shall determine whether a proposed land use not specifically listed in a land use table is allowed in a district. The director’s determination shall be based on whether or not permitting the proposed use in a particular district is consistent with the purposes of this title and the district’s purpose as set forth above, by considering the following factors:

(A) The physical characteristics of the use and its supporting structures, including but not limited to scale, traffic and other impacts, and hours of operation;

(B) Whether or not the use complements or is compatible with other uses permitted in the district; and

(C) The use is similar to a permitted use, as listed in the use table.

b. Permitted Use Table.

Table 1. Permitted use table. 

 

Land Use Districts

DMU

TMU

DMR

DSF

Public

RESIDENTIAL USES

 

 

 

 

 

Dwelling, single-family

P16

P

P

P

 

Dwelling, two-family (Duplex)

 

P

P

P5

 

Dwelling, three-family (Triplex)

 

P

P

 

 

Cottage housing

 

 

P

 

 

Townhouse

P7

P

P

 

 

Dwelling, multi-family

P7

P

P

 

 

Fractional ownership condominiums and seasonal rentals

P7

P

 

 

 

Accessory dwelling unit (ADU)

P7

P

P

P

 

Senior assisted living facility or nursing home

P7

P

P

 

 

Family day care homes1

P7

P

P

P

 

Mini day care centers3

P7

P

P

P

 

Day care centers

P7

P

P3

P3

 

Home occupation

P

P

P2, 3

P2, 3

 

Bed and breakfast

P7

P

C3

C3

 

Hotel/motel, condotel, and other transient accommodations

P

P

 

 

 

COMMERCIAL USES

 

 

 

 

 

Retail, small scale (< 2,000 sf building footprint)

P10

P10

 

 

P6

Retail, medium scale (2,000 – 20,000 sf building footprint)

P10, 13

 

 

 

 

Retail, large scale (20,001 – 50,000 sf building footprint)

C

 

 

 

 

Retail, regional (> 50,000 sf floor area)

 

 

 

 

 

Restaurants, bars, tasting rooms, and brewpubs3

P10

P10

 

 

P6

Professional office

P8

P

 

 

 

Real estate office

P14

P

 

 

 

Banks

P

 

 

 

 

Personal service establishments

P

P11

 

 

P6

General services establishments

P

 

 

 

 

Gasoline station and auto service3

P7

 

 

 

 

Mini-storage and warehouse facility

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial use providing drive-through service

P15

P

 

 

 

General industrial4

P7, 12

 

 

 

 

Heavy industrial

 

 

 

 

 

Marijuana retail outlet

C

C

 

 

 

SPECIAL USES

 

 

 

 

 

Parks and playgrounds including park buildings

C

C

C

C

P

Community recreational facility

C

C

C

C

P

Conference center

P8

 

 

 

 

Private sports club

P8

P

 

 

 

Government office/structure3

P

C

C

C

P

Medical clinic/office, medical facilities

P7

 

C

 

 

Hospital3

C

 

C

 

C

Mortuary

P7

 

C

 

 

Veterinary clinic or hospital3

P7

 

 

 

 

Church3

P

C

C

C

P

Places of public or private assembly (including theaters)

P

 

 

 

P

School

C7

C

C

C

P

Museum

P

P

 

 

P

Boat launching facilities, marinas and similar facilities

P

P

 

 

P

Parking lot or structure

P7

P

P3

 

P

Public utility facility9

C

C

C

C

C

Table 1 development conditions:

(1)    Family day care homes, subject to licensing requirements of the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services and fire code requirements as set forth in Chapter 212-54 WAC.

(2)    Home occupations that involve no customers or other business-related visitors to the home business, no signs or other outward appearance that a business exists in the home, no delivery trucks, and no more than one individual residing within the home who is active in the home occupation business; provided, that if the director is given satisfactory proof of a physical disability of the individual wishing to engage in a home business or occupation, a volunteer or employee may assist in the home occupation. In addition, the home occupation must comply with the conditions for home occupation set forth in Section 17.56.060 and the fees for a home occupation permit as established by resolution of the city council must be paid.

(3)    Subject use is permitted under applicable conditions set forth in Chapter 17.56.

(4)    General industrial uses are permitted provided there are no anticipated external impacts and limited truck traffic as determined by the director.

(5)    Two-family dwelling units are allowed in the DSF District on corner lots provided there is no more than one dwelling unit entry, driveway, and garage facing each street.

(6)    Commercial leases and concessions as authorized by the public entity that is the owner of the land.

(7)    Except for lobbies or similar entrances, the subject use is prohibited within thirty feet of the sidewalk on the ground floor of designated storefront streets.

(8)    Except for lobbies or similar entrances, the subject use is prohibited within thirty feet of the sidewalk on the ground floor of “pedestrian/retail” designated storefront streets.

(9)    Specified conditions with respect to emissions of light, glare, smoke, odor, dust, particulate matters, and vibrations, community design, and hours of operation may be prescribed to ensure compatibility with surrounding uses and other applicable state and federal standards. Conditions may include required use/building enclosures, compatible architectural design, setbacks, and landscaping/screening techniques.

(10)    Restaurants, bars, and liquor stores shall not be located on sites directly across from the DMR or the DSF Districts.

(11)    Subject use is limited to two thousand square feet in building footprint.

(12)    Subject use is limited to five thousand square feet in building footprint.

(13)    Single use retail uses adjacent to Woodin Avenue, where designated as a pedestrian/retail storefront street per Figure 2, are limited to a ten-thousand-square-foot building footprint.

(14)    Real estate offices shall be limited to two hundred fifty lineal feet of street frontage along the portion of Woodin Avenue that is designated as pedestrian/retail storefront street per Figure 2.

(15)    Commercial uses providing drive-through service are permitted under the following conditions:

(a)    Subject use is not permitted on a designated pedestrian/retail storefront street per Figure 2.

(b)    Proposal utilizes an existing building (constructed as of November 23, 2010).

(c)    No new driveways are proposed.

(d)    The use and proposed design minimizes pedestrian and vehicular safety impacts as determined by the city.

(16)    Existing legal single-family dwellings are permitted uses. They may expand cumulatively up to twenty-five percent until such time as the building converts to a non-single-family use.

c. Accessory Uses and Structures.

i. Attached or freestanding private garage, carport or combination thereof not to exceed fifty percent of the floor area of principal residential structures, including basement area; provided, that all single-family residences, regardless of size, shall be allowed a minimum size private garage or carport of nine hundred sixty square feet. A garage larger than the standards set out herein shall be allowed as a conditional use. For other standards related to garages associated with residential uses, see Section 17.14.030 for multi-family structures and Section 17.14.050 for single-family, duplexes, triplexes, accessory dwelling units, and townhouses.

ii. Other accessory buildings collectively shall be no greater than twenty-five percent of the floor area of principal residential structures, excluding the basement area, not to exceed six hundred square feet; provided, that regardless of size of the principal structure, other accessory buildings collectively may be at least three hundred square feet.

iii. Not more than one each of a house trailer or truck, or two boats, may be stored in the rear yard area of any one zoning lot.

iv. Fences.

(A) Front yard and between a street and any building: forty-two inches maximum height. On corner lots, fences shall be limited to thirty-six inches in height for a distance of fifteen feet from the intersection of the property lines abutting the street and to forty-two inches for the remainder of the front yard facing on those streets.

Where two adjoining properties have front yards of differing depths, any fence built along the side yard between the two properties shall not exceed a height of forty-two inches adjacent to the front yard of either dwelling.

Front yard fence height may be increased to a maximum of four feet in those instances where a “family day care home, mini day care center and day care centers” have been established in accordance with the provisions of Section 17.56.080;

(B) Side yard: six feet maximum height;

(C) Rear yard: six feet maximum height; and

(D) Where there is a difference in grade between two adjoining properties, the base line for the fence height shall be the median of the difference between the grades of the two properties.

v. Covered Patios.

(A) A freestanding covered patio must meet the standards of this section. If the covered patio is attached to a dwelling, it is to be considered as a part of that dwelling;

(B) Height limit: ten feet; provided, however, that a fireplace flue may extend beyond the maximum height limit to a height of not over thirteen feet; and

vi. Swimming Pools. All swimming pools must be located behind the front yard setback line and the yard or area around them must be enclosed by a fence of not less than five feet in height. At least a five-foot setback from all side and rear property lines must be maintained.

vii. Temporary Construction Buildings, Travel Trailers, and Recreational Vehicles. Temporary structures or vehicles for storage of tools and equipment, or for supervisory offices, may be permitted for construction projects; provided, that such structures/vehicles are:

(A) Allowed only during periods of active construction;

(B) The owner shall obtain a permit from the city after the purchasing of a building permit. The permit shall be prominently displayed on such vehicle so as to be visible on the abutting street;

(C) All such vehicles shall have operable self-contained sanitary facilities or be connected to the city sewer system; and

(D) Removed within thirty days of project completion or cessation of work.

3. Dimensional Standards. If a subscript number appears in the box at the intersection of the column and the row, developments are subject to the development condition with the corresponding number immediately following the dimensional standard table.

Table 2. Dimensional standards table. 

 

Land Use Districts

DMU

TMU

DMR

DSF

Public

DEVELOPMENT INTENSITY

Minimum lot area

1

1

1

6,000 sf

NA

Minimum lot width at building line

1

1

1

60'

NA

Minimum lot depth

1

1

1

90'

NA

Maximum building height

2 – 4 stories2

2 – 4 stories2

2 – 3 stories3

2 stories4

2 – 4 stories5

Maximum land coverage for all buildings

NA

NA

NA

30%

NA

BUILDING PLACEMENT

Front yard6

0 – 15' min.

0 – 15' min.

15' min.7

25' min.7

8

Side yard

0 – 5' min.13

0 – 5' min.13

0' min.9

5' min.12

5' min.

10

Rear yard

0' min.

0' min.

20' min.11

20' min.11

10

Table 2 development conditions:

(1)    Applicants shall successfully demonstrate to the city how lot sizes and shapes are sufficient to accommodate permitted uses.

(2)    See Table 3 and Figure 3 for the maximum number of stories for applicable city blocks in the DMU and TMU Districts. The table below sets forth the maximum building height in feet per the maximum designated number of stories, plus any special conditions that apply.

(3)    The maximum building height in the DMR District is two stories or thirty-five feet, whichever is less, except that a third floor is allowed under the following conditions:

i.    The third floor shall be set back horizontally from the front facade by at least five feet, regardless of the facade setback. Covered porches that extend at least six feet in front of the facade and cover an area at least forty-eight square feet shall qualify as the front facade for the purposes of this standard; and

ii.    The maximum width of the third floor visible from the street shall be sixty feet; or

iii.    The third floor must be a partial floor under a gable roof (see Figure 4 for clarification).

(4)    The maximum height in the DSF District shall be two stories or thirty feet, whichever is less.

(5)    The height limit in the public district shall be the same as the adjacent land use district. Where the site is adjacent to more than one land use district, the height limit of the district closest to the proposed building shall apply.

(6)    See subsection D of this section, Site Orientation Standards, for front yard setback standards.

(7)    Covered porches may project into the front yard by up to six feet.

(8)    Front yard setback requirements in the public district shall be the same as the district located across the street. Where the public district occupies land on both sides of the street, front yard setback provisions of the nearest other land use district shall apply as determined by the director.

(9)    No internal side yard setbacks are required for two- or three-family dwellings, townhouses or multi-family dwellings, or for subdivisions where zero lot line homes are proposed. See Figure 5 for examples.

(10)    For public district sites adjacent to DMU District properties, there is no minimum side or rear yard setback requirement. For public district sites adjacent to all other districts, the minimum side and rear yards shall be the same as those in the adjacent district.

(11)    For lots with alleys, garages, detached accessory dwelling units, and other accessory buildings may be placed up to alley easement or property line.

(12)    One foot of additional setback is required for each foot of building height over twenty-five feet. See Figure 6 for an example.

(13)    No setbacks are required for window-less fire walls, otherwise the minimum building setback is five feet.

 

Table 3. Maximum building height in the DMU and TMU Districts. 

Maximum no. of stories as indicated in Figure 3

Maximum height in feet

Special conditions/exceptions

2

25'

A 3rd floor is not permitted. For additions to existing buildings (as of November 9, 2010), the maximum height is 30 feet. Existing buildings over 30 feet in heigth may be rebuilt to existing height in the event of fire or natural disaster provided documentation on building height is provided, as determined by the director.

2*

35'

A 3rd floor is permitted under the following conditions:

a) The upper floor or floors shall be set back horizontally from the facade by at least 5 feet, regardless of the facade setback. Covered porches that extend at least 6 feet in front of the facade and cover an area at least 48 square feet shall qualify as the front facade for the purposes of this standard; or

b) The 3rd floor must be a partial floor, as defined, under a gabled or hipped roof. See Figure 4 for clarification.

3

40'

A 4th floor is not permitted.

3*

45'

A 4th floor is permitted under the following conditions:

a) The 4th floor shall be set back horizontally from the facade by at least 5 feet, regardless of the facade setback; or

b) The 4th floor must be a partial floor, as defined, under a gabled or hipped roof.

 

4

45'

A 5th floor is not permitted.

All blocks

Heights 3 stories or 35' and above

The developer shall prepare an axonometric or other three-dimensional drawing or model illustrating the massing of the proposed project and the surrounding area (within 500 feet of the site), to examine how the proposed development fits within the existing and planned context of surrounding development and complies with the Downtown design standards. The illustration or model shall depict the exterior massing of the shell of the building and not detailed engineering models of the structure or interior.

As a result of the application review or model, the administrator may condition the development to modify bulk, building spacing, or height to protect public views.

Figure 3. Downtown building height limits per district and block by the number of stories.

Figure 4. Design options providing for a third floor in the DMR District.

Figure 5. Examples where no internal side yard setbacks are required for duplexes (left example) and zero lot line homes (right example).

Figure 6. Side yard setbacks in the DMR District.

D. Site Orientation Standards.

1. Intent.

a. To reinforce the historic storefront character of Chelan’s downtown core area.

b. To enhance the pedestrian environment in downtown Chelan.

c. To minimize potential negative impacts of parking lots and garages on the streetscape.

d. To promote “eyes on the street” for security for pedestrians and to create a more welcoming and interesting streetscape.

e. To reinforce the historic streetscape character of downtown’s residential areas.

2. Storefront Street. The intent is to emphasize and/or reinforce a “Main Street” setting with storefronts placed adjacent to sidewalks. For all designated storefront streets (see Figure 2), the following standards apply:

a. Permitted Ground Floor Use along Street Frontages. Nonresidential uses are required on the ground floor, except lobbies for residential uses are acceptable. For “pedestrian/retail” designated storefront streets defined in Figure 2, pedestrian-oriented uses are required on the ground floor (for example, no professional offices on the ground floor). See the permitted use chart in subsection C of this section for details.

b. Permitted Building Frontages and Transparency.

i. Storefronts meeting the design requirements set forth below:

(A) Building entries shall face the sidewalk;

(B) Weather protection at least six feet deep is required along at least seventy percent of the facades on the north sides of the street. Weather protection is not required on the south sides of the street; and

(C) Transparent window area along at least seventy percent of the ground floor facade between thirty inches and eight feet above grade is required. Display windows may count for up to fifty percent of the transparency requirements provided they are at least sixteen inches of depth to allow for changeable displays. Tack on display cases shall not qualify as transparent window area. Departures to the transparency requirement will be considered by the director provided the design treatment meets the intent of the standards.

ii. Building setbacks from the public right-of-way may be permitted provided the space between the front property line and the building:

(A) Is a widened sidewalk area; or

(B) Is a pedestrian-oriented space, as defined in Section 17.14.030.

Figure 7. Storefront requirements.

c. Parking Location. Parking shall be located to the rear, below, or above storefronts. Where some off-street parking (both surface and structured) adjacent to the street is unavoidable, as determined by the director, no more than sixty feet of frontage shall be occupied by parking and vehicular access.

i. Departure. For proposed parking structures along Johnson Street or Wapato Avenue east of Emerson Street, the city will consider departures to this standard provided nonresidential floor area with minimum thirteen-foot floor to ceiling heights and thirty-foot depths are provided on street corners and design treatments are provided along the facade to add visual interest to the pedestrian.

Figure 8. Parking location requirements for storefront streets.

3. Secondary Street. The intent is to provide for the option of storefronts or landscaped frontages. For all designated secondary streets (see Figure 2), the following standards apply:

a. Permitted Ground Floor Use along Street Frontages. All permitted uses permitted by the applicable land use district are acceptable on the ground floor, except where otherwise noted herein.

b. Permitted Frontages.

i. Storefronts as defined above (see Figure 7).

ii. Stoops, which are elevated platform entryways situated close to the sidewalk (see Figure 9). Stoops shall meet the requirements set forth below:

(A) Building entries shall be visible and accessible from the sidewalk;

(B) Maximum average stoop height shall be three feet;

(C) Minimum front yard building setback shall be six feet. Stoops meeting the requirements above will not count as a building;

(D) Weather protection at least three feet deep is required at building entries;

(E) Transparent windows/doors shall occupy a minimum of fifteen percent of the facade. For the purpose of this requirement, the facade is all vertical surfaces of the structure generally facing the street. Where a portion or portions of the structure are set back fifteen feet or more from the front facade, such areas shall not be included in the transparency calculations; and

(F) Ramps may be integrated into the stoop design where needed for accessibility requirements.

Figure 9. Stoop requirements. Note that stoops are permitted on designated secondary streets, but not on storefront streets.

iii. Landscaped front yards meeting the requirements below:

(A) At least one building entry shall be visible from the sidewalk. Exception: Entries that face onto a courtyard that is oriented towards the street are permitted;

(B) Weather protection at least three feet deep is required at building entries; and

(C) Transparent windows/doors shall occupy a minimum of fifteen percent of the facade. For the purpose of this requirement, the facade is all vertical surfaces of the structure generally facing the street. Where a portion or portions of the structure are set back fifteen feet or more from the front facade, such areas shall not be included in the transparency calculations. Exception: Where the building is within ten feet of the front property line, at least fifty percent of the ground floor facade between thirty inches and eight feet above grade shall be transparent.

See Figure 10 below for illustrations.

Figure 10. Landscaped frontage requirements.

iv. Any combination of the above frontages.

c. Parking Location. Parking shall be located to the side, rear, under, or above buildings. No more than fifty percent of the frontage shall be occupied by parking and vehicular access uses, regardless of the frontage type used. Garages and carports, both attached and detached, shall be set back at least twenty feet from the front property line and no closer to the property line than other parts of the facade. See Figure 11 for acceptable and unacceptable examples.

i. Departure. The city will consider departures to this standard provided the director determines that the use, building, and site design features contribute to the visual character and pedestrian environment downtown. In this instance, design features to mitigate visual impacts of any parking lots shall go above and beyond minimum requirements in order to effectively define the street edge and provide continuous interest to the pedestrian along the sidewalk. The director shall determine the parking lot mitigation necessary for approval.

Departures for corner lots are not permitted.

Figure 11. Parking location requirements for secondary and landscaped streets.

4. Landscape Street. The intent is to provide landscaped front yards. For all designated landscaped streets (see Figure 2), the following standards apply:

a. Permitted Ground Floor Use along Street Frontages. All uses permitted by applicable land use district;

b. Permitted Frontages. Landscaped front yards as defined above (see Figure 10); and

c. Parking Location. Parking shall be located to the side or rear of buildings. No more than fifty percent of the frontage shall be occupied by parking and vehicular access uses, regardless of the frontage type used. Garages and carports, both attached and detached, shall be set back at least twenty feet from the front property line and no closer to the property line than other parts of the facade. Departures to the garage setback will be considered by the director provided design treatments are included to minimize safety and visual impacts of garage on the streetscape. (Ord. 1533 § 6 (Exhs. 19, 20) (part), 2017; Ord. 1513 § 2 (Exh. A) (part), 2016; Ord. 1474 § 3 (Exh. B), 2014; Ord. 1410 § 3 (Exh. B) (part), 2010).

17.14.030 Site planning and design elements.

A. Purpose and Applicability.

1. Purpose. This section provides direction for the layout of buildings, open spaces, circulation elements, and large site development and the design of site elements consistent with the goals and policies of the Chelan downtown master plan.

2. Applicability. Unless otherwise noted, the provisions in this section apply to all new nonresidential and multi-family construction within the downtown planning area (see Section 17.14.010(B) for clarification).

B. Side/Rear Yard and Alley Design.

1. Intent.

a. To provide for compatibility between developments.

b. To provide side and rear yard design options that enhance downtown’s pedestrian environment and the setting for development.

c. To provide flexible standards that allow property owners to maximize on-site development while meeting community design goals.

2. Solar Access and Privacy along Side/Rear Yards.

a. Buildings or portions thereof containing multi-family dwelling units whose only solar access is from the applicable side of the building (facing towards the side property line) shall be set back from the applicable side or rear property lines at least fifteen feet. See Figure 12.

b. Balconies or rooftop decks within fifteen horizontal feet of a side property line must utilize opaque guard rails to minimize privacy impacts to adjacent properties.

Figure 12. Solar access and privacy standards for multi-family residential buildings along side/rear yards.

3. Alley Design Standards – Historic Core. Alleys directly north and south of Woodin Avenue between Columbia and Sanders Streets are subject to supplemental alley design standards set forth in Section 5 of the City of Chelan Development Standards Manual.

Figure 13. Design guidelines for alley improvements in the historic core.

C. Open Space.

1. Intent.

a. To enrich the pedestrian environment in downtown Chelan.

b. To provide accessible, safe, convenient, and usable on-site open space for residential uses.

c. To create open spaces that enhance the residential setting.

d. To provide for pedestrian-oriented open space in conjunction with large scale commercial development.

2. Open Space Requirements for Nonresidential Uses. All nonresidential development on sites more than one acre in size, including commercial portions of mixed-use development, shall provide pedestrian-oriented open space equal to at least one percent of the net project area plus one percent of the gross nonresidential building floor area, exclusive of structured parking. The intent is to mitigate the impacts of large scale commercial development and to contribute to the pedestrian-oriented character of downtown. Pedestrian-oriented space shall comply with the design provisions of subsection (C)(1) of this section. See Figure 14 for an example.

Figure 14. Illustrating the amount of open space required for nonresidential development.

3. Pedestrian-Oriented Open Space Design Criteria. These spaces, as required per Section 17.14.020(C)(2), are intended to be publicly accessible spaces that enliven the pedestrian environment by providing (1) opportunities for outdoor dining, socializing, relaxing and (2) visual amenities that contribute to the unique character of downtown. Design criteria for pedestrian open space:

a. Sidewalk area, where widened beyond minimum requirements, shall count as pedestrian-oriented open space. The additional sidewalk area may be used for outdoor dining and temporary display of retail goods. The standards in subsections (C)(3)(b) and (c) of this section shall not apply to sidewalks, where used as usable open space;

b. The following design elements are required for pedestrian-oriented open space:

i. Spaces shall be physically and visually accessible from the adjacent street or major internal vehicle or pedestrian route. Spaces shall be in locations that the intended user can easily access and use, rather than simply leftover or undevelopable spaces where very little pedestrian traffic is anticipated;

ii. Paved walking surfaces of either concrete or approved unit paving;

iii. Pedestrian-scaled lighting (no more than fourteen feet in height) at a level averaging at least two foot-candles throughout the space. Lighting may be on site or building-mounted lighting;

iv. At least three feet of seating area (bench, ledge, etc.) or one individual seat per sixty square feet of plaza area or open space. This provision may be relaxed or waived where there are provisions for movable seating that meet the intent of the standard as determined by the director;

v. Spaces shall be positioned in areas with significant pedestrian traffic to provide interest and security – such as adjacent to a building entry; and

vi. Landscaping that adds visual or seasonal interest to the space.

Figure 15. Examples of pedestrian-oriented open spaces.

c. The following features are encouraged in pedestrian-oriented space:

i. Pedestrian amenities such as a water feature, drinking fountain, and/or distinctive paving or artwork;

ii. Provide pedestrian-oriented facades on some or all buildings facing the space;

iii. Consideration of the sun angle at noon and the wind pattern in the design of the space;

iv. Transitional zones along building edges to allow for outdoor eating areas and a planted buffer;

v. Movable seating;

vi. Incorporation of water treatment features such as rain gardens or the use of an area over a vault as a pedestrian-oriented space; and

vii. Weather protection, especially weather protection that can be moved or altered to accommodate conditions.

d. The following features are prohibited within pedestrian-oriented space:

i. Asphalt or gravel pavement, except where continuous gravel or asphalt paths intersect with the space;

ii. Adjacent chain link fences;

iii. Adjacent blank walls; and

iv. Adjacent dumpsters or service areas.

4. Open Space Requirements for Multi-Family Uses. All multi-family development, including multi-family portions of mixed-use development, shall provide open space at least equal to ten percent of the building living space, not counting corridors, lobbies, etc. For example, for an eight-unit development where the units average one thousand square feet, the minimum required open space shall be eight hundred square feet. The required open space may be provided in a combination of the following ways:

a. One hundred percent of the required open space may be in the form of common open space available to all residents and meeting the requirements of subsection (C)(2)(a) of this section. Common open space may be in the form of courtyards, front porches, patios, play areas, gardens or similar spaces;

b. Up to one hundred percent of the required open space may be provided by shared roof decks located on the top of buildings which are available to all residents and meet the requirements of subsection (C)(2)(b) of this section; and/or

c. Up to fifty percent of the required open space may be provided by private or common balconies meeting the requirements of subsection (C)(2)(c) of this section;

d. Up to fifty percent of the required open space may be provided by common indoor recreation areas meeting the requirements of subsection (C)(2)(d) of this section.

e. Up to twenty-five percent of the required open space may be provided by pea patch areas meeting the requirements of subsection (C)(2)(e) of this section.

5. Multi-Family Open Space Design Criteria.

a. Common open space includes landscaped courtyards or decks, front porches, gardens with pathways, children’s play areas, or other multi-purpose recreational and/or green spaces. Special requirements and recommendations for common open spaces include the following:

i. Required setback areas shall not count towards the open space requirement unless they are portions of a space that meets the dimensional and design requirements and guidelines herein as determined by the director;

ii. Space shall be large enough to provide functional leisure or recreational activity. To meet this requirement, no dimension shall be less than fifteen feet in width (except for front porches);

iii. Spaces (particularly children’s play areas) shall be visible from at least some dwelling units and positioned near pedestrian activity;

iv. Spaces shall feature paths, landscaping, seating, lighting and other pedestrian amenities to make the area more functional and enjoyable;

v. Individual entries may be provided onto common open space from adjacent ground floor residential units, where applicable. Small, semi-private open spaces for adjacent ground floor units that maintain visual access to the common area are strongly encouraged to enliven the space. Low walls or hedges (less than three feet in height) are encouraged to provide clear definition of semi-private and common spaces;

vi. Separate common space from ground floor windows, automobile circulation, service areas and parking lots with landscaping, low-level fencing, and/or other treatments as approved by the director that enhance safety and privacy (both for common open space and dwelling units);

vii. Space should be oriented to receive sunlight, facing east, west, or (preferably) south, when possible;

viii. Stairways, stair landings, above grade walkways, balconies and decks shall not encroach into the common open space. An atrium roof covering may be built over a courtyard to provide weather protection provided it does not obstruct natural light inside the courtyard. Front porches are an exception; and

ix. Shared front porches qualify as common open space provided:

(A) No dimension is less than eight feet; and

(B) The porches are accessible to all residents.

Figure 16. Examples of common open space.

b. Shared Rooftop Decks. Such spaces shall meet the following requirements:

i. Space shall be ADA accessible to all dwelling units;

ii. Space shall provide amenities such as seating areas, landscaping, and/or other features that encourage use as determined by the director;

iii. Space shall feature hard surfacing appropriate to encourage resident use; and

iv. Space shall incorporate features that provide for the safety of residents, such as enclosures and appropriate lighting levels.

c. Private Balconies and Decks. Such spaces shall be at least thirty-five square feet, with no dimension less than four feet, to provide a space usable for human activity. The space shall meet ADA standards. This standard also applies to individual front porches if counted toward townhouse open space requirements.

d. Indoor Recreational Areas. Such spaces shall meet the following conditions:

i. The space shall meet ADA standards and shall be located in a visible area, such as near an entrance, lobby, or high traffic corridors; and

ii. Space shall be designed specifically to serve interior recreational functions and not merely be leftover unrentable space used to meet the open space requirement. Such space shall include amenities and design elements that will encourage use by residents as determined by the director.

e. Pea Patches. Such spaces shall meet the following conditions:

i. All spaces shall be located to receive at least six hours of natural sunlight per day in summer months;

ii. All spaces shall have access to irrigation;

iii. All spaces shall have tillable soil to a depth of one foot, minimum;

iv. Spaces may be provided in shared or private yard areas, at ground level, on balconies, or on rooftop decks;

v. Where some or all of the food production space is within shared common open space or off site, a management program shall be required setting forth the following provisions:

(A) Access to interested residents meeting minimum space requirements set forth herein;

(B) Provisions for space management and maintenance; and

(C) No additional fees shall be assessed to space users beyond standard homeowners’ association or resident maintenance fees; and

vi. Design standards where food production space is provided within shared common open spaces:

(A) Walkways between planting beds shall be at least two feet wide; and

(B) Planting beds shall be raised above surface level. For ground-level spaces, planting beds shall be raised at least six inches. For rooftop spaces, planting beds shall be raised by at least eighteen inches.

Figure 17. Pea patch example.

D. Internal Pedestrian Access and Design.

1. Intent. To improve the pedestrian environment by providing safe and clear connections between the sidewalk and adjacent uses, between businesses, and through parking lots.

2. Access to Sidewalk. All buildings shall have clear pedestrian access to the sidewalk. Where a use fronts two streets, access shall be provided from the road closest to the main entrance, preferably from both streets. Buildings with entries not facing the street shall have a clear and obvious pedestrian access way from the street to the entry.

3. Sites with Multiple Businesses or Buildings. Pedestrian paths or walkways connecting all businesses and the entries of multiple commercial buildings frequented by the public on the same development site shall be provided.

Figure 18. Good internal pedestrian circulation. Note connections from the street, between buildings and through parking lots.

4. Parking Lot Pathways. A paved walkway or sidewalk with eight feet of unobstructed width shall be provided for safe walking areas through parking lots greater than one hundred fifty feet long (measured either parallel or perpendicular to the street front). Walkways shall be provided for at least every three parking aisles or a distance of less than one hundred fifty feet shall be maintained between paths. Such access routes through parking areas shall be separated from vehicular parking and travel lanes by use of contrasting paving material, which may be raised above the vehicular pavement. Speed bumps may not be used to satisfy this requirement. Trees and pedestrian-scaled lighting (maximum fifteen feet in height) shall be used to clearly define pedestrian walkways or other pedestrian areas within the parking area.

Figure 19. Parking lot pathway standards and example.

5. Internal Walkway Widths and Design.

a. Pathways along the front facade of mixed-use and retail buildings one hundred feet or more in length (measured along the facade) that are not located adjacent to a street must be at least twelve feet wide with eight feet minimum unobstructed width and include the following:

i. Street trees, as approved by the director, shall be placed at an average of thirty feet on center and placed in grates (except where trees are placed in planting strips). Breaks in the tree coverage will be allowed near major building entries to enhance visibility. However, no less than one tree per sixty lineal feet of building facade must be provided;

ii. Planting strips may be used between any vehicular access or parking area and the pathway; provided, that the required trees are included and the pathway is at least eight feet in width and the combined pathway and planting strip is at least fourteen feet in width; and

iii. Pedestrian-scaled lighting may be used as a substitute to the required street trees subject to director approval, provided they are used at the same intervals.

Figure 20. Internal walkway standards and an example along retail or mixed-use buildings.

b. For all other interior pathways, the applicant shall successfully demonstrate that the proposed walkway is of sufficient width to accommodate the anticipated number of users. See Figure 21 for considerations.

Figure 21. Considerations for pathway walking widths.

6. Pedestrian Crossings.

a. Crosswalks are required when a walkway crosses a paved area accessible to vehicles; and

b. Applicants must continue the sidewalk pattern and material across driveways.

E. Large Site Development Standards. All development permit applications for sites over one acre or with multiple buildings, except for single-family development, shall demonstrate that the project is based on a unifying site planning concept that meets the following criteria:

1. Incorporates open space and landscaping as a unifying element;

2. Where possible, incorporates screening, utilities, and drainage as positive elements;

3. Provides pedestrian paths or walkways connecting all businesses and the entries of multiple buildings; and

4. Building entrances shall not be focused around a central parking lot but be connected by a sidewalk/pathway system and/or open space(s).

F. Service Areas and Mechanical Equipment.

1. Intent.

a. To minimize the potential negative impacts of service elements.

b. To encourage thoughtful siting of service elements that balance functional needs with the desire to screen negative impacts.

2. Service Element Location and Design. All developments shall provide a designated spot for service elements (refuse and disposal). Such elements shall meet the following requirements:

a. Service elements shall be located to minimize the negative visual, noise, odor, and physical impacts to the street environment, adjacent (on- and off-site) residents or other uses, and pedestrian areas;

b. The designated spot for service elements shall be paved with concrete;

Figure 22. Appropriate service area location and enclosure example.

c. Appropriate enclosure of the common trash and recycling elements shall be required, as determined by the director. Requirements and considerations:

i. Service areas visible from the street, pathway, pedestrian-oriented space or public parking area (alleys are exempt) shall be enclosed and screened around their perimeter by a durable wall or fence at least six feet high. Developments shall use materials and detailing consistent with primary structures on site. Acceptable materials include brick, concrete block or stone;

ii. The sides and rear of the enclosure must be screened with Type A, B, or C landscaping at least five feet deep in visible locations as determined by the director to soften the views of the screening element and add visual interest;

iii. Collection points shall be located and configured so that the enclosure gate swing does not obstruct pedestrian or vehicle traffic, or does not require that a hauling truck project into any public right-of-way;

iv. Proximity to adjacent residential units will be a key factor in determining appropriate service element treatment; and

v. Preferably, service enclosures are integrated into the building itself.

3. Utility Meters, Electrical Conduit, and Other Service Utility Apparatus. These elements shall be located and/or designed to minimize their visibility to the public. Project designers are strongly encouraged to coordinate with applicable service providers early in the design process to determine the best approach in meeting these standards. If such elements are mounted in a location visible from the street, pedestrian pathway, common open space, or shared auto courtyards, they shall be screened with vegetation or by architectural features.

Figure 23. Good and bad utility meter configurations. The examples on the left are consolidated and somewhat screened by landscaping elements, whereas the right examples are exposed and degrade the character of these townhomes.

4. Rooftop Mechanical Equipment. All rooftop mechanical equipment shall be organized, proportioned, detailed, screened, landscaped (with decks or terraces) and/or colored to be an integral element of the building and minimize visual impacts from the ground level of adjacent streets and properties. For example, screening features should utilize similar building materials and forms to blend with the architectural character of the building.

Figure 24. Screening examples of rooftop mechanical equipment.

G. Lighting.

1. Intent.

a. To encourage the judicious use of lighting in conjunction with other security methods to increase site safety.

b. To encourage the use of lighting as an integral design component to enhance buildings, landscaping, and other site features.

c. To encourage night sky visibility and to reduce the general illumination of the sky in Chelan.

d. To reduce the horizontal glare and vertical light trespass from a development onto adjacent parcels and natural features.

e. To discourage the use of lighting for advertising purposes.

2. Lighting Standards and Guidelines. Provide appropriate lighting levels in all areas used by pedestrians or automobiles, including building entries, walkways, parking areas, circulation areas, and other open space areas. Specifically:

a. All public areas shall be lighted with average minimum and maximum levels as follows:

i. Minimum (for low or nonpedestrian and vehicular traffic areas) of one-half foot-candle;

ii. Moderate (for moderate or high volume pedestrian areas) of one to two foot-candles; and

iii. Maximum (for high volume pedestrian areas and building entries) of four foot-candles;

b. Lighting shall be provided at consistent levels, with gradual transitions between maximum and minimum levels of lighting and between lit areas and unlit areas. Highly contrasting pools of light and dark areas shall be avoided;

c. Parking lot lighting fixtures shall be nonglare and mounted no more than twenty-five feet above the ground, with lower fixtures preferable so as to maintain a human scale. Requests for higher lighting fixtures may be considered with the approval of the director. All fixtures over fifteen feet in height shall be fitted with a full cut-off shield;

d. Pedestrian-scaled lighting (light fixtures no taller than fifteen feet) is encouraged in areas with high anticipated pedestrian activity. Lighting shall enable pedestrians to identify a face forty-five feet away in order to promote safety;

e. Lighting should not be permitted to trespass onto adjacent private parcels nor shall light source (luminaire) be visible at the property line. All building lights shall be directed onto the building itself and/or the ground immediately adjacent to it. The light emissions should not be visible above the roofline of the building. Light fixtures other than traditional cobra heads are encouraged; and

Figure 25. Lighting guidelines.

f. All outdoor lighting on public and private property shall comply with the dark sky provisions of Chapter 17.62. Exceptions may be allowed by the director for pedestrian-oriented lighting associated with commercial uses and/or mixed-use buildings.

H. Parking Lot Design.

1. Intent. To minimize potential negative impacts of parking lots on downtown’s visual character, pedestrian environment, local water quality conditions, and adjacent uses.

2. Surface Parking Lot Screening Standards.

a. Where new surface parking lots or parking lots associated with Level III additions are adjacent to streets, one of the following buffer options between the sidewalk and the parking lot shall be incorporated:

i. Provide a five-foot-wide planting bed that incorporates a continuous low wall (approximately three feet tall). The planting bed shall be in front of the wall and feature Type C landscaping. Alternative landscaping schemes will be considered by the director provided they meet the intent of the guidelines. The wall shall be constructed of brick, stone, decorative concrete or concrete block, or other permanent material that provides visual interest and helps to define the street edge as determined by the director. See Figure 26 for an example;

Figure 26. Parking lot planting buffer with low wall.

ii. Provide an elevated planter which is a minimum of five feet wide and between two and three feet in height. Ledges that are approximately twelve inches in width are encouraged as they can double as a seating area. The planter must be constructed of masonry, concrete or other permanent material that effectively contrasts with the color of the sidewalk and combines ground cover and annuals, perennials, ornamental grasses, low shrubs, and/or small trees that provide seasonal interest as determined by the director. See Figure 27 as an example; or

Figure 27. Elevated parking lot planting buffer.

iii. Provide at least ten feet of Type C landscaping.

Figure 28. Ten-foot parking lot buffer with Type C landscaping.

All options above should choose and maintain plantings to maintain eye level visibility between the street/sidewalk and parking area for safety. This means that shrubs and other low plantings should be maintained below three feet in height while trees (once they achieve taller heights) should generally be trimmed to up to the eight-foot level. See Figure 29.

Figure 29. Parking lot planting buffers shall emphasize the 3:8 rule for visibility and safety.

b. Where new surface parking lots or parking lots associated with Level III additions are located along side property lines, a six-foot screen fence shall be required on the property line with at least five feet of Type A, B, or C landscaping in front of the fence. Breaks in the fence/landscaping are permitted for internal pedestrian and vehicular connections between properties. Properties fronting on designated storefront streets and/or those with shared parking agreements with applicable neighbors are exempt from this requirement. Departures will be considered by the director provided they meet the intent of the standards (see Section 17.14.020(B)(2) for considerations).

3. Other Relevant Code Sections.

a. Section 9 (Parking Standards) of the City of Chelan Development Standards Manual.

b. Parking lot pathway standards set forth in Section 17.14.020(D)(4).

c. Internal parking lot landscaping standards set forth in Section 17.60.040(B)(3).

I. Special Features and Amenities.

1. Intent.

a. To create attractive and comfortable pedestrian environments.

b. To enhance the unique character and identity of downtown Chelan.

2. Durable Pedestrian Furniture. Pedestrian furniture provided in public spaces shall be made of durable, vandal- and weather-resistant materials that do not retain rainwater and can be reasonably maintained over an extended period of time.

3. Streetscape Amenities. Streetscape amenities must be integrated into the design of sidewalks in conjunction with new construction along all designated storefront and secondary streets. Level I and II additions and project sites adjacent to sidewalks that were recently constructed or upgraded by the city (as determined by the director) shall be exempt from these standards. For each one hundred cumulative lineal feet of storefront street frontage, at least two of the desired amenity elements listed below shall be included. Along designated secondary streets, at least one amenity element shall be included. The type, location, and design of chosen amenities shall contribute to a well-balanced mix of features on the street, as determined by the director. Desired amenities include:

a. Seating. Each six feet of seating area or four individual seats count as one amenity element. Seating areas should generally be located in areas that provide views of pedestrian activity. Seating ledges must be at least twelve inches wide to qualify;

b. Trash Receptacles. To qualify as an amenity, at least one trash receptacle is needed per one hundred linear feet of sidewalk. For designated pedestrian-oriented streets, this shall be required;

c. Permanent landscaping elements including planting beds and other landscaping elements that add visual interest to the sidewalk as determined by the director;

d. Special pavement patterns and/or tree grates;

e. Bicycle racks;

f. Informational kiosks (may count as two amenity elements at the discretion of the director);

g. Decorative clocks (may count as two amenity elements at the discretion of the director);

h. Artwork as approved by the arts council (may count as two amenity elements at the discretion of the arts council);

i. Special lighting; and

j. Other amenities that meet the intent as determined by the director.

Features above that are publicly funded, already required by code, and/or obstruct pedestrian movement shall not qualify as an amenity to meet this standard.

All features are subject to city approval.

Figure 30. Examples of desirable streetscape amenities for downtown Chelan.

(Ord. 1410 § 3 (Exh. B) (part), 2010).

17.14.040 Building design.

A. Purpose and Applicability.

1. Purpose. This section provides direction for the design of buildings consistent with the goals and policies of the Chelan downtown master plan.

2. Applicability. Unless otherwise noted, the provisions in this section apply to all nonresidential and multi-family development types within the downtown planning area.

B. Architectural Character.

1. Intent. To promote architectural design that reinforces and strengthens downtown Chelan’s unique small town/historic character/distinct setting. The focus is to encourage architecture with a strong sense of human scale, fine detailing, quality materials, sensitive to the environment, oriented to pedestrians, and designed appropriate to the site’s unique context. This approach is intended to allow for a diversity of architectural styles provided they meet the design standards of this chapter.

2. Architectural Character Standards and Guidelines.

a. Historic Core (Woodin Avenue between the River and Sanders Street).

i. Historic Buildings. Property owners of buildings constructed prior to 1950 are strongly encouraged to use the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (web: http://www.nps.gov/hps/tps/standguide/) (hard copy also available at City Hall) as a guide to preserve, rehabilitate, restore, reconstruct, or add to historic properties. These standards provide detailed recommendations on restoration, maintenance, repair, replacement, design, alterations, building materials, roofs, interiors, etc. Also, the state of Washington’s website provides contacts and technical assistance related to historic preservation at: http://cted.wa.gov/site/411/default.aspx. Applicants are also encouraged to consult with the Historic Downtown Chelan Association and/or other local resources for design guidance involving planned remodels/additions to pre-1950s buildings.

Historic photographs are extremely useful in determining historic precedent. Contact the city or Chelan Historical Society regarding historical photographs of downtown Chelan.

Supplemental standards and guidelines:

(A) Covering over original windows or design details on identified historic buildings is prohibited.

(B) Alterations to historic materials should be minimized.

(C) Original architectural features should be repaired rather than replaced. If replacement is necessary, replacements should match the original in design, construction, color, and texture as close as possible.

(D) Missing architectural features should be replaced with an accurate duplication of the original features. However, a second acceptable option for the replacement feature is a new design that is compatible with the remaining character-defining features of the historic building. The new design should always take into account the size, scale, and material of the historic building itself and, most importantly, should be clearly differentiated so that a false historical appearance is not created. See Figures 32 and 33 for example facade enhancements/renovations.

(E) Unique features and examples of skilled craftsmanship should be maintained and protected.

(F) For facade additions to historic buildings, such additions should either extend the facade through use of consistent articulation, materials, and roofline treatment or design the addition to look like a separate building and comply with the guidelines for new buildings referenced in subsection (B)(2)(a)(iii) of this section.

The director may allow alterations to the side or rear facades that are not character defining; provided, that the alterations do not interfere with existing building features or alter the historic character of the building. The director may allow alterations to the original primary facades in order to accommodate a desired use, provided deviation from historic conditions is minimized.

Figure 31. Illustrating how simple facade enhancements can upgrade the historic character of downtown.

Figure 32. Illustrating a desirable facade renovation to an existing Woodin Avenue building. Use of original facade materials is encouraged, if possible. Otherwise, use durable materials compatible with the facade and historic character of downtown.

ii. Nonperiod Architecture. Existing architecture which is not consistent with the early 1900 style and represents later periods is also encouraged to celebrate distinctive design features, except where such features conflict with other standards and guidelines herein, as determined by the director. Renovations of these structures should facilitate pedestrian access. Unique signage and design elements which are not inconsistent with the remainder of the guidelines are to be encouraged.

iii. New Buildings. Applicants for new buildings shall successfully demonstrate how they have based the building facade’s design on the form and elements common to early twentieth century downtown structures. This can be done through comparable facade massing and articulation, careful handling of the storefront and building top, and compatibility of materials and colors. Figure 34 below identifies desirable characteristics of existing buildings. Applicants may consider modern interpretations of these building elements and components in a way that meets the guidelines herein and complements the surrounding context.

Figure 33. Historic core design guidelines draw from desirable characteristics of existing buildings.

Figure 34. Appropriate and inappropriate infill building examples.

b. Other Sites within the DMU and TMU Districts.

i. Encourage architecture that emphasizes a human sense of scale, prominent rooflines, fine detailing, and an inviting appearance. The “Northwest” themed architectural style (popular in recent downtown construction – see Figure 35 below) emphasizing the use of natural wood (including heavy timbers), prominent rooflines, accent stonework, and detailed window trimming is encouraged.

Figure 35. Newer commercial buildings emphasize the use of wood and heavy timbers, prominent rooflines, and accent stonework.

ii. No franchise/corporate architecture. Architecture that is defined predominately by corporate identity features (and difficult to adapt to other uses) is prohibited. For example, some fast food franchises have very specific architectural features that reinforce their identity.

iii. Unusual design themes or architectural styles that have no history with Chelan are discouraged.

c. Sites within the DMR and DSF Districts. Encourage architectural styles that are compatible with the generally two-story and vernacular twentieth century architecture.

C. Architectural Scale.

1. Intent.

a. To reduce the scale of large buildings and add visual interest.

b. To enhance the visual character of downtown Chelan.

2. Building Articulation – Storefronts. All buildings adjacent to storefront streets or featuring a pedestrian-oriented facade built up to the sidewalk edge: Buildings must include articulation features no more than every forty feet to create a pattern of small storefronts. Buildings less than sixty feet wide are exempt from this standard. At least two of the following methods must be employed:

a. Use of window and/or entries that reinforce the pattern of forty-foot storefront spaces.

b. Use of weather protection features that reinforce forty-foot storefronts. For example, for a business that occupies one hundred twenty feet of frontage, use three separate awnings to break down the scale of the storefronts. Alternating colors of the awnings may be useful as well.

c. Change of roofline per subsection (C)(6) of this section.

d. Use of vertical piers that reinforce storefront pattern.

e. Change in building material or siding style.

f. Other methods that meet the intent of the standards as approved by the director.

Figure 36. Storefront articulation examples.

Departures will be considered by the city provided the design meets the intent of the standards. For example, the proposed articulation may be longer, but if the building features attractive detailing, materials, interesting roofline treatments, and interesting storefront design helps the design fit into the site’s context and contributes to the pedestrian environment and existing/desired character, then perhaps it should be an approved departure.

3. Building Articulation – Other Nonresidential/Mixed-Use Buildings. All other buildings featuring nonresidential uses on the ground floor (not covered in subsection (C)(2) of this section) shall include at least three of the following articulation features along all facades containing the public building entries (alley facades are exempt) at intervals of no more than sixty feet:

a. Providing vertical building modulation of at least two feet in depth and four feet in width if combined with a change in siding materials and/or roofline modulation per subsection (C)(6) of this section. Otherwise, the vertical modulation shall be at least ten feet deep and fifteen feet wide, to qualify.

b. Providing horizontal modulation (upper level step backs). To qualify for this measure, the minimum upper level step back shall be at least five feet and the treatment shall be used consistently with other articulation elements or utilized along at least seventy-five percent of the facade.

c. Repeating distinctive window patterns at intervals less than the articulation interval.

d. Providing a covered entry or separate weather protection feature for each articulation interval.

e. Use of vertical piers that reinforce storefront pattern. To qualify for this measure, the piers must project at least two inches from the facade and extend from the ground to the roofline.

f. Change of roofline per subsection (C)(6) of this section.

g. Changing materials and/or color with a change in building plane.

h. Providing lighting fixtures, trellis, tree, or other landscape feature within each interval.

i. Other methods that meet the intent of the standards as approved by the director.

Departures will be considered by the city provided the design meets the intent of the standards. Elements to consider are the level of detailing, quality of building materials, design of storefronts, and integration with, or enhancement of, the surrounding context.

Figure 37. Building articulation example for other nonstorefront commercial facades.

4. Building Articulation – Multi-Family Buildings. All multi-family buildings and residential portions of mixed-use buildings shall include at least three of the following articulation features at intervals of no more than thirty feet along all facades facing a street, common open space, and common parking areas:

a. Repeating distinctive window patterns at intervals less than the required interval.

b. Providing vertical building modulation. Minimum depth and width of modulation is eighteen inches and four feet (respectively) if tied to a change in color or building material and/or roofline modulation as defined in subsection (C)(6) of this section. Otherwise, minimum depth of modulation is ten feet and minimum width for each modulation is fifteen feet. Balconies may not be used to meet modulation option unless they are recessed or projected from the facade and integrated with the building’s architecture as determined by the director. For example, “cave” balconies or other balconies that appear to be “tacked on” to the facade will not qualify for this option.

c. Change of roofline per subsection (C)(6) of this section.

d. Providing horizontal modulation (upper level step backs). To qualify for this measure, the minimum upper level step back shall be at least five feet and the treatment shall be used consistently with other articulation elements or utilized along at least fifty percent of the facade.

e. Articulating of the building’s top, middle, and bottom. This includes a distinctive ground floor or lower floor design, consistent articulation of middle floors, and a distinctive roofline.

Departures will be considered by the city provided the design meets the intent of the standards. Elements to consider are the level of detailing, quality of building materials, types of articulated features, and integration with, or enhancement of, the surrounding context.

For articulation of townhouses, see Section 17.14.050(F)(5).

Figure 38. Building articulation example for other nonstorefront commercial facades.

5. Roofline/Cornice Design Options. Rooflines visible from a public street, open space, or public parking area must meet one of the following design options:

a. Comply with roofline modulation provisions per subsection (C)(6) of this section.

b. Provide a cornice of two parts with the top projecting at least six inches from the face of the building and the bottom part featuring a concave design or projecting at least two inches from the facade, but extending no less than two inches from the facade than the top part (see Figure 39 for examples). The height of the cornice (both parts combined) shall be at least twelve inches for buildings twenty feet or less in height; eighteen inches for buildings greater than twenty feet and less than thirty feet in height; and twenty-four inches for buildings thirty feet and greater in height. Cornices shall not project over property lines, except where permitted on property lines abutting public right-of-way. The cornice line must extend along at least seventy-five percent of the facade.

c. Other decorative cornice line that meets the intent of the standards. See Figures 39 and 40 for examples.

d. Any combination of the options above.

Figure 39. Acceptable cornice examples.

Figure 40. Desirable (left) and undesirable (right) local cornice examples.

6. Roofline Modulation. In order to qualify as a roofline modulation treatment in the standards herein, rooflines shall be varied by emphasizing dormers, chimneys, stepped roofs, gables, or a broken or articulated roofline consistent with the required articulation interval. Modulation shall consist of either:

a. For flat roofs or facades with horizontal eave, fascia, or parapet, the minimum vertical dimension of roofline modulation is the greater of two feet or one-tenth multiplied by the wall height (finish grade to top of the wall) when combined with vertical building modulation techniques described in subsections (C)(2) through (4) of this section. Otherwise, the minimum vertical dimension of roofline modulation is the greater of four feet or two-tenths multiplied by the wall height.

b. A sloped or gabled roofline segment of at least twenty feet in width and a minimum slope of 6:12. The roofline must include modulated segments at no more than the interval required per the applicable standard above.

c. A combination of the above.

Figure 41. Roofline modulation standards.

7. Maximum Facade Width. The maximum facade width (facades facing the street or customer parking lot) is one hundred feet. Exceptions: Buildings exceeding one hundred feet in width shall incorporate significant modulation and/or articulation features that effectively break up the scale of the building and add visual interest from the street. Such buildings shall incorporate at least one of the following design elements:

a. Provide vertical building modulation at least ten feet deep and twenty feet wide. For multi-story buildings the modulation must extend through more than one-half of the building floors;

b. Use of a contrasting vertical modulated design component featuring all of the following:

i. Component extends through all floors above the first floor fronting on the street. Exception: upper floors that are stepped back more than ten feet from the facade are exempt;

ii. Utilizes a change in building materials that effectively contrast from the rest of the facade;

iii. Component is modulated vertically from the rest of the facade by an average of six inches. The director may exempt storefront buildings from this provision provided all other standards herein are met and the design effectively meets the intent of the standards; and

iv. Component is designed to provide roofline modulation per subsection (C)(6) of this section; or

c. Facade employs building walls with contrasting articulation that make it appear like two distinct buildings. To qualify for this option, these contrasting facades must employ both of the following:

i. Different building materials and/or configuration of building materials; and

ii. Contrasting window design (sizes or configurations).

Departures will be considered by the city provided the design meets the intent of the standards. Elements to consider are the level of detailing, quality of building materials, types of articulated features, and integration with, or enhancement of, the surrounding context (considering views from all publicly observable locations within downtown).

Figure 42. Maximum facade width standards and acceptable/unacceptable departure examples. The upper right examples use a change in materials, facade articulation (window styles), and roofline change. The middle right image uses substantial facade and roofline modulation. The lower right does not include any notable articulation or modulation.

D. Building Elements and Details.

1. Intent. To encourage the incorporation of design details and small scale elements into building facades that are attractive at a pedestrian scale.

2. Facade Details Toolbox. All nonresidential and mixed-use buildings shall be enhanced with appropriate details. All new buildings must employ at least one detail element from each of the three categories below for each facade facing a street or public space for each facade articulation interval (per subsections (C)(2) and (3) of this section). For example, a building with one hundred twenty feet of street frontage with a facade articulated at forty-foot intervals will need to meet the standards for each of the three facade segments.

a. Window and/or Entry Treatment.

i. Display windows divided into a grid of multiple panes;

ii. Transom windows;

iii. Roll-up windows/doors;

iv. Other distinctive window treatment that meets the intent of the standards;

v. Recessed entry;

vi. Decorative door;

vii. Arcade;

viii. Landscaped trellises or other decorative element that incorporates landscaping near the building entry; or

ix. Other decorative or specially designed entry treatment that meets the intent of the standards as determined by the director.

b. Building Elements and Facade Details.

i. Custom-designed weather protection element such as a steel canopy, cloth awning, or retractable awning;

ii. Decorative, custom hanging sign(s);

iii. Decorative building-mounted light fixtures;

iv. Bay windows, trellises, towers, and similar elements; or

v. Other details or elements that meet the intent of these standards, as determined by the director.

c. Building Materials and Other Facade Elements.

i. Decorative building materials/use of building materials. Examples include decorative use of brick, tile, or stonework;

ii. Artwork on building (such as a mural) or bas-relief sculpture;

iii. Decorative kick-plate, pier, beltcourse, or other similar feature;

iv. Hand-crafted material, such as special wrought iron or carved wood; or

v. Other details that meet the intent of the standards as determined by the director.

“Custom,” “decorative,” or “hand-crafted” elements referenced above must be distinctive or “one-of-a-kind” elements or unusual designs that require a high level of craftsmanship as determined by the director.

Departures to the standards above will be considered by the director provided the number, quality, and mix of details meet the intent of the standards.

Figure 43. Good storefront detail examples for the Woodin Avenue historic core. The left image includes a decorative use of brick, decorative awning, and decorative kick-plate. The right image uses a steel canopy (Chelan Sports), decorative use of bricks, and decorative window treatments.

Figure 44. Acceptable facade detailing example for outside the historic core. This building uses decorative stone and shinglework, decorative windows, and a decorative entry feature.

3. Street Corner Buildings. Nonresidential or mixed-use buildings located within thirty feet of the street corner (see Figure 45 below) shall provide one or more of the elements listed below on the building corner:

a. A cropped building corner with corner pedestrian entry;

b. A bay window or turret;

c. A clock or bell tower;

d. Balconies above the ground floor;

e. Sculpture or artwork element; must be a one-of-a-kind design element;

f. Distinctive use of facade materials; and/or

g. Other special or unique corner building treatment, other than the use of fabric or vinyl awnings, for pedestrian weather protection at the corner of the building as determined by the director.

All corner building design elements must be sized to be proportional to the building and the size of the applicable intersection, as determined by the director (for example, larger intersections warrant more substantial design treatments).

Figure 45. Clarifying which buildings shall comply with standards.

Figure 46. Desirable building corner examples.

4. Window Design. Buildings shall employ techniques to recess or project individual windows above the ground floor at least two inches from the facade or incorporate window trim at least four inches in width that features color that contrasts with the base building color. Departures will be considered by the director where buildings employ other distinctive window or facade treatment that adds a sense of depth to the facade and/or visual interest to the building.

Figure 47. Acceptable and unacceptable (far right image) window design on upper floors. Note that the two windows on the left are recessed from the facade and all three acceptable examples include trim. The image on the right includes no trim or recess/projection.

5. Year of Construction Plaque. All new commercial and mixed-use buildings must note the year of construction of a building by the installation of a plaque attached to the building. Numbers etched into stone, brick, or concrete may be used in lieu of a plaque. The year of construction is to be noted by numbers not less than six inches high. Other information associated with the building that may be of public interest may be included.

E. Building Materials and Colors.

1. Intent.

a. To encourage high quality building materials that reinforce the historic small town character of Chelan.

b. To discourage poor materials with high life-cycle costs.

c. To encourage the use of materials that reduce the visual bulk of large buildings.

2. Metal Siding Standards. Metal siding may be used if it is incorporated with other permitted materials and it complies with the following:

a. It features visible corner molding and trim and does not extend lower than two feet above grade. Masonry, concrete, or other durable material must be incorporated between the siding and the ground plane;

b. Metal siding shall be factory finished, with a matte, nonreflective surface; and

Figure 48. Acceptable and unacceptable metal siding examples. Notice the corner and window trim and use of concrete block near the ground level on the left image. The circled area on the right includes metal siding all the way to the ground, which is prohibited.

c. The use of metal siding is prohibited on designated storefront streets.

3. Concrete Block Standards. Concrete block may be used if it is incorporated with other permitted materials and it complies with the following:

a. When used for the primary facade, buildings must incorporate a combination of textures and/or colors to add visual interest. For example, combining split or rock-facade units with smooth blocks can create distinctive patterns; and

b. Concrete block may comprise no more than fifty percent of a facade facing a public right-of-way or open space. Departures to this standard will be considered by the city provided design treatments are included to enhance the visual character of the building at all observable scales.

Figure 49. Acceptable and unacceptable concrete block examples. The left example uses a mixture of split-faced colored concrete block and smooth-faced concrete block, together comprising just under fifty percent of the whole facade. The large expanse of smooth-faced concrete block on the right is not desirable for Chelan.

4. Standards for Stucco or Other Similar Troweled Finishes. Such material/finishes may be used if it is incorporated with other permitted materials and it complies with the following:

a. Stucco and similar troweled finishes (including exterior insulation and finish system or “EIFS”) must be trimmed in wood, masonry, or other material and must be sheltered from extreme weather by roof overhangs or other methods and are limited to no more than fifty percent of the facade area facing a public right-of-way or open space. Departures to this standard will be considered by the city provided design treatments are included to enhance the visual character of the building at all observable scales;

b. Horizontal surfaces exposed to the weather must be avoided; and

c. Stucco, EIFS, and similar surfaces should not extend below two feet above the ground plane. Concrete, masonry, or other durable material must be used below the two-feet-above-grade line to provide a durable surface where damage is most likely.

Figure 50. Acceptable and unacceptable stucco examples. The left image uses concrete block near the sidewalk, while the Petco maintains stucco to the base of the facade.

5. Prohibited Materials.

a. Mirrored glass where used on more than ten percent of the facade;

b. T-111 siding and similar processed sheet products;

c. Chain link fencing (except for temporary fencing and for parks);

d. Fiberglass products and similar sheet products; and

e. Back-lit vinyl awnings used as signs.

6. Storefront Building Color. A storefront’s palette should be no more than three colors; one base color, one trim color, and one accent color. Encourage trim and accent colors that contrast with the base color. Specifically, darker base colors with white trim work particularly well. However, lighter base colors can effectively be combined with dark trim colors. Applicants should consult with the Historic Chelan Downtown Association on appropriate facade colors.

F. Blank Wall Treatment.

1. Intent.

a. To avoid untreated blank walls.

b. To retain and enhance the character and identity of downtown Chelan.

2. Blank Wall Definition. A wall (including building facades and retaining walls) is considered a blank wall if:

a. A ground floor wall or portion of a ground floor wall over six feet in height has a horizontal length greater than fifteen feet and does not include a transparent window or door; or

b. Any portion of a ground floor wall having a surface area of four hundred square feet or greater does not include a transparent window or door.

Figure 51. Blank wall definition and treatment examples.

3. Blank Wall Standards. Untreated blank walls visible from a public street or pedestrian pathway are prohibited. Methods to treat blank walls can include:

a. Display windows at least sixteen inches of depth to allow for changeable displays. Tack on display cases shall not qualify as a blank wall treatment;

b. Landscape planting bed at least five feet wide or a raised planter bed at least two feet high and three feet wide in front of the wall with planting materials that are sufficient to obscure or screen at least sixty percent of the wall’s surface within three years;

c. Installing a vertical trellis in front of the wall with climbing vines or plant materials;

d. Installing a mural reviewed by the arts council and approved by the director; and/or

e. Special building detailing that adds visual interest at a pedestrian scale. Such detailing must use a variety of surfaces; monotonous designs will not meet the intent of the standards.

For large visible blank walls, a variety of treatments may be required to meet the intent of the standards.

4. Fire walls along property lines are exempt from the above standards, but where they are visible to the public, they shall include horizontal and/or vertical banding or other design treatments to add visual interest to the wall.

Figure 52. Acceptable and unacceptable fire wall treatments. Note the use of horizontal banding in the left image. Plain concrete block as in the right image is not allowed.

G. Energy Efficient Building Design. The following are voluntary provisions intended to encourage energy efficient building design within Chelan.

1. Intent.

a. To reduce greenhouse gas emissions resulting from buildings.

b. To encourage high quality energy efficient construction that reduces long-term maintenance costs.

c. To encourage the use of roof design and materials that maximize the energy efficiency of buildings.

2. Residential Buildings. New and remodeled buildings should be designed to meet the Northwest ENERGY STAR Homes Certification Requirements for Single-Family Homes or Multi-Family Homes (link: http://www.northwestenergystar.com/partner-resources/bopmulti/index.html).

3. Commercial or Mixed-Use Buildings. New and remodeled buildings should be designed to earn the ENERGY STAR rating by achieving the rating of seventy-five or higher using the EPA energy target finder tool (link: http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=new_bldg_design.bus_target_finder).

4. Roof Design. The solar reflectivity index for flat roofs should be a minimum of seventy-eight. The solar reflectivity index for sloped roofs should be a minimum of twenty-nine. (Ord. 1410 § 3 (Exh. B) (part), 2010).

17.14.050 Housing type standards.

A. Purpose and Applicability.

1. Purpose. This section provides supplemental direction for the design of new residential developments consistent with the goals and policies of the Chelan downtown master plan.

2. Applicability. Each subsection herein provides standards that apply to a particular type of housing within the downtown planning area. The provisions herein supplement the standards set forth in Section 17.14.020. Triplexes and townhouses are also subject to the provisions of Sections 17.14.030 and 17.14.040 unless otherwise noted.

B. Single-Family Design Standards.

1. Intent.

a. To enhance the character of the street;

b. To maintain “eyes on the street” for safety to pedestrians and to create a more welcoming and interesting streetscape;

c. To deemphasize garages and driveways as major visual elements along the street; and

d. To provide usable yard space for residents.

2. Entries.

a. Clear and obvious pedestrian access between the sidewalk and the building entry is required for new homes.

b. All new houses shall provide a covered entry with a minimum dimension of four feet by six feet. Covered entries may project up to six feet into the front yard per Section 17.14.020(C)(3).

Figure 1. Single-family design requirements.

3. Garage Placement and Design.

a. Where lots abut an alley, the garage or off-street parking area is encouraged to take access from the alley.

b. The garage face shall occupy no more than fifty percent of the ground-level facade facing the street.

c. Garages shall be set back at least twenty feet from the front property line.

4. Driveway Standards. See Section 5 of the City of Chelan Development Standards Manual for applicable standards.

5. Minimum Usable Open Space. All new single-family residences shall provide a contiguous open space equivalent to ten percent of the lot size. Such open space shall not be located within the front yard. The required open space shall feature a minimum dimension of fifteen feet on all sides. For example, a six-thousand-square-foot lot would require a contiguous open space of at least six hundred square feet, or twenty feet by thirty feet in area. For lots in the DMR District where there is more than one single-family residence on the lot, each residence shall have access to a usable open space with minimum dimensions of fifteen feet on all sides. Driveways shall not count in the calculations for usable open space.

All single-family additions shall not create or increase any nonconformity with this standard.

Figure 2. Open space requirements for alley-loaded lots.

C. Duplex and Triplex Design Standards.

1. Intent. Duplexes and triplexes should be designed similar in nature to single-family homes and shall feature a visible entry and windows facing the street. The visibility of driveways and garages should be minimized and sufficient private open space should be provided.

2. Design Standards. Specifically, duplexes and triplexes shall comply with the single-family design standards in subsection B of this section with the following exceptions and additional provisions:

a. Duplexes and triplexes may include a twenty-foot-wide shared driveway or two twelve-foot driveways on opposite ends of the lot;

b. Separate covered entries for each unit are required (applicable to new buildings only); and

c. Duplexes on corner lots shall place pedestrian entries on opposite streets (applicable to new buildings only).

Figure 3. Diagram illustrating some duplex design standards.

D. Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU).

1. Intent.

a. To provide infill housing opportunities downtown.

b. To provide affordable housing options downtown and all residential zones.

c. To provide an opportunity for rental income for downtown property owners.

2. Standards for All ADUs in All Zones. One accessory dwelling unit is permitted provided all of the following conditions are met:

a. ADU Entrance. The ADU entrance shall be subordinate (set back) to the principal dwelling unit entrance. The ADU entrance shall be less visible from the street view of the principal dwelling than the main entrance of the principal dwelling unit.

i. A pedestrian walkway shall be provided from the street or alley to the ADU entrance; and

ii. A stairway to access a second-story ADU shall be internal, or, if external, it must not be visible from the street;

b. No more than two bedrooms shall be provided in an accessory dwelling unit;

c. The square footage of an ADU, excluding garage area, shall not exceed fifty percent of the total square footage or one thousand two hundred square feet of the primary residence, whichever is less; except for a unit sharing a common floor-ceiling with a permitted accessory or primary structure, the planning director may permit an increased size allowance in order to efficiently use all floor area, so long as all the other standards are met;

d. ADUs shall contain a minimum of two hundred seventy-five square feet in floor area, exclusive of stairways or garage area;

e. One additional off-street parking space shall be required for an ADU;

f. The presence of an accessory dwelling unit must be clearly identified on each entrance by proper numbering;

g. Privacy. The orientation of the ADU shall, to the maximum extent practical as determined by the director, maintain the privacy of residents in adjoining dwellings as determined by the physical characteristics surrounding the ADU, including landscape screening, fencing, and window and door placement. The director may require that windows, doors, and balconies be relocated to maintain the privacy of the new unit and/or adjacent residences;

h. The accessory dwelling unit shall meet all construction and utility code standards including, but not limited to, building, fire, plumbing, and Title 13, regulating water and sewers, all as now exist or as may be hereafter amended;

i. Accessory dwelling units shall be permitted at homes approved for home occupations or bed and breakfast, provided these uses are attached to the primary structure, not the ADU;

j. Detached accessory dwelling units must be screened from neighboring properties with a six-foot height solid visual barrier where necessary to protect abutting property owners’ privacy, as determined by the director.

3. Standards for an Attached ADU.

a. ADUs may not exceed fifty percent of the floor area of a primary dwelling unit or one thousand two hundred square feet, whichever is less. Exception: The director may allow increased size for an attached ADU in order to efficiently use all floor area on one floor or a portion of an existing house (constructed as of November 9, 2010), as long as all other standards herein are met; and

b. Additions to Existing Homes. The ADU shall be architecturally consistent with the principal unit. Specific standards:

i. Exterior Materials. The exterior finish material must be the same or visually match in type, size and placement the exterior finish material of the primary dwelling;

ii. Roof Pitch. The roof pitch must be the same as the predominant roof pitch of the primary dwelling;

iii. Trim. Trim must be the same in type, size, and location as the trim used on the primary dwelling;

iv. Windows. Windows must match those in the primary dwelling in proportion (relationship of width to height) and orientation (horizontal or vertical). This standard does not apply when it conflicts with building code regulations; and

v. Front Facade. The front facade of the principal dwelling shall not be significantly altered to accommodate an ADU.

Figure 4. Attached ADU example/standards.

4. Standards for a Detached ADU (DADU).

a. The footprint or total square footage of DADUs may not exceed fifty percent of the floor area of a primary dwelling unit or one thousand two hundred square feet, whichever is less;

b. Detached DADUs may be separate freestanding structures located to the side or rear of a primary dwelling unit or may be placed next to and/or above a garage;

c. DADUs are subject to the building placement standards set forth for the applicable land use district in Section 17.14.020(C)(3);

d. The site coverage of the DADU and accessory buildings shall not exceed forty percent of the rear yard area;

e. There shall be a minimum separation of fifteen feet between the existing dwellings and the DADU, except where the DADU is built on top of and/or next to an existing garage; and

Figure 5. DADU example/standards.

f. The maximum width of the DADU shall be seventy-five percent of the width of the lot, including all projecting building elements such as bay windows and balconies.

E. Cottage Housing.

1. Intent.

a. To provide an opportunity for small, detached housing types clustered around a common open space.

b. To ensure that cottage developments contribute to the overall character of downtown residential areas.

c. To provide for centrally located and functional common open space that fosters a sense of community.

d. To provide for semi-private area around individual cottages to enable diversity in landscape design and foster a sense of ownership.

e. To minimize visual impacts of parking areas on the street and adjacent properties and the visual setting for the development.

f. To promote conservation of resources by providing for clusters of small dwelling units on a property.

2. Description. Cottage housing refers to clusters of small detached dwelling units arranged around a common open space.

3. Lot Configuration. Cottages may be configured as condominiums or fee-simple lots provided they meet the standards herein.

4. Density Bonus. Due to the smaller relative size of cottage units, each cottage shall be counted as one-half a dwelling unit for the purpose of calculating density. For example, a cluster of six cottages would be equivalent to three dwelling units.

5. Table of Dimensional Standards for Cottages.

Table 4. Dimensional standards for cottages 

Standard

Requirement

Maximum Floor Area

1,200 SF

Maximum Floor Area/Ground or Main Floor

800 SF

Minimum Common Space (See Design Standards below for more info)

400 SF/unit

Minimum Private Open Space (See Design Standards below for more info)

200 SF/unit

Maximum Height for Cottages

25' (all parts of the roof above 18' shall be pitched with a minimum roof slope of 6:12)

Maximum Height for Cottages Accessory Structures

18'

Setbacks (to exterior property lines)

See Section 17.14.020(C)(3)

Minimum Distance between Structures (Including accessory structures)

10'

Minimum Parking Spaces per Cottage

1.5

6. Units in Each Cluster. Cottage housing developments shall contain a minimum of four and a maximum of twelve cottages located in a cluster to encourage a sense of community among the residents. A development site may contain more than one cottage housing development.

7. Windows on the Street. Transparent windows and/or doors are required on at least fifteen percent of the facades (all vertical surfaces) of all cottages facing the street and common open space. Departures may be permitted for cottages where this standard applies to two or more facades, provided the design meets the intent of the standards.

8. Parking and Driveway Location and Design.

a. Parking shall be located on the same property as the cottage development;

b. Where lots abut an alley, the garage or off-street parking area is encouraged to take access from the alley;

c. Parking areas shall be located to the side or rear of cottage clusters and not between the street and cottages. Parking is prohibited in the front and interior setback areas;

d. Parking and vehicular areas shall be screened from public street and adjacent residential uses by landscaping or architectural screens. For parking lots adjacent to the street, at least ten feet of Type C landscaping shall be provided between the sidewalk and the parking area. For parking lots along adjacent residential uses, at least five feet of Type A, B, or C landscaping shall be required. The director will consider alternative landscaping techniques provided they effectively mitigate views into the parking area from the street or adjacent residential uses and enhance the visual setting for the development;

e. Parking shall be located in clusters of not more than five adjoining uncovered spaces (except where adjacent to an alley). Departures will be considered by the director provided alternative configurations improve the visual setting for development;

f. Garages may be attached to individual cottages provided all other standards herein are met and the footprint of the ground floor, including garage, does not exceed one thousand square feet. Such garages shall be located away from the common open spaces; and

g. No more than one driveway per cottage cluster shall be permitted, except where clusters front onto more than one street.

9. Common Open Space Requirements.

a. Shall abut at least fifty percent of the cottages in a cottage housing development;

b. Shall have cottages abutting on at least two sides;

c. Cottages shall be oriented around and have the main entry from the common open space;

d. Cottages shall be within sixty-feet walking distance of the common open space; and

e. Open space shall include at least one courtyard, plaza, garden, or other central open space, with access to all units. The minimum dimensions of this open space are fifteen feet by twenty feet.

10. Required Private Open Space. Required private open space shall be adjacent to each dwelling unit, for the exclusive use of the cottage resident(s). The space shall be usable (not on a steep slope) and oriented toward the common open space as much as possible, with no dimension less than ten feet.

11. Porches. Cottage facades facing the common open space or common pathway shall feature a roofed porch at least eighty square feet in size with a minimum dimension of eight feet on any side.

12. Covered Entry and Visual Interest. Cottages located facing a public street shall provide:

a. A covered entry feature (with a minimum dimension of six feet by six feet) visible from the street;

b. At least ten feet of landscaped open space between the residence and the street; and

c. At least two architectural details approved by the director, such as:

i. Decorative lighting;

ii. Decorative trim;

iii. Special door;

iv. Trellis or decorative building element; and/or

v. Bay window.

Alternative design treatments will be considered by the director provided the design treatments provide visual interest to the pedestrian.

13. Character and Diversity. Cottages and accessory buildings within a particular cluster shall be designed within the same “family” of architectural styles. Examples of elements include:

a. Similar building/roof form and pitch;

b. Similar siding materials;

c. Similar porch detailing; and/or

d. Similar window trim;

A diversity of cottages can be achieved within a “family” of styles by:

e. Alternating porch styles (such as roof forms);

f. Alternating siding details on facades and/or roof gables; and/or

g. Different siding color.

Figure 6. Typical cottage housing layouts.

Figure 7. Cottage housing examples.

F. Townhouses.

1. Intent.

a. To ensure that townhouse developments enhance the pedestrian-oriented character of downtown streets.

b. To provide adequate open space for townhouse developments.

c. To reduce the impact of garages and driveways on the pedestrian environment.

d. To reduce the apparent bulk and scale of townhouse buildings compatible with the established character of downtown Chelan.

e. To promote architectural variety that adds visual interest to the neighborhood.

Figure 8. Desirable townhouse example. With units fronting on the street and garages placed to the rear accessible from an alley or shared driveway.

2. Entries.

a. Townhouses fronting on a street must all have individual ground-related entries accessible from the street. Configurations where enclosed rear yards back up to a street are prohibited;

b. Separate covered entries at least three feet deep are required for all dwelling units;

c. For sites without alleys or other rear vehicular access, new buildings must emphasize individual pedestrian entrances over private garages to the extent possible by using both of the following measures:

i. Enhance entries with a trellis, small porch, or other architectural features that provides cover for a person entering the unit and a transitional space between outside and inside the dwelling; and

ii. Provide a planted area in front of each pedestrian entry of at least twenty square feet in area, with no dimension less than four feet. Provide a combination of shrubs or ground cover and a street tree (refer to city arborist or street tree list if available); and

d. Planting strips with no dimension less than four feet are required adjacent to the primary entry of all dwelling units. This includes townhouses located to the rear of lots off an alley or private internal drive.

3. Garages and Driveways.

a. Where lots abut an alley, the garage or off-street parking area should take access from the alley;

b. For lots without alleys, individual driveways off of the street are prohibited (shared driveways are required);

c. Garages facing a public street are prohibited;

d. Internal Drive Aisle Standards.

i. Must meet minimum fire code widths;

ii. Minimum building separation along uncovered internal drive aisles shall be twenty-five feet. The purpose is to provide adequate vehicular turning radius, allow for landscaping elements on at least one side, and provide adequate light and air on both sides of the dwelling units and drive aisles, which often function as usable open space for residents; and

iii. Upper level building projections over drive aisles are limited to three feet, and must comply with provisions in subsection (F)(3)(d)(ii) of this section.

Figure 9. Good and bad examples of garage/entry configurations. The left example features a landscaped area and a trellis to highlight the entry. In the middle image, the balconies and landscaped areas deemphasize the garage. In the right image, the lack of landscaping is a glaring omission.

4. Open Space. Townhouse residential units shall provide open space at least equal to ten percent of the building living space, not counting automobile storage. The required open space may be provided by one or more of the following ways:

a. Usable private open space that is directly adjacent and accessible to dwelling units. Such space shall have minimum dimensions of at least twelve feet on all sides and is configured to accommodate human activity such as outdoor eating, gardening, toddler play, etc.;

b. Common open space meeting the requirements of Section 17.14.030(C)(5)(a);

c. Balconies, decks and/or front porches meeting the requirements of Section 17.14.030(C)(5)(b); and/or

d. Pea patch space meeting the requirements of Section 17.14.030(C)(5)(e).

5. Building Design.

a. Townhouse Articulation. Townhouse buildings shall comply with multi-family building articulation standards as set forth in Section 17.14.040(C)(4), except that the articulation intervals shall be no wider than the width of units in the building. Thus, if individual units are fifteen feet wide, the building shall include at least three articulation features per Section 17.14.040(C)(4) for all facades facing a street, common open space, and common parking areas at intervals no greater than fifteen feet.

b. Repetition with Variety. Townhouse developments shall employ one or more of the following “repetition with variety” guidelines:

i. Reversing the elevation of two out of four dwellings for townhouses;

ii. Providing different building elevations for external townhouse units (versus internal units) by changing the roofline, articulation, windows, and/or building modulation patterns (see Figure 10);

iii. Adding a different dwelling design or different scale of the same design, where a one-story version of the basic dwelling design where two stories are typical (or a two-story design where three stories are typical); and/or

iv. Other design treatments that add variety or provide special visual interest. While the variable use of color on buildings can be effective in reducing the perceived scale of the building and adding visual interest, color changes alone are not sufficient to meet the intent of the guidelines.

Figure 10. Acceptable townhouse configuration employing the repetition with variety concept.

Figure 11. An acceptable townhouse building. Note the landscaped front yards and individual walkways and entries. The internal units each have distinct but identical windows and roof forms. The outside unit is differentiated through the use of building materials, window design, unit size, and facade detailing.

(Ord. 1556 § 8 (Exh. G), 2019; Ord. 1410 § 3 (Exh. B) (part), 2010).

17.14.060 Definitions.

Blank Wall. See Section 17.14.040(F) for the definition and desirable treatments of a “blank wall.”

“Building articulation” means the giving of emphasis to architectural elements (like windows, balconies, entries, etc.) that create a complementary pattern or rhythm, dividing large buildings into smaller identifiable pieces. See Section 17.14.040(C) for applicable standards.

Common Open Space. See Section 17.14.030(C)(2)(b) for the definition of “common open space.”

“Condotel” refers to a building that is used both as a hotel and a condominium.

“Cottage housing” refers to clusters of small detached dwelling units arranged around a common open space.

“CPTED” refers to “crime prevention through environmental design,” which is a multi-disciplinary approach to deterring criminal behavior through environmental design. CPTED strategies rely upon the ability to influence offender decisions that precede criminal acts.

“Landscaped street” refers to a segment of a street envisioned to have or maintain landscaped building setbacks along the street. See Figure 2 for the location of designated landscaped streets and Section 17.14.020(D)(4) for the description and applicable standards for properties fronting on designated landscaped streets.

Multi-Family Open Space. See Section 17.14.030(C)(2)(d) for the definition of “multi-family open space.”

“Partial floor” refers to the space under a gabled or hipped roof where a horizontal line intersecting the roof decking and the exterior wall is no more than five feet above the floor level of the top floor.

Pedestrian-Oriented Open Space (or Pedestrian-Oriented Space). See Section 17.14.030(C)(2)(a) for the definition of “pedestrian-oriented open space” and Section 17.14.030(C)(3) for applicable design criteria.

“Roofline modulation” means variation in roof form. See Section 17.14.040(C)(6) for provisions.

“Secondary street” refers to a segment of a street in a mixed-use district where there is an option for storefronts or landscaped setbacks along the street and ground floor residential or commercial uses. See Figure 2 for the location of designated secondary streets and Section 17.14.020(D)(3) for the description and applicable standards for properties fronting on designated secondary streets.

“Solar access” means the availability of (or access to) unobstructed, direct sunlight.

“Solar reflectance index (SRI)” is a measure of the roof’s ability to reject solar heat, as shown by a small temperature rise. It is defined so that a standard black (reflectance 0.05, emittance 0.90) is 0 and a standard white (reflectance 0.80, emittance 0.90) is 100. For example, the standard black has a temperature rise of 90 degrees Fahrenheit (50 degrees Celsius) in full sun, and the standard white has a temperature rise of 14.6 degrees Fahrenheit (8.1 degrees Celsius). Once the maximum temperature rise of a given material has been computed, the SRI can be computed by interpolating between the values for white and black. Materials with the highest SRI values are the coolest choices for roofing. Due to the way SRI is defined, particularly hot materials can even take slightly negative values, and particularly cool materials can even exceed 100.

“Storefront street” refers to a street or segment of a street where envisioned to have storefronts placed up to the edge of the sidewalk. See Figure 2 for the location of designated storefront streets and Section 17.14.020(D)(2) for the description and applicable standards for properties fronting on designated storefront streets.

Usable Open Space. See Section 17.14.030(C)(2)(e) for the definition of “usable open space.”

“Transparent window” refers to a window that is capable of transmitting light so that objects or images can be seen as if there were no intervening material variation in roof form. (Ord. 1410 §§ 3, 10 (Exh. B) (part), 2010).