Chapter 17.70
WIRELESS TELECOMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES

Sections:

17.70.010    Purpose.

17.70.015    Definitions.

17.70.020    Permits and exemptions.

17.70.030    General siting criteria.

17.70.040    Large satellite dish antenna(s) – Development standards.

17.70.050    Amateur radio towers – Development standards.

17.70.060    Broadcast and relay towers – Development standards.

17.70.070    Wireless communications facilities – Development standards.

17.70.080    Special exceptions.

17.70.010 Purpose.

In addition to implementing the general purposes of the comprehensive plan and development regulations, this chapter addresses the issues of appearance and safety associated with broadcast and relay towers, amateur radio towers, telecommunications monopoles, satellite dish antenna(s), and related equipment. It provides adequate siting opportunities at appropriate locations within the city to support existing communications technologies and to encourage new technologies as needed for businesses and institutions to stay competitive.

A wide range of locations and options for the provision of wireless technology which minimize safety hazards and visual impacts sometimes associated with wireless communications facilities are provided. The siting of facilities on existing buildings or structures, collocation of telecommunications facilities on a single support structure, and visual mitigation tactics are encouraged to preserve neighborhood aesthetics and reduce visual clutter in the community. (Ord. 1352 § 8 Exh. 8 (part), 2008: Ord. 1214 § 1 (part), 2001).

17.70.015 Definitions.

A. “Antennas” shall mean any system of electromagnetically tuned wires, poles, rods, reflecting discs or similar devices used to transmit or receive electromagnetic waves between terrestrial and/or orbital based points; includes, but is not limited to, radio antennas, television antennas, satellite dish antennas, and cellular antennas. Types of antennas include:

1. Omni-directional (or “whip”) antennas which transmit and receive radio frequency signals in a three-hundred-sixty-degree radial pattern. For the purpose of this chapter, omnidirectional antennas are up to fifteen feet in height and up to six inches in diameter;

2. Directional (or “panel”) antennas which transmit and receive radio frequency signals in a specific directional pattern of less than three hundred sixty degrees; and

3. Parabolic (or “dish”) antennas which are bowl-shaped devices for the reception and/or transmission of communications signals in a specific directional pattern.

B. “Broadcast or relay tower” shall mean a freestanding support structure, attached antenna(s), and related equipment intended for transmitting, receiving or retransmitting commercial radio, television, telephone, cellular, or other communications services.

C. “Cellular communications facility” shall mean any unstaffed facility for the transmission of radio frequency signals and includes antennas, equipment shelters, and other equipment necessary to provide wireless transmission and reception utilizing cellular technology for various wireless communications systems including cellular phones, personal communications systems (PCS), paging, and similar systems.

D. “Collocation” shall mean the placement and arrangement of multiple antennas and equipment on a single support structure and equipment pad area.

E. “Equipment shelter” shall mean the structure associated with a cellular communications facility or wireless communications facility that is used to house electronic, radio, battery, and power supply systems or equipment.

F. “Large satellite dish” shall mean any satellite dish antenna(s) whose diameter is greater than one meter in residential zones or two meters in industrial or commercial zones.

G. “Reception window obstruction” shall mean a physical barrier which would block an electromagnetic signal.

H. “Satellite dish antenna(s)” shall mean a type of antenna(s) and supporting structure consisting of a solid, open mesh, or bar configured reflective surface used to receive and/or transmit radio frequency communications signals. Such an apparatus is typically in the shape of a shallow dish, cone, horn, or cornucopia.

I. “Small satellite dish” shall mean any satellite dish antenna(s) whose diameter is less than or equal to one meter located in any zoning district or two meters within industrial or commercial zones.

J. “Tower” shall mean any built structure, including any guy wires and anchors, constructed for the support of antennas that would raise the topmost point of the attached antennas more than twenty-five feet above the surrounding ground or building. This includes, but is not limited to, lattice towers, guy towers, wood or steel monopoles, and attached antennas.

K. “Wireless communications facility” shall mean any unstaffed facility for the transmission and reception of radio or microwave signals used for commercial communication. A wireless communications facility provides services which include cellular telephone, personal communications services (PCS), other mobile radio services, and any other service provided by wireless common carriers licensed by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). A wireless communications facility may be attached to an existing structure or a freestanding tower. A wireless communications facility consists of antenna(s) and related equipment and may include an equipment enclosure, screening, or a support structure. (Ord. 1352 § 8 Exh. 8 (part), 2008: Ord. 1214 § 1 (part), 2001).

17.70.020 Permits and exemptions.

A. Permits Required.

1. Building Permits. A building permit is required for all telecommunications facilities unless specifically exempted under subsection B of this section, Exemptions.

2. Telecommunications Facility Permits. A telecommunications facility permit (Type IA) is required for all telecommunications facilities which are not reviewed under special development permit (Type IVA) or general development permit (Type II) processes, except for wireless communications facilities which collocate on an existing broadcast and relay tower, where adequate provisions for antennas and ground-mounted equipment exist (building permit only).

3. Combined Review. Telecommunications facilities regulated under this section which are proposed in conjunction with a site plan approval application for commercial or residential development shall not be required to obtain separate building permit approval or separate telecommunications facility permit approval. However, communications facilities will be reviewed according to the same criteria outlined in this section.

4. Summary of Required Permits. The appropriate permit procedure is delineated in the permitted land uses charts and summarized as follows:

a. Small Satellite Dish Antenna(s). Small satellite dish antenna(s) require no permits and are exempt under this section.

b. Large Satellite Dish Antenna(s). Large satellite dish antenna(s) require a building permit and a telecommunications facility permit (Type IA). In the R-M and R-L zoning districts, large satellite dish antennas shall require a conditional use permit.

c. Amateur Radio Towers. Amateur radio towers require a building permit and telecommunications facility permit (Type IA).

d. Broadcast and Relay Towers. Broadcast and relay towers and other freestanding support structures require a building permit and a special development permit (Type IVA) in all zoning districts where allowed, except the Warehousing and Industrial District (W-I) zone where a general development permit (Type IIA) is required. In the R-M and R-L zoning districts, broadcast and relay towers shall require a conditional use permit.

e. Wireless Communications Facilities. Wireless communications facilities collocated on an existing broadcast and relay tower, where adequate provisions for antennas and ground-mounted equipment exist, require a building permit only. Wireless communications facilities attached to nonresidential structures within commercial and industrial zoning districts require a building permit and a telecommunications facility permit (Type IA). Wireless communications facilities attached to nonresidential structures within all other zoning districts require a building permit and a general development permit (Type IIA). Wireless communications facilities not attached to an existing structure and not mounted on a broadcast or relay tower (i.e., stand-alone or ground-mounted facilities with antenna(s)) require a building permit and telecommunications facility permit (Type IA). Wireless communications facilities attached to a residential structure require a special development permit (Type IVA). Wireless monopoles, lattice, and guy towers, and existing antenna support structures extended in height, are regulated by the subsections that govern broadcast and relay towers.

B. Exemptions. The following antenna(s) shall be exempt from this chapter as follows:

1. VHF and UHF Receive-Only Television Antenna(s). VHF and UHF receive-only antenna(s) shall not be required to obtain site plan approval nor shall they be required to obtain building permit approval. VHF/UHF antenna(s) shall be restricted to a height limit of no more than fifteen feet above the existing or proposed roof.

2. Small Satellite Dish Antenna(s). Small dish antenna(s) in all zones shall be exempt from obtaining site plan approval and shall not be required to obtain building permit approval. (Ord. 1533 § 6 (Exh. 75) (part), 2017: Ord. 1352 § 8 Exh. 8 (part), 2008: Ord. 1214 § 1 (part), 2001).

17.70.030 General siting criteria.

A. The permitted land uses charts identify zoning districts and the review process for telecommunications facilities. The development standards in this section address setback and other site-specific location factors. Siting criteria for broadcast and relay towers and wireless communications facilities are necessary to encourage the siting of those facilities in locations most appropriate based on land use compatibility, neighborhood characteristics, and aesthetic considerations. No general siting criteria are necessary for satellite dishes or amateur radio towers because these facilities are allowed within all zoning districts.

B. Generally, collocation on existing broadcast and relay towers is encouraged by fewer standards and less complex permit procedures (refer to permitted land uses charts). Further, attachment of antenna(s) to existing nonresidential structures and buildings primarily within industrial, manufacturing, business park, and commercial zoning districts is preferable to broadcast and relay towers or monopoles. Feasibility studies prepared by qualified radio frequency engineers are required for applications for telecommunications facilities to demonstrate that locations on existing structures and/or higher ranked preferred siting locations have been explored by the permit applicant.

C. When a broadcast and relay tower is proposed, preferred locations are within the Warehouse and Industrial District (W-I) zone by utilizing Type IIA (i.e., general development permit) permit procedures.

1. Broadcast and Relay Towers. Broadcast and relay towers including monopoles shall be minimized by collocating wireless facilities on existing towers. New broadcast and relay towers are most appropriately located in the W-I zoning district followed in order of preference by C-W, C-HS, T-A, PLF, R-M, and R-L zoning districts. The site considered shall be a minimum three hundred feet from residential structures unless locating at an existing wireless communications facility or Section 17.70.080, Special exceptions, criteria have been satisfied.

2. Wireless Communications Facilities. The following sites shall be considered by applicants as the preferred order for location of proposed wireless facilities including antenna(s), equipment, and equipment shelters. As determined feasible, and in order of preference, the sites are:

a. Existing Broadcast and Relay Towers. On any existing site or tower where a legal wireless telecommunications facility is currently located regardless of underlying zoning.

b. Industrial, Manufacturing. Structures or sites used exclusively for industrial and manufacturing park uses within the Warehousing and Industrial District (W-I) zone. These are areas of more intensive land uses where a full range of public facilities are expected.

c. Publicly Used Structures. Attached to existing public facilities such as water towers, utility structures, fire stations, bridges, and other public buildings within all zoning districts not utilized primarily for recreational uses. (Refer to rules and regulations specific to facilities located on city-owned land, buildings, or public right-of-way, Chapter 15.22.)

d. Business, Commercial and Public Facilities Sites. Structures or sites used for retail, commercial, and office uses. These are areas of more intensive land uses where a full range of public facilities is expected. These zones in order of priority are C-W, C-HS, T-A and PLF.

e. Structures or sites which are not used wholly for residential use, including residential accessory structures (e.g., detached garage). Where the installation complies with all FCC regulations and standards, institutional structures, places of worship, and other nonresidential sites may be considered.

f. Residential Structures. Wireless communications facilities attached to residential structures are not permitted in the R-L zoning district. (Ord. 1533 § 6 (Exh. 76) (part), 2017: Ord. 1352 § 8 Exh. 8 (part), 2008: Ord. 1214 § 1 (part), 2001).

17.70.040 Large satellite dish antenna(s) – Development standards.

A. Standards for All Zoning Districts. The following standards shall be applied to all proposed large satellite dish antenna(s):

1. Satellite dish antenna(s) reviewed under this section shall not be located within any front yard or side yard building setback areas.

2. Mountings and satellite dishes should be no taller than the minimum required for the purposes of obtaining an obstruction-free reception window.

3. To the extent technically feasible, specific paint colors may be required to allow the large satellite dish and mounting structures to blend better with their setting.

4. Screening of all large satellite dish antenna(s) shall be provided with one or a combination of the following methods: fencing, walls, landscaping, structures, or topography which will block the view of the antenna(s) as much as practicable from any street and from the yards and main floor living areas of residential properties within approximately five hundred feet. Screening may be located anywhere between the antenna(s) and the above-mentioned viewpoints. Landscaping for the purposes of screening shall be maintained in healthy condition.

5. No satellite dish antenna(s) shall be used for the purposes of signage or message display of any kind.

6. Construction plans and final construction of the mounting bases of all large satellite dish antenna(s) shall be approved by the city building department.

7. Aluminum mesh dishes should be used whenever possible instead of a solid fiberglass type.

B. Additional Standards in Residential Zones – Large Satellite Dish Antenna(s).

1. Only one large dish satellite antenna shall be allowed on each property.

2. Large satellite dish antenna(s) shall not be mounted on roofs.

3. Large satellite dish antenna(s) shall not exceed twelve feet in diameter and fifteen feet in height, including their bases. Height shall be measured from existing grade.

4. A solid visual screen (ninety percent solid or more) pursuant to landscaping standards shall be provided as high as the center of the dish when viewed from off the site. Above the center of the dish, the screening should be fifty percent or more to the top of the antenna(s) when viewed from off the site. Evergreen plants shall be used to accomplish year-round screening, and shall be large enough at installation to meet appropriate screening standards.

C. Additional Standards in Nonresidential Zones – Large Satellite Dish Antenna(s).

1. Antenna(s) may be either roof-mounted or ground-mounted.

2. Ground-Mounted.

a. Ground-mounted antenna(s) shall not exceed twelve feet in diameter and fifteen feet in height. Height shall be measured from existing grade.

b. Ground-mounted antenna(s) shall be located outside of any required setback and required landscaped area and preferably located in service areas or other less visible locations.

c. From the time of installation, ground-mounted antenna(s) shall be solidly screened (ninety percent or more) as high as the center of the dish when viewed from off the site. Solid screening shall be provided as high as the dish if the proposed location abuts an adjoining residential zone.

3. Roof-Mounted.

a. Roof-mounted large satellite antenna(s) shall not exceed twelve feet in diameter and fifteen feet in height, including their bases. Height shall be measured from the roof line.

b. Roof-mounted antenna(s) should be placed as close to the center of the roof as possible. If the dish is still visible from any point within approximately five hundred feet as viewed from ground level, additional screening shall be required to supplement the screening provided by the roof itself. If the dish is not visible from five hundred feet or less, no additional screening will be necessary.

c. Roof-mounted antenna(s) shall be solidly screened at least as high as the center of the dish. The screening shall be of a material and design compatible with the building, and can include penthouse screening, parapet walls, or other similar screening. (Ord. 1352 § 8 Exh. 8 (part), 2008: Ord. 1214 § 1 (part), 2001).

17.70.050 Amateur radio towers – Development standards.

A. Development Standards for All Zoning Districts.

1. Amateur radio towers reviewed under this section shall not be located within any easements, the front yard or side or rear yard building setback areas.

2. Mountings and amateur radio towers should be no taller than the minimum required for the purposes of obtaining an obstruction-free reception window.

3. To the extent technically feasible, and in compliance with safety regulations, specific paint colors may be required to allow the tower to blend better with its setting.

4. Screening of the bases of ground-mounted amateur radio towers shall be provided with one or a combination of the following methods: fencing, walls, landscaping, structures, or topography which will block the view of the antenna(s) as much as practicable from any street and from the yards and main floor living areas of residential properties within approximately five hundred feet. Screening may be located anywhere between the base and the above-mentioned viewpoints. Landscaping for the purposes of screening shall be maintained in a healthy condition. Bases of amateur radio towers shall be solidly screened by a view-obscuring fence, wall, or evergreen plantings at least six feet in height.

5. Amateur radio towers shall not be used for the purposes of signage and shall not display a message of any kind.

6. Construction plans and final construction of the mounting bases of amateur radio towers covered by this section shall meet the structural design requirements of this section and shall be approved by the city building department.

7. Amateur radio towers may be ground- or roof-mounted; however, ground-mounted towers must be located at a point farthest from lot lines as feasible.

B. Additional Standards in Residential Zones – Amateur Radio Towers.

1. Towers shall not be constructed or used for commercial use.

2. The height of a ground-mounted tower may not exceed sixty-five feet unless a proposal demonstrates that physical obstructions impair the adequate use of the tower. Telescoping towers may exceed the sixty-five-foot height limit only when extended and operating. The combined structure of a roof-mounted tower and antenna(s) shall not exceed a height of twenty-five feet above the existing roofline.

3. Towers shall be located at a point farthest from lot lines as feasible, or the point farthest from residential structures on abutting properties.

4. In residential zones, the base of a ground-mounted tower shall be screened with fencing, walls, landscaping, or other means such that the view of the antenna(s) base is blocked as much as practicable from any street and from the yards and main living floor areas of surrounding residential properties. The screening may be located anywhere between the antenna(s) and the above-mentioned viewpoints. Landscaping that qualifies for the purpose of screening shall be maintained in a healthy condition.

5. Applications shall document that the proposed tower and any mounting bases are designed to withstand wind and seismic loads as established by the International Building Code. (Ord. 1352 § 8 Exh. 8 (part), 2008: Ord. 1214 § 1 (part), 2001).

17.70.060 Broadcast and relay towers – Development standards.

A. Development Standards for All Zoning Districts.

1. The applicant shall demonstrate that the proposed location was selected pursuant to the siting criteria of Section 17.70.030. Placement of a broadcast and relay tower shall be denied if an alternative placement of the antenna(s) on a building or other existing structure can accommodate the communications needs. Applications shall be required to provide documentation that reasonable efforts to identify alternative locations were made.

2. Owners and operators of a proposed broadcast and relay tower shall provide information regarding the opportunity for the collocation of other antenna(s) and related equipment. If feasible, provision for future collocation may be required.

3. Broadcast and relay towers reviewed under this section shall not be located within any required building setback areas.

4. Broadcast and relay towers shall not be used for the purposes of signage to display a message of any kind.

5. To the extent technically feasible and in compliance with safety regulations, specific colors of paint may be required to allow the broadcast and relay tower to blend better with its setting. The broadcast and relay tower shall be integrated through location and design to blend in with the existing characteristics of the site to the extent practical. Before and after photos or drawings shall be submitted demonstrating the camouflaging or screening techniques used.

6. Any fencing required for security shall meet general fencing requirements of the city.

7. A Washington licensed professional engineer shall certify in writing, over his or her seal, that both construction plans and final construction of the broadcast and relay radio towers are designed to reasonably withstand wind and seismic loads as established by the International Building Code.

8. All broadcast and relay towers shall be removed by the facility owner within twelve months of the date they cease to be operational, or if the facility falls into disrepair and is not maintained. Disrepair includes structural features, paint, landscaping, or general lack of maintenance which could result in safety or visual impacts. The broadcast and relay tower to be removed includes the freestanding support structure, attached antenna(s), and related equipment, including the concrete pad on which the support structure is located, if applicable.

9. Broadcast and relay towers may be conditioned to allow review for continued use at five-year intervals. Rapid technological advancements, changing markets, and regulatory interpretations indicate the need to periodically review the appropriate design of broadcast and relay towers and monopoles.

B. Additional Standards in Residential Zones – Broadcast and Relay Towers.

1. Commercial broadcast and relay towers shall not be allowed in the residential (R-L and R-M) zones unless they meet the special exception criteria of Section 17.70.080.

2. The combined broadcast and relay tower and antenna(s) shall not extend more than fifteen feet above the maximum height of the zone for which it is proposed to a maximum of sixty feet. A height bonus of fifteen feet may be allowed by the approval authority when collocation is specifically provided for on the broadcast and relay tower.

3. The attached antenna(s) shall not dominate the appearance of the structure.

4. Broadcast and relay towers shall be located at a point farthest from lot lines as feasible.

5. The base of a ground-mounted broadcast and relay tower shall be screened with fencing, walls, landscaping, or other means such that the view of the antenna(s) base is blocked as much as practicable from any street and from the yards and main living floor areas of surrounding residential properties. Before and after photos or drawings shall be submitted demonstrating the camouflaging or screening techniques used. The screening may be located anywhere between the antenna(s) and the above-mentioned viewpoints. Landscaping that qualifies for the purpose of screening shall be maintained in a healthy condition.

C. Additional Standards in Nonresidential Zones – Broadcast and Relay Towers. The combined height of a broadcast and relay tower and antenna(s) located in nonresidential zones shall not exceed eighty-five feet except when collocation is specifically provided for, then the broadcast and relay tower shall not exceed one hundred feet. Extensions, antennas, and arms attached to broadcast and relay towers and/or antennas shall not exceed eight feet in length horizontally. (Ord. 1533 § 6 (Exh. 77) (part), 2017: Ord. 1352 § 8 Exh. 8 (part), 2008: Ord. 1214 § 1 (part), 2001).

17.70.070 Wireless communications facilities – Development standards.

A. Development Standards for All Zoning Districts. The following standards shall be applied to all wireless equipment, such as antenna(s) and equipment shelters, exclusive of the broadcast and relay tower. Wireless monopoles, lattice and guy towers, and existing pole structures extended in height are regulated by the provisions that govern broadcast and relay towers, Section 17.70.060 of this chapter.

1. Placement of a freestanding wireless communications facility shall be denied if placement of the antenna(s) on an existing structure can accommodate the operator’s communications needs. The collocation of a proposed antenna(s) on an existing broadcast and relay tower or placement on an existing structure shall be explored and documented by the operator in order to show that reasonable efforts were made to identify alternate locations.

2. No wireless equipment reviewed under this section shall be located within required building setback areas.

3. The combined antenna(s) and supporting structure shall not extend more than fifteen feet above the existing or proposed roof structure.

4. No wireless equipment shall be used for the purposes of signage or message display of any kind.

5. Location of wireless communications antenna(s) on existing buildings or other structures shall be screened or camouflaged to the greatest practicable extent by use of shelters, compatible materials, location, color, and/or other stealth tactics to reduce visibility of the antenna(s) as viewed from any street or residential property. Before and after photos or drawings shall be submitted demonstrating the camouflaging or screening techniques used. If within the downtown area from Saunders to Columbia Avenue, evidence that downtown associations have been contacted and their input has been incorporated into the screening or camouflaging shall be provided with the application.

6. Screening of wireless equipment shall be provided with one or a combination of the following materials: fencing, walls, landscaping, structures, or topography which will block the view of the antenna(s) and equipment shelter as much as practicable from any street and from the yards and main floor living areas of residential properties within approximately five hundred feet. Screening may be located anywhere between the base and the above-mentioned viewpoints. Landscaping for the purposes of screening shall be maintained in a healthy condition.

7. Any fencing required for security shall meet general fencing requirements of the city.

8. Construction plans and final construction of the mountings of wireless antenna(s) and equipment shelters shall be approved by the city building department. Applications shall document that the proposed broadcast and relay tower and any mounting bases are designed to reasonably withstand wind and seismic loads.

9. A wireless communications facility shall be removed by the facility owner within twelve months of the date it ceases to be operational, or if the facility falls into disrepair and is not maintained. Disrepair includes structural features, paint, landscaping, or general lack of maintenance which could result in safety or visual impacts. The wireless communications facility to be removed consists of antenna(s) and related equipment and may include equipment enclosure, screening, or support structure, including the concrete pad on which the support structure is located, if applicable.

B. Additional Standards in Residential Zones – Wireless Communications Facilities.

1. Commercial telecommunications facilities shall be allowed in the residential zones only when attached to public facilities or when the special exception criteria in Section 17.70.080 of this chapter are satisfied and a conditional use permit is obtained pursuant to Section 17.56.280 of this code. For purposes of this provision, “public facilities” shall mean those facilities owned by a public entity.

2. The antenna(s) shall not dominate the structure upon which it is attached and shall be visually concealed utilizing color and compatible material to camouflage the facility to the greatest extent feasible.

3. Associated aboveground equipment shelters shall be minimized, and shall not exceed two hundred forty square feet (e.g., twelve by twenty feet) unless operators can demonstrate that more space is needed. Shelters shall be painted a color that matches existing structures or the surrounding landscape. The use of concrete or concrete aggregate shelters is not allowed. A solid visual screen (ninety percent solid or more) shall be created around the perimeter of the shelter. Operators shall consider undergrounding equipment if technically feasible or placing the equipment within existing structures.

C. Additional Development Standards in Nonresidential Zones – Wireless Communications Facilities. Associated aboveground equipment shelters shall not exceed two hundred forty square feet (e.g., twelve by twenty feet) unless operators can demonstrate that more space is needed. A solid visual screen (ninety percent solid or more) shall be created around the perimeter of the shelter. Operators shall consider undergrounding equipment if technically feasible or placing the equipment within an existing structure. Aboveground equipment shelters for antenna(s) located on buildings shall be located within, on the sides or behind the buildings and screened to the fullest extent possible. Screening of exterior shelters shall provide colors and materials which blend with surrounding structures. (Ord. 1352 § 8 Exh. 8 (part), 2008: Ord. 1214 § 1 (part), 2001).

17.70.080 Special exceptions.

When adherence to all development standards of this chapter would result in a physical barrier which would block signal reception or transmission or prevent effective communication in all permissible locations, a special exception may be permitted, provided both criteria outlined below are met. Exceptions do not apply to variations from the International Building Code. A variance pursuant to Chapter 17.64 of this code is required for variations from applicable zoning regulations not described in this chapter.

The final approval authority for granting of the special exception shall be the same as that of the permit approving the antenna(s) location. A request for a special exception shall be processed in conjunction with the permit approving the antenna(s) location and shall not require any additional application or fees.

Upon review of special exception requests, the approval authority shall consider first those standards having the least effect upon the resulting aesthetic compatibility of the antenna(s) or tower with the surrounding environment. The approval authority shall review setback, size, screening requirements, and height limits.

A. Special Exception Criteria – General Criteria.

1. The applicant shall justify the request for a special exception by demonstrating that the obstruction or inability to receive a communication signal is the result of factors beyond the property owner’s or applicant’s control, taking into consideration potential permitted development on adjacent and neighboring lots with regard to future reception window obstruction. Pictures, drawings (to scale), maps and/or manufacturer’s specifications, and other technical information as necessary, should be provided to demonstrate to the city that the special exception is necessary.

2. The applicant for a special exception shall demonstrate that the proposed materials, shape, and color of the antenna(s) will minimize negative visual impacts on adjacent or nearby residential uses to the greatest extent possible. The use of certain materials, shapes and colors may be required in order to minimize visual impacts.

B. Large Satellite Dish Antenna(s) – Special Exceptions.

1. Residential Zones. Modifications to requirements for setbacks, size, screening and maximum height limit may be considered by special exception. If a special exception from the height limit for a ground-mounted dish is requested, the height of the dish shall be limited to a maximum of eighteen feet.

Only if these modifications would still block an electromagnetic signal shall rooftop location be considered. If a special exception is sought to obtain a rooftop location, the diameter of the dish shall be limited to six feet and maximum permitted height shall be fifteen feet above the roofline. The approval authority may require the applicant to place the antenna(s) in an area on the roof which takes into consideration view blockage and aesthetics, provided there is a usable signal.

2. Nonresidential Zones.

a. Ground-Mounted Antenna(s). Exceptions to be first considered shall be from setback, landscape and service area requirements, and size and screening requirements. Only if these waived regulations would still block an electromagnetic signal shall a special exception from height requirements be considered. If a special exception is sought to vary from the height limit, the height of the dish shall be limited to a maximum of twenty feet.

b. Roof-Mounted Antenna(s). The first exception to be considered shall be the center of roof requirement; the second exception shall be from the size and screening requirements, respectively. Only if these waived regulations would still result in a block of the signal shall a special exception from height requirements be considered. A special exception from the height limit shall be allowed up to a maximum of twenty feet above the existing or proposed structure. The approval authority may require the applicant to place the antenna(s) in an area on the roof which takes into consideration view blockage and aesthetics, provided there is a usable signal and structural considerations allow the alternative placement.

C. Amateur Radio Towers – Special Exceptions.

1. Residential Zones. Where a property owner desires to vary from the height, location or setback limitations, the special exception general criteria must be met.

D. Broadcast and Relay Towers – Special Exceptions. Where a property owner desires to vary from applicable criteria, the special exception general criteria must be met.

E. Wireless Communications Facilities – Special Exceptions.

1. Urban Recreation Zone and Residential Zones. An applicant of a proposed wireless facility that exceeds the height limit shall meet the special exception general criteria.

2. Commercial and Industrial Zones. An applicant of a proposed wireless communications facility that exceeds the height limit shall be required to meet the special exception general criteria. (Ord. 1352 § 8 Exh. 8 (part), 2008: Ord. 1214 § 1 (part), 2001).