Chapter 31.03
SEQUIM-DUNGENESS REGIONAL PLAN

Sections:

31.03.010    Purpose and intent.

31.03.020    Comprehensive Plan map designations.

31.03.110    Public facilities and services – Inventory and analysis.

31.03.120    Public facilities and services – Policies.

31.03.130    Transportation – Inventory and analysis.

31.03.140    Transportation policies.

31.03.150    Affordable housing – Inventory and analysis.

31.03.160    Affordable housing – Policies.

31.03.170    Economic development – Inventory and analysis.

31.03.180    Economic development – Policies.

31.03.190    Open space and the environment – Inventory and analysis.

31.03.195    Open space and the environment – Conservation policies.

31.03.220    Agricultural land – Inventory and analysis.

31.03.230    Agricultural land conservation – Policies.

31.03.240    Forest land – Inventory and analysis.

31.03.250    Forest land conservation – Policies.

31.03.260    Rural land – Inventory and analysis.

31.03.270    Rural land – Policies.

31.03.280    Urban growth – Discussion.

31.03.290    Urban growth policies.

31.03.310    City of Sequim urban growth area (UGA).

31.03.315    Adoption of City of Sequim Comprehensive Plan.

31.03.320    Diamond Point/Sunshine Acres rural center.

31.03.330    Sunland planned urban residential community.

31.03.340    Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road neighborhood.

31.03.350    Carlsborg urban growth area.

31.03.415    Miller Peninsula neighborhood.

31.03.425    Palo Alto-Chicken Coop neighborhood.

31.03.435    Blyn LAMIRD.

31.03.445    Happy Valley-Bell Hill neighborhood.

31.03.455    Sequim-West Neighborhood.

31.03.465    Dungeness-Jamestown neighborhood.

31.03.475    Dungeness Valley neighborhood.

31.03.485    Agnew neighborhood.

31.03.500    Lost Mountain neighborhood.

31.03.510    Upper Blue Mountain neighborhood.

31.03.520    R Corner/Kitchen-Dick Road neighborhood.

SOURCE:    ADOPTED:

Ord. 574    06/27/95

AMENDED SOURCE:    ADOPTED:

Ord. 598    07/09/96

Ord. 599    07/24/96

Ord. 603    09/10/96

Ord. 604    10/29/96

Ord. 610    02/25/97

Ord. 619    07/08/97

Ord. 623    07/08/97

Ord. 627    10/10/97

Ord. 628    11/04/97

Ord. 658    01/08/99

Ord. 662    02/23/99

Ord. 664    03/09/99

Ord. 674    08/10/99

Ord. 682    02/08/00

Ord. 696    08/08/00

Ord. 700    12/05/00

Ord. 725    08/06/02

Ord. 801    12/19/06

Ord. 835    10/21/08

Ord. 850    06/23/09

Ord. 852    07/21/09

Ord. 857    12/08/09

Ord. 920    11/29/16

31.03.010 Purpose and intent.

It is the purpose and intent of this regional Comprehensive Plan to further the objective of the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan in this title, to provide a guide for coordinated and orderly growth and development of the land and physical improvements in the unincorporated areas of the Sequim-Dungeness regional planning area, generally described as the area east of Siebert’s Creek to the Jefferson County line, inclusive of State lands.

31.03.020 Comprehensive Plan map designations.

The Sequim-Dungeness Planning Region contains the following land use designations that are mapped on the adopted Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map, as amended, that is part of this chapter and title:

Land Use Designation

 

Maximum Densities

Commercial Forest

CF

One dwelling per 80 acres

Rural

R1

One dwelling per acre

Rural Suburban Community

RSC

One dwelling per acre

Rural-Moderate

R2

One dwelling per 2.4 acres

Rural-Low

R5

One dwelling per 4.8 acres

Rural Neighborhood Conservation

NC

One dwelling per 5 acres. Under optional innovative zoning techniques, up to one dwelling per 2.4 acres

Rural-Very Low

R20

One dwelling per 19.6 acres

Rural Center

CEN

One dwelling per one-half acre

Rural Village

RV

One dwelling per one-quarter acre

Rural Village Low

RV2

One dwelling per acre

Carlsborg Village Commercial

CV

One dwelling per one-half acre

Rural Commercial

RC

One dwelling per one-half acre

Urban Residential

URL/URH

Two to four dwellings per acre

Industrial

M

Residential uses accessory to industrial uses

City of Sequim UGA

 

Various, see CCC 31.03.310

Public Land

P

Park facilities

Carlsborg UGA

 

Various, see CCC 31.03.350

31.03.110 Public facilities and services – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards.

Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks.

(2) Overview. It is more cost-efficient to provide some public facilities and services when the population is concentrated, such as in an urban area. Through the designation of urban growth areas, Clallam County and other service providers can plan more cost effective and efficient services.

Growth increases the demand for new and/or improved public facilities and services. New residential growth may impact school facilities by having more school age children without a corresponding increase in school facilities. Development can increase traffic levels on County roads and transit systems. Connections to water or sewer systems diminish the available capacity for future growth.

The overall purpose of this growth management plan is to identify urban areas where public facilities and services can be provided efficiently; ensure that public facilities and services keep pace with growth so that service levels are not diminished; and plan for where facilities and services will be located.

(3) Definition. The Growth Management Act defines “public facilities” as streets, roads, highways, sidewalks, trails, street and road lighting systems, traffic signals, domestic water systems, storm and sanitary sewer systems, parks and recreation facilities, and schools. “Public services” include fire protection and suppression, law enforcement, public health, education, recreation, environmental protection, and other governmental services.

(4) Schools. The Sequim School District has facilities within the City of Sequim and Carlsborg. School facilities in this area have not kept pace with the increase in school children. School construction funding comes primarily from local levies (bonds) authorized by voters within the school district. The Sequim School District has been unsuccessful in obtaining voter approval for new school construction. Existing school facilities are overcrowded, requiring the installation of portable classroom buildings. There is, and will continue to be, a need for increased school capacity during the 20-year life of this plan. The School District has tentatively identified a location for school expansion within the City of Sequim near the existing school complex.

(5) Water. Public Utility District Number 1 of Clallam County operates the Evergreen, Carlsborg, and Deer Park/O’Brien Road/Agnew water systems. The Public Utility District finances construction of these systems through local utility districts (LUDs). Sunland has a water district that provides water service to that community. There are numerous private water purveyors within the area (see Figure 1).

(6) Sewer. Sanitary sewer exists within the City of Sequim (plus some lands within the urban growth area) and at Sunland. The Public Utility District is authorized to provide sewage disposal service throughout the PUD service area. A community drainfield in Sunshine Acres is now operated by the PUD.

(7) Parks and Recreation. Clallam County has several parks and recreation facilities within the Sequim-Dungeness planning area, including the Dungeness Recreation Area, Cline Spit, Port Williams, Panorama Vista, and Dungeness Landing. The Sequim-Dungeness Park and Recreation District is a local district with similar service boundaries to this planning area. The District operates the Sequim Aquatic Center, the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe manages Railroad Bridge Park, and the Port of Port Angeles owns and operates John Wayne Marina. State parks in the area include Sequim Bay State Park and the planned Miller Peninsula State Park. The planning area also includes the Olympic National Park and Olympic National Forest, which have numerous recreation sites. Private recreation opportunities in the area include Dungeness, Skyridge, and Sunland golf courses, although Sunland is now private. There is a demand for new golf courses with public access and trails linking the Olympic Discovery Trail (ODT) with these facilities.

(8) Fire Protection. Fire protection in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley is provided by Clallam County Fire Protection District Number 3. The main station for the Fire District is within the City of Sequim, with other stations located at Carlsborg, Blyn, Diamond Point, Dungeness, Lost Mountain and R Corner. Fire protection districts, like hospital and library districts, are junior taxing districts. Funding for these junior taxing districts comes from property taxes and timber revenues from County trust lands.

(9) Public Health. Public health facilities serving this planning area are located within Port Angeles. Public health services are available through Clallam County’s Home Health Program. Numerous private health care facilities exist within the planning area. These facilities are needed to serve the aging population.

(10) Other Governmental Services. Clallam County provides no other direct governmental facilities within the planning area. Consideration has been made in the past to satellite offices for some of the County’s services, such as law enforcement, health, and community development. At this time, the most efficient use of facilities is to continue basing the services within Port Angeles. As the population grows in this area, the need for satellite facilities and increased services needs to be closely monitored.

(11) Financing. New development often pays for the cost of extending new public facilities and services. For example, if a development is proposed on a County road that is not adequate to handle additional traffic, the County is able to require the developer to pay the costs of improving the County road (called “mitigation”). Water and sewer systems are similarly financed; if a developer proposes to extend water and sewer to a property, it is the responsibility of the developer to pay the costs for extending those services.

Another way that development pays for the cost of extending new public facilities is through development fees. For example, the City of Sequim requires anyone who hooks up to the sewer or water system to pay a connection fee. This fee is put into a special account for the eventual planning and upgrade of the system, such as the sewer treatment facility. This connection fee is in addition to requiring the developer extend the actual collection or distribution lines.

This method of paying for public facility and service extension is based on three principles: (1) setting level of service standards for public facilities and services; (2) ensuring that public facilities and services necessary to support development are adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy (called “concurrency”); and (3) requiring development to pay fees for the new facilities rather than rely solely on property taxes or grants to fund development of these public facilities.

31.03.120 Public facilities and services – Policies.

(1) Parks and Recreation.

(a) Policy 1. Identify and provide for increased recreational and public access opportunities to natural resource lands and water where appropriate.

(i) Encourage further development of saltwater access points for recreation, such as trails, boating, and passive uses.

(ii) Encourage further development of public access to freshwater areas, particularly the Dungeness River.

(iii) Existing managed public access to public forest lands for recreation should be maintained.

(iv) Encourage final development of the Olympic Discovery Trail and links from it to other parks and recreation facilities and schools.

(b) Policy 2. That portion of the Clallam County Parks and Recreation Plan, as now or hereafter amended, which relates to the Sequim-Dungeness region is hereby adopted as part of this Plan.

(c) Policy 3. Parks and recreation facilities necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development as identified in the County Capital Facilities Plan, as now or hereafter amended.

(2) Schools.

(a) [Policy No. 4] New school facilities should locate within the Sequim urban growth area or Carlsborg rural commercial activity center where public facilities and services needed to support the school facilities (e.g., water, sewer, transportation, fire and police) can be efficiently provided.

(b) [Policy No. 5] School facilities necessary to support development should be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use, or a financial commitment is in place to complete the improvements within six years without decreasing current service levels below established minimum standards.

(c) [Policy No. 6] The County, City of Sequim, State of Washington and the Sequim School District should work cooperatively to identify funding sources needed for improvements to school facilities caused by new development.

(3) Water. Please see urban growth policies (CCC 31.03.290 et seq.) for specific reference to water service within the designated urban growth areas.

(a) [Policy No. 7] Public water systems should be provided within designated urban growth areas, rural centers, rural villages, and rural commercial activity centers. Public or municipal water systems (i.e., PUD and City of Sequim) should be limited in rural lands to those areas that can demonstrate water quantity limitations, water quality problems or hydraulic continuity to rivers and streams.

(b) [Policy No. 8] Extension or the existence of public water service in designated rural areas or resource lands shall not result in or be justification for higher density than that anticipated by a regional or subarea comprehensive plan.

(c) [Policy No. 9] Level of service and facility standards should be developed by the water service provider, with standards set based on expected land use densities established by this plan.

(d) [Policy No. 10] Water systems necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use.

(4) Fire Protection. [Policy No. 11] Fire protection and suppression facilities in urban areas should receive first priority. Fire flow (e.g., fire hydrants) in rural areas should not be required of new development or extension of public water systems except for commercial/industrial uses and public facilities.

(5) Other Governmental Services. [Policy No. 12] Clallam County and other governmental service providers should continually monitor the population growth, age and other demographic characteristics of the population to determine the need for new or expanded services.

(6) Sanitary Waste Disposal. Please see County-wide Comprehensive Plan policies for specific reference to sanitary waste disposal within and outside urban growth areas.

Table 1 – Public (Group A) Water Systems 
Sequim-Dungeness Regional Planning Area

Map Number

Water System Name

20

Monterra

21

Solmar

22

Estates

23

Olympic View

24

Sunshine Park

25

Cedar Grove (aka Spencers Mobile Home Park)

26

Clallam County PUD

27

Carlsborg Mobile Home Park

28

Sequim Valley Tracts

29

Parkwood Adult Community

30

Greenwood Acres/Dungeness Mobile Home Park

31

Dungeness Meadows

32

Mains Farm

33

Dungeness Bay Plat

34

Dungeness Beach Plat

35

Meadowbrook Village

36

Brandt Point

37

Dungeness Beach

38

Dungeness Heights

39

Forest Ridge

40

Madrona Ridge

41

Woodland Heights

42

Jamestown

43

Sunland Shores

44

Sunland

45

Lee Water Conditional Use

46

North Olympic Vista

47

Deytona

48

City of Sequim

49

Palo Verde #2

50

Flauras Acres

51

Still Road

52

Baywood Village

53

John Wayne Marina

54

West Sequim Bay

55

Sunshine Acres

56

Diamond Point

57

Clallam County PUD

Please see Figure 1 for location of the water systems identified in Table 1.

31.03.130 Transportation – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Encourage efficient multimodal transportation systems such as trails that are based on regional priorities and coordinated with County and city comprehensive plans.

Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards.

(2) Definition. The transportation system is composed of air, water, and land transportation facilities and services, including highways and streets, paths, trails and sidewalks, transit, airports, and ports.

(3) Circulation System. The transportation and circulation system should function to serve the land use patterns established by the Comprehensive Plan. For example, rural areas should be served by a transportation system designed for rural uses while urban areas should be served by a circulation system designed to serve urban uses. The transportation system should also focus on connections, either between urban centers, such as from Port Angeles to Sequim, or Carlsborg to Sequim, or between different “modes” of travel, such as automobiles to public transit. Some parts of the circulation system in this area serve County-wide and State-wide interests, such as Highway 101, the Sequim Valley Airport, Olympic Discovery Trail, Old Olympic Highway, and boat launch/moorage facilities. It is imperative that the County-wide and State-wide interests are considered when making land use or facility decisions affecting these systems.

(4) Land Use Coordination. In the past, land use planning and transportation planning were not always coordinated. Developments were approved on roads without consideration to impacts on roads or better use of public transportation. Conversely, roads and highways were built in rural areas which encouraged conversion of rural areas into higher densities or commercial centers. The Clallam County Comprehensive Plan indicates that the transportation system should be consistent with the land use plan.

(5) Level of Service. Level of service standards are used to serve as a gauge to judge the performance of the transportation system. When land use assumptions are made based on expected population growth and traffic demand, transportation engineers determine whether the transportation system is capable of handling the increased demand by using these level of service (LOS) standards.

LOS standards are based on the average daily traffic (ADT) and characteristics of the area that the road serves (rural, suburban and urban). LOS standards indicate congestion or how free-flowing the traffic is. LOS standards do not indicate whether the road meets adopted County road (safety) standards.

The level of service established in the County-wide Comprehensive Plan for County roads, either in urban or rural areas is LOS “C.” Level of service for State highways is LOS “D” for urban areas and tourist corridors, and LOS “C” for rural highways. Figure 5 indicates that all County roads are currently operating at or above these standards.

The forecast of future traffic on County roads in this plan is based on two (2) methods: projected population growth and build-out potential based on land use designations. The forecast of traffic and the impact on adopted LOS standards is used to determine if the transportation system is capable of handling the demand. If the system is not capable of handling the demand, the comprehensive plan must identify how the system will be improved and financed, or the land use plan must be revised to ensure that the minimum “level of service” standards are met.

Figure 6 indicates that the system is designed to accommodate the projected land use plan for this region, with some exceptions that should be monitored. Table 2 in this section, however, indicates that the system is not designed to handle the estimated build-out. The following roads show failure to meet LOS standards based on the build-out analysis: West Sequim Bay Road, Sequim-Dungeness Way, and Old Olympic Highway. At what date they fail to meet LOS standards depends upon growth rates. As can be seen in the table, portions of Old Olympic Highway and Sequim-Dungeness Way are already operating at LOS “C.” This indicates that these road segments may fail to meet standards within a shorter period of time.

Table 2 – LOS Analysis for County Roads (Build-out and Population Growth)

Road Name

Current LOS1

LOS Build-out2

LOS 2000 Pop.3

LOS 2010 Pop.

ADT Most Recent Count4

ADT 2000 Pop.

ADT 2010 Pop.

ADT Build-out

From Mile Post

To Mile Post

Old Olympic Hwy.

C

D

C

C

2,683

3,651

3,729

12,483

7.34

8.56

Old Olympic Hwy.

C

D

C

C

3,115

4,239

4,329

14,307

9.19

9.37

Old Olympic Hwy.

C

D

B

C

3,115

4,239

4,329

14,307

9.37

9.68

Sequim Dungeness Way

C

D

C

C

6,232

6,394

6,549

14,676

0.60

1.00

Sequim Dungeness Way

B

D

B

B

6,543

8,904

9,093

19,138

1.00

2.52

West Sequim Bay Rd.

B

E

B

C

1,804

2,159

2,554

18,204

0.00

1.20

1.    Current LOS is analyzed using the Highway Capacity Manual.

2.    LOS is determined based on future build-out with two considerations: vacant parcels and proposed land use densities within the plan.

3.    LOS 2000 and LOS 2010 is based on projected population growth rates, not land use densities or vacant parcels.

4.    ADT – Average Daily Traffic. Most Recent Count is anywhere from 1985 to 1993. The ADT for population counts are based on projected population growth rates.

(6) Road Standards. Level of service standards do not indicate that a County road meets minimum design standards. Design standards for County roads are set forth in RCW 35.83.030 and RCW 43.32.020. Those standards are as follows:

ADT

Below 150

150 – 400

401 – 750

751– 1,000

1,001 – 2,000

2,001 plus

Roadway Width

20 – 24 ft.

24 ft.

26 ft.

28 ft.

34 ft.

40 ft.

Lane Width

10 ft.

10 ft.

10 ft.

10 ft.

11 ft.

12 ft.

Based on these standards, Figure 7 indicates the County collectors and minor collectors with width deficiencies. As can be seen in this table, nearly all of the County roads in this region do not meet the adopted road width standards, even though they meet LOS standards.

Table 3 identifies segments of County roads which are 18 feet or less in width with over 125 average daily traffic (ADT). These roads do not meet minimum safety standards. The table also clearly outlines the discrepancy between using LOS standards and road width standards. For example, although Taylor Ranch Road is currently at LOS “A,” and is projected to be LOS “B,” it clearly is deficient in road width (only twelve (12) feet). LOS measures how free-flowing a roadway segment is, but fails to recognize whether the road meets minimum safety standards.

Table 3 – County Roads Less than Twenty (20) Feet in Width and over 125 ADT

Road Name

Pavement Width – Current

Deficient Road Width

Current LOS

LOS Build-out

ADT – Most Recent Count

Taylor Ranch Rd.

12

14

A

B

514

Marshall Rd.

14

6

A

B

148

Anderson Rd.

16

8

A

A

292

Chicken Coop Rd.

16

8

A

A

190

Cline Spit Rd.

16

8

A

A

256

Gehrke Rd.

16

4

A

A

148

Hendrickson Rd.

16

8

A

B

268

Hooker Rd.

16

8

A

A

171

Jamestown Rd.

16

8

A

B

325

Riverside Rd.

16

8

A

B

255

Voice of America Rd.

16

18

B

B

1,106

Ward Rd.

16

8

A

A

224

3rd Ave.

18

10

B

B

789

Anderson Rd.

18

6

A

A

292

Atterberry Rd.

18

8

B

B

662

Barr Rd.

18

8

A

B

416

Beach Dr.

18

2

A

A

125

Blue Mountain Rd.

18

6

A

A

153

Brackett Rd.

18

6

A

B

359

Cameron Rd.

18

6

A

A

219

Chicken Coop Rd.

18

6

A

A

228

Clark Rd.

18

6

A

A

159

Discovery Way

18

2

A

A

138

Evans Rd.

18

8

A

B

533

Gehrke Rd.

18

8

A

B

481

Happy Valley Rd.

18

6

A

B

328

Hendrickson Rd.

18

16

B

C

1,262

Hog Back Rd.

18

6

A

A

160

Jamestown Rd.

18

6

A

B

325

Keeler Rd.

18

6

A

B

167

Kirk Rd.

18

6

A

A

204

Lewis Rd.

18

6

A

A

324

Listolsen Rd.

18

6

A

A

200

Lotzgesell Rd.

18

10

B

B

868

MacLeay Rd.

18

6

A

A

269

Marine Dr.

18

10

B

B

885

Marine Dr.

18

10

B

B

976

McComb Rd.

18

6

A

B

332

Medsker Rd.

18

6

A

B

353

Mill Rd.

18

16

B

C

1,049

Miller Rd.

18

8

A

C

539

Monterra Dr.

18

2

A

A

125

Old Blyn Hwy.

18

8

A

B

488

Olsen Rd.

18

6

A

A

200

Palo Alto Rd.

18

8

A

A

485

Pinnell Rd.

18

8

A

B

410

Port Williams Rd.

18

16

B

C

1,694

Roupe Rd.

18

6

A

A

197

Runnion Rd.

18

8

B

B

729

Schmuck Rd.

18

6

A

B

304

Secor Rd.

18

6

A

B

203

Sequim Dungeness Way

18

16

B

C

1,117

Shore Rd.

18

6

A

A

302

Silberhorn Rd.

18

10

B

C

798

Spath Rd.

18

8

A

B

406

Towne Rd.

18

16

B

C

1,020

Vautier Rd.

18

8

A

B

452

Washington Harbor Rd.

18

10

B

C

777

Wheeler Rd.

18

6

A

A

227

Woodcock Rd.

18

6

A

A

185

(7) Private Roads. The transportation system in the Sequim-Dungeness region also includes private streets and easements, often unimproved, designed to serve lots within short plats and surveys. A mechanism to upgrade these roads to land division and fire protection minimum standards should be in place to assist property owners developing property which does not directly abut a public street.

(8) Alternative Solutions. Solutions to transportation deficiencies may include incentives to change patterns of transportation behavior, such as car pooling rather than single occupancy vehicles, and enhancements to alternative modes of transportation that would be efficient and less costly to maintain, such as transit, bicycle lanes, and trails.

31.03.140 Transportation policies.

(1) Policy 1. Preserve and enhance the Highway 101 corridor for regional mobility of goods, services and passengers.

(a) Encourage the Washington State Legislature and Washington State Department of Transportation to complete the improvements to the Highway 101 corridor as outlined in the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Palo Alto to O’Brien Road corridor.

(b) Designate the Sequim Bypass as a transportation corridor in the comprehensive plan and ensure that any new development or land divisions are not in conflict with this designation. (See Figure 4.)

(c) Work with the Washington State Department of Transportation and other agencies to ensure that Highway 101 meets the goal that the corridor function regionally for the mobility of goods, services and passengers.

(d) Adopt development regulations prohibiting access to Highway 101 when access to County/City roads is available or when shared access points are available.

(e) Highway 101 should have adequate shoulders for bicyclists. Storage facilities for bicycles should be available in conjunction with transit shelters along the corridor.

(f) Pedestrian facilities (sidewalks or paths) should be planned along the Highway 101 corridor through Carlsborg and Sequim with connections to the Olympic Discovery Trail.

(g) Park-and-ride lots and transit shelters should be conveniently located along the Highway 101 corridor in Sequim and Carlsborg, and at the intersections of County arterials and Highway 101.

(h) Passing lanes should be planned along the highway corridor in rural areas.

(i) The proliferation of stoplights on Highway 101 should be discouraged.

(2) Rural and Urban Roads.

(a) [Policy No. 2] With the completion of Cays Road and Anderson Road extension projects, the circulation system of County roads in rural and resource land areas should be considered completed for this planning area. The County should not pursue new County roads except in those circumstances where roads are built within subdivisions with private funds and then turned over to the County for maintenance.

(b) Policy 3. Improve circulation patterns around the City of Sequim.

(i) Improvements to access Highway 101 from the area north of Sequim should be made, including increasing the capacity of Port Williams to Brown Road, and Hendrickson to Priest Road with shoulders sufficient for bicycles and connection to the Olympic Discovery Trail.

(ii) Improvements to the circulation pattern within the City of Sequim urban growth area should be made, including consideration of interim measures to reduce congestion until the Sequim Bypass is constructed, and the improvement of Sequim Avenue south to Happy Valley Road.

(iii) Monitor growth on West Sequim Bay Road and the need to improve the road to meet LOS standards. The County should not permit new urban development within the City of Sequim to access onto the County road if the road fails to meet LOS or safety standards.

(c) [Policy No. 4] Improve circulation patterns within the Carlsborg rural commercial activity center, particularly to ensure minimal congestion caused by industrial and commercial development in the area.

(d) [Policy No. 5] The following road improvements have been identified based on LOS standards, improved circulation, and road width and safety standards. The roads are listed in approximate order of importance:

•    

Old Olympic Highway (finish widening)

•    

Cays Road (extension)

•    

Brown Road (widening)

•    

Port Williams Road – from Sequim-Dungeness Way to Brown Road (widening)

•    

Sequim-Dungeness and Woodcock (intersection improvements, widening, shoulders)

•    

Kendall-Hendrickson-Priest Road (widening, shoulders)

•    

Diamond Point Road (intersections, curves and widening for pedestrians and bicyclists)

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West Sequim Bay (widening)

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Evans Road (widening within urban growth area)

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Happy Valley Road (curves near Johnson Creek and River Road to 3rd Avenue)

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Runnion/Heath Road (intersection)

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Washington Harbor (curves, shoulders, ditches)

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Palo Alto (curves, width near 101)

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Spath Road (widening)

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Sherbourne (curves, shoulders)

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Hooker (101 south 1-1/2 miles)

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Marine Drive (guardrails, shoulders)

(3) Road Standards. Please see County-wide Comprehensive Plan for adopted County Road standards.

(a) [Policy No. 6] Improvements to County roads should consider the rural character of the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. Needed safety improvements should be the minimum necessary to address the safety problem, particularly in rural areas where country roads enhance the character of the area, as well as being a deterrent to speeding. In rural areas, limit the number of access points to County roads in order to limit impediments to traffic and to maintain open space qualities.

(b) [Policy No. 7] When County roads are rebuilt in this area, forecasts of future traffic should be based on the following principles:

(i) If the County road is on the regional transportation network (see Peninsula Regional Transportation Planning Organization – PRTPO), the road should be designed to accommodate transportation growth rates within the PRTPO plan.

(ii) If the County road is not on the regional transportation network, the road should be designed based on 50 percent of potential build-out as indicated in the land use plan.

(c) [Policy No. 8] Private road standards should allow for flexibility while meeting minimum safety requirements for emergency vehicles, except in those circumstances where it is in the best public interest to develop a public road. Right-of-way standards, improved widths, and surfacing of private roads should not be required at the same standard as public roads. The use of road improvement districts (RIDs) should be encouraged to equitably share the cost of upgrading private roads to land division and fire protection minimum standards.

(4) Paths, Trails and Sidewalks.

(a) [Policy No. 9] Nonmotorized travel should be promoted within the Sequim-Dungeness area for multipurpose recreation and transportation trails for users of all abilities.

(b) [Policy No. 10] Encourage development of a path or trail connecting Sequim and Carlsborg, preferably in conjunction with the Railroad Bridge Park.

(c) [Policy No. 11] A path, trail or sidewalk accommodating nonmotorized travel shall be required along Highway 101, County arterials, major collectors within urban growth areas or rural commercial activity centers, and within walking distance of school facilities.

(5) Policy 12. The following are the designated bicycle routes. All roads on a designated bicycle route should have a minimum improved shoulder width of three to five feet, depending on the speed limit of the road.

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Highway 101

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Old Olympic Highway

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Port Williams Road (from Sequim-Dungeness to Brown Road)

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Brown Road

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West Sequim Bay Road

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Old Blyn Highway

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Sequim-Dungeness Way

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Lotzgesell Road

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Kitchen-Dick Road

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Diamond Point Road.

(6) Multimodal.

(a) [Policy No. 13] First priority for transit service and facility improvements should be for designated urban growth areas, rural commercial activity centers and routes along the regional transportation system.

(b) [Policy No. 14] Park-and-ride lots and transit shelters should be conveniently located along the Highway 101 corridor in Sequim and Carlsborg, and at the intersections of County arterials or collectors and Highway 101. Design park-and-ride lots with transit shelters and bicycle storage facilities on site.

(7) Airports.

(a) [Policy No. 15] Ensure that land uses adjacent to the Sequim Valley and Diamond Point Airports are compatible with the continued use of the airports for air transportation needs of the region.

(b) [Policy No. 16] Provide adequate roadway connections between the Sequim Valley Airport and the existing major arterial streets, roads and highways serving the airport. Ensure that there are public transportation connections to the Sequim Valley Airport.

(8) Level of Service.

(a) [Policy No. 17] The minimum acceptable level of service (LOS) standard for County roads in both rural and urban areas shall be LOS “C,” using standard rating methodology.

(b) [Policy No. 18] New development, such as land divisions and nonresource uses (other than forestry, agriculture, fisheries) should not be allowed unless served by a County road meeting the following minimum standards:

(i) Surface width: 16 feet;

(ii) Grade: 12 percent maximum.

(9) Financing.

(a) [Policy No. 19] Place a high priority on investment and expenditure of limited public funds in the transportation system in urban growth areas and limit investment and expenditure in rural areas to arterial development connecting communities and neighborhoods.

(b) [Policy No. 20] The existing transportation system should be maintained before expenditure of limited public funds on expanded facilities.

(c) [Policy No. 21] Traditional funding sources should continue to be the primary funding source pay for improvements to County roads in the region.

(d) [Policy No. 22] The County shall require new development to rectify and/or compensate for impacts to transportation facilities not meeting minimum safety standards or for developments expected to increase demand, such as average daily traffic (ADT), by more than 50 percent over current demand.

31.03.150 Affordable housing– Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goal. Encourage the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of the population of this State, promote a variety of residential densities and housing types, and encourage preservation of existing housing stock.

(2) Definition. Affordable housing is typically broken into three categories based on family income. Because of the increase in housing values in the past five years, all three categories of affordable housing are desired within the planning area.

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Very low income – those families earning below 50 percent of County-wide median income can afford to spend 33 percent on rent or sale price;

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Low income – those families earning 50 to 80 percent of County-wide median income can afford to spend 33 percent on rent or sale price;

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Moderate income – those families earning 80 to 95 percent of County-wide median income can afford to spend 33 percent on rent or sale price.

(3) Cost of Housing. Recent trends show that the average home price is greater than what a median income family can afford. Manufactured housing, on the other hand, had an average value of $42,000. Manufactured housing on leased lots (e.g., mobile home parks) can be an affordable option.

(4) Affordable Housing Types. The types of affordable housing available within the Sequim-Dungeness area include:

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Multifamily in Sequim;

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Mobile home parks, such as Parkwood, Green Acres, etc.;

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Housing developments, such as Monterra which have manufactured housing;

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Housing developments with small lot sizes, such as Solmar and Sunshine Acres; and

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Accessory housing, such as converted basements and guest houses.

(5) Regulations. Additional regulations and costs for public services and facilities can drive up the cost of housing. Limiting densities in rural areas may make the area more exclusive, which could raise property values and thus, property taxes.

Flexible zoning techniques could lower the cost of some property. Rather than establishing minimum lot sizes in rural areas, land divisions could be based on maximum residential density. This way, a landowner might be able to place lots closer to required services, such as roads and electricity, thus lowering the cost for development of the lots.

31.03.160 Affordable housing – Policies.

(1) Flexible zoning techniques, cluster housing (provided adjacent property owners are protected from adverse impacts), and transfer of density on a parcel should be allowed in order to lower the cost of land for affordable housing opportunities. All types of housing opportunities, including multifamily, should be allowed in approved planned unit developments.

(2) Multifamily developments should be allowed within urban growth areas, rural centers and rural commercial activity centers.

(3) Employee housing should be encouraged in commercial and industrial zoning districts.

(4) The County should place a high priority on provision of infrastructure to serve high density housing development in urban growth areas and should consider partially subsidizing infrastructure costs to low-income affordable housing projects.

(5) The County should ensure that development standards do not discourage the provision of affordable housing.

(6) Allow higher urban density housing construction outside urban growth areas, including multifamily, in areas identified as rural centers, rural commercial activity centers and rural villages.

(7) The County should ensure that sufficient lands are designated within urban growth areas for the provision of high density and affordable housing development.

(8) Retention and development of mobile home parks within urban growth areas should be encouraged.

31.03.170 Economic development – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goal. Encourage economic development throughout the State that is consistent with adopted comprehensive plans, promote economic opportunity for all citizens of this State, especially for unemployed and for disadvantaged persons, and encourage growth in areas experiencing insufficient economic growth, all within the capacities of the State’s natural resources, public services, and public facilities.

(2) Outlook. The economy of Clallam County and the Sequim-Dungeness regional planning area has changed dramatically in the last 20 years. Twenty years ago, the area relied heavily on the agriculture and forestry industry. Conversion of farmlands into residential development and changes in forest management have caused the area to look more toward tourism, recreation, residential development and retail for its economic future. Light manufacturing and medical services also can play a vital role in the future.

Commercial and industrial development has and will continue to play a vital role in the economic development of the region. Commercial development, particularly retail, has expanded considerably in the last 10-year period. Industrial or manufacturing type jobs, however, have not flourished. Manufacturing is an important part of an economic development strategy: the jobs are family wage income, far exceeding service type jobs, and the sale of manufactured goods outside the region represent new dollars recruited within the local community. Both commercial and industrial development requires suitable locations, appropriately zoned, and with the necessary infrastructure.

The total industrial land base is equivalent to approximately three and one-half acres per 1,000 population. This is below national averages – 8.3 acres per 1,000 population, and far below the averages within the Port Angeles region – 35 acres per thousand. Maintaining, or increasing the industrial land base for future economic growth will be a difficult challenge.

31.03.180 Economic development – Policies.

(1) All levels of government should encourage economic development by providing water, sewer, and transportation infrastructure, appropriate land use designations (e.g., zoning) and encouraging new businesses to locate in those areas. Improvement costs should be paid through bonds, local improvement districts, and real estate excise taxes and repaid by the developer over time. The cost of connection to these systems needs to be carefully considered as excessive fees can discourage economic growth.

(2) Commercial and industrial land use designations should allow mixed uses in order to encourage more opportunities to site a business. For example, light manufacturing should be allowed in commercial areas while retail should be allowed in industrial areas.

(3) One hundred additional acres of industrial land should be identified through the 20-year planning process in the Sequim-Dungeness region as a goal toward achieving an appropriate ratio of industrial land use to residential population; national averages should be used as a benchmark. The first priority for location of new industrial land is within the City of Sequim urban growth area.

(4) Existing areas designated for industrial development and/or manufacturing, including lands within Sequim, Carlsborg and Sunshine Acres, must be assured of continued development through development regulations, and if necessary, urban growth area designations.

(5) Rural areas should allow research or campus-like business parks. Standards should be developed to ensure that these facilities do not cause adverse impacts, such as increased traffic, noise or pollution.

(6) The quality of the environment should be protected in order to attract tourists and new business which desire to locate in a quality environment enjoyed on the Olympic Peninsula.

(7) Recreational developments which provide attractions to tourists and citizens in the area should be encouraged. Examples of appropriate developments would include golf courses, shoreline access, parks, trails, and destination resorts. Existing tourist attractions, including the Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, the Olympic Discovery Trail, and Cline Spit, should be maintained for public access and enjoyment.

(8) Resource-based industries should continue to be supported, including conservation of forest and agricultural lands, and processing of raw materials.

(9) Clallam County should ensure that land use plans and regulations provide an environment conducive to business development, consistent with economic goals and objectives and protection of the public health, safety and welfare.

31.03.190 Open space and the environment – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Maintain and enhance natural resource-based industries, including productive timber, agricultural, and fisheries industries. Encourage the conservation of productive forest lands and productive agricultural lands, and discourage incompatible uses.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities such as the Olympic Discovery Trail, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks with links to the Olympic Discovery Trail.

Protect the environment and enhance the State’s high quality of life, including air and water quality, and the availability of water.

(2) Land Use. The Sequim-Dungeness region contains a diverse array of open spaces: pasture lands, hayland and cropland, forest land, wetlands and river corridors. There are over 13,000 acres of land used for crop, hay and pasture. Over 100,000 acres are in forest land, including State and federal lands. Urban lands account for slightly over 2,000 acres within the City of Sequim and Sunland. Rural lands account for over 10,000 acres in the region.

(3) Water. Water plays a vital role in the quality of life, culture, past and future development of the region. Irrigation is critical to continued agricultural production. There are six irrigation diversions and nine irrigation districts with over 97 miles of ditches, all originating from the Dungeness River. Groundwater in this area is susceptible to the stresses of increasing contamination and withdrawal, and in need of special consideration as land uses change and management regimes are developed. Groundwater is also recharged in some places by irrigation ditches. Withdrawal of groundwater can impact stream flows of rivers and creeks. Wetlands occur throughout the area, although larger areas are concentrated along the Dungeness River, Gierin Creek and along the saltwater shorelines. The Dungeness River is subject to devastating floods and, other than coastal floods, is the area most prone to flooding in the region.

(4) Air and Noise. Air quality and noise can be additional environmental problems in the Valley. Industrial land uses can cause air quality and noise related problems, particularly in the residential areas. Since a residential use is a primary land use in the Valley, measures to ensure maintenance of air quality and noise standards could be important.

(5) Watershed Planning. Clallam County and other resource agencies have completed and adopted several watershed planning efforts in this area. Adopted plans include the Sequim Bay Watershed Management Plan, Dungeness River Watershed Management Plan, Sequim-Dungeness Groundwater Protection Strategy, Dungeness-Quilcene Water Resources Management Plan, Dungeness River Flood Control Management Plan and the Dungeness River Greenway Plan. The County is also working on a pilot project on wetland functional assessment in this planning area (State Wetland Integration Strategy – SWIS) and has a watershed restoration grant from the Jobs for the Environment Project.

31.03.195 Open space and the environment – Conservation policies.

(1) General. Policy 1. Conserve and protect the environmental attributes of the Sequim-Dungeness region that characterize the quality of life for residents of both the area and the State of Washington.

(a) Protect wetlands, shorelines and other water resources beneficial to fisheries, wildlife, recreation and public use. Achieve this policy through education and enhancement of resources and through regulation of appropriate uses, buffers and activities.

(b) Adopt and implement drainage and erosion control standards for new development in order to protect water quality and prevent impacts to water quantity (e.g., flooding).

(c) Encourage public acquisition of lands of outstanding habitat or open space value, particularly those lands that are threatened by encroaching development.

(d) Support development of the Miller Peninsula State Park, balancing between maintaining the environmental attributes of the site and surrounding properties with the need for active recreational opportunities, developing connecting links to the Olympic Discovery Trail for non-motorized access.

(2) Corridors. Policy 2. Encourage the maintenance and enhancement of open space corridors, greenbelts and greenways, and non-motorized trails in the Valley.

(a) In forested areas such as Diamond Point, limit the number of access points to County roads in order to maintain a greenbelt along the road.

(b) Encourage the beautification of development along the Highway 101 corridor through landscape guidelines and through the control of signage, including the prohibition of billboard construction and the eventual removal.

(c) Designate open space corridors that provide linkages for wildlife and fisheries and protect these corridors through education, enhancement and regulations. See Figure 8 for designated habitat corridors.

(d) Conserve and enhance the Dungeness River as a greenway corridor for the benefit of fish, wildlife, flood protection, people and open space.

(e) Conserve the corridors of Siebert’s Creek, McDonnell Creek, Cassalery Creek, Bell Creek, Johnson Creek, Jimmycomelately Creek, Gierin Creek, Matriotti Creek, Meadowbrook Creek, and Cooper Creek for the benefit of fish and wildlife.

(f) Encourage further development of non-motorized trails to link natural resource land and water to the Olympic Discovery Trail.

(3) Recreation. [Policy No. 3] Identify and provide for increased recreational and public access opportunities to natural resource lands and water where appropriate and complementary to the natural and cultural characteristics of the area.

(a) Encourage further development of saltwater access points for recreation, such as trails, boating, and passive uses.

(b) Maintain existing access points for recreation, including the Dungeness Spit.

(c) Encourage further development of public access to freshwater areas, particularly the Dungeness River.

(d) Existing managed public access to public forest lands for recreation should be maintained.

(4) Water Quality. [Policy No. 4] Maintain and improve water quality to support fish resources, irrigation, recreation, wildlife habitat, domestic and industrial water supplies.

(a) Minimize pollutants in drinking water, industrial, commercial, agricultural and stock water supplies. Focus efforts on sources of bacteria, chemicals, nutrients, and sediment.

(b) Protect and restore the natural ecosystem functions of aquatic and riparian areas.

(c) Maintain the harvestability of commercial and recreational shellfish and protect and/or improve shellfish habitat.

(5) Land Use.

(a) [Policy No. 5] Ensure that land uses and densities allowed in rural areas are consistent with the need of area neighborhoods for open spaces, wildlife, peace and quiet, and the capacity of the land and water resource to handle development.

(i) Set rural land use patterns based on identified geographic neighborhoods and taking into account the local availability of water and land area for wastewater treatment.

(ii) Discourage or prohibit higher densities adjacent to significant fisheries or wildlife habitat, near wetlands and other environmentally sensitive areas, on poorly drained soils or on steep slopes.

(iii) Protect air quality and minimize noise impacts from industry and other uses in rural areas.

(b) [Policy No. 6] Minimize the public costs and potential dangers associated with inappropriate development in frequently flooded areas, geologic hazard areas, wetlands, fish and wildlife habitat, and areas with a critical recharging effect on aquifers.

(i) Development should occur on the most environmentally suitable and naturally stable portion of a development site.

(ii) Preserve natural flood control and stormwater storage from alterations to drainage or stream flow patterns.

(iii) Encourage enhancement, restoration and creation of biological and ecological functions of wetlands and habitat areas.

(6) Groundwater. [Policy No. 7] Pursue appropriate groundwater protection programs and coordinate groundwater with surface water quality protection, as well as efforts to resolve ground or surface water quantity issues.

(a) The quality and quantity of the shallow groundwater aquifer should be protected as it affects recharge of streams, estuaries and deep aquifer systems. The quality and quantity of the deep aquifer system should also be protected, especially for drinking water.

(b) Clallam County should work with State agencies to reduce the disincentives for establishing community water systems. Community water systems should be provided in areas with particular susceptibility to quality or quantity problems.

(7) Watershed Plans. [Policy No. 8] Clallam County should continue to work towards implementation of watershed management plans and other special area studies which enhance our understanding of environmental and open space resources of the planning area and ways to conserve those resources.

(8) Water Resources.

(a) [Policy No. 9] Municipal and residential water supplies should be directed to locations and depths so as to minimize the risk of hydraulic continuity, or where the water withdrawal does not cause impacts on in-stream flow requirements for fish.

(b) [Policy No. 10] Water should be used from the hydrologic unit from which it is derived, and water resources should be kept within the region.

(c) [Policy No. 11] Conservation and efficiency strategies for water resources should be developed and implemented region-wide to provide the most efficient use of all water resources.

(9) Marine Shorelines. [Policy No. 12] Clallam County shall preserve the scenic, aesthetic and ecological qualities of the marine shorelines of Clallam County, in harmony with those uses which are deemed essential to the life of its citizens. Clallam County shall implement marine resource goals through the Clallam County Shoreline Master Program and/or Critical Areas Ordinance, as now or hereafter amended.

31.03.220 Agricultural land – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Maintain and enhance natural resource-based industries, including productive timber, agricultural, and fisheries industries. Encourage the conservation of productive forest lands and productive agricultural lands, and discourage incompatible uses.

Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities such as non-motorized trails; conserve fish and wildlife habitat; increase access to natural resource lands and water, such as non-motorized trails; and develop parks.

Private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation having been made. The property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and discriminatory actions.

(2) Definition. The Growth Management Act defines “agricultural land” as land primarily devoted to the commercial production of horticultural, viticultural, floricultural, dairy, apiary, vegetable, or animal products or of berries, grain, hay, straw, turf, seed, Christmas trees not subject to the excise tax imposed by RCW 84.33.100 through 84.33.140, finfish in upland hatcheries, or livestock, and that has long-term commercial significance for agricultural production.

The Growth Management Act defines “long-term commercial significance” to include the growing capacity, productivity, and soil composition of the land for sustained commercial production, in consideration of the land’s proximity to population areas, and the possibility of more intense uses of the land.

(3) Resource Base. The agricultural resource base in Clallam County, and particularly the Sequim-Dungeness region, is at a crucial turning point. During the period of time from 1955 to 1978, the Census of Agriculture shows a loss of over 47,000 acres of farmland in the County, the vast majority of which was located in the Sequim-Dungeness region. Additional losses of agricultural land have occurred since that time.

In 1992, Clallam County adopted interim designation and conservation regulations to conserve agricultural lands. These regulations designated approximately 7,500 acres of land as agricultural. Development within these designations was allowed if developed in a cluster pattern (30 percent development/70 percent farm). These interim measures were successful in discouraging additional loss of agricultural lands to nonagricultural use.

As the total resource base declines for agricultural use, the viability of the remaining agricultural lands for long-term commercial production also declines. With less land being farmed, equipment suppliers, and other support services also decline. The days where the Sequim-Dungeness Valley was a major agricultural base, with numerous dairies and other agricultural business, is now unfortunately only a part of our history.

(4) Development Pressures. The remaining agricultural land in the Sequim-Dungeness region continues to be subject to development pressures, even with the interim regulations adopted in 1992. Despite regulations, existing agricultural land can be converted, either by selling existing “vested” five-acre survey developments, or clustering the development and converting at least 30 percent of the land.

Before 1993, Clallam County did not regulate divisions of land over five acres in size. As a result of several planning and zoning initiatives, many of the agricultural landowners legally divided their land into five-acre parcels (“vested” lots). These five-acre parcels may be sold at any time despite the land being zoned for agricultural uses. Thus, it is impossible to ensure long-term commercial agricultural production on these lands. It is estimated that 50 percent of the lands designated for agricultural land use in 1992 have already been legally divided into five-acre parcels.

Interim cluster development regulations required large density incentives to encourage landowners to cluster development rather than sell five-acre parcels. Issues relating to the densities allowed in agricultural cluster developments and the viability of farming the remaining open space have been raised by the public and the agricultural community. If cluster development patterns are to succeed, the density in the cluster cannot cause a drastic change in the character of the surrounding area and the remaining farmland has to be large enough to be commercially viable.

There have been other nonresidential pressures for agricultural land, most notably active recreation such as golf courses. With the increase in population and the recent closure of some private golf courses to the public, there has been increased pressure to allow golf courses on agricultural land.

(5) Open Space. Although it is recognized that agricultural lands do play a significant role in our local economy and lifestyle, these lands may play a greater role as open space for the enjoyment of the public, preservation of the remaining rural character of the Sequim-Dungeness Valley, and as wildlife habitat. If the agricultural lands are viewed as open space, then consideration to other open space uses like golf courses might be made.

(6) Public Interest. During the regional planning process, citizens of the Sequim-Dungeness region have indicated a strong interest in conserving agricultural lands, open space and the quality of the environment. This issue has, and will continue to be, a very emotional discussion between property owners and the general public. It is unquestionable that the remaining agricultural lands in the area play a vital component in maintaining the rural character of the Valley. However, the interest of the general public over the interest of the private property owner must be carefully considered. This plan cannot diminish the goal to protect property rights.

(7) Conservation Alternatives. Conservation of agricultural lands could be accomplished through several alternatives:

•    

Public acquisition or transfer of development rights; and/or

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Regulation of property, restricting land to agricultural uses or cluster developments; and/or

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Incentives, such as taxes, flexible zoning techniques, technical assistance.

(8) Development Rights. There are several ways to acquire the development rights, purchase those rights or transfer the rights to other properties. This plan pursues the concept of purchasing those rights.

The purchase of development rights occurs when the public acquires the rights held by the property owner to develop the land while the owner maintains the right to utilize the land for agricultural purposes. Once the public has purchased the development rights of the property, title to those rights no longer remains with the property owner and the agricultural nature of the land is preserved. The public purchase of development rights should provide more assurance that agricultural lands will be conserved forever than the use of traditional regulatory measures.

Other options available to local governments for conservation of agricultural lands and open space are special property tax laws (conservation futures) or real estate excise tax. Conservation futures authorize an assessment of $0.0625 per $1,000 of assessed valuation, which would have generated $133,800 in revenue in 1994. This tax does not require voter approval and could be used as the source for issuance of bonds approved by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners. Real estate excise taxes include an option for a voter-approved one percent tax on the transfer of property for the purpose of acquiring conservation areas, which would have resulted in $1,200,000 in revenue in 1993.

(9) Finfish Hatcheries. In 1994 the State amended the definition of agricultural land to include finfish in upland hatcheries. This planning area has finfish hatcheries at Hurd Creek and the Dungeness River. The Hurd Creek hatchery is susceptible to incompatible adjacent residential land uses which might affect water quality, and the Dungeness hatchery might be susceptible to upper watershed disturbances from sedimentation, siltation and other water quality problems.

31.03.230 Agricultural land conservation – Policies.

(1) Findings. [Policy No. 1] There are agricultural lands of long-term commercial significance in parts of the Sequim-Dungeness planning area.

(2) Conservation Strategy. [Policy No. 2] Maintain, enhance and conserve productive agricultural lands through the following means:

•    

Continue to provide tax incentives (open space or current use assessments);

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Continue to provide technical assistance, such as resource conservation plans prepared by the Clallam Conservation District or Natural Resource Conservation Service;

•    

Allow and encourage small-scale agricultural uses within both rural and urban areas;

•    

Provide incentives to cluster development on the least productive soils and conserve remaining land for continued agricultural use;

•    

Discourage incompatible uses on adjacent lands, through increased setbacks, limits on utility extensions in agricultural areas, right-to-practice agriculture ordinances, and notification to residential landowners of potential incompatible uses;

•    

Work towards long-term (i.e., permanent) conservation through public and/or private purchase of development rights; and

•    

Clallam County has demonstrated its willingness to provide for long-term preservation of resource lands and the County shall be willing to consider additional resource land purchases as landowner opportunities arise and the public indicates their strong preference for additional land purchases.

(3) Final Regulation.

(a) [Policy No. 3] Land meeting the following criteria is designated as agricultural on the land use map and as an agricultural retention zone on the zoning map:

(i) Soil Criteria.

(A) The soil capability class is I, II, and includes the Agnew Soil Series which is a Class III; or

(B) The soil capability class is III and IVs if within an irrigation district or if irrigated; or

(C) The soil capability class is Vw (if drained) or VIw (if drained), subject to the critical area regulations;

(ii) The property does not now have access (hookup rights) to municipal sewers;

(iii) The property has a minimum net farmable parcel size of fifteen (15) acres, including land under contiguous ownership (such as five (5) acre survey parcels);

(iv) The property is usually found in a large contiguous block of agricultural use (minimum of forty (40) acres);

(v) The property is not within a designated urban growth area;

(b) [Policy No. 4] Development regulations shall provide for an agricultural retention zoning district with the following provisions and considerations:

(i) Conserve agricultural lands through land use regulations utilizing agricultural retention developments (twenty-five (25) percent maximum development area/seventy-five (75) minimum farm area). The regulations shall contain the following provisions:

(A) Residential base density in agricultural zones shall be one dwelling unit per sixteen (16) acres if a conventional development pattern of sixteen (16) acre lots is utilized or one dwelling unit per five (5) acres plus a density bonus if a cluster development pattern is utilized. Properties in an agricultural retention zone which have previously divided consistent with the land division ordinance to parcel sizes of approximately five (5) acres or less and are being recombined into a contiguous parcel of a size capable of qualifying for an agricultural retention development shall be able to utilize all of the available residential base density plus density bonuses on-site in an agricultural retention development site or they may transfer development rights to a nonagricultural property. Properties in an agricultural retention zone which have not previously divided to parcel sizes of approximately five (5) acres or less shall be able to utilize a base density of one home per sixteen (16) acres in an on-site agricultural retention development with the remaining one home per five (5) acre base density plus density bonus available for transfer of development rights or for purchase of development rights.

(B) A fifty (50) percent density bonus should be provided for landowners pursuing a cluster development pattern in order to provide an incentive to those owners of contiguous five (5) acre lots (2,300 acres of the agricultural designation) to recombine those lots to a minimum lot size of sixteen (16) acres for the purpose of establishing an agricultural retention development. The fifty (50) percent density bonus may be utilized on-site for a cluster development where previously divided parcels of approximately five (5) acres or less are being recombined into a contiguous parcel size capable of qualifying for an agricultural retention development (sixteen (16) acre minimum size). The fifty (50) percent density bonus for all other lands within the agricultural retention zone may only be utilized outside of the agricultural retention zone through a transfer of development rights to a designated receiving zone or may be extinguished through the purchase of development rights.

(C) Allow golf courses in agricultural zones as a conditional use in an agricultural retention development. All structures and residential components of a golf course shall locate in the development portion (twenty-five (25) percent) of the site. Any elements of a golf course located in an agricultural reserve shall be designed to be compatible with continuing agricultural activities.

(ii) The raising of crops and livestock and associated agricultural activities shall be the principal land use within areas designated as agricultural. Agricultural land uses on the portion of a parcel set aside for agriculture would include, but not be limited to, a farm residence, farm buildings, and direct marketing farm stands, home enterprises and home-based industries. These uses shall not disrupt agricultural land use within the district.

(iii) Residential developments in agricultural lands should be clustered on the least productive portion of the parcel and should be designed to accommodate adjacent agricultural uses. Residential developments shall be clustered in such a manner as not to impact wetland areas consistent with the Clallam County Critical Areas Code.

(iv) Lands designated as agricultural shall provide for the retention of large parcels and ownership patterns conducive to agriculture. The minimum agricultural reserve size in agricultural resource lands shall be fifteen (15) net farmable acres. The term “net farmable acres” means that at a minimum fifteen (15) acres shall remain open and farmable after all associated development is complete. When clustered subdivisions are used in areas designated for agricultural, the clusters should be arranged to protect and combine large tracts for productive farming, minimize conflicts with continued agriculture and be consistent with public facility and service requirements.

(c) [Policy No. 5] Land designated as agricultural will remain in this classification unless it can be shown that:

(i) An error was made in application of the criteria establishing the zone; or

(ii) Commercial farming is no longer a viable option for this area due to loss of all irrigation potential or other significant physical loss of agricultural potential; or

(iii) After giving careful consideration and upon the basis of abundant long-term evidence utilizing local agricultural land values (nonresidential values) and local farmland lease rates as a means of comparison, the Board of County Commissioners finds that no entity will purchase or lease the land for agricultural use at a fair, locally determined, agricultural market value.

(d) [Policy No. 6] Land with an approved cluster development site shall remain in the agricultural designation.

(e) [Policy No. 7] Agricultural lands with 15 net farmable acres that do not meet the criteria listed in Policy No. 3, subsection (3)(a) of this section, may be designated as agricultural if the land is capable of agricultural production and the owner desires to have it designated.

(4) Land Use Maps. [Policy No. 8] The Comprehensive Plan land use map shall have one designation for agricultural resource lands with density provisions that allow no more than one home per 16 acres unless an agricultural retention development is proposed which would allow a base density of one home per five acres for properties in an agricultural retention zone. Properties in an agricultural retention zone which have previously divided to parcel sizes of approximately five acres or less and are being recombined into a contiguous parcel of a size capable of qualifying for an agricultural retention development shall be able to utilize all of the available residential base density on-site in the agricultural retention developments site or may transfer/sell development rights off-site. Properties in an agricultural retention zone which have not previously divided to parcel sizes of approximately five acres or less shall be able to utilize a base density of one home per 16 acres in an on-site agricultural retention development with the remaining one home per five-acre base density available for transfer of development rights or for purchase of development rights.

(5) Purchase of Development Rights. [Policy No. 9] Develop a program for lasting, long-term conservation of agricultural lands based on public and/or private financial support.

(a) Focus the program on purchase of development rights in order to keep lands in private ownership. Once development rights are purchased, future development shall be restricted through such legal instruments as necessary to ensure permanent conservation of lands for the benefit of future generations.

(b) Work with the public and landowners to set priorities for the purchase of development rights which will provide long-term protection of farmland. Priorities may be set based on development pressures, open space value, or environmental values.

(c) Development rights to agricultural lands should be acquired through innovative financing mechanisms.

(d) County revenues shall not be used to fund a purchase of development rights (PDR) program without the approval of the citizens of Clallam County as evidenced by an affirmative vote of County-wide registered voters. The County will be supportive of private initiatives to establish a fund to implement a PDR program.

(6) Transfer of Development Rights.

(a) [Policy No. 10] Before the end of 1998, develop a program for transfer of development rights from areas with an agriculture designation into areas outside of the agriculture designation where additional development may be appropriately located in the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. Until additional development rights receiving zones in the Sequim urban growth area and in the proposed Carlsborg urban growth area are designated, development rights from agricultural retention zones may be transferred into the existing Port Angeles urban growth area designated receiving zones.

(b) [Policy No. 11] Clallam County shall conduct a study of the value of transfer of agricultural land development rights at least every five years in order to determine the average selling price of development rights and to compare these values with the average sales price of comparable bare land lot sales recorded throughout the Sequim-Dungeness Valley. These studies shall be utilized by the County to determine if adjustments to the agricultural retention zone are needed.

(7) Incompatible Development.

(a) [Policy No. 12] Public services and utilities within and adjacent to areas designated as agricultural shall be designed to prevent negative impacts on agriculture and to maintain total farmland acreage, as follows:

(i) Water lines, sewer lines, and other public facilities should avoid crossing areas designated as agricultural unless their purpose is to provide service necessary for agriculture and they can be installed at times which minimize negative impacts on seasonal agricultural practices;

(ii) Roads that cross areas designated as agricultural should be aligned, designed and maintained to minimize negative impacts on agriculture and support farm traffic; and

(iii) In rare cases when facilities meeting urban needs intrude into areas designated as agricultural, they should be located to prevent disruption of agricultural activity.

(b) [Policy No. 13] Land located adjacent to designated agricultural lands should be compatible with the agricultural use through the following measures:

(i) Increased setbacks for all buildings located outside of but adjacent to agricultural areas.

(ii) Implementation of the Right to Practice Agriculture Ordinance, an ordinance designed to minimize nuisance complaints regarding agricultural activities that follow best management practices.

(8) Incentives.

(a) [Policy No. 14] Agricultural reserves in approved agricultural retention developments should be exempt from taxation originating from local improvement districts and local utility districts unless they directly benefit agricultural land use.

(b) [Policy No. 15] Continue to conserve all agricultural lands, whether designated for long-term commercial significance or not, through property tax incentives (current use assessments).

(c) [Policy No. 16] Clallam County shall develop a low-cost revolving loan program to aid local farmers/landowners in financing the upfront development costs for preliminary engineering and subdivision approval permitting fees in agricultural retention developments. These loans shall be repaid to Clallam County through initial sales of subdivision lots.

(9) Finfish Hatcheries. [Policy No. 17] Ensure that land uses adjacent to finfish hatcheries are compatible with the long-term commercial production of those hatcheries. Consideration shall be given to appropriate land use densities, land use practices, and maintenance of water quality standards.

31.03.240 Forest land – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Maintain and enhance natural resource-based industries, including productive timber, agricultural, and fisheries industries. Encourage the conservation of productive forest lands and productive agricultural lands, and discourage incompatible uses.

Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities such as non-motorized trails; conserve fish and wildlife habitat; increase access to natural resource lands and water, such as non-motorized trails; and develop parks.

(2) Definition. The Growth Management Act defines “forest land” as land primarily devoted to growing trees for long-term commercial timber production on land that can be economically and practically managed for such production, including Christmas trees subject to the excise tax imposed under RCW 84.33.100 through 84.33.140, and that has long-term commercial significance. In determining whether forest land is primarily devoted to growing trees for long-term commercial timber production on land that can be economically and practically managed for such production, the following factors shall be considered: (a) the proximity of the land to urban, suburban, and rural settlements; (b) surrounding parcel size and the compatibility and intensity of adjacent and nearby land uses; (c) long-term local economic conditions that affect the ability to manage for timber production; and (d) the availability of public facilities and services conducive to conversion of forest land to other uses.

The Growth Management Act defines “long-term commercial significance” to include the growing capacity, productivity, and soil composition of the land for sustained commercial production, in consideration of the land’s proximity to population areas, and the possibility of more intense uses of the land.

(3) Resource Base. Commercial forestry in the Sequim-Dungeness region is still a viable industry. There are sufficient public (federal and State) and private lands to provide a resource base for timber harvesting. In 1992, the County designated approximately 33,000 acres of lands as forest lands of long-term commercial significance in the Sequim-Dungeness region, including approximately 3,500 acres as transitional forest lands. A large percentage of the lands designated are State and federal lands. There are few forest resource support industries in this planning area. Mills and log storage yards are primarily located in the Port Angeles area.

(4) Incompatible Uses. A significant conflict with commercial forest operations is the growing residential encroachment into forested areas. Lost Mountain, Blue Mountain, Happy Valley, and Palo Alto are examples of areas where residential development has increased and encroached upon the commercial forest. In these situations, conflicts between residential land uses and traditional forest management techniques will continue to increase.

(5) Conservation Alternatives. One of the regulatory tools that Clallam County adopted in 1992 to conserve the forest resource base and ensure compatibility at the forest/rural interface was the use of a commercial-residential mixed use zones (CFM). The majority of these zoning districts were in the foothills in the Sequim-Dungeness region. Residential development within the CFM zones was allowed through a cluster pattern (30 percent development/70 percent forest), in exchange for which a density bonus of 300 percent was allowed in the CFM-20 zone and 70 percent in the CFM-5 zone.

There are other options the County could pursue for transitional forest lands, some of which may be more appropriately designated as commercial forest, with one residential dwelling unit per 80 acres allowed through a special permitting process. A zoning district which allows single-family dwelling units on 20 acres could be established on the remaining transitional areas, with increased setbacks from adjacent resource lands. Planned unit developments which reserve an area for resource production could be encouraged within these zones. Flexible zoning techniques, which allow the landowner to transfer density to smaller lot sizes within the same ownership may also work towards conserving the forest lands.

31.03.250 Forest land conservation – Policies.

(1) Lands meeting the definition or criteria for commercial forest lands in the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan should be designated as commercial forest lands of long-term commercial significance. In general, these lands have a minimum parcel size of 80 acres, are currently forested, and have a forest land grade which is capable of growing trees at a commercially viable growth rate.

(2) Land found in close association with large blocks of commercial forest land and which buffer commercial forest lands from rural development patterns should be designated for very low density forest residential uses.

(a) Residential densities on rural lands adjacent to large blocks of commercial forest land should generally be Rural Very Low, except in those areas where land use patterns or previous zoning allowed one unit per five acres, in which case the property should be designated rural low.

(b) Rural lands should ensure compatibility with adjacent commercial forest land use through increased structural setbacks and recognition of the Right-to-Practice Forestry Ordinance on adjacent lands.

(c) Flexible zoning techniques, whereby a landowner transfers density to minimize conflict with adjacent commercial forest land use and which sets aside land for wildlife, resource production and/or open space shall be allowed within these zones. (Example: a landowner which owns 80 acres designated Rural Very Low has four residential dwelling rights. The landowner could transfer this density to create three parcels five acres in size, and leave the remaining land (65 acres) for forest use with one dwelling unit.)

(d) Landowners within the rural lands should be notified of property tax options for conserving forest lands.

(3) Existing managed public access to public forest lands for recreation should be maintained.

(4) Except in a case where an error might have been made in application of the criteria designating commercial forest land, these designated commercial forest lands shall remain in this classification throughout the life of the plan (20 years) unless the following criteria are met:

(a) The change will not affect the commercial viability of the surrounding forest land; and

(b) The County finds that commercial forestry cannot generate a reasonable return on investment when compared to other forested properties and that growth could not be directed to other nonforested rural lands in the same vicinity.

31.03.260 Rural land – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities such as non-motorized trails, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks.

Protect the environment and enhance the State’s high quality of life, including air and water quality, and the availability of water.

Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures that have historical or archaeological significance.

(2) Definition. The Growth Management Act does not define rural lands. Rural lands are defined as what they are not: they are not designated for urban growth, agriculture, forest, or mineral resources. The County is required to have a rural element which permits land uses that are compatible with the rural character of such lands and provide for a variety of rural densities.

(3) Rural Growth. During the past 20 years, the unincorporated area of the Sequim-Dungeness region has grown almost five times more in population than the City of Sequim, the area’s only incorporated city. Over 9,300 people moved into areas outside of the City, while only 2,000 moved into the City of Sequim. Nearly 70 percent of the regional planning area population lives in a rural area. People moving to the Sequim-Dungeness region are looking for a rural lifestyle and are generally moving from a more urbanized environment. As a result, each person’s perception of what is rural might be based on where they used to live.

Unchecked rural growth does not satisfy the goal of the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan to reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development or encouraging development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner.

(4) Rural Character and Rural Services. The character of the rural area has changed dramatically over the past 20 years. In fact, 20 years ago, much of the planning area would not have been considered as rural lands, but as agriculture or forestlands.

Rural areas are characterized by limited urban-type services such as fire, police and other limited governmental services. Urban-type facilities such as sewers, municipal water systems, curbs, sidewalks, street lights, and public transit are generally not present, but may be sporadically located based on need or old service areas. Rural areas are characterized by diverse, sometimes incompatible, land uses and living styles. Rural areas have a variety of residential densities, and are not characterized by consistent zoning patterns as may be found in suburban areas. Small and large scale resource production is often interspersed with rural areas, such as agriculture and forestry.

In order to make efficient use of scarce public resources, and to not encourage growth in rural areas, limits on the types and quantity of public facilities and services could be implemented. For example, a higher priority for transportation system expenditures (such as roads, trails and transit) could be given to urban areas over rural areas.

It is unquestionable that rural areas require some level of public services and facilities, such as law enforcement, fire protection, roads, and schools. In some areas of the region, water and sewer services may also be needed to address public health or environmental quality, such as in existing high-density developments in the rural areas. The Sequim-Dungeness Regional Plan needs to allow flexibility for certain urban services to be extended into rural areas, with standards to ensure that growth into rural areas does not take precedence over growth into urban areas.

(5) Rural Centers. There are several “rural centers” or “rural villages” that are located outside urban growth areas, as well as several areas previously designated for commercial use. These areas are part of the existing rural character and the rights of the present property owners should generally be maintained. Expansion of these existing commercial areas should be limited, and the types of uses allowed in these areas should be restricted to those where uses of such type, scale, size, or intensity already existed as of July 1, 1990, and that do not cause increased need for public expenditures, such as roads and fire protection. These goals can be achieved by formally designating them as LAMIRDs.

(6) Commercial Uses. In some neighborhoods home-based industries, such as bed and breakfast inns, cabinet shops, and art galleries are considered appropriate, while in other areas the neighborhood is primarily residential and such uses would be a great interference with the rural character. It is clear that any rural land use categories developed for the Sequim-Dungeness region need to make allowances for these types of uses to be permitted; provided, that they are consistent with the existing character of the neighborhood in which they are proposed.

Most neighborhoods, even in rural areas, also require some services which are convenient, such as a small neighborhood grocery store, restaurant and gas station. The Agnew Grocery is one example of a rural neighborhood store, appropriately located and sized for the community it serves. Not all of the rural neighborhoods within this regional plan have convenient services. It is possible that the location of these services might be requested in the time period of this plan.

(7) Housing Densities. The types of housing developments considered appropriate for the rural areas varies within the Sequim-Dungeness region. Previous land use classifications and the desires of property owners developed a clear pattern of larger lots in the southern portion of the region, towards the Olympic Mountains. Similar areas of large lots exist in the areas east of Sequim, including the Miller Peninsula. In the Dungeness Valley, however, lots tend to be between one and five acres in area and are compatible with the community in this subregion.

The Sequim-Dungeness Regional Plan establishes land use patterns by neighborhood, with areas south of Highway 101 and east of Sequim having larger lot sizes, areas along the Dungeness River having larger lots in order to protect the critical resources of the river, and areas north of Highway 101 in the Dungeness Valley having a range of densities based on the existing conditions.

The proposed rural land use categories offer a range of rural residential densities (from one dwelling per acre to one dwelling per 20 acres) and a variety of nonresidential rural land use categories. More intensive rural densities and non-residential rural land uses should be designated as LAMIRDs and contained within those areas already predominately built out at such densities and/or land uses.

(8) Historical and Cultural Resources. The Sequim-Dungeness regional planning area has plentiful historical and cultural resources. Resources of significance include the Dungeness School, John Hyer Farm, Blue Mountain School, Emery Farmstead, Dungeness River Bridge, Manis Mastodon Site, McAlmond House, U.S. Quarantine Station Surgeon’s Residence, New Dungeness Light Station, New Dungeness, Graveyard Spit, Gierin Farmstead, Port Williams, and Washington Harbor.

31.03.270 Rural land – Policies.

(1) Rural Centers (Policy 1). Support new development within the Diamond Point-Sunshine Acres, and Blyn Rural Centers consistent with the guidelines and criteria of CCC 31.02.263.

(2) Rural Commercial (Policy 2). Support new development within designated rural commercial lands consistent with the guidelines and criteria under CCC 31.02.263.

(3) Home Business (Policy 3). Home-based businesses should be encouraged when the use is not intrusive to the surrounding residential character of the neighborhood.

(a) Home-based business that have little, if any, outward characteristics of a business should be allowed in all areas.

(b) Home-based business that have some outward characteristics of a business should be allowed only when consideration is made for the rural character of the surrounding neighborhood.

(4) Neighborhood Commercial (Policy 4). Commercial uses limited to neighborhood convenience services should be allowed within rural residential areas when located and designed to be compatible with surrounding land uses. Such uses should be sited only after involvement of the neighborhood in the siting process.

(5) Industrial Use (Policy 5). Allow campus-style light manufacturing, research facilities or corporate offices to locate outside urban growth areas or rural centers when meeting the following standards:

(a) Existing transportation networks must serve the site which are adequate to handle traffic without adversely impacting adjacent land uses. When locating in rural areas, significant increases in traffic volumes should not be expected. Occasional deliveries of materials or supplies are permitted; consistent traffic should be prohibited unless accessing directly onto Highway 101 at improved intersections.

(b) The types of light manufacturing, research facilities or corporate offices should be limited to those uses that will not cause impacts to adjoining lands from dust, noise, light and glare or other nuisances inconsistent with the need for peace and quiet in rural areas.

(c) These facilities should be located on large parcels of land (minimum of 20 to 40 acres), buffered such that buildings and parking areas are not readily visible from streets or adjoining properties, and self-contained with services such as sewage and water.

(6) Rural Residential Densities.

(a) Policy 6. The Sequim-Dungeness region should allow a range of rural densities from one dwelling unit per acre to one dwelling unit per 20 acres. The conversion of rural areas into higher densities should be discouraged, except where clear public benefit is demonstrated through such mechanisms as planned unit developments. More intensive rural densities and nonresidential rural land uses should be limited to and contained within those areas already predominately built out at such densities and/or land uses by 1990 and be designated consistent with the guidelines and criteria under CCC 31.02.263. Lands previously zoned as forestry 1, commercial forest, or commercial forest/residential mixed use which did not meet the criteria for designation of forestlands of long-term commercial significance should be re-designated as Rural Very Low, unless the property was previously zoned at a higher density.

(b)  Policy 7. The extension or existence of public water service in designated rural areas lands shall not be justification for higher density than that established by the Sequim-Dungeness Regional Plan. Water purveyor plans must demonstrate that new facilities are consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and won’t require increased densities to finance the planned facilities.

(7) Flexible Zoning (Policy 8). All rural residential zones should allow the transfer of density within the ownership boundaries subject to a proposed land division, with no new lot being created less than one acre in area, and total number of lots determined based on the underlying zoning density. This flexible zoning technique may achieve affordable housing goals and preserve the rural character by having a variety of housing lot sizes scattered throughout rural areas.

(8) Recreation (Policy 9). Standards shall be set for recreational uses in rural areas, including recreational vehicle parks, limited camping facilities along non-motorized trails such as the Olympic Discovery Trail, and commercial outdoor oriented activities:

(a) Standards for buffering and landscaping to ensure compatibility with surrounding rural land uses shall be accomplished;

(b) Standards for noise, traffic, light, and glare, and other nuisance characteristics;

(c) Such uses shall be located on a minimum parcel size of five acres.

(9) Historic and Cultural Resources. Please refer to the County-wide Comprehensive Plan for goals and policies to conserve historic and cultural resources throughout Clallam County.

31.03.280 Urban growth – Discussion.

(1) GMA Goals. Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner.

Encourage the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of the population of this State, promote a variety of residential densities and housing types, and encourage preservation of existing housing stock.

Encourage economic development throughout the State that is consistent with adopted comprehensive plans, promote economic opportunity for all citizens of this State, especially for unemployed and for disadvantaged persons, and encourage growth in areas experiencing insufficient economic growth, all within the capacities of the State’s natural resources, public services, and public facilities.

Private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation having been made. The property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and discriminatory actions.

Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures that have historical or archaeological significance.

(2) Definitions. The Growth Management Act defines “urban growth” as development that makes intensive use of land for the location of buildings, structures, and impermeable surfaces to such a degree as to be incompatible with the primary use of such land for the production of food, other agricultural products, or fiber, or the extraction of mineral resources. When allowed to spread over wide areas, urban growth typically requires urban governmental services.

The Growth Management Act defines “characterized by urban growth” as referring to land having urban growth located on it, or to land located in relationship to an area with urban growth on it as to be appropriate for urban growth.

The Growth Management Act and County-wide Planning Policies define “urban governmental services” to include those services historically and typically delivered by cities or other identified service providers, such as a utility district, and which at a minimum include the provision for sanitary waste, solid waste disposal systems, water systems, urban roads and pedestrian facilities, public transportation systems, stormwater systems, police and fire and emergency service systems, electrical and communication systems, school and health care facilities, and neighborhood and/or community parks.

(3) Urban Growth Areas. The Growth Management Act requires Clallam County to designate an urban growth area or areas within which urban growth shall be encouraged and outside of which growth can occur only if it is not urban in nature. Each city that is located in the County shall be included within an urban growth area. An urban growth area may include territory that is located outside of a city only if such territory already is characterized by urban growth or is adjacent to territory already characterized by urban growth.

Based upon the growth management planning population projection made for the County by the Washington State Office of Financial Management (see County-wide Plan for population projections and allocations), the urban growth areas shall include areas and densities sufficient to permit the urban growth that is projected to occur in the succeeding 20-year period.

Each urban growth area shall permit urban densities and shall include greenbelt and open space areas.

Urban growth should be located first in areas already characterized by urban growth (see definition) that have existing public facility and service capacities to serve such development, and second in areas already characterized by urban growth that will be served by a combination of both existing public facilities and services and any additional needed public facilities and services that are provided by either public or private sources. Further, it is appropriate that urban government services be provided by cities, and urban government services should not be provided in rural areas.

(4) Why UGAs? The Growth Management Act states that growth outside urban growth areas can occur “only if it is not urban in nature.” Furthermore, urban governmental services should not be extended into rural areas.

There are several areas within the Sequim-Dungeness Regional Planning area that are “urban in nature,” “characterized by urban growth,” and have “urban governmental services.” At Sunland: are the urban residential development, sewer and water systems urban in nature? At Diamond Point-Sunshine Acres: is the urban residential, commercial and industrial development urban in nature?

Failure to designate an area for urban growth means growth that is “urban in nature” will not be allowed and extension of urban governmental services might not be allowed. Designation of urban growth areas is one of several “tools” in the Growth Management tool box. It is a tool by which the County can say no to further development outside the UGA boundary and yes to planning and providing urban services and facilities within the UGA boundary.

(5) UGA Objectives. The Clallam County Comprehensive Plan works toward conserving rural and resource lands, and making most efficient use of scarce public resources through encouraging development within urban growth areas.

With higher densities, it is possible to provide more efficient transportation, fire and police, water, sewage disposal, and other public services. Public transit studies point out that public transportation systems are not cost-effective until densities of seven dwellings per acre are achieved. It is important that when urban areas are set aside, urban densities and services get established. Continuing to allow rural densities and rural services within urban areas will not achieve UGA or GMA objectives.

Encouraging urban growth also helps protect rural and resource lands from conversion. When sufficient land within urban areas is provided at a reasonable price and well-designed, there is less demand for rural lands. In the past 20 years, a large portion of the rural growth occurred because the property was less expensive, and affordable housing opportunities (such as manufactured housing) were allowed.

Urban lands are also the area where the region’s primary economic activity takes place: retail, wholesale, professional offices and industry. Commercial and industrial uses often encourage other urban development around it, and increase the need for extension or improvement of public services and facilities. Therefore, those types of commercial and industrial uses should not be allowed outside of urban growth areas.

(6) Battelle. Battelle Memorial Institute’s Sequim Marine Research Operations (MRO), a non-profit research institute and operator of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Department of Energy, is located on approximately 105 acres along the west shore of Sequim Bay generally situated between West Sequim Bay and Washington Harbor Roads. The MRO also owns approximately 35 acres of Sequim Bay tideland areas, including portions of Travis Spit, to support research efforts. The MRO targeted this location in 1965 specifically for access to Sequim Bay, which provides the essential marine resources required for Battelle’s preeminent research activities.

Primary research activities are related to marine and coastal resources, environmental chemistry, water resource modeling, ecotoxicology and biotechnology, and, more recently, national and homeland security. This facility is emerging as a leader in these additional areas: sustainable development of ocean energy and understanding and mitigating long-term impacts of human activities, including climate change, on marine resources.

The marine research operations campus currently supports about 100 staff. Approximately 7.3 acres are developed consisting of eight facilities providing: 6,000 square feet of analytical and general-purpose laboratory space; 5,300 square feet of wet/bioassay laboratory space; 2,000 square feet of electronics and maintenance shop areas; and 38,700 square feet of offices, conference rooms, and support/storage structures.

Battelle’s conceptual plan for expansion of the Sequim MRO campus addresses the need for additional buildings and infrastructure to continue research on local, regional, national, and global marine environmental and coastal issues. The Campus Master Plan identifies potential future expansion of the MRO facility footprint by as much as 180,000 to 240,000 square feet. This additional square footage would be used for new research laboratories, conference/training/learning facilities, and transitory facilities for project-related housing. The ultimate build-out of this campus is expected to add 200 to 300 researchers and staff over a 10- to 20-year timeframe. To accommodate this additional development, it is imperative to receive water and sewer utilities, and other municipal services, from the City of Sequim.

Inclusion of the Battelle property adjacent to the City within the Sequim Urban Growth Area is needed for long-term retention, growth and sustainability of Battelle’s marine-based research operations. Battelle’s growth and sustainability are dependent on urban services. No other viable alternative sites exist in the Sequim UGA that provide the land and water access to support Battelle research activities.

31.03.290 Urban growth policies.

(1) The criteria for designation and implementation of urban growth areas contained in the County-wide Comprehensive Plan shall be followed.

(2) The City of Sequim shall be designated for urban growth, with specific land use and governmental services determined through City of Sequim’s growth management planning process and policies within this Plan.

(3) In order to provide stability to where urban growth and services will occur, urban growth area boundaries should not be amended any sooner than 10 years from the date the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan is adopted.

31.03.310 City of Sequim urban growth area (UGA).

(1) UGA Boundary (Policy 1). The Sequim Urban Growth Area boundary is set forth on the adopted Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map, as amended, that is part of this chapter and title.

(2) Critical Areas.

(a) Policy 2. The Dungeness River should not be encroached upon by the City of Sequim Urban Growth Area. The Dungeness River should remain under a single local government’s jurisdiction and management.

(b) Policy 3. Implementation of the urban growth area should include specific measures to protect the water quality and resources of Sequim Bay, Bell Creek, Gierin Creek and Johnson Creek.

(c) Policy 4. Groundwater resources should be protected through City/County adoption of stormwater and erosion control measures, water quality education programs, and other best management practices which avoid or minimize impacts to groundwater.

(3) Resource Lands (Policy 5). Agricultural lands to the north of the sewer treatment plant should not be impacted from urban development, as these lands are the largest remaining contiguous tracts of agricultural lands in the Dungeness Valley and should be conserved.

(4) Transportation (Policy 6). Improve circulation patterns around the Sequim urban growth area (see Figure 4):

(a) Complete improvements to U.S. 101, including the Sequim Bypass, as outlined in the final environmental impact statement for the Palo Alto to O’Brien Road corridor study.

(b) Improve circulation from the north by increasing the capacity of Port Williams to Brown Road, and Hendrickson to Priest Road.

(c) Encourage improvements to the circulation patterns within the City, including consideration of interim measures to reduce congestion until the Sequim Bypass is constructed and mobility improvements to West Sequim Bay Road.

See paths, trails and sidewalk policies in CCC 31.03.140.

(5) Open Space and Greenbelts (Policy 7). The City shall designate greenbelts within the urban growth area. Areas that should be considered include Bell Creek, Gierin Creek, Sequim Bay, Johnson Creek, and some remaining farms within the urban growth area. (See Figure 8 for critical habitat corridors.)

(6) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) Policy 8. The City, the Public Utility District, and the County should agree on water service boundaries within the urban growth area. The comprehensive plan for the City of Sequim UGA shall designate water service boundaries. Individual or private community water or on-site sewage systems within the UGA should be prohibited for new land divisions. All urban services should be provided by the City of Sequim, unless the Public Utility District is an identified service provider.

(b) Policy 9. Development within the urban growth area should be provided with improvements constructed to City of Sequim standards. The city development standards should include roads, sidewalks, water, sewer, lot area, lot shape, setbacks, and land uses.

(c) Policy 10. The County and City should prohibit development within the urban growth area if it is not built to urban standards, including the prohibition of rural density subdivisions with individual wells and on-site septic systems.

(7) Joint Planning.

(a) Policy 11. The City of Sequim should take the lead responsibility for planning the urban growth area. The Sequim-Dungeness Regional Plan should adopt the City’s plan by reference, provided the plan is consistent with the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan and the Growth Management Act.

(b) Policy 12. The City should develop a phased annexation plan consistent with the extension of urban services to the annexed areas.

(8) Land Uses.

(a) Policy 13. The City of Sequim should be the primary commercial and service center for the Sequim-Dungeness region. Commercial development should be concentrated in the core of the City and not allowed to sprawl into rural areas and cause congestion on U.S. 101 or other arterials of regional significance.

(b) Policy 14. The maximum lot size for new land divisions within the Sequim urban growth area should be less than one acre; provided, however, that lots greater than 10 acres may be allowed.

(c) Policy 15. The City should attempt to site industrial activities within the urban growth area in order to provide economic opportunities (see economic development policies).

(d) Policy 16. A range of housing opportunities should be available throughout the urban growth area.

(e) Policy 17. Designate and zone the approximately 105-acre Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (Battelle) properties along the west side of Sequim Bay and adjacent to the City of Sequim for research and development park activities. The research and development park land use and zoning designation should be limited to national security, campus-style research, and development facilities involved in environmental, chemical, biotechnology, energy efficiency, and marine and coastal security research. This designation should also allow for facilities and uses associated with coordinated/collaborative educational partnerships fostering commercially valuable research and prototype development.

31.03.315 Adoption of City of Sequim Comprehensive Plan.

The City of Sequim Comprehensive Plan dated December 23, 1996, and adopted under City of Sequim Ordinance 96-032, is hereby adopted by reference in accordance with Policy 11 in CCC 31.03.310(7)(a); except as amended pursuant to this section. All future amendments to the City of Sequim Comprehensive Plan which apply to the unincorporated area of the Sequim urban growth area shall be reviewed consistent with plan amendment procedures jointly adopted by the City of Sequim and Clallam County.

(1) The City of Sequim Optimum Land Use Map dated December 23, 1996, applicable to the unincorporated Sequim Urban Growth Area, is hereby incorporated by reference as part of the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map, as amended by Clallam County.

(2) Land Use Policy LUP-4 [Page 3-7] shall be amended to read as follows:

Land Uses within the City of Sequim Urban Growth Area shall be planned to accommodate a minimum annual growth in population of 2.5%, and shall anticipate and accommodate an annual population growth rate of 5% per year for the next twenty years. Prior to any proposed expansion of the urban growth area, population and growth rate data shall be collected and analyzed.

(3) Land Use Policy LUP-8 [Pages 3-8 and 3-9] shall be amended to read as follows:

LUP-8.1 RESIDENTIAL DISTRICTS:

LUP-8.1.1  Residential Districts

a. R-I (LS-Limited Services): This designation is deleted because it was found noncompliant and invalid with the Growth Management Act by the Western Washington Growth Management Hearings Board.

b. R-I (Services-S): This designation is deleted because it was found noncompliant and invalid with the Growth Management Act by the Western Washington Growth Management Hearings Board.

c. R-II: Single family detached residences - up to 4 to 5 dwellings units per acre. The R-II zone provides for consistency and predictability in established single family neighborhoods. Duplex development may be allowed as a conditional land use.

d. R-III: Medium density single family or multi-family residences - up to 8 to 10 dwelling units per acre. Detached and attached single family homes, smaller lot sizes, and duplex and triplex development would be allowed in the R-III zoning designation. R-III zoning is located in areas where urban services are or will be provided concurrent with development. This medium-density zoning is typically located close to transit, with easy access to neighborhood parks, schools and shopping.

e. R-IV: Medium - Higher density single family or multi-family residences - up to 16 dwelling units per acre. Medium-High density residential uses with single family attached and detached; single family small-lot; multi-family duplexes, triplexes, and apartment development allowed at a density of up to 16 dwelling units per acre.

R-IV zoning is located in areas where urban services are currently available or will be provided concurrent with development. This medium-density zoning is typically located close to transit, with easy access to neighborhood parks, schools and shopping.

R-IV zoning includes areas specifically designated for congregate care facilities, nursing homes and assisted living retirement communities.

f. R-V (OVERLAY): Highest density multi-family residences only - 10 to 24 dwelling units per acre. This district is the highest density residential zoning district, allowing only multi-family residential development. There is a minimum 10 dwellings units per acre up to 24 dwelling units per acre density requirement. R-V zoning designations should be located close to downtown services and amenities, and applied for using the overlay and/or sub-area processes.

8.1.2 Maximum Residential Densities: Development review standards for residential land divisions at densities lower than the maximum density indicated on the City of Sequim Comprehensive Plan Optimum Land Use Map shall be adopted. These review standards shall demonstrate that redevelopment of such parcels at the maximum density indicated on the Optimum Land Use Map can be achieved and shall ensure that adequate public facilities and services can be provided in an efficient and coordinated manner when redevelopment occurs. Development review standards shall address, but are not limited to, the following provisions: shadow platting of future lots, preserving easements or rights-of-way for urban services, offsetting building sites to allow for future re-subdivision, and plat notes.

(4) Land Use Policy LUP-18 [Page 3-13] shall be amended to read as follows:

New development and redevelopment shall address the following minimum improvements. Minimum improvement standards shall be based on, but are not limited to, the following criteria: date lot was created; lot size; dwelling unit density; type of development; proximity to existing urban services; and proximity to planned urban services identified under the City of Sequim Six-Year Capital Facility Plan.

a. Paved streets, curbs and sidewalks or surfaced walkways;

b. Adequate off-street parking;

c. Street lighting;

d. Detention facilities;

e. Public water supply;

f. Public sanitary sewers;

g. Circulation and traffic patterns for the development and the surrounding neighborhood; and

h. Recreational needs, including trails, parks and playgrounds.

(5) Land Use Policy LUP-19 [Page 3-13] is deleted because the R-I (S) and R-I (LS) types of designations were found noncompliant and invalid with the Growth Management Act by the Western Washington Growth Management Hearings Board.

(6) Land Use Policy LUP-22 [Page 3-13] is deleted because the R-I (LS) type of designation was found noncompliant and invalid with the Growth Management Act by the Western Washington Growth Management Hearings Board.

(7) Land Use Policy LUP-25 [Page 3-14] is hereby deleted.

(8) Land Use Policy LUP-26 [Page 3-14] is hereby deleted.

(9) Land Use Project Policy LUPROJ-1 [Page 3-19] shall be amended to read as follows:

The City and the County shall establish standard methodologies to be used to determine the appropriate fair share participation by new development for those off-site improvements that are due all or in part to a proposed project.

(10) The last paragraph on Page 4-1 of the Urban Growth Area Element shall be amended to read as follows:

Neighborhood Preference. The Bell Hill neighborhood, which is located within the unincorporated County southerly and immediately adjacent to the City limits, expressed focused opposition to inclusion within the UGA to the Clallam County Board of Commissioners. Neighborhood residents argued that this area was largely “built-out (at one acre lot sizes),” and that they had little desire to be subject to City regulation. Although currently served by City of Sequim sewer and water services, this area has been excluded from the Urban Growth Area in accordance with neighborhood desires. The County has established a new comprehensive plan and zoning land use designation called Rural Suburban Community which allows remaining lots in the Bell Hill area to develop consistent with the established neighborhood pattern, without being included within the Urban Growth Area.

(11) Urban Growth Area Policy UGA-4 [Pages 4-4 and 4-5] shall be amended to read as follows:

The City of Sequim and Clallam County shall prepare an interlocal agreement for the Urban Growth Area. The interlocal agreement shall define:

a. A single integrated process for the review and processing of development proposals;

b. A single integrated system of fees which describes the permits and approvals subject to the fee system, the method(s) of fee collection, and extent to which fees will be shared by the City and County;

c. A System Expansion Review Process (SERP), which describes how and when utilities services will be extended to areas not currently served, and allowable development densities for properties without urban services (sewer and water) will be implemented by the City and County; and

d. Clallam County’s contribution towards maintaining the adopted Level of Service for Parks and Recreation facilities within the Sequim Urban Growth Area.

(12) Urban Growth Area Policy UGA-6 [Page 4-5] shall be amended to read as follows:

Urban levels of development, services, and facilities shall be allowed within the unincorporated portion of Sequim’s Urban Growth Area consistent with the adopted City of Sequim Six-Year Capital Facilities Plan for extension of urban services. A developer or new customer may extend required urban services and facilities consistent with CAPFAC - 16.3; provided that such extension is consistent with the intent of this Plan to provide efficient and adequate urban levels of service for future development.

(13) Urban Growth Area Policy UGA-20 [Page 4-6] shall be amended to read as follows:

The City of Sequim shall review and provide comment on land use decisions within the unincorporated portion of the Sequim Urban Growth Area.

(14) Urban Growth Area Policy UGA-25 [Page 4-7] shall be amended to read as follows:

The City of Sequim and Clallam County shall adopt complementary regulations for the protection of critical areas, payment of impact fees, and development standards including bulk and dimensional, zoning designations and allowed uses, setbacks, buffering and landscaping requirements, and street and utility standards for new development within the unincorporated Urban Growth Area.

(15) Environment Policy ENV-18 [Page 7-8] shall be amended to read as follows:

The City of Sequim should coordinate with Clallam County to identify drainage problems. The City of Sequim and Clallam County should consider this information when planning for or undertaking capital improvements to provide for adequate drainage for proposed land uses in the Urban Growth Area.

(16) Housing Policy HUP-2 [Page 9-3] shall be amended to read as follows:

The City should preserve opportunities for larger lot (1/2 - 1 acre) development, and ensure that larger lot development remains a choice. Areas which have been identified as being appropriate for larger lot development include areas with an existing 1/2 acre development pattern and areas adjacent to critical areas.

(17) Capital Facilities Policy CAPFAC-9.7 [Page 12-10] is hereby deleted.

(18) Capital Facilities Policy CAPFAC-9.11 [Page 12-10] shall be amended to read as follows:

All new building permits issued within the UGA may include conditions that require connection to the City of Sequim water services consistent with the provisions of the SERP Agreement.

(19) Capital Facilities Policy CAPFAC-18.3 [Page 12-15] shall be amended to read as follows:

Wastewater service will be available and service extensions allowed to new customers outside the City limits but within the UGA provided:

•    The development meets the phasing requirements of the land use plan.

•    The development is consistent with City land use policies and the requirements of the Comprehensive Plan.

•    Service extensions are consistent with CAPFAC - 16.3.

(20) Capital Facilities Policy CAPFAC-18.6 [Page 12-16] is hereby deleted.

(21) The Capital Facilities Plan section on Parks which begins on Page 12-37 shall be amended to include the below added text at the end of the Parks section:

Clallam County Capital Improvement Projects

Clallam County has acquired 155-acres of land to be developed as the Robin Hill Farm County Park. The Robin Hill Farm County Park is located within 5 miles of the Sequim Urban Growth Area. Clallam County is planning to develop the following recreational facilities over the next 6-years at the Robin Hill Park: a group picnic shelter; twenty (20) picnic sites; tot lot; putting green; basketball/tennis courts; bicycle/hiker campground with a total of thirty (30) sites; pedestrian, equestrian, and bike trails (approximately 2 miles); and sports fields (grass area for two baseball fields and 1 soccer field).

The Olympic Discovery Trail will provide a non-motorized multi-use trail for urban growth area residents to access the Robin Hill Farm County Park. Clallam County has constructed and opened a 1 1/2 mile segment (west of Carlsborg) of the Olympic Discovery Trail between the Robin Hill Farm County Park and the City of Sequim Urban Growth Area. The County is actively working on acquiring additional easements for those unincorporated portions of the trail between the Park and urban growth area and for the portions of the trail planned for the unincorporated portions of the Sequim UGA.

The future additions of Robin Hill Farm County Park and Olympic Discovery Trail shall be used to address Clallam County level of service standards in accordance with the 1994 Clallam County Capital Facilities Plan for neighborhood, community, and regional parks for the Sequim-Dungeness Regional Planning Area. Clallam County’s provision of these park and recreation facilities shall be used to also address the County’s contribution to needed park and recreational facilities identified for the unincorporated Sequim Urban Growth Area as described in Table 12-7.

(22) The Capital Facilities Plan section on Transportation which begins on Page 12-47 shall be amended to include the below added text at the end of the Transportation section:

Clallam County Capital Improvement Projects

Clallam County in partnership with other local government agencies and private partners has participated in the planning for and implementation of the Olympic Discovery Trail. The Olympic Discovery Trail is a non-motorized, multi-user trail which when completed will span 52 miles in Clallam and Jefferson County connecting the urban communities of Port Angeles, Sequim and Port Townsend. The trail will accommodate multiple recreational users with a designed 10 foot wide paved surface for bicycles, wheelchairs, walkers, and rollerblades and a 4-6 foot wide unpaved surface for horses and mountain bikes. Clallam County’s contribution to the Olympic Discovery Trail shall satisfy the level of service standard for multi-use trail deficiencies within the unincorporated Sequim Urban Growth Area as described in Table 12-13.

The Clallam County Six-Year Road Plan contains the transportation capital facilities improvement projects for the unincorporated areas of Clallam County, including the Sequim UGA. The County’s Six-Year Road Plan is in addition to the City of Sequim capital improvement projects described in Table 12-14.

(23) The text associated with provision number 1 at the bottom of page 15-6 shall be amended to read as follows:

1. Transportation Study Areas (TSA) shall be jointly established and administered by the City and County to address the short and long term impacts of future growth on vehicular and multi-modal circulation within specifically designated study areas. For planning purposes, the preliminary boundaries of the proposed TSA’s shall be established consistent with the Preliminary TSA Map (See Figure 16).

These initial boundaries may be revised to more accurately depict affected properties. The criteria for revision shall be based primarily on an analysis of the potential off-site transportation impacts associated with the possible future development of specific properties at transitional zone densities.

(24) Transportation Study Area Policy IMPROJ-7 [Page 15-11] shall be amended to read as follows:

A computer model of the existing road net contained within each TSA shall be constructed by the City in coordination with Clallam County. The purpose of these models is to establish existing baseline traffic volumes, allocate additional trips associated with proposed development projects, evaluate reserve capacity, identify Level of Service (LOS) “thresholds” (those points in time when volumes change to such a degree that the existing LOS is altered), evaluate the efficacy of proposed improvements and interventions, assist in the identification of appropriate “fair-share” contributions from new growth, and aid the City in developing a cost effective and implementable schedule for the provision of required improvements.

(25) Transportation Study Area Policy IMPROJ-8 [Page 15-11] shall be amended to read as follows:

The City shall use information developed through the application of the above referenced computer models to identify the location, scope, timing, and cost for all proposed transportation improvements located within each Transportation Study Area (TSA). In addition, the City shall clearly identify what proportion of each of the proposed improvements is due to impacts associated with new growth. The City and County will work together to identify and implement transportation improvement projects within the unincorporated urban growth area.

(26) Transportation Study Area Policy IMPROJ-9 [Page 15-12] shall be amended to read as follows:

As part of its ongoing revision of current development regulations, the City shall revise applicable sections of the Municipal Code to integrate mandatory participation in Transportation Study Area (TSA) review (where locationally appropriate). The City and the County shall establish standard methodologies for development review in order to include compliance with TSA requirements as a condition of land use approval.

(27) Amend the Open Space and Parks and Recreation Projects identified on Pages 5-5 and 5-6 to include an added project referred to as OSRPROJ-4 that shall read as follows:

The City shall coordinate the Master Plan with Clallam County to address the recreational needs of the unincorporated Sequim Urban Growth Area. The Master Plan shall consider current public recreation and park land opportunities provided by the City, Clallam County, other public entities, and private land owners within and in the vicinity of the Sequim Urban Growth Area. The County and City agree to review and update their respective capital facilities plans for Parks and recreation facilities consistent with this joint planning effort.

(28) Amend the Financial Analysis section on page 12-27 to read as follows:

Financial Analysis

Revenues that come into the City are used to fund two general categories of City expenses - operating expenses and capital improvements. For the Capital Facility Plan, it is only the funds available to finance the capital projects identified in the City’s capital improvement programs (CIPs) that are considered.

Although some revenue sources can be used only for capital projects, the funds for capital projects are often what remain after operating expenses are covered. To complete the analysis for the CFP, City staff projected revenue sources and departmental budgets out 6 years to the year 2001. The assumptions used for these projections are as follows:

•    Revenue increase 5% per year (equal to population growth)

•    Salaries, wages, benefits 6% per year

•    Other expenses 5% per year

Although the Capital Facility Plan was based on a 5% growth rate, the capital facility plan can be supported at a 2.5% growth rate based on the alternative analysis prepared as part of the City of Sequim Comprehensive Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS).

Assumptions

A revenue increase of 5% was used to match the projected population growth rate. Salaries, wages, and benefits were assumed to grow by 6%. This higher rate for salary growth provides a conservative projection to allow not only for inflation of wages but also step increases and other wage adjustments. Other expenses are assumed to grow at the rate of population growth.

31.03.320 Diamond Point/Sunshine Acres rural center.

(1) Boundary. [Policy No. 1] The rural center boundary should be limited generally to the residential, commercial, and industrial plats of Sunshine Acres and Diamond Point. The boundaries should be the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Discovery Bay on the north and east, the State Park land on the west, and the southerly limits of the Sunshine Acres development on the south.

(2) Critical Areas. [Policy No. 2] Critical resources in the rural center include shellfish beds, geologically unstable bluffs, shorelines, and wildlife habitat. Bluff erosion due to stormwater runoff is causing considerable gully erosion and deposition. Pollution from stormwater runoff, erosion, and failing sewage systems should be addressed. Trees along shoreline bluffs may be critical for eagles, peregrine falcons, and other birds utilizing shoreline trees for perching or nesting. The wetland at Diamond Point (the Lagoon) should be protected from filling and disturbance of wildlife.

(3) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 3] Water service is provided in this rural center by two private companies. Further land divisions should be prohibited unless water service is extended to those areas, either by a private party or public provider.

(b) [Policy No. 4] Sewer service is not available in the rural center. There are areas of poor soils with limitations for on-site septic systems. The PUD has taken over ownership of one community drainfield in Sunshine Acres. Additional community drainfields owned and managed by the PUD is the most viable option for sewage disposal and should be required for new land divisions.

(4) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) [Policy No. 5] This rural center is surrounded by open space and greenbelts, including saltwater and the designated State Park land. Some of the forested open space pose a fire threat. The State of Washington and the Homeowners’ Association should be encouraged to provide a fire break. Coordination of water service should be encouraged with Jefferson County Public Utility District.

(b) [Policy No. 6] Public access along the saltwater shoreline should also be considered appropriate in order to link public tidelands in the area (see Park and Recreation Plan).

(5) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 7] Since Diamond Point and Sunshine Acres are geographically confined, roads within the development are not expected to carry large traffic volumes and road standards should be more rural in nature.

(b) [Policy No. 8] The Diamond Point Airport provides convenient private air service to the area. Maintenance of this airport should be implemented through appropriate adjacent land uses.

(c) [Policy No. 9] There are some roads within the rural center with unsafe intersections. Improvements to these intersections with Diamond Point Road should be implemented.

(d) Policy 10. Diamond Point Road has inadequate shoulders for bicycling and walking. Improvements should be made for nonmotorized transportation linking the Diamond Point area to the Olympic Discovery Trail.

(6) Land Uses.

(a) [Policy No. 11] Diamond Point and Sunshine Acres are private developments platted prior to County zoning ordinances being adopted. As a result, several areas are designated for commercial, industrial, and urban residential uses. The use of those areas for their original intent should be continued through this plan implementation. Commercial/industrial development shall be contained within the boundaries of the general commercial designation. Urban residential designations in this rural center are reserved for noncommercial land use.

(b) [Policy No. 12] Commercial, industrial, and residential support facilities for the proposed Miller Peninsula State Park should be provided by the Diamond Point/Sunshine Acres rural center.

(c) [Policy No. 13] Additional residential development in the rural center is limited to lands along the bluff between the State Park and Sunshine Acres, and some lands to the west of the RV Park. The lands along the bluff may be a candidate for a cluster development oriented to protecting the environmental features of the site.

(d) [Policy No. 14] Several of the plats have private covenants restricting future development to noncommercial uses. This plan does not supersede those covenants where the covenants are more restrictive than County ordinances. Where the County ordinances are more restrictive, the County ordinance applies. Applicants for nonresidential development should be advised of potential conflicts with private covenants in this area and homeowner associations notified of applications.

(e) [Policy No. 15] Setbacks and lot sizes should be similar to urban growth areas in the Sequim-Dungeness region.

31.03.330 Sunland planned urban residential community.

(1) Boundary. [Policy No. 1] Sunland is a planned community with urban services and facilities. The development is not fully built, and the development does not meet the definition of master planned resorts. The Sunland development is bounded by Sequim-Dungeness Way on the west, Woodcock Road on the north and Holland Road on the east. The southerly boundary is limited to the Sunland development.

(2) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 2] The soils of this area have been identified as having a critical recharging effect on aquifers used for potable water. Sludge and sewage disposal should be carefully applied, as well as assurance that other contaminants which could enter the aquifer are not allowed.

(b) [Policy No. 3] A significant wildlife habitat corridor has been designated to the east of Sunland. Growth should not significantly impact this corridor.

(3) Resource Lands. [Policy No. 4] There are agricultural resource lands to the north, east and west of Sunland. The Sunland planned residential development should not encroach on these agricultural lands.

(4) Public Services and Facilities. [Policy No. 5] Sewer and water is provided in the Sunland development through a water and sewer district with adequate capacity to be available in the future.

(5) Open Space and Greenbelts. [Policy No. 6] The golf course of Sunland and other open spaces within the development are more than adequate to provide for these needs.

(6) Transportation. [Policy No. 7] Sequim-Dungeness Way and Woodcock Road (east of Sequim-Dungeness Way) have potential for large increases in traffic caused by growth within the area. Assurance must be given to having these roads continue to function as major arterials and collectors.

(7) Land Use. [Policy No. 8] Development within the Sunland planned urban residential community should continue consistent with the master plan for the development. A mixture of residential densities is appropriate, and roads should be built to urban residential standards.

31.03.340 Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road neighborhood.

(1) Community Vision.

(a) Policy 1. The 20-year vision for the Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road neighborhood is for moderate rural growth centered along Highway 101 and maintenance of rural densities and open spaces outside the Carlsborg urban growth area.

(b) Policy 2. The Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road neighborhood expects only limited population growth.

(c) Policy 3. Environmental quality will be maintained and enhanced through groundwater, wetland and stream protection measures. The community will continue to monitor development and ways to increase the livability of the community for future generations.

(2) Community Boundaries (Policy 4). The Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road neighborhood is generally defined as the area west of the Dungeness River, south of Old Olympic Highway, east of Kitchen-Dick Road, and north of Roupe Road, excluding the Carlsborg UGA.

(3) Background Data (Policy 5). Considerable information was obtained by a task force in the course of developing the Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road (formerly the Carlsborg neighborhood) plan. The information is summarized as follows:

(a) Population. Growth in the Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road neighborhood is expected to be 285 in the next 20-year period.

(b) Land Supply Needs. Based on expected population growth, the community should expect a total of approximately 150 new dwelling units.

(c) Water. The PUD provides water service to portions of the Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road community. The water reservoir on Frost Road is designed to handle 350 connections (only 40 connections are currently on the system).

(d) Sewage Disposal. Currently, there is not a public sewer or community on-site sewage system in the Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road area operated by a public entity. This area predominantly has excessively permeable soils which require pressurized sand-lined trench systems for individual on-site sewage disposal. Under the new State health regulations, these soils will require a minimum of half-acre lots when there is public water supply. Where there is no public water supply, then minimum lot sizes range from one to two and one-half acres.

(4) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) Water (Policy 6). The following policies guide water service delivery to this neighborhood:

(i) The PUD water system should be extended at the request of landowners.

(ii) New land divisions should require connection to the PUD water system when economically feasible to serve the property.

(iii) Existing lots or buildings are not required to hook into the PUD water system.

(b) Sewage Disposal (Policy 7). The following policies should guide sewage disposal within the area:

(i) Community systems managed and maintained by a public entity will provide greater assurance that water resources will be protected.

(5) Critical Areas.

(a) Policy 8. The Dungeness River and various wetlands shall be protected from encroachment of development consistent with the County Critical Areas Ordinance.

(b) Policy 9. The County and community should continue to work towards protecting and enhancing Matriotti Creek for fish and wildlife habitat.

(c) Policy 10. A large portion of the Dungeness-Kitchen Dick neighborhood is within an area having a critical recharging effect on aquifers used for potable water. Special care must be taken to ensure the use of proper on-site sewage disposal, best management agricultural practices, and other potential sources of contaminants are prevented from entering the aquifer. Also, any commercial and industrial land uses with hazardous substances, such as gas and oil, shall require spill containment and other measures to assure water quality protection.

(6) Resource Lands.

(a) Policy 11. Agricultural lands designated along the Dungeness River north of the Railroad Park Bridge, along the Sequim Valley airport, and near Kitchen-Dick Road should be protected from encroachment of development.

(b) Policy 12. Forest lands of long-term commercial significance (State lands) designated south of the Agnew ditch (south of Atterberry Road) should be protected from encroachment of development.

(7) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) Policy 13. The Dungeness River has been designated as an open space corridor for the benefit of fish, wildlife, flood protection, people and open space. Maintaining the river corridor for these benefits is critical. In addition, the river separates the urban areas of Carlsborg and Sequim. Development along Highway 101 adjacent to the Dungeness River should be low-intensity, maintaining rural character and open space values.

(b) Policy 14. The agricultural lands which are adjacent to the airport and Dungeness River should be conserved in open space patterns, preferably through the purchase of development rights, planned unit developments, or very low-density residential subdivisions.

(c) Policy 15. Matriotti Creek shall be considered as an open space corridor and greenbelt within the Urban Growth Areas. Consideration should be given to public access (e.g., trails) along the creek only with the mutual agreement of property owners.

(8) Transportation.

(a) Highway 101 (Policy 16). New development along the highway corridor should reduce conflicts and congestion with the regional mobility of traffic. Access points should be directed to existing intersections.

(b) Regional County Roads (Policy 17). Carlsborg and Kitchen-Dick Roads are considered of regional significance to the County and beyond. The County shall work to ensure that these roads continue to function as regionally significant components of the transportation system.

(c) Other County Roads (Policy 18). Improvements to County roads identified in this area include Mill Road and Spath Road. These improvements are for safety purposes only.

(d) Airport (Policy 19). The County shall ensure the continued viability of the Sequim Valley airport, including assurance that adjacent land uses do not cause conflicts with the continued use and maintenance of the airport.

(e) Nonmotorized Transportation (Policy 20). Nonmotorized trails, paths and sidewalks along Highway 101, Carlsborg Road, and the abandoned railroad corridor should be implemented.

(9) Land Uses (see Land Use Map) (Policy 21). The Dungeness-Kitchen Dick Road neighborhood is characterized by a mix of rural residential lands and designated agricultural resource lands.

31.03.350 Carlsborg urban growth area.

The purpose of this section is to establish land use designations and policies for the unincorporated Carlsborg UGA.

(1) Community Vision.

(a) Policy 1. In setting forth the 560-acre Carlsborg UGA, the Board of County Commissioners recognizes the Carlsborg community’s historic mix of commercial, industrial and residential land uses, allows for continued development and economic growth, and seeks consistency with various state and local land use laws, while continuing to respect the character of the community.

(b) Policy 2. The 20-year vision for the Carlsborg UGA is for continued commercial, industrial and residential growth consistent with established land use policies and regulations.

(i) Residential growth will continue the historic housing pattern (i.e., single- and multiple-family dwellings. New residential housing will provide for the needs of a wide range of residents to maintain a dynamic community.

(ii) General commercial activities will continue to be developed along portions of the Highway 101 Corridor, and less intense commercial activities along Carlsborg Road. These activities will provide a range of retail and wholesale services and products for local and regional residents, tourists, and others.

(iii) Industrial activities will continue to be developed within the Carlsborg Industrial Park and Idea Development (north of the Industrial Park). These activities will provide industrial, commercial and manufacturing services fundamental to the economic vitality of the community and Clallam County.

(iv) The area immediately southwest of the intersection of Spath and Carlsborg roads (commonly referred to as the Carlsborg historic village), contains a unique mixture of older commercial and residential properties located on small parcels. The County will continue to work with the community to maintain the historic and cultural value of this area. Development and redevelopment will reflect a human-scale, pedestrian-friendly character enhanced by amenities such as restaurants, shops, sidewalks, lighting, trail connections, and public restrooms.

(c) Policy 3. The commercial and industrial activities within the Carlsborg UGA will generate revenue through the creation of family wage jobs. These activities will be conducted in a manner which promotes community viability blending well with the local character while maintaining environmental stewardship for the benefit of residents, workers, customers, and the entire community. These activities will also be planned for and conducted in a manner consistent with the guidance provided by the Growth Management Act.

(d) Policy 4. Environmental quality will be maintained and enhanced through groundwater, well and stream protection measures.

(i) Public water systems operated by Clallam County PUD No. 1 will be extended throughout the UGA as expeditiously as possible. New development will connect to public water. However, existing individual wells and systems that are maintained and operated in accordance with local and State health regulations shall be allowed to continue indefinitely.

(ii) New development will connect to the Carlsborg Sewer System consistent with the 2014 Carlsborg Wastewater Treatment Plan, as amended, and the adopted sewer connection standards found in Chapter 13.12 CCC, Carlsborg Sewer System.

(iii) Development served by existing on-site septic systems should be encouraged to connect to the Carlsborg Sewer System through incentives and other programs.

(iv) The public-private development of green belts and open spaces and the enhancement of Matriotti Creek as a wildlife corridor will be encouraged.

(e) Policy 5. The UGA is part of a regional transportation network, including Highway 101, whereby coordination between local planning and regional transportation planning should be done in order to continue to provide a safe and efficient transportation network.

(f) Policy 6. To enhance multi-modal opportunities, linkages and improvements shall be encouraged with a service extension along Carlsborg Road to the Village Center. The multi-modal transit opportunities should include a transit stop and a park and ride lot.

(g) Policy 7. Non-motorized transportation and pedestrian usage will be enhanced by installing sidewalks and paths throughout the UGA within walking distance of Greywolf School, along Highway 101, and major arterials and collectors including along Carlsborg/Hooker, Atterbury, Taylor Cutoff, Mill, Heath, East Runnion, and Spath Roads. In addition, non-motorized opportunities should be established adjacent to Matriotti Creek with connections to the Olympic Discovery Trail, residential areas, and the Village Center.

(h) Policy 8. Residential zoning is the predominant land use within the UGA and residential areas abut or surround commercial and industrial zones. Carlsborg residents are drawn by the natural beauty of the area; the accessibility of area amenities; and the low to moderate cost of living. New commercial and industrial development should respect the needs and views of adjacent residential areas. Consideration should be given to design elements such as buffers and screening between residential, commercial and industrial zones to protect residents from inordinate noise, light, glare and obstruction of views.

(2) Urban Growth Area Boundaries. Policy 9. The Carlsborg UGA is composed of three areas: Highway Commercial, Carlsborg Village Center, and Urban Residential. These areas are depicted on the official land use map and are more generally described as follows:

(a) Highway Commercial – generally defined as that area adjacent to the Highway 101 corridor between Matriotti Creek on the west and Gilbert/Taylor Cutoff Road on the east, excluding that portion on the south side of Highway 101 beginning at Parkwood Manufactured Housing Community, LLC. East of Parkwood Manufactured Housing Community, LLC, to Taylor Cutoff Road is commercial. This also includes those existing businesses on the east side of the intersections of Gilbert/Taylor Cutoff Road and Highway 101, as well as the commercial areas along Hooker Road between Highway 101 and Atterberry Road.

(b) Carlsborg Village Center – generally defined as that area adjacent to Carlsborg Road between Runnion Road and the Olympic Discovery Trail (including the industrial parks), and property abutting Streit Road between Spath and W. Runnion, and no further east than the boundary of the Carlsborg Industrial Park. This area also includes those properties on the north side of Runnion Road, east of the Carlsborg/Runnion Road intersection.

(c) Urban Residential – generally defined as those lands not described above and east of or including Matriotti Creek, west of Taylor Cutoff Road, south of Spath Road and north of Atterberry Road.

(3) Background Data. Policy 10. Considerable information was obtained in the course of developing the Carlsborg neighborhood plan. The information includes existing and forecast population and 20-year built-out potential.

(a) The population in the Carlsborg neighborhood was 856 in 2013, and is forecast to be about 1,288 in 2030, and 1,971 in 2050 based on a 2.15 percent annual rate of growth as identified in the 2014 Sewer Facility Plan.

(b) Land Supply Needs. Based on expected population growth, the community should expect a total of approximately 225 new dwelling units within the 20-year planning period.

(c) Water. The PUD provides water service to portions of the Carlsborg UGA. Additionally, private wells and group water systems provide service within the UGA.

(d) Sanitary sewer service is anticipated by the fall of 2017. This system will require gravity sewer mains connecting to a pump station in Carlsborg and force mains (pressure sewer lines) to the City of Sequim via Highway 101 bridge to a point of connection with the City of Sequim collection system at Grant Road. From there, Carlsborg wastewater will be conveyed in a common sewer to the City of Sequim Water Reclamation Facility.

(4) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) Water. Policy 11. The following policies guide water service delivery to this neighborhood:

(i) The PUD shall be the public water purveyor within the Carlsborg UGA.

(ii) New land divisions shall require connection to the PUD water system, or another approved water system which meets the level of service standards set by the Carlsborg Capital Facilities Plan.

(iii) Existing lots or buildings are not required to hook up to the PUD water system.

(b) Sewage Disposal. Policy 12. The following policies shall guide sewage disposal within the area:

(i) Clallam County shall utilize the 2014 Carlsborg Wastewater Facilities Plan, as amended, to assist in guiding development and expansion of the Carlsborg Sewer System.

(ii) All new on-site septic systems and repairs of failed systems shall utilize enhanced treatment technologies in order to achieve a minimum 50 percent reduction in nitrate discharge. In identifying appropriate treatment methods, consideration shall be given to the latest technology available that has demonstrated reliable treatment and removal of biological and chemical contaminants.

(iii) Clallam County shall adopt and periodically update policies and requirements for connections to the Carlsborg Sewer System found in Chapter 13.12 CCC.

(5) Critical Areas.

(a) Policy 13. The Dungeness River and various wetlands within and near the UGA shall be protected from encroachment of urban development consistent with the Clallam County Critical Areas Ordinance.

(b) Policy 14. The County shall continue efforts to work with the Carlsborg community to protect and enhance Matriotti Creek for fish and wildlife habitat, and promote environmental education.

(c) Policy 15. A large portion of the Carlsborg UGA is within an area having a critical recharging effect on aquifers used for potable water.

(i) With the development and construction of a sanitary sewer system, properties with on-site septic systems will be encouraged to connect to sewer. The decrease in on-site septic use will reduce groundwater contamination from this source.

(ii) All new development and redevelopment shall adhere to stormwater run-off best management practices that include the use of low impact development techniques, best management agricultural practices, and homeowner maintenance practices (e.g., lawn fertilizer, disposal of pet wastes) to ensure aquifer contamination is minimized.

(iii) Any commercial and industrial land uses with hazardous substances, such as gas and oil, shall require spill containment and other measures to assure continued water quality protection.

(6) Open Space and Greenbelts. Policy 16. Matriotti Creek shall be considered as an open space corridor and greenbelt within the UGA. Consideration should be given to public access (e.g., trails) along the creek only with the mutual agreement of property owners.

(7) Transportation.

(a) Non-motorized Transportation. Policy 17. Non-motorized trails, paths and sidewalks are required within walking distance of Greywolf School, and in the vicinity of Highway 101, Carlsborg Road, Olympic Discovery Trail, and Matriotti Creek, in order to enhance foot and bicycle transportation between residential, commercial, recreation areas and public schools. A sidewalk and trail plan, as specified in the Carlsborg Capital Facilities Plan, shall be implemented as a condition of new developments and/or through an improvement district or grant project approved by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners.

(b) Policy 18. Traffic circulation shall be improved through and within the Carlsborg UGA. This should include maintaining a level of service of “C” throughout the UGA.

(c) The County shall consider the 2008 Carlsborg Area Transportation Study as it relates to overall traffic improvements within the Carlsborg UGA.

(d) The County shall continue efforts in identifying road and traffic enhancements through the Six-Year Transportation Improvement Program.

(e) Highway 101. Policy 19. New development along the highway corridor shall address congestion and conflict along with the need for regional mobility of traffic along Highway 101 by considering alternate and safe access to the development, including but not limited to: constructing a frontage road along Highway 101 or combining access with existing, adjacent access locations where feasible.

(f) Policy 20. Highway 101 is the primary highway that provides the main through-corridor for all vehicle traffic between Sequim and Port Angeles, and all points to the east and west of those communities. The County recognizes that the maintenance, operation and/or modifications to SR 101 are under the jurisdiction of the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT). However, the County also has an inherently vested interest in the safe and efficient traffic flow on SR 101 for commercial, private and emergency vehicular traffic throughout its length, including the section that passes through the Carlsborg UGA. The County shall work with the WSDOT to develop a plan for the Carlsborg/Highway 101 Corridor that:

(i) Identifies intersection improvements and access restrictions/frontage road improvements that are needed to improve safety and enhance regional mobility;

(ii) Ensures that installation of additional traffic signals along Highway 101 shall only be considered by WSDOT after all other reasonable alternatives have been determined to be infeasible;

(iii) Ensures that all other highway improvements within the corridor are developed consistent with all other County land use goals and policies as specified in the Comprehensive Plan, Zoning Code and Capital Facilities Plan, as now or hereafter amended.

(g) Policy 21. The County and WSDOT shall jointly review access permits to insure that new access is minimized to the greatest degree feasible. New access is to be directed to existing intersections with preference to those that are signalized.

(h) Policy 22. To accommodate new development, frontage roads may need to be developed by property owners with assistance of Clallam County through the Road Improvement District program in the following locations: (i) between Greywolf School and Highway 101 west of Carlsborg Road, and (ii) between Parkwood Manufactured Housing Community, LLC, and Hooker Road via Valley Center Place and Harrison Road (private roads).

(i) Regional County Roads. Policy 23. Carlsborg Road is considered to have regional significance to the County. The County shall work to ensure that this road continues to function as a regionally significant component of the transportation system.

(j) Other County Roads. Policy 24. Improvements to County roads identified in this area are specified in the Carlsborg Capital Facilities Plan and include: Mill Road, E. Runnion Road and Spath Road. These improvements (road widening) are for safety purposes only.

(8) Development Standards.

(a) Policy 25. It is the general goal to improve the appearance of Highway 101 commercially zoned properties and the Carlsborg Village area through improvements to building appearance, landscaping, parks and trails. The following guidelines should be followed:

(i) The County should investigate obtaining an improvement district and/or grant funding to assist with these efforts. Landscaping of new commercial and industrial developments shall include street trees and landscape plantings along the roadside edge of the developments.

(ii) New development will be designed so that buildings and parking areas are situated on parcels in ways that improve access and safety for pedestrians and transit.

(iii) In conjunction with area property owners, the County should investigate the need for special zoning standards and financial incentives (tax credits, grants, etc.) that will assist in the preservation and redevelopment of the historic village of Carlsborg.

(iv) All new development shall incorporate adequate internal pedestrian circulation features (sidewalks, trails, pathways) that emphasize safety and connections to community features (historic village, Greywolf School, Highway 101, commercial areas, industrial parks, parks, Olympic Discovery Trail, etc.).

(v) The County shall work with the Carlsborg community to seek additional recreation opportunities, including trails and potential neighborhood parks should be explored. These facilities shall be connected through the development and implementation of a sidewalk/trail plan with mutual agreement from affected property owners.

(vi) Additional zoning standards shall be developed for the UGA to include minimum lot size and width and height, off-street parking, signage, and buffer provisions to safeguard residential areas from commercial/industrial developments.

(b) Policy 26. Water supply shall be provided consistent with the following:

(i) All new land divisions shall connect to an approved public water supply. Approved public water supply shall consist of either of the following:

(A) Clallam County PUD Carlsborg water system;

(B) Existing Group A public water systems (i.e., private systems with more than 15 service connections) provided that such system shall:

1. Comply with design and water quality standards established by State law (Chapters 246-290 and 246-291 WAC), as now or hereafter amended, and

2. Provide level of service (LOS) equal to or greater than that specified in the 2000 Carlsborg Capital Facilities Plan, as amended.

(ii) Existing individual wells and community water systems shall be allowed to continue indefinitely; provided, they comply with State and County health code requirements for potable water. When existing systems fail to meet these standards, and when the landowner is unable to rectify the deficiency, the land owner shall be required to connect to the PUD system or other approved community water system. To rectify a deficiency, the landowner may make structural or facility repairs, or deepen or replace an existing well, which must be drilled at a minimum into the middle aquifer.

(iii) Existing individual wells or community systems shall not be expanded or altered in any way that would result in the expansion of the system or service area without full compliance with all criteria of this section.

(iv) New community water systems in the Carlsborg UGA shall be permitted only if they meet or exceed the criteria for Group A water systems (15 or more connections), and demonstrate consistency with the level of service established in the Carlsborg CFP.

(c) Land Use Designations/Boundaries. Policy 27. Land use designations for the Carlsborg UGA shall only be amended consistent with the following:

(i) In order to help provide consistency and certainty for landowners, the Carlsborg UGA shall not be comprehensively reevaluated for changes in land use designations for a period of 10 years from the date of adoption of this policy.

(ii) Amendments to land use designations involving individual parcels or groups of parcels shall be reviewed consistent with CCC 31.08.370 (Required Showing for an Amendment).

(iii) The boundaries of the Carlsborg UGA may be reviewed and considered for expansion only after it can be demonstrated that population growth rates and land supply projections did not provide sufficient urban lands within the Carlsborg UGA to accommodate needed future growth.

(9) Land Uses.

(a) Policy 28. The Carlsborg Land Use Map shall serve as the official zoning map for the unincorporated Carlsborg UGA. Land use zones established are shown in Table 1 below:

Table 1 – Conversion Table of Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Designations

Comprehensive Plan Designation

Zoning Designation

Zoning Symbol

Carlsborg Urban Residential – Low

Carlsborg Urban Residential – Low

CR-I

Carlsborg Urban Residential – Medium

Carlsborg Urban Residential – Medium

CR-II

Carlsborg Urban Residential – High

Carlsborg Urban Residential – High

CR-III

Carlsborg Village Center

Carlsborg Village Center

CN

Carlsborg General Commercial

Carlsborg General Commercial

CGC

Carlsborg Commercial

Carlsborg Commercial

CC

Carlsborg Industrial

Carlsborg Industrial

CI

(b) Policy 29. The purpose of land use zones established under this section is as follows:

(i) Carlsborg Urban Residential – Low (CR-I). The purpose of the Carlsborg Urban Residential Low designation is to provide a density of four to six dwelling units per acre for single-family residential development that is generally free from encroachment of commercial and industrial activities.

(ii) Carlsborg Residential – Medium (CR-II). The purpose of the Carlsborg Urban Residential Medium designation is to provide a density of four to eight dwelling units per acre for areas of single- and multifamily residential development that is generally free from encroachment of commercial and industrial activities.

(iii) Carlsborg Residential – High (CR-III). The purpose of the Carlsborg Urban Residential High designation is to provide a density of four to 10 dwelling units per acre for areas of single- and multifamily residential development that is generally free from encroachment of commercial and industrial activities.

(iv) Carlsborg Village Center (CN). The purpose of the Carlsborg Village Center designation is to provide for high-density residential development and small scale commercial uses that can be located and serve residential neighborhoods within the historic village center of Carlsborg. The standards for the district are intended to reinforce the established scale and ambiance of neighborhood retail oriented toward the pedestrian while ensuring adequate transit and automobile access. The Village Center designation is intended to promote local orientation and to limit adverse impacts on nearby residential areas.

(v) Carlsborg General Commercial (CGC). The purpose of the Carlsborg General Commercial designation is to provide for a wide range of moderate-scale commercial activities that provide for neighborhood, regional, and tourist-related goods and services for both residents and the traveling public.

(vi) Carlsborg Industrial (CI). The purpose of the Carlsborg Industrial designation is to allow for low nuisance, low intensity industrial uses.

(vii) Carlsborg Commercial (CC). The purpose of the Carlsborg Commercial designation is to provide for a limited area of high-density residential development and low impact neighborhood commercial activities.

31.03.415 Miller Peninsula neighborhood.

(1) Location. [Policy No. 1] This neighborhood generally includes the Miller Peninsula from the western shores of Discovery Bay to the eastern shores of Sequim Bay, and from the Strait of Juan de Fuca on the north to the Forest Service boundary on the south.

(2) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 2] See Diamond Point-Sunshine Acres rural center discussion.

(b) [Policy No. 3] Concern has been raised regarding the potential fire danger on the Miller Peninsula. The State of Washington and the Homeowners’ Association should be encouraged to provide a fire break.

(c) [Policy No. 4] Public access along the saltwater shoreline should be encouraged in order to link public tidelands in the area (see Park and Recreation Plan).

(d) [Policy No. 5] New private development and outdoor oriented recreation facilities which are larger than twenty (20) acres in size and/or would use large volumes of water shall be required to establish that the Miller Peninsula groundwater sources are sufficient to meet the build-out potentials of the Miller Peninsula neighborhood and the Diamond Point rural center as well as the proposed development prior to development approval.

(e) [Policy No. 6] Clallam County PUD shall be the only PUD allowed to construct water systems or sewer systems within the Miller Peninsula and the Diamond Point rural center.

(3) Critical Areas and Open Space.

(a) [Policy No. 7] The shoreline bluffs along the Strait of Juan de Fuca and Discovery Bay have been designated as critical wildlife corridors (primarily birds) and as geologically hazardous. Consideration must be given to the proper siting of development to ensure both protection of habitat and safety.

(b) [Policy No. 8] Highway 101 in this area is the most scenic stretch within this regional planning area. It is the gateway to Clallam County from the east. Rural development shall protect the scenic character, including prohibition on billboard construction, purchase of scenic conservation easements along the highway corridor and/or encouragement of planned unit developments for scenic properties along the highway.

(4) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 9] Clallam County, Jefferson County and the State should work together to make improvements to the Diamond Point-Old Gardiner-Highway 101 intersection, particularly as traffic might increase due to the Miller Peninsula State Park.

(b) [Policy No. 10] Diamond Point Road shall meet minimum County road standards prior to development of the planned Miller Peninsula State Park. The road also has inadequate shoulders for bicycling and walking; the shoulders or other trails should be improved.

(c) [Policy No. 11] The number of access points to Diamond Point Road shall be limited in order to maintain a greenbelt along the road.

(5) Resource Lands. [Policy No. 12] Forest lands of long-term commercial significance have been designated south of Chicken Coop Road. These forest lands shall not be encroached upon by residential development. Development adjacent to these lands must consider the impact to the adjacent forest land use.

(6) Land Use.

(a) Policy 13. This area has strong rural character, including open space corridors along the highway and large ownership patterns. Large areas of public land exists on the Peninsula, now designated by the Washington State Parks Commission for future development as a State Park. Rural densities should remain at one dwelling per five acres (rural low), with the area along East Sequim Bay Road designated for Rural Neighborhood Conservation (five-acre base density) subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique), except where a LAMIRD is designated according to the provisions of CCC 31.02.263.

(b) Policy 14. Commercial land uses shall be strongly discouraged along US 101 and within a half mile of roads intersecting US 101 as these would tend to encourage strip development of the highway and diminish the current rural character of the area.

(c) Policy 15. Commercial development at the intersection of Diamond Point Road and US 101 or at any point along US 101 between the eastern Clallam County line and the Blyn rural center will be discouraged as sufficient areas for commercial development have been provided within the Diamond Point/Sunshine Acres and Blyn rural centers. Should the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe put its ownership in the vicinity of the intersection of Diamond Point Road and US 101 into tribal trust status in order to allow commercial development of this site contrary to the direction provided by local residents as expressed in the Sequim-Dungeness Regional Plan, then such development shall not provide any justification for adjacent commercial development of lands under Clallam County jurisdiction.

31.03.425 Palo Alto-Chicken Coop neighborhood.

(1) Location. [Policy No. 1] This neighborhood is generally described as the foothills area from the Dungeness River on the west to the Jefferson County line on the east, including land along Highway 101 on the east side of Sequim Bay, but exclusive of Happy Valley.

(2) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 2] Due to the steeper slopes in this area, much of the land has been designated as being erosion and landslide prone. Development within these areas shall adhere to best management practices.

(b) [Policy No. 3] Fish and wildlife habitat resources in the area include Johnson Creek, Jimmycomelately Creek, Chicken Coop Creek, and Sequim Bay. These areas provide significant fish and wildlife habitat and need to be protected from impacts of development.

(3) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 4] The majority of this area has been designated as forest lands of long-term commercial significance. These lands are still commercially viable; provided, that development is not allowed to encroach on these lands.

(b) [Policy No. 5] Development adjacent to designated commercial forest lands shall be at a very low density (one home per 20 acres). Those areas where the predominant land use pattern at this time is one home per five acres may be designated for low densities (one home per five acres).

(4) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 6] Several County roads within this area are less than 20 feet in width and have traffic levels in excess of 150 vehicles per day (ADT). Further development, such as land divisions and other traffic-generating development should not be allowed until the roads meet minimum safety standards identified in this plan.

(b) [Policy No. 7] Along Highway 101, potential encroachment or sprawl from the Blyn rural center, including development accessory to the Jamestown S’Klallam casino, shall be avoided.

(5) Land Use.

(a) Policy 8. This area has strong rural character, including open space corridors along the highway and large ownership patterns. Because of commercial forest land use, most rural densities should be at one dwelling per 20 acres (Rural Very Low), except along East Sequim Bay Road, which is designated for Rural Neighborhood Conservation (five-acre base density) subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique), and the lower parts of Palo Alto Road, which is designated for low rural densities (one home per five acres).

(b) Policy 9. US 101 from Johnson Creek to the Jefferson County line is the most scenic stretch within this regional planning area. It is the gateway to Clallam County from the east. Rural development shall protect the scenic character, including prohibition on billboard construction, purchase of scenic conservation easements along the highway corridor and/or encouragement of planned unit developments for scenic properties along the highway.

(c) Policy 10. Commercial land uses shall be strongly discouraged along US 101 and within a half mile of roads intersecting US 101 as these would tend to encourage strip development of the highway and diminish the current rural character of the area.

31.03.435 Blyn LAMIRD.

(1) Location (Policy 1). The Blyn LAMIRD is at the south end of Sequim Bay. The Blyn LAMIRD is composed of a mix of recreational, commercial, and residential activities.

(2) Critical Areas (Policy 2). The Blyn LAMIRD includes large wetland complexes and significant fish and wildlife habitat corridors, in addition to Sequim Bay. Fragmentation of these wetlands and habitats by development should not occur. Development is encouraged to transfer density or cluster development away from these critical areas.

(3) Resource Lands (Policy 3). Forest lands of long-term commercial significance are located nearby the Blyn LAMIRD. The LAMIRD designation is limited to those areas characterized by more intensive development by July 1, 1990, and ensures that encroachment of more intensive rural development into forestlands will not occur. Development adjacent to these forest lands shall assure compatibility with normal timber harvesting practices.

(4) Public Services and Facilities (Policy 4). Future development by the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe in the Blyn LAMIRD will require increased public services, particularly police and fire. Future development plans should be carefully coordinated with those service providers. It is also assumed that some services will be provided by the Tribe and would be open to local residents.

(5) Transportation (Policy 5). Impacts to Highway 101 from development in Blyn must be mitigated. Improvements to intersections of County roads and Highway 101 will be required for new development which increases traffic congestion. An overpass on Highway 101 should be considered if traffic congestion caused by development of the casino impacts the regional mobility of the highway.

(6) Land Use.

(a) Policy 6. The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe began a casino operation at Blyn in 1995. This operation will have a profound effect on the future of this area, including increased traffic and increased desire for other services (such as restaurants, lodging and gas stations). The Tribe has been careful in its development plans to address issues facing the community. Since local government has no regulatory authority of Tribal land use, it is best that the community work together with the Tribe to address any concerns. Some issues that the Tribe and community have been working together on include routing the Olympic Discovery Trail across Tribal land, the proposed inclusion of the salt marsh observation deck and natural resources interpretive center, providing signage describing the historical significance of the previous logging yard, and monitoring of environmental rehabilitation of the Jimmycomelately Creek and estuary.

(b) Policy 7. Blyn qualifies for designation as a LAMIRD and is designated as a LAMIRD with logical outer boundaries delineated predominately by a built environment that existed before or as of July 1, 1990. Infill development will be allowed consistent with the type, scale, size, or intensity of development that already existed as of July 1, 1990.

31.03.445 Happy Valley-Bell Hill neighborhood.

(1) Location. [Policy No. 1] The Happy Valley and Bell Hill neighborhood is south of the Sequim urban growth area. The area includes Bell Hill, the Valley floor, as well as some of the foothills, and extends from Johnson Creek on the east to the Dungeness River on the west.

(2) Critical Areas. [Policy No. 2] Happy Valley includes some steep slopes on the south side of Happy Valley Road which are landslide and erosion hazards. There are several wetland resource areas throughout the Valley, and both Johnson Creek and the Dungeness River are designated as significant fish and wildlife corridors.

(3) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 3] This neighborhood includes some lands designated as forest lands of long-term commercial significance. With the exception of one parcel (State of Washington – Section 36 – River Road), these forest lands are on steeper slopes not conducive to development. Some lands designated as Rural Very Low have the ability to produce commercial timber; due to the steeper slopes, and larger parcels, cluster development on these parcels is encouraged.

(b) [Policy No. 4] The State of Washington land along River Road in Section 36 can be of long-term commercial significance for timber production. Because this land is relatively flat and in close proximity to the City of Sequim, interest in more intense uses of this land have been expressed (e.g., golf courses and residential development). Encroachment of residential uses in this area may result in greater difficulty in managing this parcel in the long run for timber production. This plan, however, envisions continued timber production on this parcel until such time as it can be demonstrated that timber production is not viable in the long-term and growth cannot be directed to other non-resource areas. This parcel can also be considered for potential public recreation uses, as its location adjacent to the Dungeness River and City of Sequim offer good opportunities.

(4) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 5] Happy Valley was considered as an option for the Sequim Bypass. Construction of a highway in this area would be entirely incompatible with the rural character of the area and shall not be pursued.

(b) [Policy No. 6] Happy Valley Road should continue to maintain rural characteristics, designed for low speeds and local traffic. Consideration should be given, however, to improving the road through the curves on the east end and connecting Happy Valley and Palo Alto Roads to have only one intersection with Highway 101.

(c) [Policy No. 7] Sequim Avenue South should be extended to meet Happy Valley Road. This will improve circulation between Happy Valley and Sequim.

(5) Land Use.

(a) Policy 8. With the exception of Bell Hill, this area remains rural with a variety of rural densities. Bell Hill (Highland Hills development) is suburban in character with sewer services provided by the City of Sequim and water service by the Public Utility District. The Happy Valley community has expressed a strong interest in protecting the rural quality of the area. Varying residential densities are appropriate for this area, with certain areas designated for Rural Neighborhood Conservation (five-acre base density) subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique).

(b) Policy 9. Flexible zoning techniques may conserve rural characteristics under the following circumstances:

(i) Overall increase in underlying densities should not be allowed unless some other public benefits are provided;

(ii) Open space or forest lands are conserved in perpetuity; and/or

(iii) The clustered development maintains rural characteristics, considering building design and placement on lots relative to topography and adjoining landowners.

(c) Policy 10. Some of the more vocal opposition to home-based businesses and industry came during neighborhood meetings for this area. Landowners prefer not to see home-based industries which cause traffic, are unsightly and would otherwise detract from a rural residential character. Examples of incompatible development are car repair and tourist shops.

(d) Policy 11. Land use designations need to consider logical physical or community boundaries. Past designations were not consistent throughout the Valley area, with densities ranging from one home per acre to one home per 20 acres.

31.03.455 Sequim-West Neighborhood.

(1) Description. [Policy No. 1] This area includes lands to the northwest, west and southwest of the City of Sequim.

(2) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 2] Several critical areas have been designated within this area, including the Dungeness River, Cassalery Creek, and lands with a critical recharging effect on aquifers used for potable water.

(b) [Policy No. 3] For policies governing protection of the designated critical areas, please refer to CCC 31.03.195.

(3) Resource Lands. [Policy No. 4] Forest lands of long-term commercial significance have been designated just south of this neighborhood. Land uses adjoining that land shall ensure continued viability of long-term forest production, with increased setbacks from the forest line and notification of potential incompatible uses required during new development.

(4) Transportation.

(a) Policy 5. This neighborhood includes several circulation systems that are critical to the regional ability to move people and goods including Highway 101, River Road, Priest Road, Hendrickson Road, and Old Olympic Highway. In addition, the abandoned railroad corridor (Railroad Bridge Park) provides a non-motorized link to the Olympic Discovery Trail from Carlsborg to Sequim and public transit uses these principal routes.

(b) [Policy No. 6] Portions of the Sequim Bypass are planned to go through this neighborhood. It is imperative that new highway construction be assured of minimal congestion caused by new growth. Expansion of urban growth area boundaries in order to cater to the highway traffic shall be discouraged.

(c) [Policy No. 7] Please see Figure 4 for planned improvements to circulation along Hendrickson and Priest Roads. In addition, the County and Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe should work cooperatively to ensure safe access to the planned Natural History Center.

(d) [Policy No. 8] Old Olympic Highway must be continually monitored for meeting LOS standards in this area. This section of highway carries large volumes of traffic and may not maintain acceptable standards. Alternatives to increasing capacity of the road should be sought, such as increased transit service and other demand management strategies.

(5) Open Space and Greenbelts. [Policy No. 9] The Dungeness River has been designated as an open space corridor for the benefit of fish, wildlife, flood protection, people and open space. Maintaining the river corridor for these benefits is critical. In addition, the River separates the urbanizing areas of Carlsborg and Sequim. Development along Highway 101 adjacent to the Dungeness River should be low-intensity, maintaining rural character and open space values.

(6) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 10] This neighborhood includes some pockets of higher urban type densities close to the City of Sequim. These developments require increased public services and facilities, such as police, fire and health care.

(b) [Policy No. 11] The Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe is planning a natural history center adjoining the Dungeness River; this location would be adjoining the Railroad Bridge Park. The Dungeness River Greenway Concept Plan also envisions other public access potential along portions of the Dungeness River in this area, if cooperatively implemented with landowners.

(7) Land Use.

(a) Policy 12. Lands along the Dungeness River are designated for low density rural uses, due to environmental constraints. While some lands outside the river corridor in this area have been developed in parcels of one acre or less with roadway systems and other public service and facilities designed to handle this development, a significant portion of this area remains in larger parcel sizes. This area should be designated for Rural Neighborhood Conservation (five-acre base density) subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique), except where a LAMIRD is designated according to the provisions of CCC 31.02.263.

(b) Policy 13. New land divisions in this area must consider the impact on aquifer recharge areas. Sewage disposal must meet local health code standards and monitoring of groundwater quality should be an ongoing effort.

31.03.465 Dungeness-Jamestown neighborhood.

(1) Description. [Policy No. 1] This area is described generally as the area north of Old Olympic Highway and the Sequim urban growth area, and east of the Dungeness River, to the Strait of Juan de Fuca. (For Sunland policies, please refer to CCC 31.03.330.)

(2) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 2] Several critical areas have been designated within this neighborhood planning area, including wetlands, creeks and rivers (Dungeness, Bell, Cassalery, Cooper, Gierin, Meadowbrook), the Strait of Juan de Fuca, lands with a critical recharging effect on aquifers used for potable water and some erosion-prone soils.

(b) [Policy No. 3] Some of the largest and most important wetland complexes are within this area. Many of these wetland complexes are associated with the saltwater shoreline, and have several fish and wildlife habitat functions. Land uses near these wetland complexes should be for low density rural uses.

(c) [Policy No. 4] The Dungeness River has been designated as an open space corridor for the benefit of fish, wildlife, flood protection, people and open space. Maintaining the river corridor for these benefits is critical.

(3) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 5] This area includes considerable acreage designated as interim agricultural lands. The only agricultural block that is not facing the possibility of more intense use of the land due to its proximity to growth areas is the block which includes Grays Marsh and lands along Schmuck Road.

(b) [Policy No. 6] The agricultural land along Sequim-Dungeness Way and Woodcock Road may see more intense uses of the land if development rights are not acquired. The proximity of this land to major roads, the previous platting into five-acre parcels, and the scenic open space values these parcels bring make them a candidate for purchase of development rights. Other alternatives to consider for these lands is cluster development with open space retained, preferably in continued agricultural use.

(c) [Policy No. 7] Some of the agricultural lands along the Dungeness River may also be high priority candidates for purchase of development rights, either due to pressures for conversion to residential uses, caused by “vested” five-acre surveys, and/or conservation of lands along the Dungeness River for other benefits. Several of the Dungeness River parcels were designated as high candidates for open space conservation at public forums in 1994.

(4) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 8] Please refer to CCC 31.03.130, Transportation Inventory and Analysis, which indicates that Sequim-Dungeness Way, Old Olympic Highway and Woodcock Road (east of Sequim-Dungeness Way) may require improvements in the future.

(b) Policy 9. Designated bicycle routes in this area include Old Olympic Highway, Port Williams Road, and Brown Road. Connectors to the Olympic Discovery Trail such as along Sequim-Dungeness Way, Woodcock Road, Evans Road, and Towne Road should be developed.

(c) [Policy No. 10] A nonmotorized trail segment is a possibility along the Dungeness River if the landowners agree. The Dungeness River Greenway Concept Plan identifies use of the dike on the east side of the River between Sequim-Dungeness and Woodcock for potential public access.

(5) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 11] The County Parks and Recreation Plan has identified acquisition of tidelands from the Port Williams Park either north or south. This area has also been tentatively identified by the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife for public acquisition of both shoreline and upland habitat.

(b) [Policy No. 12] Due to the historic high densities allowed in the Three Crabs Road and Dungeness area, and the potential for water quality problems, consideration to community options for sewage disposal should be given, such as community drainfields.

(c) [Policy No. 13] The City of Sequim’s sewer treatment plant and outfall are within this neighborhood planning area. Clallam County shall work cooperatively with the City of Sequim to enable the city to expand their sewer treatment facility to meet future service needs.

(6) Land Use.

(a) Policy 14. This neighborhood includes the historic community of “Dungeness,” Three Crabs and parts of the Jamestown area. Encourage the continued development of “Dungeness” as an historic community providing services to tourists and local residents, consistent with the need to protect adjacent critical areas from adverse impacts.

(i) Development within “Dungeness” should focus on the old townsite area, and not be oriented towards Sequim-Dungeness Way.

(ii) Commercial uses allowed within this rural center should be limited to the types of uses that serve the local community and tourists, such as overnight accommodations, restaurants, gift shops, grocery stores, taverns, etc.

(b) Policy 15. Development in this area should avoid placing greater impacts on the Dungeness River, wetlands, and saltwater shorelines from stormwater runoff, loss of sensitive area buffers and riparian zones and human disturbance.

(c) Policy 16. Rural residential densities within this area should be set based on natural physical boundaries and natural limitations. The following principles should apply:

(i) Land immediately north and southwest of the City of Sequim should be designated for Rural Neighborhood Conservation (five-acre base density) subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique);

(ii) Land which is within or in close proximity to wetland complexes and the Dungeness River should be designated for rural low densities (one home per five acres);

(iii) Land north of West Sequim Bay Road to Sequim Bay, outside the City of Sequim urban growth area, should be designated for Rural Neighborhood Conservation (five-acre base density) subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique).

(iv) Land outside of wetland, fish and wildlife areas, but not in close proximity to Sequim, should be designated for Rural Neighborhood Conservation (five-acre base density) subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique).

(d) Policy 17. Discourage incompatible uses on lands adjacent to agricultural lands so long as the agricultural use continues and is viable. Work towards long-term conservation through tax incentives and purchase of development rights.

31.03.475 Dungeness Valley neighborhood.

(1) Description. [Policy No. 1] This area is described as those lands north of Old Olympic Highway, west of the Dungeness River and east of Kitchen-Dick Road.

(2) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 2] Several critical areas have been designated within this neighborhood planning area, including wetlands, Dungeness River, Matriotti Creek, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, lands with a critical recharging effect on aquifers used for potable water and some erosion-prone soils.

(b) [Policy No. 3] The Dungeness River has been designated as an open space corridor for the benefit of fish, wildlife, flood protection, people and open space. Maintaining the river corridor for these benefits is critical.

(c) [Policy No. 4] Considerable attention has been given to rehabilitating Matriotti Creek for fish habitat. Development along this creek segment should not impact Matriotti Creek and landowners are encouraged to work with State and local agencies in rehabilitating the stream.

(d) [Policy No. 5] Water quality is essential to the economic and environmental health in the Dungeness Valley. Numerous cultural and economic resources, such as finfish and shellfish, drinking water, and irrigation are dependent upon maintaining good water quality upstream and downstream, above and below ground. Prevention of degradation before it occurs is preferred over the expense of correction. Educational activities are encouraged as a method of preventing nonpoint pollution associated with land use in this area.

(3) Resource Lands. [Policy No. 6] The agricultural lands within this area include Olympic Game Farm, Clark Farm, several other farms along the Dungeness River, and agricultural lands at the intersection of Kitchen-Dick and Old Olympic Highway. Some of these lands may be high priority candidates for purchase of development rights, either due to pressures for conversion to residential uses, caused by “vested” five-acre surveys, and/or conservation of lands along the Dungeness River. Several of the Dungeness River parcels were designated as high candidates for open space conservation at public forums in 1994.

(4) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 7] Several County roads within this neighborhood are primary roads for the circulation within the Sequim-Dungeness regional planning area, including Cays, Anderson, Old Olympic Highway, Woodcock, Sequim-Dungeness Way, Kitchen-Dick, and Lotzgesell or Hogback Roads. The County shall ensure that these roads continue to serve that function, and ways to minimize congestion caused by too many access points or turning movements should be sought.

(b) [Policy No. 8] A nonmotorized trail segment is a possibility along the Dungeness River if the landowners agree. The Dungeness River Greenway Concept Plan identifies use of the dike on the east side of the River between Sequim-Dungeness and Woodcock for potential public access.

(5) Open Space and Greenbelts. [Policy No. 9] The agricultural lands at the intersection of Kitchen-Dick and Old Olympic Highway have very high scenic value, in part due to their location along County arterials, and in part due to the proximity to a public recreation site (Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge). Several of these agricultural ownerships have also been previously divided into five-acre parcels, making them highly likely to convert to residential uses. These parcels should be high candidates for purchase of development rights or encouraging cluster forms of development that conserve open space values.

(6) Public Services and Facilities. [Policy No. 10] This neighborhood planning area includes several park and recreation facilities, including Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge and Dungeness Recreation Area, Cline Spit, Dungeness River Park (Ward Road) and Dungeness Boat Launch (Port). The County Park and Recreation Plan identifies additional acquisition of lands on Cline Spit and adjacent to the Dungeness Recreation Area. In addition, the County’s recent acquisition of Dungeness River property for park development may lead to other County park facilities along the River implementing the Dungeness River Greenway Concept Plan. There are several private recreation facilities within this area, such as the Dungeness Golf Course which provides recreation activity for the region.

(7) Land Use.

(a) Policy 11. Due to the outstanding views of Dungeness Bay, several developments within the area occurred prior to zoning regulations, including Mains Farm, Dungeness Bay and Dungeness Beach plats. As a result, where there are no physical or natural limitations, further rural development can occur at suburban-rural residential densities (one home per acre).

(b) Policy 12. Lower residential densities should occur adjacent to designated fish and wildlife habitat corridors: along Matriotti Creek (one home per 2.4 or 4.8 acres); the Dungeness River (one home per 4.8 acres); and Dungeness Bay (one home per five acres) subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique), except where a LAMIRD is designated according to the provisions of CCC 31.02.263.

(c) Policy 13. Discourage incompatible uses on lands adjacent to agricultural lands so long as the agricultural use continues and is viable. Work towards long-term conservation through tax incentives and purchase of development rights.

(d) Policy 14. Consider construction of a private or public golf course in this area as needed for the community, provided it is appropriately sited to address environmental, privacy and transportation concerns.

31.03.485 Agnew neighborhood.

(1) Description. [Policy No. 1] The Agnew neighborhood is described generally as that area north of Old Olympic Highway or the abandoned railroad corridor, east of Siebert’s Creek, and west of Kitchen-Dick Road.

(2) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 2] Critical areas designated in this area include Siebert’s Creek, McDonnell Creek, Strait of Juan de Fuca, some areas with a critical recharging effect on aquifers used for potable water, and geologically hazardous areas associated with creek ravines and marine bluffs.

(b) [Policy No. 3] Both Siebert’s and McDonnell creeks are significant fish and wildlife habitat corridors. Development adjacent to these corridors shall protect the corridors through maintenance and enhancement of riparian vegetation, control of stormwater runoff, and low intensity land uses which cause minimal disturbance to fish and wildlife.

(c) [Policy No. 4] Development along unstable marine bluffs should be set back sufficiently to minimize any public danger and control stormwater runoff to minimize erosion impacts.

(3) Resource Lands. [Policy No. 5] This area includes significant acreage designated as interim agricultural lands. Some of the agricultural lands pose a high potential for conversion to more intense uses of the land caused by “vested” five-acre surveys, while other lands, such as the Weyerhaeuser Tree Farm, have not been platted into five-acre parcels.

(4) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 6] Both Old Olympic Highway and Kitchen-Dick Road are regionally significant roads. Development along these roads should cause minimal conflicts or congestion with the primary purpose of these roads to move people and goods. Access points to these roads shall be consolidated where possible, and development which has significant traffic volumes should require installation of turn lanes.

(b) [Policy No. 7] Old Olympic Highway through the Siebert’s Creek curve is identified on the Six (6) Year Transportation Plan for realignment. This will increase safety on this road segment by avoiding a dangerous curve with icy conditions in the winter.

(c) [Policy No. 8] Old Olympic Highway and Kitchen-Dick Road are both designated as bicycle routes. Shoulders should be adequate to safely carry all nonmotorized traffic.

(5) Open Space and Greenbelts. [Policy No. 9] The agricultural lands along Old Olympic Highway have very high scenic value due to their location along a regionally significant road. Parcels along this road should be high candidates for purchase of development rights or encouraging cluster forms of development that conserve open space values.

(6) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 10] The Public Utility District operates a water system serving portions of this neighborhood planning area. Private water systems also serve the Monterra development, which is also proposed to be intertied with the Solmar water system.

(b) [Policy No. 11] Public water service in this area shall not result in or be justification for higher density than that anticipated by this neighborhood plan.

(7) Land Use.

(a) [Policy No. 12] Since adoption of the first zoning ordinance, the Agnew neighborhood has been very vocal and supportive of maintaining low rural residential densities (one home per five acres). These rural densities shall be continued through implementation of this plan for those lands north of Old Olympic Highway, west of Kitchen-Dick Road and east of Siebert’s Creek. An exception to these densities is the Blue Ribbon Farm development, which has been previously platted into one acre lots. This development pattern is now predominant in that area and may be continued.

(b) [Policy No. 13] The predominant land use in this area should be rural residential and agricultural uses. Home-based enterprises, bed and breakfast inn facilities and other nonintrusive uses might be appropriate if adequately screened and compatible with adjoining land uses.

(c) [Policy No. 14] Discourage incompatible uses on lands adjacent to agricultural lands so long as the agricultural use continues and is still viable. Work towards long-term conservation through tax incentives and purchase of development rights.

31.03.500 Lost Mountain neighborhood.

(1) Description. [Policy No. 1] This neighborhood is described generally as the area between the Dungeness River on the east and McDonnell Creek on the west, north to Atterberry Road and south to the Olympic National Forest.

(2) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 2] Critical areas designated in this area include geological hazards, significant fish and wildlife habitat corridors, some areas with a critical recharging effect on aquifers used for potable water (mostly near the Dungeness River), and wetlands.

(b) [Policy No. 3] The steeper slopes of Lost Mountain, and adjacent to the Dungeness River and McDonnell Creek, are considered erosion-prone areas. Development within these areas must ensure proper drainage and erosion control to minimize impacts.

(c) [Policy No. 4] The Dungeness River and McDonnell Creek have been designated as significant fish and wildlife habitat corridors. Development adjacent to these corridors shall protect the corridors through maintenance and enhancement of riparian vegetation, control of stormwater runoff, and low intensity land uses which cause minimal disturbance to fish and wildlife.

(d) [Policy No. 5] Because this neighborhood is in the upper parts of the watershed, impacts from development have downstream effects. Many of the wetlands and soils in this area provide groundwater recharge needed for potable water supplies. Runoff from steeper slopes can cause sedimentation and other nonpoint pollution to surface waters. Development must be carefully sited to assure downstream impacts are avoided.

(3) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 6] This planning area includes large acreage of lands designated as forest lands of long-term commercial significance. Some of the lands within this area (Lost Mountain Estates) have already been converted to residential development. Further encroachment into the commercial forest lands shall not be allowed.

(b) [Policy No. 7] Development adjacent to designated forest lands of long-term commercial significance should be at a very low density (one home per 20 acres). Those areas where the predominant land use pattern at this time is one home per five acres, or where residential development does not conflict with adjacent timber harvesting, may be designated for low densities (one home per five acres).

(4) Transportation. [Policy No. 8] Several County roads within this area are less than 20 feet in width and have traffic levels in excess of 150 vehicles per day (ADT). Further development, such as land divisions and other traffic-generating development should not be allowed until roads meet minimum safety standards identified in this plan.

(5) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 9] Limited public services and facilities are available and/or planned for this neighborhood. The PUD water system extends along Atterberry Road, but it is not planned to extend any further west. Fire District #3 has a volunteer station in Texas Valley.

(b) [Policy No. 10] Public services and facilities should be limited in this area due to the low residential densities and the inefficiency in delivering services to low densities.

(c) [Policy No. 11] Because of the proximity to forest lands of long-term commercial significance, fire protection measures for adjacent nonforest uses must be considered in development project approval.

(6) Land Use.

(a) Policy 12. Residential densities in this area should be at one home per five acres (rural low), except for lands between Taylor Cut-Off Road and Hooker Road near Carlsborg, which should be designated for Rural Neighborhood Conservation (five-acre base density) subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique), and Lost Mountain, which should be designated for Rural Very Low.

(b) Policy 13. The development pattern in Texas Valley varies from lot sizes less than five acres to lots 20 acres in size. The Valley, however, should receive land use designations based on geographic and natural limitations. Past land use designations ignored natural boundaries. Although the proposed land use designation is rural low, which is supported by adequate transportation network and fire protection services, the development of lots into five-acre “cookie cutter” tracts could be detrimental to the rural character of the Valley. Therefore, new land divisions in Texas Valley are encouraged to transfer density within the ownership in order to retain open space and rural character values.

(c) Policy 14. Lost Mountain was converted from forestry uses in the past 10 years. Due to the outstanding views on this property, there have been pressures to convert the property to higher densities. Such conversion, however, raises concerns due to limited water availability, drainage control, fire protection and compatibility with the surrounding commercial forest. Lost Mountain should remain in Rural Very Low densities throughout the life of this plan and measures taken to control stormwater runoff.

31.03.510 Upper Blue Mountain neighborhood.

(1) Description. [Policy No. 1] The Blue Mountain neighborhood includes those lands generally south of Emery Road, east of Siebert’s Creek and west of McDonnell Creek.

(2) Critical Areas. [Policy No. 2] McDonnell Creek and Siebert’s Creek have been designated as significant fish and wildlife habitat corridors and geologic hazardous areas. Development adjacent to these corridors shall protect the corridors through maintenance and enhancement of riparian vegetation, control of stormwater runoff, and low intensity land uses which cause minimal disturbance to fish and wildlife.

(3) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 3] Forest lands of long-term commercial significance have been designated throughout this neighborhood area. Ownership of forest lands is diverse: from the State of Washington to major private timber companies to individuals. Some of the State forest land is interspersed throughout the rural lands, and offers opportunities to demonstrate innovative forest management techniques.

(b) [Policy No. 4] Some of the forest lands have already been converted to residential uses through twenty (20) acre lot divisions prior to adoption of interim forest land conservation measures in 1992 (Blue Mountain Estates). As a result of this conversion, normal timber harvesting on adjacent parcels is becoming more difficult. Pressures to change the land use designation to densities exceeding what is normally compatible with adjoining forest land use (one home per 20 acres) will occur and should be avoided.

(4) Transportation. [Policy No. 5] The lower part of Blue Mountain Road has been rebuilt to County road standards. The road in the upper stretches of this planning area, however, is less than twenty (20) feet in width. Further development, such as land divisions and other traffic-generating development, should not be allowed unless the road meets minimum safety standards identified in this plan.

(5) Open Space and Greenbelts. [Policy No. 6] The State forest lands within this area provide valuable open space to this neighborhood. The forest lands must be assured, however, of continued ability to harvest timber.

(6) Public Services and Facilities. [Policy No. 7] Public services and facilities available to this area include PUD water system on the lower parts of Blue Mountain, solid waste transfer station, and volunteer fire station at R Corner. Extension of public services and facilities into this area is not expected due to lower residential densities.

(7) Land Use.

(a) [Policy No. 8] The land use pattern in this area is characterized by both commercial forest and low density rural residential uses. Residential densities should generally be Rural Very Low where area abuts the commercial forest lands. In those areas where significant five-acre tracts have already been developed, such as Gellor and Emery Road areas, rural low designations can be considered appropriate.

(b) [Policy No. 9] Higher residential densities for Blue Mountain Estates shall be discouraged, as increased traffic, stormwater runoff, fire danger and incompatibility with adjacent forest land use will not be able to be sufficiently minimized.

31.03.520 R Corner/Kitchen-Dick Road neighborhood.

(1) Description. [Policy No. 1] This neighborhood is described generally as those lands between Siebert’s Creek on the west to Kitchen-Dick Road on the east, to Emery Road (off Blue Mountain Road) and Atterberry Road on the south, to Old Olympic Highway on the north.

(2) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 2] McDonnell Creek and Siebert’s Creek have been designated as significant fish and wildlife habitat corridors and geologic hazardous areas. Development adjacent to these corridors shall protect the corridors through maintenance and enhancement of riparian vegetation, control of stormwater runoff, and low intensity land uses which cause minimal disturbance to fish and wildlife.

(b) [Policy No. 3] Several large wetland complexes exist between Highway 101 and the Agnew Ditch. These wetlands provides significant flood storage, groundwater recharge, and wildlife connections to adjacent forest lands and Siebert’s or McDonnell Creek. Fragmentation of these wetland complexes should be avoided, as well as loss of their flood storage and groundwater recharge ability.

(3) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 4] This neighborhood includes both forest lands of long-term commercial significance and agricultural lands. Forest lands have been designated south of the Agnew ditch on Blue Mountain Road. Agricultural lands are between Old Olympic Highway and Highway 101.

(b) [Policy No. 5] Some of the agricultural lands have been previously platted into five-acre survey lots and face a high chance of conversion to residential uses. Agricultural lands along Old Olympic Highway and in viewing distance from Highway 101 provide scenic values and should be considered for purchase of development rights.

(4) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 6] Highway 101, Old Olympic Highway and Kitchen-Dick Road are regionally significant transportation corridors. Development along these corridors should cause minimal conflicts or congestion with the primary purpose of these corridors to move people and goods. Access points shall be consolidated where possible, and development which has significant traffic volumes should require installation of turn lanes.

(b) [Policy No. 7] Highway 101 in this area is planned for widening to a four-lane highway. Vehicular movements across the highway should be limited to existing intersections with County roads.

(c) [Policy No. 8] Limit commercial development and other types of development with significant traffic levels along Highway 101 that would lead to congestion without adequate mitigation, such as acceleration or deceleration lanes, or left-turn lanes.

(d) [Policy No. 9] Encourage development of park-and-ride lot(s) and transit stops in this area.

(e) [Policy No. 10] Old Olympic Highway through the Siebert’s Creek curve is identified on the Six-Year Transportation Plan for realignment. This will increase safety on this road segment by avoiding a dangerous curve with icy conditions in the winter.

(f) [Policy No. 11] Highway 101, Old Olympic Highway and Kitchen-Dick Road are all designated as bicycle routes. Shoulder widths should be wide enough to accommodate all forms of nonmotorized transportation.

(g) [Policy No. 12] Improve the appearance of the Highway 101 corridor throughout this area, including the rural commercial center at Dryke and Pierson roads, through improved landscaping and screening of nonresidential-resource land uses.

(5) Open Space and Greenbelts. [Policy No. 13] The State forest lands in the Lower Blue Mountain area provide valuable open space to this neighborhood. Continued ability to harvest timber, however, must be assured.

(6) Public Services and Facilities. [Policy No. 14] Public services and facilities available to this area include PUD water system on the lower parts of Blue Mountain, solid waste transfer station, and volunteer fire station at R Corner. Extension of public services and facilities into this area is not expected due to lower residential densities.

(7) Land Use.

(a) Policy 15. Commercial development along US 101 in this area shall be discouraged except for neighborhood services near R Corner, rural commercial development near the Dryke-101-Pierce Road area, and the developed commercial area north of US 101 and east of McDonnell Creek.

(b) Policy 16. The undeveloped property currently designated for commercial and industrial use along US 101 near McDonnell Creek should be designated rural on the Comprehensive Plan Map, and the commercial or industrial development of these areas discouraged.

(c)  Policy 17. Rural residential densities should be based on natural physical boundaries.

(i) The area between US 101, Siebert’s Creek, Old Olympic Highway and McDonnell Creek should be designated rural;

(ii) The area east of McDonnell Creek, south of Old Olympic, north of Atterberry, west of Kitchen-Dick Road (or Carlsborg neighborhood), and north of Atterberry Road should be designated for Rural Neighborhood Conservation (five-acre base density) and subject to optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique), except where a LAMIRD is designated according to the provisions of CCC 31.02.263;

(iii) The area south of US 101 or Atterberry Road to the commercial forest boundary should be designated rural low;

(iv) Discourage incompatible uses on lands adjacent to agricultural lands so long as the agricultural use continues and is still viable. Work towards long-term conservation through tax incentives and purchase of development rights.

(d) Policy 18. Consider construction of a private or public golf course in this area as needed for the community, provided it is appropriately sited to address environmental, privacy and transportation concerns.