Chapter 31.04
PORT ANGELES REGIONAL PLAN

Sections:

31.04.010    Purpose and intent.

31.04.030    Port Angeles Planning Area – 2014 Vision Statement.

31.04.100    Public facilities and services – Inventory and analysis.

31.04.105    Public facilities and services – Policies.

31.04.110    Transportation – Inventory and analysis.

31.04.115    Transportation policies.

31.04.120    Affordable housing – Inventory and analysis.

31.04.125    Affordable housing – Policies.

31.04.130    Economic development – Inventory and analysis.

31.04.135    Economic development – Policies.

31.04.140    The natural environment – Inventory and analysis.

31.04.145    The natural environment – Policies.

31.04.150    Public involvement and education.

31.04.155    Public involvement and education – Policies.

31.04.200    Agricultural land – Inventory and analysis.

31.04.205    Agricultural land conservation – Policies.

31.04.210    Forest land – Inventory and analysis.

31.04.215    Forest land conservation – Policies.

31.04.220    Rural land – Inventory and analysis.

31.04.225    Rural and resource land use designations, purpose and designation criteria.

31.04.230    Rural land – Policies.

31.04.240    Urban growth – Discussion.

31.04.300    Urban land use designations, purpose and designation criteria.

31.04.310    City of Port Angeles urban growth area.

31.04.320    Gales Addition neighborhood – Port Angeles urban growth area.

31.04.330    Lee’s Creek neighborhood – Port Angeles urban growth area.

31.04.340    4 Seasons neighborhood.

31.04.400    Fairview neighborhood.

31.04.410    Deer Park neighborhood.

31.04.420    Monroe Road/Foothills neighborhood.

31.04.430    Black Diamond neighborhood.

31.04.440    Dry Creek neighborhood.

31.04.450    Place Road/Eden Valley/Little River neighborhood.

31.04.460    Lake Sutherland neighborhood.

Appendix A    Implementation strategy.

SOURCE:    ADOPTED:

Ord. 575    06/27/95

AMENDED SOURCE:    ADOPTED:

Ord. 584    02/27/96

Ord. 725    08/06/02

Ord. 746    12/16/03

Ord. 788    12/20/05

Ord. 802    12/19/06

Ord. 835    10/21/08

Ord. 850    06/23/09

Ord. 852    07/21/09

31.04.010 Purpose and intent.

It is the purpose and intent of this regional comprehensive plan to refine and to further the objectives of the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan, in this title. This regional plan provides a guide for coordinated and orderly growth and development of the land and physical improvements in the unincorporated areas of the Port Angeles regional planning area. The Port Angeles regional planning area shares its boundaries with the Port Angeles School District and is generally described as the area west of Siebert Creek and east of Lake Sutherland and excluding the area within the Crescent School District. The Port Angeles watershed, as defined for this study, encompasses a portion of the Dungeness watershed (Siebert and Bagley creeks), and all the drainage basin to just west of the Elwha River. It drains from the high ridges of the Olympic Range to Port Angeles Harbor and the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Included in this watershed are Bagley Creek, Siebert Creek, Morse Creek, Lee’s Creek, Ennis Creek, Peabody Creek, Valley Creek, Tumwater Creek, Dry Creek, and the Elwha River drainages.

The Port Angeles Regional Comprehensive Plan was developed by 67 people, representing various interest groups, organizations, neighborhoods, and tribal and other government agencies. These 67 people formed five separate subcommittees to write the Plan: affordable housing, transportation, capital facilities, economic development, and land use and watershed subcommittees. Additionally, the Growth Management Steering Committee continuously monitored and reviewed progress on the Comprehensive Plan.

The individuals on the subcommittees volunteered their time over approximately 15 months to study background information, discuss community issues, set goals for the future, brainstorm solutions, and communicate with constituent groups. The subcommittee volunteers also took time to learn what the community wanted for the future, through informal discussions with their neighbors and colleagues, and by hosting public meetings in neighborhood granges and halls to discuss their ideas and listen to the responses.

This plan contains goals and policies for watershed management as defined under Chapter 400-12 WAC, the Nonpoint Rule, to implement the Puget Sound Water Quality Management Plan. The watershed plan provides for education, incentives, and regulatory approaches to preventing and controlling cumulative effects from diffuse sources of pollution across the watershed landscape. Within the comprehensive plan, these watershed actions have been identified with a droplet symbol – “droplet”. As a watershed, the Port Angeles region consists of overlapping governmental jurisdictions which have responsibility for managing water-related resources under various mandates. Tribal, federal, State, and local entities were invited to participate and were informed about the Plan through their subcommittee representative. In addition, each entity in the watershed with responsibility for action under the Plan has written a letter of concurrence indicating their acceptance of those responsibilities (see Appendix C, on file in the Department of Community Development).

31.04.030 Port Angeles Planning Area – 2014 Vision Statement.

We envision the Port Angeles Region as Clallam County’s economic center,...

The Port Angeles Region has undergone significant change in the 20 years that have passed since the first Growth Management comprehensive plan was adopted in 1995. This plan led to a successful partnership of public, tribal and private interest groups which worked cooperatively to build a diversified, sound regional economy, managed growth to preserve resources and community character and maintained the County’s high quality of life.

Businesses which provide regional services have been grouped at convenient locations at major intersections within the urban growth area and conform to visually pleasing landscape and building design standards. These regional service center sites have been identified both within the City of Port Angeles and within the unincorporated urban growth area. Developers seeking to build a regional business facility are directed to these community approved sites. All neighborhood and regional business centers are linked by an efficient local transit system. Tribal business centers have also grown to become major employers within Clallam County.

Most new manufacturing and industrial concerns are located at the expanded Airport Industrial Park. A major push to provide infrastructure and prebuilt manufacturing sites combined with a major marketing effort in the mid-1990’s proved fruitful with several small to mid-size manufacturers relocating to Clallam County. These industries, along with local industries that were encouraged to grow with local support, now supply work for our citizens and have replaced jobs lost in other manufacturing sectors. The Airport Industrial Park has maintained a campus-like appearance which provides an attractive site to relocate a business. Port activity has also increased markedly in the last 20 years. Cruise ships and high speed passenger ferries now regularly stop in Port Angeles with visitors connecting to various points of interest in the County. Many value-added wood products, other manufactured products and specialty food products are being shipped from plants in the County to the Pacific Rim Nations. The Port is has become a major marine repair and oil spill response center.

where the urban area of Port Angeles is a cultural, educational and growth center,...

The urban area of Port Angeles provides a mixture of employment, residential, commercial, cultural and recreational opportunities. Peninsula College is now a four-year institution offering advanced degrees. Much of the new development and redevelopment which occurred after 1995 took place within the existing urban center of Port Angeles where infrastructure was in place or could be easily extended. Today, there is still ample room for development within that original urban growth area. Port Angeles is the ultimate supplier of services within the urban growth area.

a transportation hub,...

Port Angeles is linked to all other urban growth areas in the County by an efficient transit system. The County-wide transit system operates a high speed electric bus in the “transit priority” lane of Highway 101. Many electric cars now are used for local trips. The new Port Angeles Parkway provides an alternate east side, cross town route for local access to Port Angeles. The airport has become the center for commuter, visitor and freight shipment with convenient connections to transit, ferry and freight haulers. Within the Port Angeles urban growth area, neighborhood population centers are linked to the Olympic Discovery Trail via multiple feeder trails and paths for efficient nonmotorized transportation options for reaching work or for recreation.

with a population that respects the beauty and function of the natural environment,...

Twenty (20) years of work in education and environmental restoration have resulted in the development of a strong sense of stewardship towards the Port Angeles watershed and its environmental resources by all watershed residents. Critical areas are protected and environmental enhancement projects have restored many acres of wetlands and miles of streams to salmon runs. Few weekends go by when local groups are not found in the field working on habitat improvements or maintenance. Water is clean and abundant due to conservation efforts. The abundance of intact native plant communities and natural systems in the County are the focus of many professional research efforts which share their results with visitors and students through several interpretive centers built in the region. Careful stewardship has ensured the conservation of our land, air, water and energy resources for future generations.

Forest resource lands, farms and important open space resource lands first identified in 1992 remain in resource use. Many of the agricultural and open space resource lands have been permanently protected through transfer or purchase of development rights. The rural portions of the region identified in the 1995 plan have retained their rural character through the use of low density development options, open space development patterns, critical area protection measures and purchase of development rights. A clear boundary exists between rural and urban areas.

a good place to live,...

The Port Angeles region is known for its livable neighborhoods which express their own unique character. They are all noted for their quality of life, pedestrian orientation and superior design. Many residential areas have been separated from the hustle and bustle of commercial activities near Highway 101 by allowing public uses such as schools, parks and public golf courses as commercial to residential buffers. Commercial businesses in these neighborhoods provide goods and services to neighborhood residents and some have residences located on upper stories. The Highway 101 corridor is now a tree lined boulevard with landscaped medians as it passes through the urban area and businesses all along this corridor have upgraded their landscaping and physical appearance. Most high density, low cost housing has been infilled into single-family neighborhoods located just off Highway 101 in urban growth areas where easy access to transit and job opportunities is available. Well designed and landscaped manufactured home parks and multifamily developments provide an attractive low cost living environment. Visitors to our area note the distinct open space boundaries between neighborhoods which make use of the steep sided creek ravines which are left in the natural state.

where we work together,...

The Port Angeles region enjoys a healthy and stable economy, emphasizing diversity in the range of goods produced and services provided. Businesses continue to locate in our County because of the high quality of life, provision of business infrastructure, the emphasis on superior schools, and the ability of a tightly knit community to provide a safe living environment for all. The business community also recognizes that the predictability brought about by the management of growth and the creation of effective public/tribal/private partnerships has fostered a relationship of trust between residents, business interests and governments. This trust has benefited the overall economic development of the County. Problems identified by residents and the business community are clearly articulated in the Plan and solutions have been proposed with clear sources of funding identified. Residents and business interests trust their local governments to follow through on solutions because the Plans and promises made to manage growth in 1995 have been followed and changes to the original plan occur as a result of demonstrated community need. Relationships with tribal governments have improved as the community embraces its cultural diversity. Change is accepted and proceeds in an orderly fashion based on the growth management plan.

Over all, we envision a great place for all to live, work and play!

31.04.100 Public facilities and services – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards.

Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks.

(2) Watershed Goals. Protect beneficial uses of water from nonpoint sources of pollution in the Port Angeles watershed, including the effects of pathogens, chemicals, sediment, and nutrients on both surface and ground water resources.

(3) Overview. A major goal of the growth management plan is to ensure that public monies are utilized efficiently. It is more cost efficient to provide many public facilities and services when the population is concentrated, as is the case in an urban area. The designation of urban growth areas enables Clallam County and other service providers to plan cost effective and efficient services.

Growth increases the demand for new and/or improved public facilities and services. New residential growth may impact school facilities by increasing the number of school age children in an area without developing a corresponding increase in school facilities. Development can increase traffic levels on County roads and transit systems. Connections to water or sewer systems diminish the available capacity for future growth.

This growth management plan identifies urban areas where public facilities and services can be provided efficiently; ensures that public facilities and services keep pace with growth so that service levels are not diminished; and plans for the location of facilities and services. The plan also identifies the type of public facilities and services which are appropriate in rural and resource lands. The low density of development allowed in these areas dictates much lower levels of public facilities and services in order to minimize public costs.

As a watershed plan, these actions must ensure that public facilities manage the cumulative effects of growth. The plan outlines how the individual and cumulative effects of stormwater quality and quantity should be controlled, with an emphasis on best management practices and proper operation and maintenance of facilities. It also describes methods to assist the public in understanding and complying with new standards of stormwater management. The watershed actions recommend expansion of facilities and services related to waste recycling, reduction, and disposal. A marina and active boating community bring economic benefits to the Port Angeles area, but they also carry increased potential for water quality degradation from waste disposal and the chemicals associated with boat fueling, cleaning, and maintenance. Boating facilities must be designed and operated to minimize the potential for adverse impacts from these activities.

(4) Definition. The Growth Management Act defines “public facilities” as streets, roads, highways, sidewalks, street and road lighting systems, traffic signals, domestic water systems, storm and sanitary sewer systems, parks and recreation facilities, and schools. “Public services” include fire protection and suppression, law enforcement, public health, education, recreation, environmental protection, and other governmental services.

(5) Schools. The Port Angeles School District has facilities within the City of Port Angeles and in the rural locations of Fairview, Dry Creek and lower Monroe Road area. Some of the immediate needs for school facilities were met in 1994 with passage of a bond to allow replacement of the aged facility at Dry Creek. Some existing school facilities are overcrowded, requiring the use of portable classroom buildings. Future growth anticipated by this plan will require new or expanded facilities which will be primarily funded by local levies (bonds) authorized by voters within the school district.

(6) Water. Major public water systems in the Port Angeles region are operated by the City of Port Angeles, Dry Creek Water Association, Black Diamond Water District and the Public Utility District Number 1 of Clallam County which operates several water systems in the Port Angeles area. The Public Utility District finances construction of these systems through local utility districts (LUDs). There are numerous smaller private water purveyors within the area.

(7) Stormwater Management. Presently, Clallam County requires a drainage plan, approved by the Department of Public Works, before a building permit can be issued. The standard method for controlling runoff as recommended by the County is through the use of drywells. Alternative methods include detention ponds, infiltration basins, retention ponds or underground storage tanks. Three (3) primary influences on current and potential stormwater sources outside the City of Port Angeles will be: conversion of forest to residential uses, cumulative effects of development, and lack of clearing and grading ordinance.

The City of Port Angeles is developing a comprehensive Stormwater Management Plan which will present a comprehensive strategy to identify and protect local water resources (streams, wetlands, and shorelines), by controlling local sources of pollution, effective maintenance and operation of existing facilities, definition of appropriate standards for new development and the designing and construction of needed flood control improvements.

(8) Sewer. Sanitary sewer exists within the City of Port Angeles. The Public Utility District is authorized to provide sewage disposal service throughout the PUD service area.

(9) Parks and Recreation. The Clallam County fairgrounds represent the only major County park facility located in the Port Angeles planning area. The City of Port Angeles has twenty-four (24) parks and park facilities located within the City. City parks range in size from the 147-acre Lincoln Park to several neighborhood parks under one acre in size. Major recreational or community facilities include the Arts Center, Vern Burton Community Center, the Community/Senior Center and William Shore Pool. The Port of Port Angeles owns and operates the Port Angeles Boat Haven in Port Angeles harbor The planning area also includes the Olympic National Park, Olympic National Forest and State Department of Natural Resource lands which have numerous recreation sites. Private recreation opportunities in the area include Peninsula Golf Course. There is a demand for new golf courses with public access. New neighborhood scale parks will be needed to serve the growing urban population in the unincorporated portions of the Port Angeles urban growth area.

(10) Fire Protection. Fire protection in the Port Angeles planning area is provided by Clallam County Fire Protection Districts Numbers 2 and 3 in areas outside the city and by the Port Angeles Fire Department inside the city. Three (3) fire stations located at Gale’s Addition, Dry Creek and Black Diamond serve the area within District 2. Fire District 3 from Deer Park Road to Siebert Creek would be served by the R Corner fire station. The City of Port Angeles Fire Station is located downtown on 5th Street. Fire protection districts, like hospital and library districts, are junior taxing districts. Funding for these junior taxing districts comes from property taxes.

(11) Public Health. Public health facilities serving this planning area are located within Port Angeles. Public health services are available through Clallam County’s home health program. Numerous private health care facilities exist within the planning area. These facilities are needed to serve the aging population.

(12) Other Governmental Services. Clallam County provides various facilities and services from the County Courthouse and remote facilities in the Port Angeles planning area. Services provided by the County include law enforcement, roads, public works, health, social services, juvenile services, Superior Court and community development. Major facilities include the Courthouse, Juvenile Center, and County Shop. As the population grows in this area, the need for facility expansion and increased services should be closely monitored.

(13) Financing: New development often pays for the cost of extending new public facilities and services. For example, if a development is proposed on a County road that is not adequate to handle additional traffic, the County is able to require the developer to pay the costs of improving the County road (called “mitigation”). Water and sewer systems are similarly financed; if a developer proposes to extend water and sewer to a property, it is the responsibility of the developer to pay the costs for extending those services.

Another way that development pays for the cost of extending new public facilities is through development fees. For example, the City of Port Angeles requires anyone who hooks up to the sewer or water system to pay a connection fee. This fee is put into a special account for the eventual planning and upgrade of the system, such as the sewer treatment facility. This connection fee is in addition to requiring the developer to extend the actual collection or distribution lines.

This method of paying for public facility and service extension is based on three principles: (a) setting level of service standards for public facilities and services; (b) ensuring that public facilities and services necessary to support development are adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy (called “concurrency”); and (c) requiring development to pay fees for the new facilities rather than relying solely on property taxes or grants to fund development of these public facilities.

31.04.105 Public facilities and services – Policies.

(1) Parks and Recreation.

(a) Policy 1. Identify and provide for increased recreational and public access opportunities to natural resource lands and water where appropriate.

(i) Ensure prominent signage of the Olympic Discovery Trail and all its access trails and paths.

(ii) Develop a prominent system of bicycle/pedestrian feeder trails connecting US 101 to the Olympic Discovery Trail utilizing, among other options, creek bottom corridors such as Tumwater and Valley Creek Trails to provide efficient non-motorized transportation options in the Port Angeles urban growth area.

(iii) Encourage the development of the Foothills Cross Country Equestrian/Pedestrian Trail.

(iv) Maintain working relationship with Pacific Northwest Trails Association in the development of feeder trails and lowland alternatives to their primary Pacific Northwest Trail Route (PNT). As a lowland option to the PNT, the Olympic Discovery Trail Route may be designated a National Recreation Trail where it qualifies and not a National Scenic Trail should the PNT achieve that status.

(v) Encourage the establishment of neighborhood parks within the urban growth area to provide for the localized recreational needs of neighborhood residents in the urban area.

(vi) Encourage further development of saltwater access points for recreation, such as trails, boating, and passive uses.

(vii) Encourage further development of public access to freshwater areas, particularly Lake Sutherland and the Elwha River. With Elwha Dam removal, there will be increased visitation and safe access will be needed.

(viii) Existing managed public access to public forest lands for recreation should be maintained.

(b) [Policy No. 2] That portion of the Clallam County Parks and Recreation Plan, as now or hereafter amended, which relates to the Port Angeles region is hereby adopted as part of this plan.

(c) [Policy No. 3] Parks and recreation facilities necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development as identified in the County Capital Facilities Plan, as now or hereafter amended.

(2) Marinas and Boats.

(a) [Policy No. 4] droplet Update the Shoreline Master Program for the Port Angeles region to include best management practices for marinas. Periodically review the Program and implementation to evaluate effectiveness of BMPs in controlling and preventing pollution associated with marina and boating activities.

droplet County, City of Port Angeles

(b) [Policy No. 5] droplet Site, design and maintain marinas and marine facilities to protect against adverse effects on shellfish resources, wetlands, submerged aquatic vegetation, or other important riparian and aquatic habitat areas. The design of marinas and marine facilities should consider the migration, survival, and harvestability of food fish and shellfish.

droplet County, City of Port Angeles, Port of Port Angeles

(c) [Policy No. 6] droplet Where feasible, redevelopment or expansion of existing marina facilities that have minimal environmental impacts is preferred over new marina development in important habitat areas.

droplet County, City of Port Angeles, Port of Port Angeles

(d) [Policy No. 7] droplet Design boat hull maintenance areas to minimize contaminated runoff. Include source control best management practices that collect pollutants and keep them out of runoff. Boat hull maintenance areas shall be specified with signs listing required BMPs, and hull maintenance should not be allowed to occur outside these areas.

droplet County, City of Port Angeles, Port of Port Angeles

(e) [Policy No. 8] droplet Locate and design fueling stations so that spills can be contained in a limited area. Fueling stations and other marine facilities shall have spill containment information and equipment in a clearly marked, easily accessible location. A spill contingency plan must be developed for fuel storage and dispensation areas and must include spill emergency procedures, such as health and safety, notification, and spill containment and control procedures. Marine facilities personnel must be properly trained in spill containment and control procedures.

droplet County, City of Port Angeles, Port of Port Angeles

(f) [Policy No. 9] droplet Install pumpout, dump station, and restroom facilities where needed to reduce the release of sewage to surface waters, especially where liveaboards comprise a significant portion of the marina users. These facilities should allow ease of access and have signage to promote use by the boating public. All sewage pumpout facilities should be regularly inspected and maintained in operational condition.

droplet Port of Port Angeles

(g) [Policy No. 10] droplet Provide opportunities and facilities for proper disposal of solid and hazardous wastes.

droplet County, City of Port Angeles, Port of Port Angeles

(i) Designate locations for maintenance and cleaning, and employ best management practices to minimize wastes associated with maintenance/cleaning activities.

(ii) Provide appropriate storage, transfer, containment, and disposal facilities for liquid material, such as oil, harmful solvents, antifreeze, and paints. Provide opportunities for recycling of these materials.

(3) Schools.

(a) [Policy No. 11] New school facilities proposed after the effective date of this plan should locate within the Port Angeles urban growth areas where public facilities and services needed to support the school facilities (e.g., water, sewer, transportation, fire and police) can be efficiently provided.

(b) [Policy No. 12] School facilities necessary to support development should be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use, or a financial commitment is in place to complete the improvements within six years without decreasing current service levels below established minimum standards.

(c) [Policy No. 13] The County, City of Port Angeles, State of Washington and the Port Angeles School District should work cooperatively to identify funding sources needed for improvements to school facilities caused by new development.

(4) Water. Please see urban growth area policies for specific reference to water service within the designated urban growth areas.

(a) [Policy No. 14] Public water systems should be provided within designated urban growth areas. Public or municipal water systems (i.e., PUD and City of Port Angeles) should be limited in rural lands to those areas that are within Rural Character Conservation land use designations where public water systems are required to serve clustered development and to those areas that can demonstrate water quantity limitations, water quality problems or hydraulic continuity to rivers and streams. Public water systems in resource lands should be limited to those necessary to serve clustered development in Commercial Forest/Residential Mixed Use land use designations and to those areas that can demonstrate water quantity limitations, water quality problems or hydraulic continuity to rivers and streams.

(b) [Policy No. 15] droplet New development shall utilize existing community water systems where available and feasible, rather than establishing new community water systems in areas already served by existing systems.

droplet Clallam County, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(c) [Policy No. 16] Extension or the existence of public water service in designated rural areas or resource lands shall not result in or be justification for higher density than that anticipated by a regional or subarea comprehensive plan.

(d) [Policy No. 17] Level of service and facility standards should be developed by the water service provider, with standards based on expected land use densities established by this plan.

(e) [Policy No. 18] Water systems necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use.

(5) Stormwater Management.

(a) [Policy No. 19] droplet Control stormwater runoff and treat associated pollutants generated from new development, redevelopment, and new and relocated roads, highways, and bridges.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Transportation

(i) For new development, maintain post development peak runoff rate and average volume at levels that protect aquatic resources and capital improvements.

(ii) Both structural and nonstructural methods should be employed to mitigate the adverse impacts of stormwater.

(iii) Management practices should be designed for site-specific conditions to achieve the desired maximum effectiveness.

(iv) Regional stormwater management is advocated as a means of correcting existing problems, but not necessarily as a means of addressing new projects.

(v) Minimize stormwater impacts to natural conveyance systems.

(vi) Biofiltration best management practices shall be a required component of all stormwater management systems where feasible.

(vii) Where feasible, utilize appropriate biofiltration pollution control mechanisms to treat road and highway runoff prior to discharging to surface and ground waters of the watershed. Minimize stormwater impacts during road highway projects and seek mitigation which would increase stormwater storage.

(b) [Policy No. 20] droplet Riparian areas, and wetlands should be protected and restored as part of regional stormwater management.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(i) Use vegetation and “soft” practices, such as reed berms or willow revetments, rather than “hard” structural improvements, such as rip-rap or concrete revetments, to stabilize stream channels and reduce or eliminate the effects of stormwater.

(ii) Maintain, and increase where feasible, the natural storage capabilities of the watershed’s wetlands. Investigate the potential for increased stormwater storage through artificial wetland development at suitable sites.

(iii) Utilize constructed wetlands to treat and contain surface water runoff pollutants and decrease loading to surface waters. Constructed wetlands or sediment retention basins should be located to have a minimal impact on the surrounding areas. While wetlands constructed for stormwater treatment do not replicate all of the ecological functions of natural wetlands, they should be designed with enhancements which increase their aesthetic value as a landscape amenity whenever possible.

(c) [Policy No. 21] droplet Develop a schedule for implementing stormwater controls and capital facilities identified in stormwater management plans (Clallam County; City of Port Angeles, 1986, 1994), and other necessary improvements to existing stormwater control structures.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(i) Identify and establish priorities and funding for regional structural solutions, retrofit needs and opportunities, and nonstructural alternatives.

(d) [Policy No. 22] droplet Pollution prevention mechanisms, including education and source control and treatment, should be implemented by all jurisdictions as part of comprehensive stormwater management plans. Jurisdictions should cooperate in watershed-wide stormwater management planning and implementation.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Transportation

(e) [Policy No. 23] droplet Alternative designs and maintenance strategies should be developed for impervious parking lots which promote sweeping, use of vegetated areas/grassed swales, and other methods to contain and control pollutants.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(i) All new storm drains shall be identified with a “Dump No Waste, Drains to ... [stream, groundwater, etc.]” message.

(ii) Conduct a volunteer project to stencil existing storm drains with a “Dump No Waste” educational message.

(f) [Policy No. 24] droplet Publish design standards in a readily understandable format for permit applicants and responsible parties. Provide clear requirements to expedite planning, review, and approval of stormwater control methods.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(g) [Policy No. 25] droplet Jurisdictions should undertake periodic monitoring and maintenance to ensure proper operation and maintenance of stormwater facilities of facilities they own and/or operate.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Transportation

(h) [Policy No. 26] droplet Adopt and implement planning and design standards for stormwater facilities that require the minimum amount of maintenance for proper, long-term functioning. Ensure continued performance through appropriate maintenance operations. Repair damage after storms, and periodically inspect practices.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(i) [Policy No. 27] droplet Publish specific obligations and responsibilities of the stormwater facility owner/operator including procedures for identifying owners/operators with long-term responsibility for the facility. Whenever possible, facilities should be operated and maintained by a public entity or professional services contractor. Once installed, facilities should receive thorough maintenance at regular intervals, by individuals trained in proper inspection and maintenance of such facilities.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(j) [Policy No. 28] droplet Develop a procedure for addressing maintenance default by negligent owner/operators. A provision shall be made for public assumption of stormwater control facilities.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(k) [Policy No. 29] droplet Establish a stormwater review and inspection program which includes staff training and education.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(l) [Policy No. 30] droplet Develop training and education programs and materials for public officials, contractors, and others involved with the design, installation, operation, inspection, and maintenance of runoff facilities.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(m) [Policy No. 31] droplet Educate the public about the importance of stormwater management facilities. Explain the purpose and details of stormwater projects and programs, the benefits they provide, and the need for regular maintenance of facilities. Signage at these facilities is an effective way to provide this information, in addition to field trips, workshops, and other educational activities.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(n) [Policy No. 32] droplet Periodically review and evaluate stormwater management programs to ensure continued effectiveness and efficiency. Evaluate locally applied stormwater BMPs to determine their general effectiveness in reducing the quantity and quality impacts of runoff.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(6) Fire Protection. [Policy No. 33] Fire protection and suppression facilities in urban areas should receive first priority. Fire flow (e.g., fire hydrants) in rural areas and resource lands should not be required of new development. Extension of public water systems for fire protection should not be required in rural or resource lands except for commercial/industrial uses and public facilities.

(7) Other Governmental Services. [Policy No. 34] Clallam County and other governmental service providers should continually monitor the population growth, age and other demographic characteristics of the population to determine the need for new or expanded services.

(8) Sanitary Waste Disposal. Please see County-wide Comprehensive Plan policies for specific reference to sanitary waste disposal within and outside urban growth areas. Also see urban growth area designation policies in this regional plan for specific reference to sanitary waste disposal within the designated urban growth areas.

(a) [Policy No. 35] droplet Develop local facilities to treat and dispose of biosolids.

droplet Clallam County, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(b) [Policy No. 36] droplet So that septic sludge could be treatable through a local sewage treatment plant, land application, or other facility, educate waste generators to keep hazardous wastes out of municipal, community, and individual sewage disposal systems.

droplet Clallam County, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(c) [Policy No. 37] droplet Collect, recycle, market and distribute products manufactured from waste such as natural wood debris, debris from the construction industry, and secondary sources of similar material such as yard wastes.

droplet Clallam County

(i) Support development and implementation of a solid waste recycling and utilization project as a public-private partnership between local government and industry.

(d) [Policy No. 38] droplet Pursue a mandatory recycling program in an effort to reduce waste and illegal dumping. Provide incentives such as a variable can rate.

droplet Clallam County

(e) [Policy No. 39] droplet Additional transfer stations offering both waste disposal and recycling should be located conveniently in rural areas. New and existing transfer stations should operate during hours convenient to the public.

droplet Clallam County

(f) [Policy No. 40] droplet Identify common illegal dumping sites. Take measures to reduce the occurrence and negative impacts of dumping, such as posting signs, increasing enforcement, and organizing cleanups. Offer landfill fee waivers or “amnesty days” for organized community cleanups.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(g) [Policy No. 41] droplet Continue household hazardous waste collection events, and expand to include commercial and agricultural waste collection. Develop used oil, used antifreeze, and hazardous chemical recycling programs and site collection centers in convenient locations.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

31.04.110 Transportation – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Encourage efficient multimodal transportation systems that are based on regional priorities and coordinated with County and city comprehensive plans.

Ensure that those public facilities and services necessary to support development shall be adequate to serve the development at the time the development is available for occupancy and use without decreasing current service levels below locally established minimum standards.

(2) Definition. The “transportation system” is composed of air, water, and land transportation facilities and services, including highways and streets, paths, trails and sidewalks, transit, airports, and ports.

(3) Circulation System. The transportation and circulation system should function to serve the land use patterns established by the Comprehensive Plan. For example, rural areas should be served by a transportation system designed for rural uses while urban areas should be served by a circulation system designed to serve urban uses. The transportation system should also focus on connections, either between urban centers, such as from Port Angeles to Sequim, or between different “modes” of travel, such as automobiles to public transit. Some parts of the circulation system in this area serve County-wide and State-wide interests, such as Highway 101, Olympic Discovery Trail, Old Olympic Highway, and boat launch/moorage facilities. It is imperative that the County-wide and State-wide interests are considered when making land use or facility decisions affecting these systems.

(4) Land Use Coordination. In the past, land use planning and transportation planning were not always coordinated. A major problem with the 1982 comprehensive plan was that it utilized a saturation density scheme which allocated enough density to handle more than 100 years of growth. This over-allocation of density creates problems for planning the transportation system due to the fact that large populations can be accommodated in many rural locations and it is difficult to determine where system improvements will be needed next. Although densities allocated in this plan correct this problem in some areas, the problem can still be seen in examining the system deficiencies at build-out densities. As some areas approach build-out in the near future, the transportation system would fail without large expenditures for system improvement. These types of problems will need careful monitoring in the future and a concurrency management system must be instituted to maintain the level of service at acceptable levels. Gone are the days when developments were approved on roads without consideration to impacts on roads or better use of public transportation and highways were built in rural areas which encouraged their conversion. The Clallam County Comprehensive Plan indicates that the transportation system should be consistent with the land use plan.

(5) Level of Service. Level of service standards measuring the degree of traffic congestion are used to serve as a gauge to judge the performance of the transportation system. Level of service is ranked from “A” (free flowing, uncongested) to “F” (Highly congested). When land use assumptions are made based on expected population growth and traffic demand, transportation engineers determine whether the transportation system is capable of handling the increased demand by using these level of service (LOS) standards. LOS standards are based on the average daily traffic (ADT) and characteristics of the area that the road serves (rural, suburban and urban). While LOS standards indicate the degree of congestion or how free-flowing the traffic is, they do not indicate whether the road meets adopted County road (safety) standards.

The level of service established in the County-wide Comprehensive Plan for County roads, either in urban or rural areas is LOS “C.” LOS “C” describes a condition of traffic where the flow of traffic is stable but speeds are controlled by the volume of traffic and the driver begins to feel uncomfortable due to the number of vehicles on the road. Level of service for State highways is LOS “D” for urban areas and tourist corridors, and LOS “C” for rural highways. LOS “D” describes a traffic condition where flow is stable but speed and freedom to maneuver are severely restricted and the driver experiences a poor level of comfort. Figure 6 indicates that most County roads are currently operating at or above these standards.

The forecast of future traffic on County roads in this plan is based on two (2) methods: projected population growth and build-out potential based on land use designations. The forecast of traffic and the impact on adopted LOS standards is used to determine if the transportation system is capable of handling the demand. If the system is not capable of handling the demand, the comprehensive plan must identify how the system will be improved and financed, or the land use plan must be revised to ensure that the minimum “level of service” standards are met.

Figure 4 indicates that the current system is designed to handle the projected twenty (20) year population growth of this region. Table 1 in this section, however, indicates that the system is not designed to handle the estimated build-out. The following roads show failure to meet LOS standards based on the build-out analysis: Old Olympic Highway, Black Diamond Road, Mt. Pleasant Road and Monroe Road. The date when they fail to meet LOS standards depends upon growth rates. As can be seen in the table, portions of Old Olympic Highway, Mt. Pleasant Road and Monroe Road are already operating at LOS “C.” This indicates that these road segments may fail to meet standards within a shorter period of time.

Table 1 – LOS Analysis for County Roads (Build-out and Population Growth)

Road Name

Current LOS1

LOS - Build-out2

LOS -2000 Pop.3

LOS - 2010 Pop.

ADT - Most Recent Count4

ADT - 2000 Pop.

ADT - 2010 Pop.

ADT - Build-out

From Mile Post

To Mile Post

Black Diamond

B

D

B

B

1,170

1,501

1,771

12,675

3.66

3.76

Mt. Pleasant Road

C

F

C

C

3,379

4,688

8,200

29,056

5.76

5.83

Old Olympic Hwy.

C

E

C

C

4,291

5,504

6,495

19,691

0.26

0.34

Monroe Road

C

E

C

C

3,000

4,163

7,281

25,797

0.57

0.73

Airport Road

B

D

B

B

1,229

1,576

1,860

13,574

0.17

0.58

Baker Street

B

D

B

C

1,499

2,080

3,638

12,889

0.00

0.09

1.    Current LOS is analyzed using the Highway Capacity Manual.

2.    Build-out LOS is determined based on future build-out with two (2) considerations: vacant parcels and proposed land use densities within the Plan.

3.    LOS 2000 and LOS 2010 is based on projected population growth rates, not land use densities or vacant parcels.

4.    ADT – Average Daily Traffic. Most Recent Count is anywhere from 1985 to 1993. The ADT for population counts are based on projected population growth rates.

(6) Road Standards. Level of service standards do not indicate that a County road meets minimum design standards. Design standards for County roads are set forth in RCW 35.83.030 and RCW 43.32.020. Those standards are as follows:

Table 2 – Design Standards for County Roads

 

ADT

 

Below 150

150 - 400

401 - 750

751 - 1,000

1,001 - 2,000

2,001 - plus

Roadway Width

20 - 24 ft.

24 ft.

26 ft.

28 ft.

34 ft.

40 ft.

Lane Width

10 ft.

10 ft.

10 ft.

10 ft.

11 ft.

12 ft.

Based on these standards, Figure 2 indicates the County roads with width deficiencies. As can be seen, nearly all of the County roads in this region do not meet the adopted road width standards, even though they meet LOS standards.

Table 3 identifies the County roads segments which are eighteen (18) feet or less in width. These road segments do not meet minimum safety standards. The table also clearly outlines the discrepancy between using LOS standards and road width standards. For example, although Kemp Street is currently at LOS “A,” and is projected to be LOS “B,” it clearly is deficient in road width (only twelve (12) feet). LOS measures how free-flowing a roadway segment is, but fails to recognize whether the road meets minimum safety standards.

Table 3 – County Road Segments Less than Twenty (20) Feet in Width and over 124 ADT

Road Name

Pavement
Width – Current

Deficient Road Width

Current LOS

LOS – Build-out

ADT – Most Recent Count

3rd Ave.

18

6

A

B

254

4th Ave.

18

10

B

C

932

5th Ave.

18

16

B

C

1107

Alice

18

2

A

B

131

Bagley Creek Rd.

18

6

A

B

275

Bay View Ave. S.

18

6

A

B

153

Bean Rd.

18

8

A

C

643

Benson Rd.

18

6

A

C

200

Brook Ave. S.

18

8

A

C

573

Brown

18

8

A

C

547

Carne St.

18

6

A

B

175

Draper

18

6

A

B

314

Dry Creek Rd.

18

6

A

C

288

Eden Valley Rd.

16

4

A

B

142

Elwha Rd.

16

8

A

B

250

Ennis Creek

18

6

A

C

275

Ennis Cutoff Rd.

18

8

A

C

500

Erving Jacobs Rd.

18

6

A

B

235

Gagnon

16

4

A

B

123

Glass Rd.

16

8

A

B

179

Golf Course Rd.

18

8

A

C

402

Hauk

12

12

A

C

257

Henry Boyd Rd.

16

8

A

B

300

Herrick Rd.

18

6

A

B

253

Hoare

16

8

A

B

202

Hunt Rd.

16

4

A

B

144

Kemp St.

12

12

A

B

193

Lake Farm Rd.

16

8

A

B

192

Larch Ave.

18

16

B

C

1,382

Lee’s Creek

16

8

A

C

322

Little River Rd.

18

6

A

A

197

Lower Elwha Rd.

18

8

A

C

543

Marzden Pl.

18

2

A

B

125

Masters

18

6

A

C

226

McNutt St.

16

0

A

B

150

Monroe

18

10

B

C

805

Mt. Angeles Rd.

18

10

B

C

928

Mt. Pleasant Rd.

18

10

B

C

993

Pine Pl.

16

4

A

B

125

Pioneer

18

16

B

C

1,189

Place Rd.

16

8

A

C

369

Rife Rd.

16

8

A

B

178

Scrivner E.

18

8

A

C

438

South Shore Rd.

16

10

A

B

450

Stratton Rd.

16

8

A

C

266

Township Line Rd.

14

10

A

B

197

(7) Private Roads. The transportation system in the Port Angeles region also includes private streets and easements, often unimproved, designed to serve lots within short plats and surveys. A mechanism to upgrade these roads to land division and fire protection minimum standards should be in place to assist property owners developing property which does not directly abut a public street.

(8) Alternative Solutions. Solutions to transportation deficiencies may include incentives to change patterns of transportation behavior, such as car pooling rather than single occupancy vehicles, and enhancements to alternative modes of transportation that would be efficient and less costly to maintain, such as transit or bicycle lanes.

31.04.115 Transportation policies.

(1) Highway 101.

(a) [Policy No. 1] Preserve and enhance the Highway 101 corridor for regional mobility to improve its functionality for business, area residents, tourists, nonmotorized transportation, freight and services.

(i) Clallam County should study and plan to construct a new east-west route to be located south of and paralleling Highway 101 on the east side of the Port Angeles urban growth area. This new roadway would be primarily located within the urban growth area and provides an alternate east-west entrance into the urban area for local residents as well as an emergency access route in case the sole access point at Morse Creek should become impassable due to an emergency.

(ii) Encourage the Washington State Department of Transportation to retain all of their properties adjoining Highway 101 and Highway 112 for future use as rest stops, scenic pullouts, roadside parks and future transit pullouts.

(iii) Work with the Washington State Department of Transportation and other agencies to ensure that Highway 101 meets the goal that the corridor function regionally for the mobility of goods, services and passengers. Included in this goal would be review of State access policy to ensure the direct access to the highway from individual properties is minimized.

(iv) Improve Highway 112 and 101 in conjunction with casino development plans of the Elwha S’Klallam Tribe to ensure that safety and level of service are maintained at current levels.

(v) Adopt regulations prohibiting access to Highway 101 when access to County/City roads is available or when shared access points are available.

(vi) Highway 101 should have adequate shoulders for bicyclists. Current deficiencies in the eastern portion of the urban growth area should be corrected to encourage bicycle commuting. Storage facilities for bicycles should be available in conjunction with transit shelters along the corridor.

(vii) Pedestrian facilities (sidewalks or paths) should be planned along the Highway 101 corridor through the urban growth area of Port Angeles.

(viii) Park-and-ride lots and transit shelters should be conveniently located along the Highway 101 corridor in the urban growth area of Port Angeles and at the intersections of County arterials and Highway 101.

(ix) Passing lanes should be planned along the highway corridor in rural areas.

(x) The proliferation of stoplights on Highway 101 should be discouraged. New development should be encouraged to locate at existing intersections where stoplights are already in place.

(xi) Left-turn access to Highway 101 should be controlled with raised landscaped medians for Highway 101 center median turn lanes to prevent the potential for head on collisions caused by drivers using center median turn lanes as a left turn acceleration lanes.

(xii) The Warren-truss Elwha River Bridge should be studied for the parameters of: (1) retaining multi-use circulation; (2) rehabilitating for historic purposes and nonmotorized circulation only; (3) removing and re-establishing an improved circulation pattern; or (4) removing and replacement in the same location. New funding opportunities should accompany each transportation study option.

(b) Policy 2. Enhance the roadway aesthetics and improve the facades and landscaping of businesses fronting on the Scenic Highway 101 corridor in the urban growth area in order to enhance business opportunities and general appearance to local residents and the traveling public.

(i) The Port Angeles Highway 101 urban corridor should develop as a tree lined, landscaped boulevard. Deciduous street trees, landscaped medians, roadside landscaping and improved pedestrian amenities should be included in all future urban Highway 101 upgrades and as development standards for new development along the corridor. Assist corridor business owners in obtaining the funding needed to upgrade building facades, landscaping and pedestrian amenities.

(ii) The east entrance to Port Angeles urban growth area at Deer Park should be enhanced with landscaped medians, street trees and streetscape landscaping in accordance with the Port Angeles Gateway Plan.

(iii) Clallam County should work with the Washington State Department of Transportation to obtain funding for ADA accessible restrooms at the Deer Park Scenic Gateway Center, a popular access point to the Olympic Discovery Trail.

(iv) Work with the Washington State Department of Transportation and Clallam Transit to ensure a safe drop-off point for transit riders accessing businesses near the Deer Park Cinema.

(v) Increase traveler information and services at the Deer Park Scenic Gateway Center. Inform vehicle and bicycle travelers about the Olympic Discovery Trail, its route and connections, and access to city services.

(vi) Adopt regulations prohibiting access to Highway 101 when access to County/City roads is available or when shared access points are available.

(c) [Policy No. 3] Improve circulation patterns around the City of Port Angeles. (See Figure 10)

(i) Highway 101 capacity should be improved in the urban growth area through development of shared parking regulations, required interconnection of parking lots on adjoining lots and an associated reduction of individual access points directly onto Highway 101.

(ii) New and expanded commercial or industrial development should make appropriate provisions for transit connections in the urban area.

(2) Rural and Urban Roads.

(a) [Policy No. 4] With the completion of a new east-west route on the east side of the Port Angeles urban growth area, the circulation system of County roads in rural and resource land areas should be considered completed for this planning area. The County should not pursue new County roads except in those circumstances where roads are built within subdivisions with private funds and then turned over to the County for maintenance.

(b) [Policy No. 5] Road systems in rural and resource areas should be at rural and resource land standards which preserve the essential character of the land use.

(i) County gravel roads in forested resource lands should remain at gravel standards or be returned to another agency or vacated to adjacent property owners in order to lessen development conversion pressures which occur when paved roads provide access to resource areas. Examples of roads that should remain gravel include Little River Road (between Lake Dawn and Black Diamond Road), Upper Monroe Road, and Upper Mount Pleasant.

(ii) Improve Siebert Creek curve on Old Olympic Highway for all modes of transportation including bikes.

(c) [Policy No. 6] The following road improvements have been identified based on LOS standards, improved circulation, and road width and safety standards. The roads are listed in approximate order of importance:

•    

Old Olympic Highway (finish widening, straighten alignment)

•    

Larch Avenue (realignment of intersection with Highway 101)

•    

Edgewood Drive/Airport Road (intersection)

•    

Gales Street (widen)

•    

McNutt Street intersection with Highway 101 (eliminate intersection)

•    

Old Mill Road/Simmons Road (school bus pullout)

•    

North Lee’s Creek Road (guardrails)

•    

Black Diamond (widen)

•    

O’Brien Road (realign, widen)

•    

Lower Elwha Road (curves, shoulders, guardrails)

•    

Lake Farm Road (widen north of school)

•    

Monroe Road (widen between Arnette and Draper)

•    

Mt. Pleasant Road (widen road north of Draper and near Gravel Pit)

•    

Draper (widen)

•    

Gasman Road (realign at old rail crossing)

•    

Deer Park (install guardrail)

•    

Dan Kelly Road at intersection of Colville Road (intersection improvements)

•    

Mt. Pleasant Road at Dietz Road (intersection improvements)

•    

Henry Boyd Road (intersections and shoulder widening)

•    

Little River Road (curves)

•    

Place Road (guardrail)

•    

Township Line (widen).

(3) Road Standards.

(a) [Policy No. 7] Improvements to County roads should consider the rural character of the Port Angeles region. Needed safety improvements should be the minimum necessary to address the safety problem, particularly in rural areas where country roads enhance the character of the area, as well as being a deterrent to speeding. In rural areas, limit the number of access points to County roads in order to limit impediments to traffic and to maintain open space qualities. Please see County-wide Comprehensive Plan for adopted County road standards.

(b) [Policy No. 8] When County roads are rebuilt in this area, forecasts of future traffic should be based on the following principles:

(i) If the County road is on the regional transportation network (see Peninsula Regional Transportation Planning Organization – PRTPO), the road should be designed to accommodate transportation growth rates within the PRTPO plan.

(ii) If the County road is not on the regional transportation network, the road should be designed based on 50 percent of potential build-out as indicated in the land use plan.

(c) [Policy No. 9] Private road standards should allow for flexibility while meeting minimum safety requirements for emergency vehicles, except in those circumstances where it is in the best public interest to develop a public road. Right-of-way standards, improved widths, and surfacing of private roads should not be required at the same standard as public roads. The use of road improvement districts (RIDs) should be encouraged to equitably share the cost of upgrading private roads to land division and fire protection minimum standards.

(4) Paths, Trails and Sidewalks.

(a) [Policy No. 10] The safety and quality of travel experience for the nonmotorized traveler shall be improved with a greater role in the transportation system. Nonmotorized travel should be promoted within the Port Angeles area for multipurpose commuter, recreation and transportation trails for users of all abilities.

(b) Policy 11. The Olympic Discovery Trail should be a priority transportation and recreational facility providing easy access to affordable physical activity, a safe off-road non-motorized alternative for commuters, and a scenic route for touring bicyclists. The Olympic Discovery Trail at full development will connect Port Townsend to Forks with trail extensions accessing LaPush on the Pacific Ocean, a total distance of 145 miles.

(c) Policy 12. A system of lateral/feeder trails should connect US 101 to the Waterfront Trail adjacent to Lee’s, Ennis, Peabody and Tumwater Creeks.

(d) Policy 13. Utilizing City-owned former railroad grade, complete and sign the westerly extension of the Olympic Discovery Trail from the base of Ediz Hook to the City’s western boundary and the Elwha River including construction of a bridge over Dry Creek by the City.

(e) Policy 14. A path, trail, or sidewalk accommodating non-motorized travel shall be required along US 101, County arterials, major collectors within urban growth areas, and within walking distance of school facilities.

(5) Policy 15. The following are the designated bicycle routes. All roads on a designated bicycle route should have a minimum improved shoulder width of three to five feet, depending on the speed limit of the road. Several of these routes are within the City of Port Angeles. The City should be encouraged to designate these routes and provide safe bicycle shoulders.

•    

US 101 from Siebert Creek to Lake Crescent

•    

Old Olympic Highway from Siebert Creek to Highway 101

•    

Olympic Discovery Trail/Waterfront Trail from Old Olympic to Ediz Hook

•    

Marine Drive

•    

Front Street from College Plaza to the Waterfront Trail

•    

First Street from College Plaza to the Waterfront Trail

•    

Race Street from Front Street to the Hurricane Ridge Road

•    

Hill Street

•    

M Street from Hill Street to 18th Street

•    

L Street from 18th Street to Lauridsen

•    

Lauridsen from L Street to Airport Drive

•    

Airport Drive from Edgewood Drive to Lauridsen Boulevard

•    

Edgewood Drive from Airport Road to Laird Road

•    

Laird Road from Edgewood Drive to Highway 101

•    

Highway 112 from Freshwater Bay to Highway 101.

(6) Multimodal:

(a) Policy 16. First priority for transit service and facility improvements should be for designated urban growth areas and routes along the regional transportation system.

(b) Policy 17. Park-and-ride lots and transit shelters should be conveniently located along the Highway 101 corridor in the urban growth areas of Port Angeles and at the intersections of County arterials or collectors and Highway 101. Design park-and-ride lots with transit shelters and bicycle storage facilities on-site.

(c) Policy 18. Encourage reduced reliance on single occupant vehicles (SOV) and reduce vehicle trips generated while encouraging the use of other transportation modes as cost effective or time saving travel alternatives.

(i) In the Port Angeles urban area, foster employer and retail business partnerships with the assistance of local service organizations to implement programs encouraging employees to use alternate transportation modes by exchanging coupons as proof of HOV or non-motorized trips to work for retail service or merchandise.

(ii) Encourage transportation shuttle services and parking strategies for regional attractions such as Hurricane Ridge, the Elwha Valley, and Lake Crescent with private charter services and public/private partnerships.

(iii) Encourage ridership and support transit expansion to reduce single occupant vehicles (SOVs).

(iv) Develop neighborhood scale park-and-ride lots at Highway 101 junction of collectors in the Port Angeles urban area. Design lots with bicycle storage facilities on-site. Proposed locations: Gales Addition (Stock Market Foods), Mt. Pleasant Road, Strait View Drive, and Deer Park Road.

(v) Pursue the Port Angeles Multimodal Transportation Center for most efficient usage as a regional and local facility.

(7) Airports.

(a) Policy 19. Ensure that land uses adjacent to the Port Angeles International Airport are compatible with the continued use of the airport for the air transportation needs of the region.

(b) Policy 20. Provide adequate roadway connections between the Port Angeles International Airport and the existing major arterial streets, roads and highways serving the airport. Ensure that there are adequate public transportation connections to the Port Angeles International Airport.

(8) Marine Terminals.

(a) Policy 21. Ensure adequate access to the Port Angeles Marine Terminals providing ferry access to Canada.

(b) Policy 22. Monitor efforts to establish a high speed passenger/package freight vessel transportation system (i.e., mosquito fleet) in the Puget Sound region, and support the inclusion of Port Angeles in such a system if it is established.

(9) Level of Service.

(a) Policy 23. The minimum acceptable level of service (LOS) standard for County roads in both rural and urban areas shall be LOS “C,” using standard rating methodology.

(b) Policy 24. New development, such as land divisions and non-resource uses (e.g., forestry, agriculture, fisheries) should not be allowed unless served by a County road meeting a surface width standard of 18 feet and having a maximum grade of 12 percent.

(10) Financing.

(a) Policy 25. Place a high priority on investment and expenditure of limited public funds in the transportation system in urban growth areas and limit investment and expenditure in rural areas to arterial development connecting communities and neighborhoods.

(b) Policy 26. The existing transportation system should be maintained before expenditure of limited public funds on expanded facilities.

(c) Policy 27. Traditional funding sources should continue to be the primary funding source pay for improvements to County roads in the region.

(d) Policy 28. The County shall require new development to rectify and/or compensate for impacts to transportation facilities not meeting minimum safety standards or for developments expected to increase demand, such as significantly higher average daily traffic (ADT).

31.04.120 Affordable housing – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goal. Encourage the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of the population of this State, promote a variety of residential densities and housing types, and encourage preservation of existing housing stock.

(2) Definition. “Affordable housing” is typically broken into three categories based on family income. Because of the increase in housing values in the past five years, all three categories of affordable housing are desired within the planning area.

(a) “Very low income” means those families earning below 50 percent of County-wide median income can afford the rent or sale price.

(b) “Low income” means those families earning 50 to 80 percent of County-wide median income can afford the rent or sale price.

(c) “Moderate income” means those families earning 80 to 95 percent of County-wide median income can afford the rent or sale price.

(3) Cost of Housing. The 1990 U.S. Census indicated that a family earning the family median income in Clallam County could purchase a home of average value in the Port Angeles region. While the census figures indicate that housing is affordable in the Port Angeles region to a family earning the median income, one must weigh the fact that the average home value figures are on the low side due to the large number of older homes in the region. New homes in the Port Angeles region sell for prices that are out of reach for many families in Clallam County. The census also demonstrated that manufactured housing is an affordable housing option for many residents of the Port Angeles region.

(4) Affordable Housing Types. The types of affordable housing available within the Port Angeles area include:

•    

Multifamily in Port Angeles;

•    

Mobile home parks, such as Welcome Inn, Elmer’s Trailer Park, etc.;

•    

Housing developments which have manufactured housing;

•    

Urban density housing with small lot sizes, such as Gales Addition; and

•    

Accessory housing, such as converted basements and guest houses.

(5) Regulations. Additional regulations and costs for public services and facilities can drive up the cost of housing. Limiting densities in rural areas may make the area more exclusive, which could raise property values and thus, property taxes.

Flexible zoning techniques could lower the cost of some property. Rather than establishing minimum lot sizes in rural areas, land divisions could be based on maximum residential density. Utilizing flexible zoning, a landowner might be able to place lots closer to required services, such as roads and electricity, thus lowering the cost for development of the lots.

31.04.125 Affordable housing – Policies.

(1) Affordable housing opportunities will be available throughout the Port Angeles region in urban and rural areas. Strategies for supplying affordable housing opportunities will vary in rural and urban areas in order to maintain the character of these areas.

(2) Clallam County should encourage the development of affordable housing opportunities in urban areas. Affordable housing in urban areas will be provided through the following techniques:

(a) Multifamily developments will be encouraged to locate in the urban growth areas where transit access, availability of facilities/utilities and other factors important to multifamily development can be provided.

(b) Manufactured home parks and developments will be encouraged within the urban growth area. Existing manufactured home parks will be encouraged to remain in operation. Home prices within these parks are generally less than stick-built homes on individual sites due to smaller lot sizes or lot rental practices.

(c) The smaller lot sizes and higher densities allowed within the urban growth area should allow building lots and housing units to be available at prices affordable to many County residents.

(d) Accessory housing will be allowed in all urban and rural zones.

(e) Accessory housing and multiunit apartments will be allowed above commercial buildings and multifamily dwellings will be permitted to locate behind commercial highway frontages or along back streets in commercially zoned areas. The zoning designation of urban neighborhood commercial will be established in the unincorporated portions of the Port Angeles urban growth area as mixed use districts allowing a blend of commercial uses and multifamily development.

(3) Affordable housing opportunities should be encouraged in rural areas but will follow rural density and open space guidelines to maintain rural character and limit the development of large urban pockets within the rural area. Affordable housing opportunities in rural areas will be met through the following techniques:

(a) Accessory housing or “granny flats” will be an allowed use.

(b) Under rural character conservation homesites smaller than one acre will be approved in rural areas as long as the overall density of the site is not increased over present levels and open space areas (10 acres or larger) are provided as an integral part of the development. Half acre lots should sell at prices affordable to many moderate income residents in the County.

(4) The County should place a high priority on the provision of infrastructure to serve high density housing in the unincorporated portion of urban growth areas by working out agreements with urban service providers for sewer and water service to such developments and should consider partially subsidizing infrastructure costs to low-income affordable housing projects.

(5) Planned unit developments will be encouraged within the urban growth area with incentives provided to supply a percentage of affordable housing in each development. Prime consideration for planned unit development in rural areas should be maintenance of surrounding rural densities to maintain rural character, although some affordable units may be produced through this technique.

(6) The County-wide Housing Task Force should set goals for the provision of low cost and special needs housing in the Port Angeles region. These goals should recognize the needs identified in the Clallam County Needs Assessment Report published in June of 1991 as well as more current data or plans.

(7) Repealed by Ord. 725, 2002.

(8) Infill development in urban growth areas should be encouraged to take place at the maximum densities allowed.

(9) Clallam County should examine the feasibility of encouraging the construction of very low and low income housing by exempting these units from impact fees, should such fees be adopted.

(10) Clallam County should encourage the housing authority to obtain more HUD Section 8 rental assistance vouchers for the Port Angeles area.

(11) Clallam County should develop a housing rehabilitation program under the Community Development Block Grant Program to aid low income residents of the Port Angeles Planning Region.

(12) Flexible zoning techniques, such as cluster housing, transfer of density on a parcel, and plan unit developments that maintain current densities and the essential character of the area in which they are located should be allowed in order to lower the cost of land for affordable housing opportunities.

(13) Multifamily developments within urban growth areas should be allowed in all residential zones where density exceeds seven units per acre. Areas zoned at lesser densities in urban areas are usually heavily impacted by wetlands and other physical constraints which would severely constrain multifamily development.

(14) The County should ensure that development standards do not discourage the provision of affordable housing.

(15) The County should ensure that sufficient lands are designated within urban growth areas for the provision of high density and affordable housing development.

31.04.130 Economic development – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goal. Encourage economic development throughout the State that is consistent with adopted comprehensive plans, promote economic opportunity for all citizens of this State, especially for unemployed and for disadvantaged persons, and encourage growth in areas experiencing insufficient economic growth, all within the capacities of the State’s natural resources, public services, and public facilities.

Encourage the involvement of citizens in the planning process and ensure coordination between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts.

(2) Watershed Goal. Ensure long-term, sustainable, environmental and economic health of the watershed.

Ensure cooperation and coordination in resource management.

Promote stewardship by residents, decision makers, visitors, and agencies in the Port Angeles watershed.

(3) Outlook. The economy of Clallam County and the Port Angeles regional planning area has changed dramatically in the last 20 years. Twenty years ago, the area relied heavily on the forestry industry. Changes in forest management have led to increased efforts to diversify the region’s economic base. The recent relocation of Admiral Marine works to Clallam County with the addition of 150 new jobs is a prime example of diversification which strengthens the local economy. The region will continue to look to the forest industry, tourism, recreation, services, the construction industry and retail for its economic future. Light manufacturing and medical services also can play a vital role in the future.

A healthy, sustainable environment and economy must focus on development in place, redevelopment, and improving existing facilities. Existing levels of industry and commerce must be supported, and obsolete industries must be replaced by viable ones. Industries must be environmentally responsible if they wish to do business in Clallam County. And financial resources must be available to invest in new technologies that achieve the dual objectives of environmental and economic health.

Commercial and industrial development has and will continue to play a vital role in the economic development of the region. Commercial development, particularly retail, has expanded considerably in the last 10-year period. Industrial or manufacturing type jobs, however, have not flourished. Manufacturing is an important part of an economic development strategy: the jobs are family wage income, far exceeding service type jobs, and the sale of manufactured goods outside the region represent new dollars recruited within the local community. Both commercial and industrial development requires suitable locations, appropriately zoned, and with the necessary infrastructure.

The following table illustrates current commercial and industrial zoning within the region.

Area

Commercial Land Use

Industrial Land Use

City of Port Angeles

350 acres

855 acres

Unincorporated UGA

412 acres

366 acres

Outside UGAs

42 acres

142 acres (RLC)

31.04.135 Economic development – Policies.

(1) Clallam County should develop infrastructure extension agreements with the City of Port Angeles or the PUD that would allow development of industrial and commercial lands which are not contiguous to the City within the unincorporated portion of the Port Angeles urban growth area. Any such infrastructure extension agreements shall be consistent with an annexation plan agreed upon by Clallam County and the City of Port Angeles.

(2) Clallam County should identify urban regional commercial sites within the Port Angeles urban growth area, properly zone these sites, maintain them in appropriate sizes and quantity, and coordinate the provision of infrastructure. Design standards addressing buffers, traffic, access, noise, screening, landscaping and signage should be developed for regional commercial sites.

(a) Based on current population forecasts, the County should identify, properly zone, and reserve for future development up to two large site, urban regional commercial properties on the east side of Port Angeles.

(b) Regional commercial centers should be clustered at intersections of major collectors and Highway 101, rather than continuing to allow narrow strip development along the entire length of urban highway. Clustering regional commercial sites should enhance business vitality, protect residential property values north and south of the corridor, allow efficient service provision, minimize traffic lights on Highway 101 and improve traffic safety.

(c) Investigate the feasibility of regional commercial preservation regulations which act to maintain these properties in the large parcel sizes needed to attract regional business growth.

(3) Determine the long-range demand for industrial space and identify suitable areas for regional industrial development.

(a) Designations of land for industrial uses should provide sites of sufficient size as to attract small to medium size industrial facilities and locate industry where infrastructure is planned, exists, or can be efficiently provided.

(b) Investigate the feasibility of industrial preservation regulations which act to maintain these properties in the large parcel sizes needed to attract regional industrial growth.

(c) Due to the present lack of industrial site demand and the lack of infrastructure, some of the large area which was designated for industrial uses in the Dry Creek area in the 1982 Comprehensive Plan has been re-evaluated for its potential land use. Property which is not needed for long-term industrial development has been identified in the current plan and residential development at urban densities will be permitted on these lands located inside the urban growth area. Residential development at rural densities on these former industrial sites will be permitted outside the urban growth area.

(4) Clallam County should ensure that a reasonable proportion of small parcels (less than 10 acres) exists for small business serving neighborhood needs within the UGA. Neighborhood Commercial land use designations can be utilized to separate urban regional commercial sites and allow for commercial land uses at scales appropriate for their neighborhood setting. The existence of a commercial strip between urban regional commercial sites should not warrant the expansion of their depth into residentially zoned areas as that will not change the strip commercial nature of development but will only result in a deeper commercial strip.

(5) Clallam County working in concert with other economic development interests should maintain current commercial/industrial site survey information including available and projected public facilities and services, surrounding land uses, transportation capabilities, site suitability based on environmental constraints, and other relevant economic information.

(6) Clallam County should coordinate the development of capital facilities and public improvements as a priority to lands designated for commercial and industrial development. Clallam County should work with the City of Port Angeles and the Port to develop a coordinated infrastructure development plan for development of industrial lands.

(7) Clallam County should ensure that Highway 101 is maintained for smooth flow of commercial traffic through encouraging controlled access to the highway, supporting bypasses of current traffic bottlenecks, minimizing additional stoplights on the highway, consolidating commercial driveways fronting on Highway 101 and supporting multimodal options to single occupancy use of the highway.

(8) Clallam County will make continuous, concerted efforts to attract and support businesses which employ or address the needs of disabled and handicapped persons.

(9) Clallam County will develop and implement a set of landscaping/building design guidelines for development along the Highway 101 and Highway 112 corridors. Landscaping and design guidelines will be used to improve the visual appearance of these important travel ways. Landscaping guidelines should generally implement the design features of the drawings prepared for the Comprehensive Plan. Grant funding should be sought through various sources to upgrade landscaping and facades for existing commercial and industrial operations.

(10) All levels of government should encourage economic development by working cooperatively with other economic development interests to provide water, sewer, and transportation infrastructure, appropriate land use designations (e.g., zoning) and to encourage new businesses to locate in those areas. Improvement costs should be paid through bonds, local improvement districts, and real estate excise taxes and repaid by the developer over time. The cost of connection to these systems needs to be carefully considered as excessive fees can discourage economic growth.

(11) Urban neighborhood commercial designations within urban growth areas should allow for a mix of residential and commercial land uses in order to encourage more interaction between local residents and businesses.

(12) Rural areas should allow research parks when the nature of the research requires a rural location such as is the case with the Battelle Facility near Sequim which required a waterfront location. Standards should be developed to ensure that these facilities do not cause adverse impacts, such as increased traffic, noise or pollution.

(13) Recreational developments that provide attractions to tourists and citizens in the area should be encouraged. Examples of appropriate developments would include golf courses, shoreline access, parks, trails. Existing tourist attractions, including Hurricane Ridge, the Olympic Discovery Trail, and Sol Duc Hot Springs should be maintained for year-round public access and enjoyment.

(14) Resource-based industries should continue to be supported, including conservation of forest and agricultural lands, and processing of raw materials.

(15) Clallam County should ensure that land use plans and regulations provide an environment conducive to business development, consistent with economic goals and objectives and protection of the public health, safety and welfare.

(16) The quality of the environment should be protected in order to attract tourists and new business which desire to locate in a quality environment enjoyed on the Olympic Peninsula.

(17) droplet Foster public dialogue to explore and define the elements of a sustainable community.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension

(a) Bring together development, industry, agriculture, private citizens, and interest groups in a forum setting to identify issues, common goals, ideas, and funding sources for developing and sustaining environmental and economic health.

(b) Sponsor public cultural celebrations and entertainment that illustrate and/or support balancing environmental and economic issues.

(c) Sponsor a sustainable enterprise fair to market innovation within Clallam County, and to market Clallam County to innovative enterprises.

(18) droplet Employ educational institutions to gather information about new technologies and sustainable enterprises. Identify model communities, programs, businesses, and approaches to watersheds and sustainability. Present this information to business, industry, homeowners, schools.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension

(19) droplet Maintain and expand an inventory of sustainable industries and innovative technologies which could be transferred to the Port Angeles watershed. Make this inventory available through public libraries and public and private offices.

droplet Clallam County Economic Development Council, North Olympic Library System

(20) droplet Initiate a dialogue with neighborhood and community groups to exchange information about what is environmentally and economically acceptable.

droplet Clallam County Economic Development Council

(21) droplet Continue to develop high-quality educational institutions that are attractive to industries. Improve local secondary schools to provide academic and vocational training consistent with market needs. Seek to establish research facilities, satellite campuses, and higher-education academic institutions.

droplet Port Angeles School District, Peninsula College, Western Washington University

(22) droplet Build the resources of the public and school libraries through contributions of published materials that describe sustainable enterprises and communities on a concrete (rather than theoretical), project-oriented level. Utilize Western Washington University’s Peninsula College Environmental Studies program as a repository and general distribution center for this information.

droplet North Olympic Library System, Peninsula College, Western Washington University

(23) droplet Develop local facilities for recycling and manufacturing of recycled products. Search out and retain markets for recyclable materials. Provide additional sites for short-term storage of recyclable materials awaiting efficient means of transport. Pursue incentives to reduce waste storage through: the cost effectiveness of landfill disposal versus transportation costs; subsidizing transportation of collected materials if economically beneficial; establishing a waste-to-energy facility; or other methods.

droplet Clallam County, Clallam County Economic Development Council

(24) droplet Facilitate materials exchange, through physical or electronic bulletin boards, community “flea markets,” or a dedicated reuse/recycling facility.

droplet Clallam County

(25) droplet Initiate an awards program to recognize excellence and use of sustainability and nontoxic principles in residential and commercial development and in facility operation and maintenance.

droplet Clallam County Economic Development Council

(26) droplet Evaluate and, where feasible, reform regulations to provide economic and other incentives to attract environmentally compatible enterprises to the Port Angeles watershed. Encourage businesses to make commitments to environmental enhancement in the watershed.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(27) droplet Acquire information and conduct studies to establish the limits of a healthy watershed in Port Angeles. Identify benchmarks of health which should not be exceeded, including those related to water quantity, resource extraction, and vegetation, fish, and wildlife abundance and diversity. Identify conservation measures and technological methods which could be used to extend those limits while retaining a reserve capacity to account for unpredictable needs or losses.

droplet Western Washington University, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Peninsula College

(28) droplet Utilize a process similar to the Dungeness-Quilcene pilot project to allocate water resources among user groups before there is a crisis.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Port of Port Angeles, PUD #1 of Clallam County, Water Associations, Affected Parties

(29) droplet Analyze the economic impacts of protecting shorelines, streams, wetlands, and other water-related resources. Include the costs and benefits of protection policies, as well as the potential future costs resulting from degradation or irreversible loss of resources.

droplet Clallam County

(30) droplet Conduct long-term monitoring of parameters of watershed health. Summarize the “State of the Watershed” annually in a report written for citizens and policy makers, and include a water quality summary in the EDC’s “Investor’s Guide.”

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Western Washington University, Clallam County Economic Development Council

31.04.140 The natural environment – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Maintain and enhance natural resource-based industries, including productive timber, agricultural, and fisheries industries. Encourage the conservation of productive forest lands and productive agricultural lands, and discourage incompatible uses.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks.

Encourage the involvement of citizens in the planning process and ensure coordination between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts.

Protect the environment and enhance the State’s high quality of life, including air and water quality, and the availability of water.

(2) Watershed Goals. Protect and enhance watershed resources, and reverse degradation where it has occurred.

Protect beneficial uses of water from nonpoint sources of pollution, including the effects of pathogens, chemicals, sediment, and nutrients on both surface and ground water resources.

Ensure cooperation and coordination in resource management.

(3) Flora and Fauna. The Olympic Peninsula is renowned for its extensive conifer stands of Douglas fir, Western red cedar, Sitka spruce, and Western hemlock. The fir, cedar, and spruce are the largest tree species in the watershed. Located within the conifer stands are deciduous trees: red alder, bigleaf and vine maples, willow, and black cottonwoods. They thrive in bottom land environments, particularly alongside streams, but occasionally grow elsewhere. Many locations in the higher elevations and a few locations in the lower elevations of the watershed contain special plants and plant communities. Some plants are listed by Washington State’s Natural Heritage Program as sensitive or monitor species. Vegetative cover can reduce pollutant loads, by slowing, detaining, or even absorbing quantities of bacteria, chemicals, sediment, and even heavy metals.

Many different mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and insects use one or more habitats found within the watershed. Marine mammals commonly found near the shoreline include sea and river otters (also in rivers and streams), harbor seals, gray whales, and harbor porpoises. Cavity nesting ducks found in the watershed feed on animal matter in wetlands and require snags and emergent/woody vegetation in swamps. Buffers areas with large trees and woody vegetation for breeding and rearing of their young are beneficial. Many other species of birds either live entirely in the watershed or use it as a resting/feeding area during annual migrations. Many shore birds use the Port Angeles regional watershed shoreline to feed during spring and fall migrations.

(4) Streams. There are 312 miles of mapped streams within the Port Angeles regional watershed, which includes Bagley Creek, Siebert Creek, Morse Creek, Lee’s Creek, Ennis Creek, Peabody Creek, Valley Creek, Tumwater Creek, Dry Creek, and the Elwha River drainages. Most of these streams are perennial. All of these subwatersheds outlet into the Strait of Juan de Fuca or are a tributary to the Elwha River. Base flow in most area streams is maintained by springs, seeps, and wetlands. Stream corridors are influenced by the management and use of adjacent lands. The overall health of stream corridors determines the productive capabilities of wildlife and fish habitats within the corridor. Vegetation along streams reduces bank erosion and diminishes the impacts of flooding. Streamside vegetation filters nutrients and sediment from surface runoff, preventing or slowing their entry into surface or groundwater. Maintenance of stream flows is extremely important, especially during times of low precipitation. Several streams in the watershed have limited fish production because of low flows. Stream corridors within the Port Angeles regional watershed display a wide variety of conditions from densely wooded and undisturbed to heavily impacted. The Elwha River is the major river in the watershed. Federal law (PL102-495) has authorized a study for restoration of anadromous fish to this river. Clallam County does not support removal of the Elwha River dams, but should dam removal become a reality, could provide technical and educational support for the project.

(5) Marine Waters. Port Angeles regional watershed provides habitat for a variety of marine and freshwater fishes. The marine shoreline of most of the watershed is fairly steep with large cobble and rock. Nearshore habitats are important nurseries for many kinds of juvenile fish. Many commercially and recreationally important species of shellfish are found immediately offshore of the Port Angeles regional watershed. Dungeness crab, shrimp, sea cucumbers, and red sea urchins are the primary species harvested. Other species found and harvested to a limited extent are octopus, green sea urchins, squid, and pink shrimp. Subtidal commercial concentrations of geoducks and hardshell clams occur in the Strait.

Historically, the Port Angeles Harbor was a site of shellfish harvest by indigenous peoples. Port Angeles Harbor is now classified as prohibited for shellfish harvest by DOH, due to the limited intertidal areas and the nearness of pollution sources in the harbor. Regardless of their commercial harvestability or fitness for human consumption, shellfish serve an important ecological function. They filter pollutants from water, and are a food source for other creatures, such as birds, waterfowl, and marine mammals. Port Angeles Harbor is on the State 303(d) list for water bodies with limited water quality due to levels of dissolved oxygen in water and PCBs in edible fish. Net pens in the harbor are currently utilized for the commercial production of salmon.

(6) Wetlands. The Port Angeles regional watershed has a wealth of wetlands which contribute to the overall health, diversity, and function of the area. Three hundred sixty-six (366) wetlands are mapped in the Port Angeles regional watershed. The estimated acreage of deepwater in the watershed is 633 acres. Wetlands cover about four (4) percent (3,043 acres) and additional hydric soils four (4) percent (2,696 acres) of the total acreage of the watershed. Together, wetlands and additional hydric soils make up eight (8) percent of the watershed. The vast majority of wetlands are classified in the palustrine system.

Common plants in wetland areas include mosses, wire grass, reeds, cattails, rushes, willows, sedges, and many other water-loving plants. According to the Washington Natural Heritage Program, the Olympic Peninsula has the greatest diversity in kinds of wetlands of any place in western Washington, and Peninsula wetlands support more rare plants than any other part of the State.

(7) Aquifers. Groundwater withdrawals for both industrial and domestic use occur in the watershed (Morse Creek, Elwha River). Aquifers are naturally recharged by precipitation falling over a region, and by surface water infiltration. In the Port Angeles watershed, most recharge may be attributed to fractured rock areas in the mountains (especially since precipitation is greater in the higher elevations) and flat areas with gravel or alluvial deposits. Because it is an “invisible” resource, we know little about the quantity of water available for beneficial uses, about the quality of water underground, or how it moves through the watershed. Available groundwater quality information for the watershed is limited to monitoring conducted at active and inactive landfills, and that conducted by public water systems utilizing wells.

31.04.145 The natural environment – Policies.

(1) General.

(a) [Policy No. 1] droplet Review existing regulations relating to critical areas, sewage disposal, and land division for adequacy and effectiveness of ground and surface water protection measures.

droplet County, City of Port Angeles

(i) Strengthen the wording and enforcement of existing laws, to protect water quality and quantity and to control specific sources of nonpoint pollution.

(ii) Provide incentives for compliance if necessary and include innovative enforcement approaches such as restoration, civil penalties, dedicated fines, and/or community service.

(b) [Policy No. 2] droplet Address cumulative impacts to water quantity, water quality and beneficial uses, across all jurisdictions, when developing and implementing land use policies and plans. Conservation of water resources and prevention of pollution are the preferred management objectives.

droplet County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, PUD #1 of Clallam County, WA Department of Natural Resources, WA Department of Transportation, Olympic National Park

(c) [Policy No. 3] droplet Coordinate stream, salmon, and shellfish restoration and conservation projects for schools, volunteer organizations, landowners, and community groups. Assist real estate professionals, developers, business and industry representatives, conservation groups, and private landowners to implement restoration and conservation programs.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, County, City of Port Angeles

(d) [Policy No. 4] droplet Coordinate an interagency team to train volunteer groups to protect and enhance wetlands, riparian areas, and other watershed resources.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension

(e) [Policy No. 5] droplet Provide information and education to the public and decision-makers on the rationale behind existing resource protection measures and ordinances.

droplet County, City of Port Angeles

(2) Port Angeles Harbor.

(a) [Policy No. 6] droplet Manage Port Angeles Harbor for the multiple beneficial uses for which it is designated under State and federal water quality standards, including recreation and aesthetics, fish and shellfish habitat, wildlife, and commerce and navigation.

droplet City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Port of Port Angeles, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(b) [Policy No. 7] droplet Coordinate a cooperative, multijurisdictional effort to identify existing pollution problems in the harbor, and needs and opportunities for restoration of marine resources. Undertake remediation of pollution in Port Angeles Harbor as soon as funding can be secured. Contain or remove contaminated sediments using best available technology.

droplet City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, WA Department of Ecology

(3) Wetlands.

(a) [Policy No. 8] droplet Amend wetland policies to include protection of identified water quality and hydrologic functions of wetlands – such as water retention/detention and pollutant removal – in addition to their habitat functions and values.

droplet Clallam County

(b) [Policy No. 9] droplet Develop a nonregulatory strategy for preserving wetlands through purchase, conservation easements, and other mechanisms. Identify significant riparian corridors and wetlands for possible purchase or acquisition of conservation easements. Prioritize the areas based upon specific criteria, or by public nomination. Seek funding and methods to permanently preserve and protect wetlands identified as significant. Conduct other wetland enhancements, such as:

•    

Enhance wetlands at Laird Road through revegetation.

•    

Improve the artificial wetland north of ITT/Rayonier landfill as an amenity or educational site.

•    

Remove fill and pursue potential use of the airport wetland as mitigation banking site.

•    

Other opportunities for wetland enhancement can be found at Lincoln Park, North Brook Street, 10th and “M” streets, and Big Boy Pond at Stevens Middle School.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, North Olympic Land Trust

(4) Wildlife.

(a) [Policy No. 10] droplet Establish and/or support urban wildlife programs to create and enhance pockets of habitat within the City and outlying areas.

droplet City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clallam County

(i) Bring the “Habitat in your Backyard” program to Port Angeles; distribute “how-to” packets for creating butterfly gardens, bird gardens, frog ponds, etc.

(b) [Policy No. 11] droplet Create new corridors and maintain existing corridors of contiguous habitat for wildlife, in conjunction with streams and existing tracts of unbroken habitat.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(5) Public and Private Open Space.

(a) [Policy No. 12] droplet Public actions should maintain and protect riparian and shoreline areas while providing public access where appropriate.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Natural Resources

(b) [Policy No. 13] droplet Identify recreational access needs for streams and shorelines, and acquire easements where possible.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, North Olympic Land Trust, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(c) [Policy No. 14] droplet Compile and distribute a summary of current incentive programs for open space retention and acquisition. Explain mechanisms for the protection of open spaces and natural environments; identify criteria for protection and acquisition; and describe the advantages and disadvantages of preservation.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, North Olympic Land Trust

(d) [Policy No. 15] droplet Encourage and assist riparian property owners to dedicate conservation easements and other protective measures for corridor protection. Provide open-space tax status and other incentives for portions of properties located within the riparian corridor.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, North Olympic Land Trust

(e) [Policy No. 16] droplet Pursue opportunities to obtain DNR-managed lands along riparian corridors for open space lands by purchase or other adequate compensation to the Trust for which it is managed.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, North Olympic Land Trust, WA Department of Natural Resources

(6) Shellfish. [Policy No. 17] droplet Consider cumulative impacts to shellfish habitat and harvestability when shoreline master program, comprehensive plan amendments, and land use changes are reviewed.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(7) Fin Fish. [Policy No. 18] droplet Maintain healthy wild native fish runs. Future replacement or enhancement of fish populations should utilize locally adapted stocks when available.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(8) Aquifers. [Policy No. 19] droplet Conduct studies within the City and urban growth area to characterize possible contamination problems, and determine routes, types, and sources of contamination which may be affecting marine resources.

droplet City of Port Angeles, Clallam County

(9) Streams and Riparian Corridors. Please see neighborhood policies for reference to specific stream corridors within the Port Angeles regional watershed.

(a) [Policy No. 20] droplet For all streams, develop comprehensive, site-specific stream management plans which include stream surveys, assessment and monitoring, and recommendations for restoration or improvement. Stream evaluations should be performed in consultation with knowledgeable local residents. Plans should be linked to agency comprehensive plans, incorporate landowner needs and responsibilities, and provide for technical assistance to landowners.

droplet Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clallam Conservation District

(b) [Policy No. 21] Monitor all streams for bacteria and chemical parameters. Immediately identify and remediate suspected sources of contamination.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(c) [Policy No. 22] droplet Improve fish passage where needed, and create fish spawning and rearing habitat where appropriate.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam Conservation District

(d) [Policy No. 23] droplet Protect and enhance riparian areas with vegetation to reduce stormwater impacts and to maintain optimum water temperature.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(e) [Policy No. 24] droplet Retain or immediately reestablish vegetated buffers within all stream corridors.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(f) [Policy No. 25] droplet Use direct mailings and personal contacts to provide information and technical assistance to property owners and residents along floodplains, shorelines, and riparian areas. Include information about best management practices, low-impact shoreline management, management of erosive soils to protect water quality, and protection of riparian and other values.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Clallam Conservation District

(g) [Policy No. 26] droplet Measure all surface water withdrawals at the source to determine actual withdrawals, to ensure compliance with permitted water right allocations.

droplet WA Department of Ecology

(h) [Policy No. 27] droplet Define necessary instream flows for fish on all streams. Establish limitations on surface water withdrawals to maintain optimum instream flow for fish at critical times. Encourage water conservation during low-flow months.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, City of Port Angeles, PUD #1 of Clallam County, Water Associations

31.04.150 Public involvement and education.

(1) GMA Goals. Encourage the involvement of citizens in the planning process and ensure coordination between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts.

Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures, that have historical or archaeological significance.

(2) Watershed Goals. Promote stewardship by residents, decision makers, visitors, and agencies in the Port Angeles watershed.

Protect beneficial uses of water from nonpoint sources of pollution, including the effects of pathogens, chemicals, sediment, and nutrients on both surface and ground water resources.

Ensure cooperation and coordination in resource management.

(3) Public Involvement. In the past, public involvement and education have often been viewed as luxuries that can only be carried out if staff time and budget permit. Or, they have been conducted only to satisfy the requirements of the law. Used correctly, however, public involvement and education are important strategies which can lead to more workable and lasting answers to local problems – answers that are arrived at with the help of a well-informed citizenry, through a process that goes well beyond the “one-way” communication of traditional public hearings. The Port Angeles Plan contains policies to foster effective public participation. The Plan provides for official recognition of neighborhood-based organizations. These organizations will be notified of Comprehensive Plan modifications, zone changes and development projects which could affect their neighborhoods. Official notification will allow local residents to be positively involved at an early stage in any change which could impact them. Proponents of change or development will be encouraged to work with neighborhood groups to reach mutually acceptable proposals.

Since nonpoint source pollution stems largely from human activity, watershed plans call for ongoing efforts to change people’s understanding and behavior The nonpoint rule requires public education measures in all pollution control strategies, and Clallam County recognizes that education is the most cost effective approach to pollution prevention. Because education and public involvement are closely linked, these activities are discussed together in this section.

With activism on the rise and the public’s increased understanding of the effect of environmental, land use, and transportation issues, citizen involvement starts way before final testimony at a public hearing. Effective citizen participation, whether by mandate or choice, expands the opportunities for citizens to discuss public policy and influence officials.

(4) Historical and Cultural Resources of Native Americans and other Residents of Clallam County. Native and non-native Americans in Clallam County are interested in preserving their history and culture. Historical and cultural resources include structures, landscapes, objects and areas with significance, some of which may not be physically apparent or measurable. Cultural resources have both a physical and social dimension, and are not limited to historical associations. Cultural resources connect special places, natural resources, and historic properties with the ongoing cultural practices of specific groups.

The tie between a resource and its cultural context defines why a resource should be preserved and which characteristics of the resource are most important to protect. Culture itself is a living, evolving process, and cultural resources traditionally identified by the tribes and others include regions, specific sites and landscapes where features are imbued with scenic, spiritual or mythological meanings.

Traditional cultural resources need to be defined, regarded and protected through a formalized procedure similar to that currently used to identify and protect archaeological and historical resources. Clallam County should expand and update its surveys of historic and cultural resources and use this inventory when evaluating the impacts of land use decisions.

The Lower Elwha S’Klallam Tribe exists as a sovereign government within what is now known as Clallam County, and is committed to helping identify and protect the region’s cultural resources. The Lower Elwha S’Klallam Tribe also desires to build an effective government to government relationship with Clallam County, based on collaboration and mutual respect.

31.04.155 Public involvement and education – Policies.

(1) Education.

(a) [Policy No. 1] droplet Provide funding and support for a water resources field agent who will provide assistance in planning, conducting, and evaluating educational programs by working with local governments, property owners, and the public. The field agent should conduct regular educational presentations to civic groups and organizations in the community on water resource issues and watershed plan implementation.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, UW SeaGrant, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(b) [Policy No. 2] droplet Conduct educational programs to meet applicable stewardship objectives and which are geared toward specific neighborhoods, organizations, and user groups. Programs should provide information, discussion, and activities and should address water quality and quantity issues and problems particular to these groups. Subjects covered may include on-site sewage disposal system operation and maintenance; riparian management; waste reduction, recycling, and disposal; water conservation.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Port of Port Angeles

(i) Conduct education programs for individual forest landowners, the general public, and the forest industry about forestry best management practices, streamside management, and watershed restoration.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources, Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension

(ii) Provide public education programs for boaters, marina owners and operators, and other interested shoreline users. Signage, billing inserts, and workshops regarding proper waste disposal, spill management, and pumpout use should be a part of educational activities.

(iii) Conduct public education programs regarding proper use and disposal of household hazardous materials and chemicals.

(iv) Use public education and awareness programs to encourage the use of biodegradable cleaners and other alternatives to hazardous chemicals.

(c) [Policy No. 3] droplet Continue Clallam Conservation District’s ongoing program of water quality education for small farm and commercial farm operators. Reach out to small farm operators to identify needs and concerns, provide information about good stewardship, and provide technical assistance for conservation planning and best management practices.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension

(d) [Policy No. 4] droplet Conduct outreach and awareness programs to reach a broad spectrum of the population, including previously underserved groups. Integrate environmental education and activities into other social and economic programs. Environmental education objectives should include giving marginalized groups employment skills, control over their environment, access to power, and cultural identity.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(e) [Policy No. 5] droplet Conduct classroom workshops on clean water practices, planning for clean water, and salmon and watershed awareness. Integrate water quality and quantity studies into existing reading, social studies, and mathematics curricula.

droplet Port Angeles School District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clallam Conservation District

(f) [Policy No. 6] droplet Provide opportunities for students to earn classroom credit for participation in water quality community service projects, including short-term internships, attendance at public hearings, and serving on watershed management committees and other advisory boards.

droplet Port Angeles School District, Peninsula College, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam Conservation District

(g) [Policy No. 7] droplet Acquire and distribute self-contained educational programs such as scripted slide shows and videos; self-guided tours; and water quality self-assessment, to libraries, organizations, schools, and individuals.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(h) [Policy No. 8] droplet Develop or purchase educational displays for use in public spaces, government offices, community events.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(i) Utilize brochures, booklets, and countertop video programs to provide water quality and water quantity education for individuals applying for County and City permits.

(2) Information.

(a) [Policy No. 9] droplet Create and distribute a personal water quality decision-making guide, which includes issues related to individual attitudes and behavior, describes the options and opportunities the individual has to correct and prevent nonpoint source pollution, and the effects of those choices, and provides the individual with avenues to further protect water quality in their home, business, and community.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(b) [Policy No. 10] droplet Increase community and governmental awareness and understanding of tribal governments in general, and the local tribes in particular. Provide information about tribal sovereignty, treaty rights, and government-to-government interactions.

droplet Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County

(c) [Policy No. 11] All jurisdictions should work individually and cooperatively to identify, record, study and encourage the preservation, maintenance and appropriate use of lands, sites and structures that have cultural significance. The early identification and resolution of conflicts between the preservation of cultural resources and competing land uses should be promoted and facilitated.

(d) [Policy No. 12] droplet Publicize the procedures for obtaining an hydraulic project approval permit from Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife for any activity within stream channels, and other State and local permits governing critical areas.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(e) [Policy No. 13] droplet Use tourism advertising, publicity, and promotions to communicate environmental stewardship messages to local and regional audiences. Actively work with news media, tourism bureaus, and Chamber of Commerce to include education and information about water resource protection in their promotions.

droplet North Olympic Peninsula Visitor and Convention Bureau, Chamber of Commerce, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Clallam Conservation District, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(f) [Policy No. 14] droplet Develop art, literature, and historical presentations at schools and museums which demonstrate the cultural importance of the beneficial uses of water. Create items of popular culture (such as cards, calendars, posters, T-shirts) which portray aspects of the Port Angeles Watershed and its community as source of community identity.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(3) Activities.

(a) [Policy No. 15] droplet Identify stream, wetland, and shoreline sites in the watershed which could be used for educational programs and develop site-specific materials for these places. Conduct field trips to these sites to demonstrate beneficial use and nonpoint pollution issues and solutions.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam Conservation District, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(b) [Policy No. 16] droplet Conduct field trips and watershed tours for organizations, agency staff and boards, and the general public demonstrating nonpoint problems, beneficial uses, model farms and homes, and various best management practices as they apply to everyday situations in the watershed.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam Conservation District, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(c) [Policy No. 17] droplet Work with teachers, citizens groups, agencies, and landowners to coordinate water quality and habitat enhancement projects on local streams. Utilize local volunteers to conduct an ongoing water quality monitoring program as an educational and public involvement tool.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(d) [Policy No. 18] droplet Encourage neighborhood groups to undertake “Adopt A ... (water resource)” projects. Sponsor “Adopt A Stream,” “Adopt A Beach,” and “Adopt A Wetland” workshops in Clallam County to provide training to volunteer groups.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(e) [Policy No. 19] droplet Bring together adversarial groups in partnerships to plan, conduct, and evaluate restoration and enhancement projects on streams, shorelines, and wetlands. Use these group projects to identify common goals and negotiate common benefits in resource protection.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam Conservation District, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(f) [Policy No. 20] droplet Conduct training sessions for County, State, and agency staff, contractors, and equipment operators whose activities may impact or influence water quality.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(g) [Policy No. 21] droplet Conduct a stormwater demonstration project which includes a field workshop for local contractors, developers, and the public. Projects should be designed to accompany stormwater management manuals developed by County, City, and State.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(h) [Policy No. 22] droplet Conduct on-site sewage disposal workshops to educate people about on-site sewage disposal, including standard and alternative technology, costs, and maintenance. Train people to operate, observe, inspect, and maintain their systems.

droplet Clallam County, WSU-Cooperative Extension

(i) [Policy No. 23] droplet Educate the public and decision makers about the benefits of preserving open spaces and natural environments, and opportunities for acquisition and dedication of open spaces.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, North Olympic Land Trust, Clallam Conservation District

(j) [Policy No. 24] droplet Offer recognition and tangible reward to individuals, groups, businesses, and agencies who demonstrate leadership and make a commitment to protecting water quality or quantity. The annual “Citizen of the Year” award should include a separate category for environmental stewardship.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension

(k) [Policy No. 25] droplet Actively develop the community celebrations, exercises, and conferences which foster visioning, goal setting, and consensus-building; and which build trust, respect, and cooperation between leaders, staff, citizens, and groups.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension

(4) Public Involvement.

(a) [Policy No. 26] Neighborhood groups which represent more than twenty (20) percent of the households in their neighborhood and meet on a regular basis can be officially recognized by the Clallam County Commissioners by making application with the County. These organizations will be notified of comprehensive plan modifications, zone changes, long plats, large lot subdivisions and development projects which could affect their neighborhoods.

(b) [Policy No. 27] Encourage proponents of change or development to work with neighborhood groups to reach mutually acceptable proposals.

(c) [Policy No. 28] droplet Publicize policy actions, meeting dates and times, and contact numbers for public officials, through an easily identified and readable column in the newspapers. Active solicitation of public involvement should be a necessary component of research, planning, and policy making budgets and timelines. At a minimum, public involvement methods should consist of information dissemination, discussion, activities, and evaluation.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(d) [Policy No. 29] droplet Conduct annual “neighborhood meetings” with neighborhood councils, advisory boards, the Board of County Commissioners, City Council, Conservation District Board of Supervisors, and other agency representatives to discuss and respond to watershed and neighborhood-specific issues. Neighborhood meetings can serve as an avenue for mutual education between government officials and the public on issues concerning the regions built environment, neighborhood sites with historic or cultural significance, neighborhood design issues, view protection, control of sprawl and other quality of life issues.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Clallam Conservation District

(e) [Policy No. 30] Clear, proactive communications on issues that concern all peoples and the region are a necessary prerequisite for building a basis for understanding and protecting cultural resources. Clallam County should apply the same process to cultural resources as is now used for archeological and historical resource protection. This process should be supplemented by cooperative agreements and collaboration between jurisdictions, and by including the tribe in the notice of action in permitting processes for areas of tribal interest.

(f) [Policy No. 31] droplet Utilize dispute resolution services to conduct training on goal setting and consensus-building for neighborhood groups, citizens and government staff. Use dispute resolution services and programs to resolve conflicts and mediate solutions before resorting to litigation.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

31.04.200 Agricultural land – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Maintain and enhance natural resource-based industries, including productive timber, agricultural, and fisheries industries. Encourage the conservation of productive forest lands and productive agricultural lands, and discourage incompatible uses.

Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks.

Encourage the involvement of citizens in the planning process and ensure coordination between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts.

Private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation having been made. The property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and discriminatory actions.

(2) Definition. The Growth Management Act defines “agricultural land” as land primarily devoted to the commercial production of horticultural, viticultural, floricultural, dairy, apiary, vegetable, or animal products or of berries, grain, hay, straw, turf, seed, Christmas trees not subject to the excise tax imposed by RCW 84.33.100 through 84.33.140, finfish in upland hatcheries, or livestock and that has long-term commercial significance for agricultural production.

The Growth Management Act defines “long-term commercial significance” to include the growing capacity, productivity, and soil composition of the land for sustained commercial production, in consideration of the land’s proximity to population areas, and the possibility of more intense uses of the land.

(3) Resource Base. The Port Angeles planning area contains no land which qualifies as agricultural resource land of long-term commercial significance. This finding is based on the fact that agricultural lands in this region are primarily utilized as pasture for animal raising and very few of these operations are commercially viable. The region does, however contain several large farms which have significant impact on the rural character and aesthetics of the region. These properties should be targeted for transfer or purchase of development rights programs. The Port Angeles watershed characterization report identified eighty-five (85) farms exceeding twenty (20) acres in size covering nearly 2,000 acres. Policies should encourage the conservation of land put to productive use.

(4) Open Space. Although it is recognized that agricultural lands do play a significant role in our local economy and lifestyle, these lands may play a greater role as open space for the enjoyment of the public, preservation of the remaining rural character of the Port Angeles planning area, and as wildlife habitat.

(5) Public Interest. During the regional planning process, citizens of the Port Angeles region have indicated a strong interest in conserving agricultural lands, open space and the quality of the environment. This issue has and will continue to be a very emotional discussion between property owners and the general public. It is unquestionable that the remaining agricultural lands in the area play a vital component in maintaining rural character. However, the interest of the general public over the interest of the private property owner must be carefully considered. This plan cannot diminish the goal to protect property rights.

(6) Conservation Alternatives. Conservation of agricultural lands could be accomplished through several alternatives:

•    

Public acquisition or transfer of development rights; and/or

•    

Incentives, such as taxes, flexible zoning techniques, technical assistance.

(7) Development Rights. There are several ways to acquire the development rights: purchase those rights or transfer the rights to other properties. The purchase of development rights occurs when the public acquires the rights held by the property owner to develop the land while the owner maintains the right to utilize the land for agricultural purposes. Once the public has purchased the development rights of the property, title to those rights no longer remains with the property owner and the agricultural nature of the land is preserved. The public purchase of development rights should provide more assurance that agricultural lands will be conserved forever than the use of traditional regulatory measures.

The Sequim-Dungeness Regional Plan contains policies supporting a program to purchase the development rights of certain agricultural lands. Such a program would require a vote by all residents of the County, as the funds would be obtained through “general obligation” bonds of County government. This program could include some properties in the Port Angeles planning area as this would enhance the probability of being approved by voters in this region.

If a levy of $5,000,000 was proposed and approved, it is estimated the levy would amount to $0.103 per $1,000 of assessed valuation. In this example, the owner of a $100,000 house would pay $10.30 per year to pay off the conservation purchase bond.

Other options available to local governments for conservation of agricultural lands and open space are special property tax laws (conservation futures) or real estate excise tax. Conservation futures authorizes an assessment of $0.0625 per $1,000 of assessed valuation, which would have generated $133,800 in revenue in 1994. This tax does not require voter approval and could be used as the source for issuance of bonds approved by the Board of Clallam County Commissioners. Real estate excise taxes include an option for a voter approved one percent tax on the transfer of property for the purpose of acquiring conservation areas, which would have resulted in $1,200,000 in revenue in 1993.

(8) Finfish Hatcheries. In 1994 the State amended the definition of agricultural land to include finfish in upland hatcheries. This planning area has two (2) finfish hatcheries on the Elwha River. Both hatcheries are susceptible to incompatible adjacent residential land uses which might affect water quality.

31.04.205 Agricultural land conservation – Policies.

(1) Findings. [Policy No. 1] Based solely on growing capacity, productivity, and soil composition of the land within the Port Angeles planning area, there are not any agricultural lands of long-term commercial significance. Agricultural land uses which are found in this region, although not of long-term commercial significance, should be preserved to maintain productive agricultural use of land, to maintain economic benefit to residents of the region, to reduce reliance on food sources which originate outside the County and to maintain the rural character of the planning region.

(2) Conservation Strategy. [Policy No. 2] Maintain, enhance and conserve productive agricultural lands through the following means:

•    

Continue to provide tax incentives (open space or current use assessments);

•    

Continue to provide technical assistance, such as resource conservation plans prepared by the Clallam Conservation District or Soil Conservation Service;

•    

Allow and encourage small-scale agricultural uses within both rural and urban areas;

•    

Discourage incompatible uses on adjacent lands, through increased setbacks, limits on utility extensions in agricultural areas, right-to-practice agriculture ordinances, and notification to residential landowners of potential incompatible uses; and

•    

Work towards long-term (i.e., permanent) conservation through transfer of development rights or public purchase of development rights.

(3) Farm Land Use Maps. [Policy No. 3] Farm lands to be targeted for protection should be specifically identified and property owners contacted to determine their willingness to participate in protection programs. Such lands should enjoy the full protection of the “right to practice agriculture” ordinance as long as the farm use is to be continued.

(4) Purchase of Development Rights. [Policy No. 4] Develop a program for lasting, long-term conservation of agricultural lands based on public financial support.

(a) Focus the program on purchase of development rights in order to keep lands in private ownership. Once development rights are purchased, future development shall be restricted through such legal instruments as necessary to ensure permanent conservation of lands for the benefit of future generations.

(b) Work with the public and landowners to set priorities for the purchase of development rights. Priorities may be set based on development pressures, open space value, or environmental values.

(c) Development rights to agricultural lands should be acquired through voter approval of a general obligation bond for the purchase of development rights.

(5) Incompatible Development.

(a) [Policy No. 5] Public services and utilities within and adjacent to identified farms shall be designed to prevent negative impacts on agriculture and to maintain total farmland acreage, as follows:

(i) Water lines, sewer lines, and other public facilities should avoid crossing farmland subject to future protection programs;

(ii) Roads should not divide farmlands targeted for protection.

(b) [Policy No. 6] Continue to conserve all agricultural lands, whether designated for long-term commercial significance or not, through property tax reductions (current use assessments).

(6) Finfish Hatcheries. [Policy No. 7] Ensure that land uses adjacent to finfish hatcheries are compatible with the long-term commercial production of those hatcheries. Consideration shall be given to appropriate land use densities, land use practices, and maintenance of water quality standards.

31.04.210 Forest land – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Maintain and enhance natural resource-based industries, including productive timber, agricultural, and fisheries industries. Encourage the conservation of productive forest lands and productive agricultural lands, and discourage incompatible uses.

Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks.

Protect the environment and enhance the State’s high quality of life, including air and water quality, and the availability of water.

Encourage the involvement of citizens in the planning process and ensure coordination between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts.

(2) Watershed Goals. Protect beneficial uses of water from nonpoint sources of pollution in the Port Angeles watershed, including the effects of pathogens, chemicals, sediment, and nutrients on both surface and ground water resources.

Protect and enhance watershed resources, and reverse degradation where it has occurred.

Ensure long-term, sustainable, environmental and economic health of the watershed.

Ensure cooperation and coordination in resource management.

(3) A Vision for Forest Resource Lands. We envision the retention of forest resource lands and the maintenance of the forest industry as a major industry in the County. The forested foothills of the region remain in resource land use providing for jobs, clean and abundant water and forested vistas. The State-managed foothills area has successfully combined forest management with recreational trails utilized by thousands of bicyclists and hikers. The steep ravines of the streams in the watershed retain their forested cover providing a filter for runoff and providing cover and movement corridors for wildlife as well as fish.

(4) Definition. The Growth Management Act defines “forest land” as land primarily devoted to growing trees for long-term commercial timber production on land that can be economically and practically managed for such production, including Christmas trees subject to the excise tax imposed under RCW 84.33.100 through 84.33.140, and that has long-term commercial significance. In determining whether forest land is primarily devoted to growing trees for long-term commercial timber production on land that can be economically and practically managed for such production, the following factors shall be considered: (a) the proximity of the land to urban, suburban, and rural settlements; (b) surrounding parcel size and the compatibility and intensity of adjacent and nearby land uses; (c) long-term local economic conditions that affect the ability to manage for timber production; and (d) the availability of public facilities and services conducive to conversion of forest land to other uses.

The Growth Management Act defines “long-term commercial significance” to include the growing capacity, productivity, and soil composition of the land for sustained commercial production, in consideration of the land’s proximity to population areas, and the possibility of more intense uses of the land.

(5) Resource Base. Commercial forestry in the Port Angeles region is still a viable industry. There are sufficient public (federal and State) and private lands to provide a resource base for timber harvesting. In 1992, the County designated approximately 34,000 acres of lands as forest lands of long-term commercial significance, including approximately 3,500 acres as transitional forest lands. A large percentage of the lands designated are State and federal lands. There are many forest resource support industries in this planning area. Mills and log storage yards are primarily located in the Port Angeles area.

(6) Forest Land Use Issues. Community input through surveys, neighborhood meetings, and letters has indicated a strong interest in conserving our forest lands, open space and the quality of our environment. In 1992, Clallam County designated approximately 34,000 acres as forest lands of long-term commercial significance in the Port Angeles Region, including approximately 3,500 acres of transitional forest lands. Retaining commercial forest resource lands in resource use is the major goal of the resource lands element. Retention of resource lands benefits the taxpayers of the County in that this land use requires few County services while providing substantial income primarily in the form of harvest taxation.

Commercial forestry in the east end of the County is and will continue to be our largest industry. There are sufficient public (federal and State) and private lands to provide the resource base for timber harvesting. Retention of this resource base should limit the loss of forestry related jobs.

Additional benefits of forestland retention derive from the fact that these lands play a major role in protecting both water quality and quantity. Permanent clearing of forestlands associated with housing developments leads to rapid surface runoff as tree and other vegetation are no longer available to allow for slow infiltration of water into soils and aquifers. Construction of roads and housing greatly increases erosion as soils and cut slopes are exposed to rainfall. Roads, roofs and driveways increase impervious surfaces which directly contributes to surface runoff and to a decrease in water added to aquifers.

One of the larger conflicts with commercial forest operations occurs when residences encroach into areas managed for commercial forestry. The foothills area south of Township Line Road, Upper Mount Pleasant Road, Mt. Angeles Road and Upper Black Diamond Road are examples of areas where residential development has increased and encroached upon the commercial forest. Commercial forestry zoning is utilized to limit the number of persons locating in areas of commercial forest operations so that conflict is minimized. Commercial forestry/residential mixed use zoning is utilized in areas currently managed for commercial forestry by smaller landowners in order to retain at least a portion of these lands in commercial forestry. Commercial forestry/residential mixed use zoning allows residential uses but utilizes the forest lands retained in this type of development to buffer and separate residences from commercial forest operations which might endanger residences such as prescribed burning, spraying or harvesting operations. Commercial forestry/residential mixed use zoning is also utilized in areas surrounded by commercial forestry zoning where a residential area of limited size is intermixed with commercial forestlands and where designation as rural land use would tend to create conflicts with commercial forestry or encourage conversion of forest resource lands. Rural very low density designations are utilized in areas not currently managed for commercial forestry to buffer commercial forest areas from more intensive rural density development. Conflicts with traditional forest management techniques will continue to increase but can be minimized by maintaining commercial forest areas in commercial forest uses, utilizing buffers to reduce the risk to residences located near commercial forest lands and providing for low densities at the edge of the commercial forest.

One of the methods that Clallam County adopted to conserve the resource base and ensure compatibility at the forest/rural interface was the use of a commercial-residential mixed use zones (CFM). Most of these zones were in the foothills on the east end of the County. Development within the CFM zones was allowed if developed in a cluster pattern (thirty (30) percent development/seventy (70) percent forest). In exchange for clustering, large density bonuses were possible. This plan responds to critics of these excessive bonuses by removing the bonus provisions of the earlier ordinances. Another legitimate criticism leveled at the CFM zones was the fact that forest reserves were only set aside for twenty (20) years which is not enough time to provide for even one rotation of trees to reach maturity. This plan requires that the forest reserve be set aside permanently for forest use since the development potential of the entire property will have been utilized in the development area.

31.04.215 Forest land conservation – Policies.

(1) Generally.

(a) [Policy No. 1] Lands meeting the definition or criteria for commercial forest lands in the County General Plan should be designated as commercial forest lands of long-term commercial significance. In general, these lands should have a minimum parcel size of eighty (80) acres or contiguous parcels under the same ownership can be grouped into eighty (80) acre sizes, are currently forested, and have a forest land grade which is capable of growing trees at a commercial growth rate. (See criteria in the County-wide Plan.)

(i) Land designated as commercial forest shall remain in this classification throughout the life of this Plan (twenty (20) years) except in those cases where an error was made in the application of the criteria establishing the zone.

(b) [Policy No. 2] Commercial forestry (CF) designation and zoning at eighty (80) acre minimum lot sizes is the preferred form of protection for forest resource lands. Conversion of commercial forest (CF) zoning to zones which provide less protection of the forest resource such as commercial forestry/mixed use residential shall not be permitted during this planning period. Rural and urban lands have sufficient development potential to provide for increased populations.

(c) [Policy No. 3] Lands designated in the comprehensive plan as commercial forest/residential mixed use serve as a buffer between more intensively managed commercial forestlands and rural development patterns. Commercial forestry/residential mixed use designation and zoning are also utilized in areas surrounded by commercial forestry zoning where a residential area of limited size is intermixed with commercial forestlands and where designation as rural land use would tend to create conflicts or conversion pressures for commercial forestry. These areas are currently managed for commercial forestry but they have been impacted by adjacent residential development. They provide for a mix of protected forest reserves and low density residential lots built in a clustered development pattern. The commercial forest/residential mixed use zones have been modified in the following manner so that they may accomplish their intended purpose of protecting commercial forest uses in areas experiencing some growth pressures:

(i) Nonclustered development in all CFM zones is at one home per eighty (80) acre densities, cluster development is at one home per twenty (20) acre densities in CFM20 zones and one home per five (5) acre densities in CFM5 zones.

(ii) Density bonuses will be deleted.

(iii) Forest reserves will be permanently preserved for commercial forestry and will be located to buffer adjacent commercial forestlands.

(d) [Policy No. 4] Areas not presently managed for commercial forestry which are found in close association with large blocks of commercial forest land should be utilized as a buffer between commercial forest lands and rural sized developments. These areas should be designated for very low density residential use at twenty (20) acre densities.

(i) These transitional forest-residential lands should ensure compatibility with adjacent commercial forest land use through increased structural setbacks and recognition of the right-to-practice forestry ordinance on adjacent lands.

(ii) Flexible zoning developments which avoid the conflict with adjacent commercial forest land use and which retain a minimum of seventy (70) percent of the site in a large remainder lot in order to buffer adjacent commercial forestlands, retain open space lands for wildlife, resource production and/or open space can be encouraged within these zones.

(iii) Landowners within the transitional forest-residential lands should be notified of property tax options for conserving forest lands.

(e) [Policy No. 5] Retention of designated commercial forestlands managed by the State for forest production/harvest is a key element of preserving the viewshed in the Port Angeles region. Many State-managed forestlands are found at elevations that make them highly visible from highways, County roads and from urban areas. These lands should be retained in State ownership and should not be converted out of commercial forest designations. It is an accepted fact that the community expects these lands to be managed for commercial forest purposes using forest “best management practices.”

(f) [Policy No. 6] Retention of all designated commercial forestlands in the Port Angeles planning region is vital to maintenance of the forest industry as the regions leading industry. Given that development potentials of rural and urban lands in the region could accommodate much more than twenty (20) years of population growth, designated commercial forest resource lands should be retained in the original commercial forestland designations and zoning proposed by the 1995 plan throughout the planning period.

(g) [Policy No. 7] Retention of designated commercial forestlands is a key component to protection of water quality and water quantity.

(h) [Policy No. 8] Existing managed public access to public forest lands for recreation should be maintained.

(i) [Policy No. 9] Master planned resorts should not be located on forest resource lands that are within the viewshed of the Port Angeles urban growth area or when more than fifty (50) percent of the proposed site would be covered by critical areas. The viewshed of the Port Angeles urban growth area is defined as lands located at elevations exceeding 1,000 feet in elevation above sea level in the area between Morse Creek and the Elwha River.

(2) Forest Practices and Watershed Management.

(a) [Policy No. 10] droplet General Policies for Forest Management.

(i) Conduct an inventory of forest roads in the watershed to determine forest road maintenance needs, site and age problems, and needs for road repair or formal road abandonment. The inventory should be coordinated with existing information maintained by DNR.

droplet Clallam County, WA Department of Natural Resources

(ii) Educate landowners to evaluate operators for their knowledge of State forestry BMPs and regulations.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources, Clallam County

(iii) Manage riparian forests for conifer diversity, retaining or replanting with conifers.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources, Clallam County

(iv) Provide technical assistance to riparian landowners for vegetation enhancement utilizing conifers.

droplet Clallam Conservation District

(b) [Policy No. 11] droplet Policies for Forest Practices Related to Conversion to Another Use.

(i) Clallam County should actively participate in forest practice application review and conditioning to ensure protection of water quality.

droplet Clallam County, WA Department of Natural Resources

(A) Clallam County and the Department of Natural Resources shall annually review procedures for permitting and enforcement of forest practices applications for conversions.

(B) Through a memorandum of agreement with DNR, establish areas likely to convert (ALTCs) in which the County would become lead agency under SEPA when a forest practice approval is required.

(ii) Adequate funding for review of conversion FPAs should be allocated to the County from FPA fees. Currently, the $500 permit fee is deposited in the State’s general fund. Legislative action should be taken to return a portion of this fee to the County for review of these permits.

droplet WA State Legislature, WA Department of Natural Resources, Clallam County

(iii) Management of conversion harvests shall be based upon potential drainage impacts, regardless of acreage. Conversion harvest plans shall be prepared for forest lands harvested for conversion to another land use. Clallam County shall ensure that, at a minimum, the harvest plan includes:

(A) Drainage and erosion control best management practices;

(B) Timely revegetation utilizing native or sterile species;

(C) Protection of fish and wildlife habitat and other critical areas;

(D) Location and design of roads to minimize potential sediment generation and delivery to surface waters.

droplet Clallam County

(c) [Policy No. 12] droplet Policies Related to Timber Management Forest Practices.

(i) DNR’s review of forest practices applications shall, at a minimum, attempt to limit potential water quality impacts from forest practices by:

(A) Evaluating the cumulative effects of all harvests in the watershed;

(B) Reducing the risk of occurrence of landslides and severe erosion by identifying high-erosion-hazard areas (landslide hazard areas) within the harvest unit;

(C) Considering additional contributions from harvesting or roads to any known existing water quality impairments or problems in watersheds of concern;

(D) Timing the activity for the season or moisture conditions when the least impact occurs;

(E) Locating and designing road systems to minimize potential sediment generation and delivery to surface waters;

(F) Locating and designing temporary and permanent stream crossings to prevent failure and control impacts from the road system.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources

(ii) Evaluation of forest practice applications for timber harvest of nonconverting lands shall emphasize prevention of potential individual and cumulative effects of harvest on water quality and quantity.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources

(iii) Smaller, unstable ravines (equal to or in excess of forty (40) percent slope, or where the ground surface rises ten (10) feet or more vertically within a horizontal distance of twenty-five (25) feet) should be assessed for sensitivity to forest practices, thus requiring a Class III priority forest practices permit.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources

(iv) Plan, operate, and manage normal, ongoing forestry activities (including harvesting, road design and construction, site preparation and regeneration, and chemical management) to adequately protect the functions of forested wetlands.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources

(v) When chemicals are necessary for forest management, buffers for surface waters shall be established and clearly identified. Surface waters shall be protected from the application of toxic materials, including petroleum products, and from spills.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources

31.04.220 Rural land – Inventory and analysis.

(1) GMA Goals. Reduce the inappropriate conversion of undeveloped land into sprawling, low-density development.

Encourage the retention of open space and development of recreational opportunities, conserve fish and wildlife habitat, increase access to natural resource lands and water, and develop parks.

Protect the environment and enhance the State’s high quality of life, including air and water quality, and the availability of water.

Maintain and enhance natural resource-based industries, including productive timber, agricultural, and fisheries industries. Encourage the conservation of productive forest lands and productive agricultural lands, and discourage incompatible uses.

Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures that have historical or archaeological significance.

Encourage the involvement of citizens in the planning process and ensure coordination between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts.

(2) Watershed Goals. Protect beneficial uses of water from nonpoint sources of pollution in the Port Angeles watershed, including the effects of pathogens, chemicals, sediment, and nutrients on both surface and ground water resources.

Ensure long-term, sustainable, environmental and economic health of the watershed.

Ensure cooperation and coordination in resource management.

(3) A Vision for Rural Lands in Clallam County. We envision the rural lands in the Port Angeles planning area as a scenic patchwork of large open fields and woodlots interspersed with rural homesteads and serviced by neighborhood or tourist commercial clusters. Neighborhood/tourist commercial clusters are located at their present positions along the highway and have blended into the rural environment through the application of landscaping standards and rural design guidelines which emphasize the preservation of rural views. Recreational uses which promote open space values such as golf courses, driving ranges and horse stables are encouraged to locate along major highways to improve scenic vistas and buffer residential uses. Overly rigid development patterns which saw large areas of land divided up into uniform lot sizes with no provisions for intervening larger lot sizes or open space have been replaced by a more natural rural character conservation development pattern in rural lands. This Comprehensive Plan designation encourages land owners to create a variety of residential lot sizes ranging from one-half acre residential lots to 40-acre open spaces. Allowing for a variety of lot sizes without increasing existing densities allows farmsteads, woodlots and affordable housing options to coexist in the same general area, providing much more choice, affordability and variety than that which existed under uniform development patterns. The County’s strategy for preserving rural character has focused on maintaining open spaces, retaining a diversity of lot sizes, allowing rural growth to occur on smaller lots without increasing current densities and concentrating rural commercial enterprises at existing locations along highways.

A clear boundary exists between rural and urban areas. Average density in the rural areas is less than one home per five acres. Rural character conservation designations have been established in the rural areas which has allowed rural character to be preserved far into the future rather than allowing it to gradually degrade as unplanned development took place, as was occurring prior to the adoption of the new comprehensive plan in 1995. Several pre-existing urban density developments are found within the rural area in the vicinity of the Bluffs Subdivision, on Place Road and at Lake Sutherland. Infill development within these suburban pockets is encouraged. Many critical areas, important agricultural lands and forest lands have been permanently protected through purchase of development rights, rural character conservation open space agreements and conservation easements. Forest resource lands, farms and important open space resource lands first identified in 1992 and 1993 remain in resource use.

Critical areas in the rural portion of the County are protected and environmental enhancement projects have restored many acres of wetlands and miles of streams to salmon runs. Both the Comprehensive Plan and its implementing ordinances recognize the need to allow natural systems to be the key determinant of planning and land use activity. Incentive-based programs and ordinances seek to link, protect and enhance natural systems through appropriate zoning, conservation easements, covenants or other innovative means. Structures, roads and utility systems are placed in such a way as to minimize the alteration of the landscape and to preserve the operation of the natural systems and wildlife corridors. Water is clean and abundant due to conservation efforts. Careful stewardship has ensured the conservation of our land, air, water and energy resources for future generations and has enhanced present day property values and public safety.

(4) Defining Rural Character. The Growth Management Act defines rural lands by identifying them as the areas which are not urban growth areas and are not identified for long-term commercial production of agricultural, forest, and mineral resources. The intent of the Growth Management Act is that “rural lands” and what constitutes “rural character” are to be defined at the local level. Sprawling, estate type lots which are too small for productive woodlots or small-scale agricultural uses are to be discouraged in rural areas.

The Clallam County County-Wide Planning Policies provide guidance to the densities which are not rural in character. These policies identify a density of one unit per acre as urban/suburban, indicating that one acre per home densities without offsetting provision of open space would not be considered as “rural” in character. Several locally conducted visual preference surveys, questionnaires and comments at various public meetings indicate that many local residents think of rural lands as areas exhibiting low residential densities (one home per 10 acres or less) that provide a mixture of rural land uses. Local residents indicate that rural land uses include farms, woodlots, and natural open spaces which are clearly distinguished from urban/suburban areas that are characterized by uniform lot sizes, lack of open areas and higher densities. The County-Wide Planning Policies also indicate that maximum densities should be set for areas outside of urban growth areas, provide that the County’s Comprehensive Plan shall permit only those land uses that are compatible with the rural character of such lands and that the rural element provide for a variety of rural densities and development patterns, including the use of cluster housing concepts to encourage conservation of open space and resource lands. Lastly, the County-Wide Planning Policies suggest that rural areas abutting urban areas should provide for reduced densities or cluster development options in order to allow for future expansion of urban areas.

The region’s current “rural character” is characterized by large open spaces and pockets of concentrated residential development along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Residential communities are separated by a highly mixed rural development pattern of diverse lot sizes and land uses.

The draft vision statement for rural lands in the Port Angeles region establishes the 20-year vision for retaining rural character. Drawing from the vision statement, “rural character” is defined as a scenic patchwork of large open fields and woodlots interspersed with rural homesteads and serviced by neighborhood/tourist commercial clusters at existing locations. Density is less than one home per five acres and uniform lot sizes developed over large areas are not encouraged. Rural character conservation designations would be established to ensure that rural lot sizes exceeding 10 acres in size will be interspersed throughout the rural area and that rural character could be maintained far into the future.

(5) Rural Growth Issues and Current Trends. Achieving the goals of this plan to maintain a high quality of life for those County residents that live in rural portions of the Port Angeles planning area will require positive changes to current County policies and regulations. Current policies, regulations and market structure encourage people to locate in rural areas while at the same time allowing development to occur at densities and in patterns which diminish the very rural character that caused people to move there in the first place. A simple study of parcel maps in the County documents the trend of recent development practices to divide the landscape into uniform residential lots at densities in between urban and rural densities leading to land use patterns that can only be defined as sprawl. Rural areas in Clallam County and this planning region are rapidly being divided into one-acre, 2.4-acre and five-acre lot sizes. Land use studies show that there are already 2,500 vacant parcels in these size ranges which could meet all of the land use demand for this type of lot over the next 20 years. These individual lots contain some private open area but make no provision for productive uses of the land for raising livestock, growing timber or just leaving some open areas for wildlife habitat.

Over the past 10 years, the unincorporated or rural areas of the Port Angeles planning area have experienced over 65 percent of the decade’s growth, with the remainder of the growth occurring in the planning area’s one incorporated place, the City of Port Angeles. It appears that many people moving to this County are looking for a rural lifestyle and do not see much advantage to choosing to live in urban areas. These rural growth trends do not satisfy growth management objectives of encouraging development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services can be provided in an efficient manner. Without change, rural areas will continue to experience intense development pressures and a rapid decrease in rural quality of life. If sprawl is to be controlled, then urban growth at urban densities should be encouraged in urban areas and should not be encouraged in rural areas.

The City of Port Angeles is the only urban growth area within the Port Angeles planning area. The unincorporated portion of the urban growth area covers more than 3,000 acres. Moderate to high density development will be encouraged within the urban growth area. The availability of high density and cost-efficient services within the urban growth area should make it more cost effective to develop within the urban growth area than outside of it. This “cost of development” advantage should help to reverse the trend toward rural development and ease the development pressure currently experienced in these areas. It should be noted that all of the planned population for the entire planning area could be accommodated within this urban growth area.

(6) Defining Sprawl. It has been maintained by land use researchers in Washington that, “A new rural sprawl is consuming large amounts of land, splitting wide open spaces into fragments that are useless for agriculture, wildlife habitat, or other rural open space purposes.” Sprawl development has the following characteristics:

•    

Sprawl development lacks the density needed to provide efficient urban services but is too dense to be considered rural;

•    

Sprawl is the ever outward extension of commercial development along main highways or arterials, also known as “strip commercial development;”

•    

Sprawl blurs the distinction between urban and rural environments;

•    

Sprawl is a density of rural development which creates conflicts between agriculture, forest resource or mining operations and residential uses;

•    

Sprawl will occur from conventional zoning requiring uniform lot sizes of one home per one to five acres over large areas. Lots larger than 10 acres must be retained throughout the rural area to retain rural character.

(7) Why Keep Rural Areas Rural? There are many reasons for maintaining rural character in rural areas. Preservation of rural character has been a strong concern for residents of the Port Angeles watershed as evidenced by area-wide survey results. Economic reasons also provide a strong justification for retaining productive land uses. Some additional rationale are provided below:

(a) The designation of urban and rural areas allows efficient provision of public services and facilities when most growth is directed to compact urban centers. Studies have shown that the average annual cost to maintain services for developed land was thousands of dollars per acre more than maintaining services to productive forest lands, agricultural lands and open space.

(b) Rural areas have traditionally offered a retreat from the bustle of urban life and offer additional choices of living environments for residents.

(c) The presence of rural lands is attractive to residents and visitors. If rural character is diminished, new residents and visitors could choose to locate or spend their time and money in areas that have retained their scenic rural areas.

(d) Rural areas bordering cities provide for the logical, planned future expansion of urban areas.

(e) Rural areas adjacent to urban centers are susceptible to sprawl which can quickly overwhelm community character, County budgets and way of life.

(f) Urban and resource areas are dependent upon each other, but tend to be uneasy neighbors. Rural areas can buffer urban and resource or natural areas from each other, so that each area can function without interference from the other.

(g) Rural areas, although not designated for long-term commercially significant timber and agricultural resource use, are also appropriate areas for resource operations.

(h) Small-scale farms can thrive in rural areas near urban centers. Intensive farming can be workable on acreage as small as 10 to 20 acres.

(8) What Happens to Rural Character under Conventional Development? Further application of current development patterns allowed in rural areas will not result in retention of “rural character” or a high quality of rural living. The typical one-acre to five-acre lot in a conventional zoning district will seem “rural” only so long as it borders pasture lands or woodlots of neighboring properties. However this is “borrowed” open space, temporary in nature. When those abutting properties are also developed for home sites, the surroundings will be suburban in character and the feeling of “living in the County” will be lost. After viewing fully developed areas of one-acre, 2.4-acre and even five-acre zoning, Clallam County residents participating in visual preference surveys indicated that these areas did not look rural. The majority of land in these suburban density subdivisions will be devoted to large yards and a high percentage of the area utilized merely to provide road access to each lot. Similarly, allowing intensive urban type developments such as Sunland or Diamond Point does not retain rural character as revealed in the fact that both developments have now been designated as urban growth areas where a full suite of urban level services must be provided. The large urban growth areas adopted by Clallam County provide ample vacant land for future urban type developments.

(9) Rural Character Conservation. With these facts in mind, the plan for the Port Angeles region calls for widespread utilization of a rural character conserving development pattern. The purpose of the rural character conservation approach is to increase the variety of lot sizes available in rural areas and to permit a reasonable amount of residential development while retaining the large lots, open spaces, sensitive natural areas, and rural community character that would be lost under conventional development at these same densities. Under the rural character conservation approach, residential lot sizes could be reduced to as small as one-half acre with the typical lot size in the one-acre size range. By reducing the area required for most of the rural home sites to that which is actually needed for residential use, the remaining acreage normally contained in individual lots would be utilized to create a large remainder residential lot within each development which will range in size from eight acres to more than 100 acres depending on the size of the development proposal. Retention of larger residential lots in rural areas works to conserve the rural character of rural areas. The large remainder lot can provide for open spaces between residences, reduces the perceived density of development, provides privacy and neighborhood identity and retains natural features, woodlots and pasture land. This open space can be owned in several ways. It could be owned as one large residential lot by the property owner or it could be owned and managed by a homeowners’ association. Since all the development rights will have been utilized, it will not be further subdivided but will remain in productive rural residential use as a large lot contributing to the rural character of the area. Should the property owner decide that the rural character conservation approach will not work for him, he may still divide the property down to a rural lot size of 10 acres or larger. The rural character conservation development approach allows for lot size flexibility in developments larger than 19 acres by utilizing a sliding scale to determine the size of the remainder residential or open space lot. Lots between 19.1 and 60 acres in size would allow development of up to 30 percent of the site in small lots with 70 percent in the large remainder lot. Lots between 60.1 acres and 100 acres would allow development of 40 percent of the site in smaller lots with 60 percent in the large remainder lot. Lots larger than 100 acres would allow development of up to 45 percent of the site with 55 percent in the large remainder lot or open space.

Design guidelines in a rural character conservation development would ensure that most properties fronted on open space for enjoyment of rural vistas and that individual housing clusters were limited in size to avoid the appearance of an urban housing development. Housing would be encouraged to locate in or near the timbered portion of the property and away from existing residences to reduce its visual impact on adjacent properties and the exterior roads. The rural character conservation approach ensures that large lot sizes (10 acres or greater) and open spaces vital to the retention of rural character will be retained in rural areas. It allows most rural property owners to use their current development rights. Smaller lots still under one ownership or joint ownership could be recombined to ensure that this option is available to many property owners. Existing lots or ownerships smaller than 11 acres in size (contiguous ownership at the time of interim zoning adoption will be utilized to determine the 11-acre threshold) located within a rural character conservation designation will be allowed to subdivide to the underlying density of the zoning district in a large lot/small lot pattern.

The rural character conservation approach has many positive features. Since the amount of land utilized in residential home sites is reduced to the actual amount needed for residential use, a significant percentage of each development could remain in open space tax classification and uses. This feature limits the tax penalties incurred by the developing property owner while allowing him the possibility of producing the same income from his property if he does a well designed development. Case studies of existing open space developments in the Port Angeles area support the claim that buyers will pay as much or more for a lot in a well designed open space development as they will for a five-acre lot. This development approach would minimize public expenses involved in maintaining roads since less roads would be needed to service compact, open space developments. Woodlots and farms retained under this approach would not only provide for productive use of the land and enjoyment for the residents of the developments but could be utilized in combination to protect critical areas, connect wildlife corridors, provide space for livestock keeping, and otherwise minimize the impacts of development on the natural systems in the watershed. Problems with cluster ordinances would be avoided by providing only minor increases in density for utilizing this approach and through careful application of design guidelines to ensure the maintenance of rural character within such development areas.

(10) Flexible Zoning. A second approach will also be utilized in rural areas outside of areas designated for rural character conservation to allow for an increased diversity of rural lot sizes. Flexible zoning would allow the transfer of density within the ownership boundaries subject to a proposed land division, with no new lot being created less than one acre in area, and total number of lots determined based on the underlying zoning density. For example, a 20-acre parcel is designated as rural low (one home per 4.8 acres). This allows the owner four dwelling units. The owner decides to divide the property into two 2.5-acre lots, one five-acre lot, and one 10-acre lot. This flexible zoning technique may achieve some affordable housing goals and preserve the rural character by having a variety of housing lot sizes scattered throughout rural areas. While this approach encourages creativity, it does not ensure that the property owner retain any larger, rural sized lots which would retain rural character. The property owner is still free to develop a gridlike pattern of development which will not retain rural character at densities greater than one home per 10 acres. For this reason, this particular technique will not be utilized in rural character conservation designations where current large land ownership patterns allow for rural character to be fully retained.

(11) Urban Density Development Allowed in Rural Areas by the GMA. The Growth Management Act does provide for limited urban density growth outside urban growth areas in master planned resorts. Master planned resorts (240 acres minimum acreage) are self-contained and fully integrated planned unit developments, in a setting of significant natural amenities, with a primary focus on destination resort facilities with developed on-site indoor and outdoor recreation facilities. The County can develop policies to guide the development of these type of facilities.

(12) Controlling Sprawl by Limiting Nonresidential Uses in Rural Areas. There are three types of nonresidential uses found in the rural areas which need to be carefully controlled in order to preserve rural character. Shadow Mountain Store and RV at Lake Sutherland, Laird’s Corner and Granny’s on US 101 are examples of tourist or neighborhood commercial developments. While this type of development provides needed services to tourists and rural residents alike, it should be maintained within a set size limit or length along the highway and should occur no closer than at three-mile intervals to promote compact rural commercial service centers.

The Growth Management Act would indicate that some of the commercial and industrial uses found just east of the O’Brien Road intersection and west of Dry Creek Road have exceeded those which should be found in rural area. This second type of commercial and industrial development should be limited to these locations and further growth outside of a defined area at these locations should not be permitted. The visual impact of these uses should be reduced through the use of high quality landscaping and design guidelines.

Lastly, several industrially zoned but unutilized/utilized log yards are found outside the urban growth area. The Corey and Sons site east of Dry Creek Road is recommended for change to a rural neighborhood commercial designation in this plan to allow for appropriate use on the site while limiting further water pollution to Dry Creek which had been common under its prior use. Remote industrial sites west of the Elwha River have been recommended for designation as commercial forestry or rural land uses depending on surrounding land uses.

(13) Controlling Sprawl by Limiting Public Services Provided in Rural Areas. Public facilities and services to be provided in rural areas must be defined. Many rural areas in the Port Angeles planning area are within the service area of a public water system. Where densities greater than one home per 20 acres have been applied in the past, the only workable approach to retaining rural character at these densities is to encourage development which combines smaller residential lots with permanently retained larger rural lot sizes. Where this rural character conserving pattern is encouraged, public water systems are needed to serve compact development. Without public water, lot sizes should be five acres or larger to allow development of individual wells which do not adversely impact aquifers. Rural densities should not require extension of sewer. While police, fire and transportation systems will be provided in rural areas, expected levels of service will be much less than that found in UGAs.

(14) Implementing the 20-Year Rural Vision. Realizing the 20-year vision for the rural lands of the Port Angeles planning region will require development of rural goals, policies, and implementing actions that both encourage and ensure preservation of rural character. The types of housing developments considered appropriate for the rural areas varies within the Port Angeles planning area. Some areas have developed at one home per 2.4- to five-acre densities and designations which recognize these densities have been used in these areas. Larger lots characterize the Olympic foothills and the areas more than one-third mile from County roads. Many of these areas have been included in the rural character conservation designation which recognizes their pre-existing densities but ensures retention of rural character.

The proposed rural land use categories offer a range of rural residential densities (from one dwelling per 4.8 acres to one dwelling per 20 acres), some of which are subject to optional innovative zoning techniques. A number of LAMIRDs are designated according to the provisions of CCC 31.02.263.

31.04.225 Rural and resource land use designations, purpose and designation criteria.

The land use designations for rural and resource lands are listed and described in the charts on the following pages. The location and extent of the various rural and resource land designations within the Port Angeles Planning Region are shown on the adopted Comprehensive Plan Land Use Map, as amended, that is part of this chapter and title. The rural, rural neighborhood commercial, and rural limited commercial classifications are designated as limited areas of more intensive rural development, or LAMIRDs, pursuant to CCC 31.02.263 of this title. The designations are followed with a discussion of issues that need to be addressed to meet the 20-year vision. These charts should be utilized by the Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners, in combination with appropriate goals and policies, to evaluate proposed changes to the Comprehensive Plan and implementing ordinances. The land use designations mapped in this plan are tied to actual parcel lines and recognizable physical features. Proposals for changes in zoning which are not consistent with the mapped land use designations in this plan will require changes to the comprehensive plan.

Land Use Classification

Minimum Lot Size

Maximum Densities and Allowed Land Use

Commercial Forest

80 acres

One dwelling per 80 acres

Commercial Forest/Residential Mixed Use (20)

1/2 acre

One dwelling per 80 acres without clustering homes, or one dwelling per 20 acres when clustering homes

Commercial Forest/Residential Mixed Use (5)

1/2 acre

One dwelling per 80 acres without clustering homes, or one dwelling per 5 acres when clustering homes

Rural

1 acre

One unit per acre as infill within existing subdivisions; zone cannot be expanded in size

Rural-Low

1 acre

One dwelling per 4.8 acres

Rural Neighborhood Conservation

NC

One dwelling per 5 acres subject to optional innovative zoning techniques triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique) with densities up to one dwelling per 2.4 acres

Rural Character Conservation

1/2 acre

One dwelling unit per 10 acres without clustering; or densities of either one dwelling per 4.8 acres, or one dwelling per 2.4 acres, if large lots are retained

Rural Very Low

2.4 acres

One dwelling per 20 acres

Rural Neighborhood Commercial

None

One dwelling per 1/2 acre. Allows limited commercial services serving neighborhood needs, where uses of such type, scale, size, or intensity already existed as of July 1, 1990

Rural Limited Commercial

None

Allows established commercial and industrial uses to continue where uses of such type, scale, size, or intensity already existed as of July 1, 1990

Public

None

Caretaker dwelling allowed

Open Space Overlay

None

Identifies areas where development rights can be transferred to protect critical areas

UGA

 

See Port Angeles UGA Section

 

Rural Land Use Designations 

Land Use Designation

Residential Densities/Acres in Designation/Build-Out Populations

Quality of Life to Be Expected and Allowed Uses

Rural Low (RL)

1 dwelling/5 acres

5,347 acres in designation

2,460 people at build-out

Many features of rural character such as low density, animal keeping, low traffic volumes, outdoor recreation, wildlife habitat, and clean water are preserved at this density. When allowed to develop over large areas, the appearance can resemble that of a large lot subdivision.

Rural Neighborhood Conservation (NC)

One dwelling per 5 acres subject to optional innovative zoning techniques triggered by either specific neighborhood circumstances (overlay technique) or specific parcel criteria (cluster technique) with densities up to one dwelling per 2.4 acres

Many features of rural character such as low density, animal keeping, low traffic volumes, outdoor recreation, wildlife habitat, and clean water are preserved at this density. Allows for greater density either (a) where the neighborhood character is already established at that density, or (b) where clustering of home sites retains at least 70 percent of the property in rural open space. Affordability will increase with the infill of areas with an established neighborhood character. Rural quality of life will be maintained with developments that retain at least 70 percent in open space, reducing impacts on sensitive areas and retaining woodlots and agricultural land.

Rural Character Conservation (RCC3 and RCC5)

1 dwelling/10 acres without utilizing an open space development pattern

A 2.4 or 5-acre density allowed when homesites are configured to provide a mix of small residential lots intermixed with 10 acre+ woodlots, pasture or large residential lots

16,331 acres in designation.

3,756 – 12,250 people

Allows for a mixture of moderate sized lots (as small as 1/2 acre) mixed with permanently protected large lots (10 acres and larger) to allow rural character and uses to be retained even when fully developed. Affordability will increase with the availability of smaller lots but rural quality of life will be maintained with some lots remaining in larger lot sizes. Productive use of the land for woodlots and pasture land is maintained and critical areas can be avoided by reducing homesites to the actual size needed for residential use.

Rural Very Low (RVL)

1 dwelling per 20 acres

1,169 acres in designation

134 people at build-out

Rural density which allows retention of all rural characteristics such as animal keeping, agriculture, forestry, and open spaces. Serves as a buffer providing separation of commercial forestry and higher density rural development.

Rural

1 dwelling per 1 acre, limited to a defined, non-expandable area

802 acres

1,845 – 2,500 people at build-out

Urban density development allowed in rural areas largely where pre-existing subdivisions have established this density.

Rural Neighborhood Commercial (RNC)

Maximum allowed density is 1 dwelling per acre

Tourist commercial uses, local convenience stores, small-scale local service providers, and RV and manufactured home parks blended into the rural environment with landscaping, where uses of such type, scale, size, or intensity already existed as of July 1, 1990.

Rural Limited Commercial

None

Commercial and light industrial land use, where uses of such type, scale, size, or intensity already existed as of July 1, 1990, limited to defined, non-expandable area.

Public Land (P)

None

Parks, schools, and other public facility locations.

Total population which can be accommodated in rural areas at build-out densities

12,929 – 22,078 people at build-out in rural areas

5,052 people in PA region rural areas in 1990 Census

Proposed designations would allow for rural growth of 7,877 to 17,026 people. This growth is in the range of 2 to 4 times a high estimate of projected population growth for the region.

 

Land Use Designation

Purpose of the Designation

Land Capability/ Natural Limitations

Natural Resources/ Land Character-Lot Size

Public Services

Existing Land Uses

Rural Low Density

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for low density rural areas with lots that are large enough for many types of rural land uses. Rural low density provides a buffer between high density rural areas and areas with lower densities.

Land is capable of supporting low density rural type development with a few natural constraints. Land should be level to slightly sloping (0 to 15 percent slopes), have well drained to poorly drained soils capable of supporting individual septic systems; may have a moderate component of wetlands. Appropriate areas are relatively free of flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has moderate resource management potential with dispersed hobby farms, woodlots and larger agricultural use lands present. These low density areas could be placed adjacent to resource lands since their impact would be less than more intensive development. Current parcel sizes are between 5 acres and 11 acres in size.

This area is too far from the urban area to enable cost-effective provision of urban services. Uses do not require the extension of urban services. The area may be served by community water systems if local water is not of good quality. Rural type County road standards would apply.

This area has a mix of very large lot residential development, scattered residences and small hobby farms or woodlots. The area may be used as a transition between lower intensity rural uses and lands with good potential for resource uses. This designation is appropriate on lands with small-scale agricultural uses (animal raising, truck farming, etc.). This designation may be used along rural arterials to provide sufficient setbacks/ buffers for residential uses.

Rural Neighborhood Conservation

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for low density rural areas with lots that are large enough for many types of rural land uses with optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered either by the size of the parcel (cluster technique) or by the varying character of the many existing neighborhoods found within this zoning district (overlay technique).

These areas are relatively level (0 to 10 percent slopes), have well drained to moderately well drained soils capable of supporting individual septic systems, have only a minor component of wetlands and are relatively free of flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

Rural quality of life will be maintained by the low base density, as well as by the optional cluster technique that retains at least 70 percent in open space, with development subject to cluster design objectives and standards designed to reduce impacts on sensitive areas and retain woodlots and agricultural land, and other rural open space infill at a density consistent with the substantial residential development already existing in the neighborhood will not result in the inappropriate conversion of large tracts of undeveloped lands and will be consistent with the visual compatibility of rural development with the surrounding rural area.

These areas are generally located near major transportation corridors. Uses do not require the extension of urban services. Infrastructure and services to support infill will already exist in neighborhoods that are already substantially developed. Development under the optional innovative zoning techniques must be served by community water systems and County road standards will apply.

This area has a variety of development patterns, including many neighborhoods already characterized by (a) substantial development and the existence of ample services and facilities that would support infill at existing densities, and (b) neighborhoods with larger lots that would be suitable for a pattern of development that would retain at least 70 percent in open space.

Rural Character Conservation

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for a diversity of rural lot sizes, which includes large lots where productive rural land uses will continue to thrive, and smaller residential-sized lots for homesites. Rural character conservation provides a buffer between high density rural areas and areas with lower densities.

Land is capable of supporting low density rural type development with some natural constraints. Development sites should be level to sloping (0 to 20 percent slopes), while larger lots retained may be quite steep, have well drained to poorly drained soils capable of supporting individual septic systems, a high component of wetlands and floodplains, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has good resource management potential with dispersed hobby farms, woodlots and larger agricultural use lands present. These low density areas could be placed adjacent to resource lands since their impact would be less than more intensive development. Predominant parcel sizes are greater than 11 acres in size with rural land uses of woodlot or pasture land, and critical areas.

Uses do not require the extension of urban services. The area can be served by community water systems. Rural type County road standards would apply.

Area is a mix of scattered residences, hobby farms, woodlots and larger parcels still used for agricultural or forest production. The area may be used as a transition between lower intensity rural uses and lands with good potential for resource uses. This designation is often utilized where critical areas are present, in order to allow a pattern of development which could provide a greater measure of protection to these lands.

Rural Very Low

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for very low density rural areas with lots that are large enough for a mixture of rural and resource land uses. Rural low density allows for residential development at a density which is usually compatible with areas with natural limitations such as wetlands or ground with moderate erosion potential.

The land should be capable of supporting low density rural type development with moderate natural constraints. Land should be level to sloping (0 to 25 percent slopes), have well drained to poorly drained soils capable of supporting individual septic systems, may have a high component of wetlands and floodplains, has a moderate erosion potential but should be relatively free of landslide hazards.

The area has good resource management potential with dispersed hobby farms, woodlots and larger agricultural or forest land uses present. These very low density areas could be placed adjacent to resource lands since their impact would be less than more intensive development. Lot size is greater than 19 acres, predominantly pasture land and some woodlots.

This area is too far from the urban area to enable cost-effective provision of urban services. Uses do not require the extension of urban services. The area will not be served by community water systems. Rural type County road standards would apply.

This area has a mix of scattered residences, hobby farms, woodlots and larger parcels still used for agricultural or forest production. The area may be used as a transition between lower intensity rural uses and lands with good potential for resource uses.

Rural

This land use designation recognizes that some rural areas have developed at urban densities prior to implementation of Clallam County’s first zoning ordinance in 1982 and allows infill development at these densities to continue. Expansion of this zone is not permitted.

The land should be capable of supporting urban type densities. Natural constraints should be few. Land should be level (0 to 10 percent slopes) with soils capable of supporting community septic systems.

The area does not support resource land uses due to the density of development. Predominant lot size is less than one acre and this designation is usually found only where subdivisions predate zoning.

This area is too far from the urban area to enable cost effective provision of urban services. Density of development in these areas creates a demand for urban services. The area will be served by community water and paved County roads.

The area is characterized by high density, urban type development located in a rural setting that predates 1990, and qualifies for LAMIRD designation.

Rural Neighborhood Commercial

This land use designation provides for limited commercial services which meet the convenience needs of local residents in rural areas. The designation is limited to those areas already well developed at plan adoption. A high degree of compatibility with rural areas is achieved through the use of small buildings, small overall area devoted to commercial use, and design and layout which screens residential areas from objectionable features.

Since a large percentage of each lot will be covered with structures or paved parking, the land should be capable of supporting intensive development with no natural constraints. Land should be flat (0 to 5 percent slopes), have well drained soils capable of supporting community septic systems, be free of wetlands and flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has minimal natural resource potential. Development will not impact resource lands. This designation will be found only where existing commercial uses are located along Highway 101. Land use policies recommend a minimum distance of 3 miles between RNC designations as well as limiting their spread along highway frontage, to prevent the appearance of strip commercial development in rural areas.

Urban services are not available. Arterials should pass through or abut this designation. Highway landscaping should be required to blend in with the rural character of the area.

Area should tend to limited commercial uses including restaurants, small-scale convenience grocery stores, gas stations, gift shops and small-scale public uses, and qualifies for LAMIRD designation, with infill development to be similar to the use, scale, size, or intensity as the uses that existed as of July 1, 1990. Screened and well designed mobile home parks or RV parks may be permitted in the portion of the rural commercial areas not directly fronting on the highway. This type of land use designation should not cover more than 20 acres in any one rural neighborhood commercial location as growth of this type of commercial activity should be directed to urban growth areas.

Rural Limited Commercial

The designation allows for continued use of areas which have already developed in limited commercial and light industrial uses. The boundaries of such areas will be strictly defined at the time of plan adoption and will not expand. Within these boundaries current uses may continue to operate as permitted uses and may intensify. Vegetative screening, berming and restrictions on light, noise and outside activities will be used when new uses are established or existing uses intensify their activities. Adjacent rural densities should be low to allow buffering for residential uses.

Since a large percentage of each lot will be covered with structures or paved parking, the land should be capable of supporting intensive development with no natural constraints. Land should be flat (0 to 5 percent slopes), have well drained soils capable of supporting community septic systems, be free of wetlands and flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has minimal natural resource potential. Development will not impact resource lands. This designation recognizes that some industrial and commercial uses were well established outside the UGAs prior to growth management planning. These uses are allowed to continue at present locations but the area will not be expanded in size.

Urban services are not available. Arterials should pass through or abut this designation. The transportation network should be able to handle high traffic flows.

The commercial/industrial areas established just east of the Morse Creek Canyon at the US 101-O’Brien intersection and just west of Dry Creek Road at US 101 are the only LAMIRD sites within the regional planning area which meet the criteria for this zoning designation. Current uses include a cinema, shooting range, car race track, car parts and repair, building fabrication, storage, plumbing supply and wood product manufacture. New commercial or industrial uses should be similar to the use, scale, size, or intensity as the uses that existed as of July 1, 1990, and tend to be light traffic generators such as wood manufacturing plants, storage facilities, and enclosed light manufacturing facilities. Heavy traffic generators such as restaurants, motels, gas stations, large employment centers or retail outlets shouldn’t be directed to the UGA.

Public Land

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide locations for existing and future sites for school facilities, public offices, cemeteries, rights-of-way, and easements.

The land should be capable of supporting public land uses which in many cases would include large buildings and parking lots.

The area has limited resource management potential and will not impact adjacent resource lands. This designation is found where public agencies own land and will use it for public purpose.

Public buildings should generally be located in urban areas with urban services available within the planning time frame.

This area has a mix of existing public uses or is vacant ground.

Commercial Forestry

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for large contiguous areas where efficient forest operation can be conducted in support of Clallam County’s forest industry. The designation protects large forestland holdings from encroachment of uses which would threaten efficient forest management practices.

The land should be capable of supporting forest operations. Land should be level to steep, have well drained to poorly drained soils, may have a high component of wetlands and floodplains, have a moderate to high erosion potential and may include landslide hazard areas. Contiguous forested ownerships larger than 80 acres are mapped in this designation with smaller surrounded parcels included.

The area has excellent resource management potential with large tracts of forest ownership. Much of the County’s employment base depends on the retention of these commercial forestlands. Contiguous parcel size under one owner is usually greater than 79 acres in size and associated with larger blocks of timberland.

Uses do not require the extension of urban services. The area will not be served by community water systems. Few roads serve this area although State highways pass through it. Access to private parcels should be largely by private gravel roads.

This area is usually forested and being managed for forest production. Some smaller hobby farms and woodlots are found within commercial forest areas but are usually surrounded on at least 2 sides by commercial forest operations. Due to the small size of these rural inclusions and the predominant surrounding uses, designation of these uses as other than commercial forestry would be spot zoning.

Commercial Forest/Residential Mixed Use

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide a mix of commercial forest operations and residential land uses. Mixed use areas allow for continued forest operation on smaller private ownerships combined with some residential development. The designation allows for a buffer area to be established between intensive forest operations and rural land uses through the use of low base densities or an option to provide a combination of a large forest reserve and clustered housing.

The land should be capable of supporting forest operations. Land should be level to slightly sloping in the development portion of the property (0 to 15 percent slopes) but may be steep in the forest reserve area, have well drained soils in the developable area to poorly drained soils in the forestry reserve, may have a high component of wetlands and floodplains in forested areas, have a low erosion potential in the developable area and a moderate to high erosion potential in the forest reserve area, and may include landslide hazard areas in the forest reserve.

The area has excellent resource management potential. Parcel sizes will range between 5 to 40 acres in size but will generally be 19 acres or larger in size or in contiguous ownerships of this size. Commercial forest use is prevalent in area as indicated by land use and tax status. This designation is especially appropriate for smaller private landowners with less than 700 acres of total ownership as they usually require the ability to sell some residential lots to supplement forestry incomes.

This area is too far from the urban area to enable cost effective provision of urban services. Uses do not require the extension of urban services. The cluster housing area may be served by community water systems. Few roads serve this area although State highways pass through it. Access to private parcels should be largely by private gravel roads.

This area is usually forested and being managed for forest production. Some smaller hobby farms and woodlots are found within commercial forest areas.

Open Space Overlay

The purpose of this land use designation is to identify open space features which are un-buildable due to natural constraints such as wetlands, steep slopes, extreme landslide hazard and extreme erosion hazard which should be preserved to protect habitat or some other desired quality. The Growth Management Act requires such lands to be located within and between urban growth areas and suggests that they be used for recreation, wildlife habitat, trails and connection of critical areas. Designation as open space does not necessarily imply public ownership or the right to public use.

The land should be unbuildable due to natural constraints such as wetlands, steep slopes, extreme landslide hazard and extreme erosion hazard. Slopes will range from level (wetlands) to steep (40 percent), have well drained to poorly drained soils, and may have a substantial component of wetlands, floodplains, seismic and landslide hazards.

The area has resource management potential and may have high value for wildlife habitat, scenic value or watershed protection. Parcel sizes are variable and the area within this designation is best defined by critical area maps and critical wildlife corridor maps.

Open space lands should be located within and between urban growth areas. The steep landslide-prone ravines in the Port Angeles planning area are one example of open space lands. Access points to open space lands are needed but few other public services are needed.

This area is generally vacant ground due to its natural constraints on building.

31.04.230 Rural land – Policies.

(1) Issue 1, Retaining Rural Character in Rural Areas over the Long Term. Problems of rural sprawl commonly associated with portions of eastern Clallam County and other localities in the State are now becoming evident in the Port Angeles planning region. The potential for rural type sprawl exists in the Port Angeles planning region because current rural designations allow rural residential densities of one acre, 2.4 acres, and five acres over large contiguous areas. These allowable densities are the same as rural lands in other parts of Washington where rural type sprawl has caused severe problems. The typical land use pattern resulting in areas developing under these allowable densities more closely resembles a series of large lot subdivisions characterized by uniform lot sizes, large lawns, and limited rural uses, rather than the former mixture of large and small lot sizes, woodlots, pastures and other rural type land uses.

One-acre densities are not rural in character when spread over large areas as this density of development leads to demand for urban levels of service in terms of schools, roads, and emergency services and does not support efficient provision of urban services. While 2.4- and five-acre densities can appear rural in nature when mixed with larger open spaces and rural lot sizes, the repetition of 2.4- and five-acre lots in a gridlike pattern over large areas does not promote retention of rural character. Further development of this type over large areas will only diminish rural character over time, increase the costs for rural service provision and inhibit the function of natural systems as development occurs in this artificial pattern across streams, wetlands, landslide hazard areas, and erosion hazard areas.

(2) Goals and Policies to Retain Rural Character.

(a) Policy 1. Rural areas should provide for a balance between human uses and the natural environment while permanently retaining the features of “rural character” such as clean water, clean air, open spaces, agriculture, forestry, low residential densities, wildlife habitats, quiet, rural lifestyles, outdoor recreation, historic properties and landscapes, and low traffic volumes which attract people to rural environments.

(b) Policy 2. Rural character is best preserved through utilization of low density residential development with lot sizes of 10 acres or larger. Areas with natural limitations and areas designated at 20-acre densities in the 1982 comprehensive plan will be retained in large lot sizes to provide rural diversity, to encourage the continuation of rural land uses that generally require acreage larger than 10 acres and to protect critical areas.

(i) Lands bordering areas designated as commercial forestry were re-evaluated in this Plan to see if they met the criteria for designation as forest land of long-term commercial significance or if they fit into a rural classification. If they met commercial forest criteria they were classified in the most appropriate designation of forest land of long-term commercial significance. When rural designations were found to be appropriate, areas were redesignated in a rural category that reflected their current density or those of the surrounding area (i.e., areas zoned at 20-acre densities which are not currently managed as commercial forestland were redesignated for rural very low density (one unit per 20 acres) to provide buffers between commercial forest lands and higher density rural development and to provide diversity of lot sizes in rural areas which promotes their use for woodlots as well as the retention of rural character.).

(ii) Rural areas remote from County roads or with natural limitations (i.e., erosion hazard, landslide hazard, wetlands, streams) or those rural lands that could be used to buffer commercial forest lands should be retained at one home per 20 acres rural densities to protect critical areas and foster diversity of parcel sizes in the rural areas.

(c) Policy 3. In many rural areas where densities greater than one home per 10 acres have been utilized in previous plans, a rural character conservation designation will be utilized to provide a pattern of development which preserves a majority of these rural lands in the larger lot sizes which contribute to rural character, maintenance of rural quality of life, keeps rural lands in productive agricultural or forest uses and allows current densities to be utilized.

(i) Rural character conservation designations and implementing zoning will conserve rural character and rural quality of life by allowing development flexibility in creating either large rural lot sizes (usually larger than 10 acres); or alternatively, a combination of smaller residential lot sizes intermixed with a large remainder residential lot or open space which will not be further subdivided. The large remainder residential lot or open space could be utilized for the mutual benefit of the adjacent property owners as part of their amenity package, could be utilized as a woodlot or for agriculture by the original owner, or could be sold to others who would utilize it for similar purposes. The large remainder residential lot or open space will not be further subdivided as its development rights have been utilized in adjacent small lot development and such restriction shall be permanently recorded on the plat maps at time of subdivision. A density bonus of one unit per 40 acres would encourage the use of this option on larger lots. Lands designated as rural character conservation should be located outside of lands designated as commercial forestry or rural very low and will generally be located in areas with a preponderance of lot sizes or contiguous ownerships larger than 10 acres. Some lots smaller than 10 acres may be found within rural character conservation designations.

(ii) Design guidelines for development in rural character conservation designations will be developed to ensure that the development has a rural appearance and to reduce the visual impact on adjacent properties. These guidelines should include, but are not limited to, encouraging residential access to permanently retained rural open spaces, minimizing large housing clusters to avoid the appearance of a urban housing development, minimizing the amount of access roads, and land management plans for open spaces.

(iii) The rural character conservation designation will allow development at densities of one home per 4.8 acres (RCC5) or one home per 2.4 acres (RCC3) if the provisions of subsections (2)(c)(iv) and (2)(c)(vi) of this section are met. These densities usually recognize densities that were available in the 1982 Comprehensive Plan except in the case of areas with one-acre densities which will see a reduction in density available for use on site to one home per 2.4 acres. Such areas may be allocated development rights for any losses in density. These density rights can be transferred for use within identified portions of the urban growth area. Other rural character conservation designations which show a reduction in density from the 1982 plan are based on desire of area residents for lesser densities, topography, high percentages of critical areas, stream headwater locations, and lack of water availability in some areas.

(iv) The rural character conservation designation and its implementing zoning districts essentially describe a type of planned unit development (PUD) that retains rural character through retention of large rural lot sizes (typically larger than 10 acres). Lot size flexibility is built into the rural character conservation development concept through the use of a sliding scale which determines the percentage of the development which can be developed in smaller residential lot sizes and the percentage of the site which must remain in an undivided rural lot size or open space as follows:

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Lots between 11 acres and 19 acres in size will utilize all but one of the density credits available to the site in smaller residential lot sizes (maximum size of one acre) with the one remainder housing credit utilized by the larger remainder lot.

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Lots between 19.1 and 60 acres in size would allow development of up to 30 percent of the site in small lots, with 70 percent of the site in the large remainder lot.

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Lots between 60.1 acres and 100 acres would allow development of 40 percent of the site in smaller lots, with 60 percent in the large remainder lot.

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Lots larger than 100 acres would allow development of up to 45 percent of the site, with 55 percent of the site in the large remainder lot or open space.

(v) The rural character conservation designation and implementing zoning district should allow creation of residential lots 10 acres or larger if the option in subsection (2)(c)(iv) of this section is not utilized or desired. Lots 10 acres or larger should only be able to further subdivide if all the newly created lots will be 10 acres or larger or meet the lot size provisions outlined in subsection (2)(c)(iv) of this section.

(vi) Lots between 9.6 acres and 11 acres in size (contiguous ownership at the time of adoption of the interim zoning ordinance will be utilized to determine the 11-acre threshold) located within rural character conservation designation should be allowed to subdivide to the underlying density of the zoning district (i.e., one unit per five acres in RCC5 or one unit per 2.4 acres in RCC3) in a large lot/small lot pattern (maximum size of small lot residential parcel is 1.5 acres).

(d) Policy 4. In rural areas characterized by a variety of development patterns, a rural neighborhood conservation designation will be utilized to provide for low density rural areas with lots that are large enough for many types of rural land uses with optional innovative zoning techniques that are triggered either by the size of the parcel or by the varying character of the many existing neighborhoods found within this zoning district.

(i) Rural quality of life will be maintained by the low base density, as well as by the optional cluster technique that retains at least 70 percent in open space, with development subject to cluster design objectives and standards designed to reduce impacts on sensitive areas and retain woodlots, agricultural land, and other rural open space.

(ii) Infill at a density consistent with the substantial residential development already existing in certain neighborhoods will not result in the inappropriate conversion of large tracts of undeveloped lands and will be consistent with the visual compatibility of rural development with the surrounding rural area. For the purpose of this provision, a “neighborhood” is the area that extends 500 feet beyond the subject parcel’s boundaries, and “substantially developed” means that at least 70 percent of all parcels within that neighborhood contain residential development at the time of the permit application. Substantially developed neighborhoods will already contain mature infrastructure and services.

(iii) Public water systems and county road standards will apply to developments under either of the optional overlay or the cluster innovative zoning techniques.

(e) Policy 5. In all rural residential designations except rural neighborhood conservation and rural character conservation, a maximum residential density should be set for each Comprehensive Plan designation and should be utilized in place of minimum lot size to control densities in order to create greater diversity of lot sizes in rural areas which contributes to retention of rural character.

(i) When land is subdivided, property deeds and plat maps should be recorded showing the number of development rights which have been utilized and the number which remain for each parcel created.

(ii) The presence of small lots in a rural area created utilizing a maximum density system should not be used as a justification for increased densities.

(f) Policy 6. Current densities allowed in the Port Angeles planning region would meet the growth needs of the region far beyond those identified for the next 20-year planning period. Rural densities should not be increased above current rural density levels during this planning time frame (1995 – 2014) in order to preserve rural character and to limit demand for public services and facilities in rural areas. The conversion of rural areas into higher density rural designations or zoning districts will be discouraged.

(i) Continued development at densities of one home per acre or less without offsetting provision of open space is not a preferred rural development pattern and will be discouraged. Areas currently zoned for one acre lots which have not developed at these densities over large areas should utilize a rural character conservation development approach to allow rural character to be preserved through open space retention. One acre lot sizes will be allowed in the rural area in subdivisions currently developed at this density and in areas where these lot sizes are already existent to the extent that they qualify for and have been designated as LAMIRDs. Existing, legal, nonconforming lots will be buildable.

(ii) Continued development at densities of 2.4 and five acres per home without offsetting provision of open space is not a preferred rural development pattern and will be discouraged in the Port Angeles planning region. Areas currently zoned for 2.4- and five-acre lots which have not extensively developed at this density should utilize a rural neighborhood conservation or rural character conservation development approach to allow rural character to be preserved through retention of permanently protected pasture land and woodlots. Development densities of 2.4 and five acres per home will be allowed in rural areas where occupied lots in these lot sizes are already existent over large areas (greater than 50 acres). Existing, legal, nonconforming lots will be buildable under any change in zoning.

(g) Policy 7. Conversion of forest lands of long-term commercial significance located outside of urban growth areas into rural land uses other than master planned resorts will be prohibited in order to retain the base of industrial forest lands upon which the County’s largest industry is dependent. These lands provide important functions relating to retaining local employment, furthering economic development, retaining rural character, preservation of water quality, ensuring water quantity, protecting habitat and provide scenic vistas from rural lands and highways.

(3) Issue 2, Urban Residential Density Development in Rural Areas. Densities exceeding one home per acre when allowed to spread over large areas are identified in the Clallam County County-Wide Planning Policies as urban in nature. Comprehensive Plan goals and policies must limit new development at urban densities in rural areas.

Industrial land uses which contain few objectionable characteristics and commercial land uses exceeding those needed by rural neighborhoods or for tourists should also be located in urban growth areas. These types of intensive developments are better suited for development in the designated urban growth area of Port Angeles. Landslide hazard areas are also not appropriate for urban type development.

(4) Goals and Policies for Controlling Urban Densities.

(a) Policy 8. Limit urban residential lot development outside of urban growth areas and within critical areas.

(i) Areas characterized as of July 1, 1990, by a predominately built environment at densities equal to or exceeding one home per acre will be designated as LAMIRDs, and infill development will be allowed at such density within the logical outer boundary set in the Comprehensive Plan. Such LAMIRDs will not be expanded beyond these initial limits in order to ensure that urban density development occurs within and not outside of urban growth areas.

(ii) Lots of one acre or less may only be created through an approved rural neighborhood conservation, rural character conservation development plan, or as infill lots within designated LAMIRDs.

(iii) Landslide hazard areas should be designated for very low rural residential, open space or commercial forestry uses.

(b) Policy 9. Master planned resorts would be appropriate in rural areas with waterfront amenities. Commercial forest/residential mixed use or commercial forest areas may be appropriate locations for master planned resorts if rural sites are unavailable.

(c) Policy 10. Extension or existence of public water service in designated rural areas or resource lands shall not result in or be justification for higher densities than that anticipated by the regional land use plan. Water purveyor plans must demonstrate that new facilities are consistent with the comprehensive plan and won’t require increased densities to finance planned facilities.

(5) Issue 3, Rural Commercial Activities. Tourist and neighborhood commercial development areas such as Shadow Mountain Store and RV at Lake Sutherland, Laird’s Corner, Granny’s on US 101, and Indian Creek on US 101 at the Elwha River are examples of nonresidential uses found in the rural areas which qualify for LAMIRD designation (Lake Sutherland LAMIRD, Laird’s Corner LAMIRD, Granny’s Cafe LAMIRD, and Indian Creek LAMIRD), and as such will be carefully controlled in order to preserve rural character. While this type of development provides needed services to tourists and rural residents alike, it should be maintained within a set size limit or length along the highway and should occur only at existing locations to promote compact rural commercial service centers and to direct most commercial growth to urban growth areas. Rural limited commercial designations have been established to deal with the level of commercial and industrial development found east of Morse Creek canyon, at the US 101-O’Brien intersection, and west of Dry Creek Road, and these areas are designated as LAMIRDs (Deer Park LAMIRD, O’Brien LAMIRD, and Laird’s Corner LAMIRD (east portion), respectively). The level of commercial and industrial found within rural limited commercial designations should be directed to UGAs, but areas designated as LAMIRDs may contain commercial or industrial uses of such type, scale, size, or intensity as already existed as of July 1, 1990. The visual impact of nonresidential land uses in rural areas should be reduced through the use of high quality landscaping and design guidelines.

(6) Goals and Policies to Control Rural Commercial Activities.

(a) Policy 11. Development of existing commercial and industrial designated lands in the Deer Park LAMIRD and O’Brien LAMIRD should be allowed subject to the following standards:

(i) Allowable land uses should be limited to uses of such type, scale, size, or intensity as already existed as of July 1, 1990, such as:

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Tourist facilities such as snack bars, gift shops, antique stores and gas stations;

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Services for the local neighborhood such as professional offices, barbers, etc.;

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Small-scale retail serving the local neighborhood such as convenience grocery, etc.;

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Light manufacturing and storage uses such as cabinet making, boat building, fully screened mini-storage.

(ii) Standards should be set for the development of this property, including:

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Limiting the percentage of impervious surface to maintain an “open” atmosphere;

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Requiring setbacks, buffers and screening to separate commercial and industrial land uses from adjacent residential zones;

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Requiring highway and building landscaping that meets high standards for protection of rural character including complete screening of visually jarring uses such as mini-storage and outdoor RV storage, etc.;

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Limiting the size of any one building to avoid large-scale facilities;

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Development of a frontage road which feeds commercial traffic onto O’Brien Road.

(iii) Expansion of this commercial/industrial area outside of existing boundaries shall not be permitted under any circumstances.

(iv) Development outside UGAs must not lead to expansion of urban services or facilities such as sewer, water or improved transportation systems.

(b) Policy 12. Development of existing rural neighborhood commercial designations within the Lake Sutherland LAMIRD, Laird’s Corner LAMIRD, Granny’s Cafe LAMIRD, and Indian Creek LAMIRD should be allowed within their respective logical outer boundaries, and shall be subject to the following standards:

(i) Allowable land uses should be limited to uses of such type, scale, size, or intensity as already existed as of July 1, 1990, including:

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Tourist facilities like snack bars, gift shops, antique stores and gas stations, RV parks;

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Services for the local neighborhood such as churches, barbers, etc.;

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Small-scale retail serving the local neighborhood such as convenience grocery, etc.

(ii) Standards should be set for the development of the property, including:

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Limiting the percentage of impervious surface to maintain an “open” atmosphere;

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Requiring setbacks, buffers and screening to separate commercial and industrial land uses from adjacent residential zones;

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Requiring high standards of highway and building landscaping to protect rural character;

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Limiting the size of any one building to under 10,000 square feet to avoid large-scale facilities in rural areas.

(c) Policy 13. Commercial uses allowed in rural residential designations should be limited to those which would not impact rural character. Standards shall be set for recreational uses in rural areas, including recreational vehicle parks and commercial outdoor oriented activities. The following revisions should be made to the allowed uses, conditional uses and standards in rural zones:

(i) Commercial outdoor oriented recreational use in rural residential designations shall be limited to boat launching facilities, golf courses, campgrounds and similar uses carried on outside of buildings in order to direct intensive commercial uses such as motels, hotels, restaurants and variety stores to locate in appropriate areas including urban growth areas or in rural commercial designations.

(ii) Professional offices, exceeding the scope of home enterprises, should locate in appropriate areas including urban growth areas, tourist commercial designations, neighborhood commercial designations and limited commercial designations.

(iii) Research facilities that require rural locations due to the type of research conducted may be appropriately located in rural areas but those facilities whose research does not dictate a rural location should locate in appropriate areas including urban growth areas or in rural commercial limited designations.

(iv) Communication broadcast stations, mini-storage and boat storage should locate in appropriate areas including urban growth areas (all three uses), tourist commercial (boat storage) and rural limited commercial (all three uses) designations. Mini-storage, boat storage, and wrecking yards shall not locate in rural residential designations along State highways as this use would destroy rural character and scenic vistas.

(v) Standards for buffering and landscaping to ensure compatibility with surrounding rural land uses shall be accomplished.

(vi) Standards for noise, traffic, light and glare, and other nuisance characteristics shall be implemented.

(vii) Rural commercial and recreational commercial uses in rural areas shall be located on a minimum parcel size of five acres.

(d) Policy 14. Home-based businesses should be encouraged when the use is not intrusive to the surrounding residential character of the neighborhood.

(i) Home-based business that have little, if any, outward characteristics of a business should be allowed in all areas.

(ii) Home-based business that have some outward characteristics of a business should be allowed only when consideration is made for the rural character of the surrounding neighborhood.

(e) Policy 15. Industrial lands outside the urban growth area have been identified in the Laird’s Corner LAMIRD (east part). This industrial land has a land use designation of rural limited commercial which recognizes areas which have extensively developed in commercial and industrial land use outside urban growth areas. Land use on this property should remain similar to the use, scale, size, or intensity as the uses that existed as of July 1, 1990. The following standards shall be implemented in rural limited commercial designations:

(i) Earthen berms, natural landscaping, trees should be utilized in a minimum buffer area of 25 feet along the exterior property boundaries to buffer these uses from adjacent rural residential land uses.

(ii) Noise, lights and odors shall be controlled to the extent which is economically feasible for the type of operation on the site.

(iii) Each industrial use shall control the water quality impacts of its operation to the maximum extent possible.

(7) Issue 4, Retaining Scenic Corridors along State Highways. US 101 and SR 112 are the major travel routes through the Port Angeles region. Retention of the scenic values and rural feeling of this travel corridor is important to both residents and tourists alike as they travel to communities for goods and services and to popular recreation destinations. Development along the corridor should be controlled to protect rural character and scenic vistas.

(a) Policy 16. In order to preserve scenic rural corridors, the preferred land uses along US 101 and SR 112 should include low density residential interspersed with neighborhood/tourist commercial at existing locations along the roadway. Further development of commercial uses outside of these existing locations would not be permitted in order to direct a majority of commercial and industrial development to urban growth areas. A minimum distance of two and one-half to three miles should be maintained between tourist commercial land uses along State highways in order to prevent sprawl development of strip commercial corridors.

(i) Residential densities within a quarter mile of the State highways outside the urban growth area should be no greater than one home per five acres or develop using a rural character conservation approach. Residential setbacks from the highway should be large in order to preserve rural character, minimize the effects of road noise on residences, to prevent commercial conversion pressures and to improve or maintain the visual appearance of these important scenic corridors. Where large residential setbacks are not possible or would conflict with critical area protection, other screening options should be encouraged such as retention of trees and landscaping.

(b) Policy 17. In order to preserve scenic rural corridors, Clallam County should work with the DNR and other large forest land owners to make corridors along State highways a showcase for forestry practices such as commercial thinning, shelter wood cuts and other silvicultural practices. See also Goals and Policies under this subsection.

(c) Policy 18. Clallam County shall continue to prohibit construction of new billboards along scenic highways and shall continue County efforts to remove existing billboards located along designated scenic highways.

(8) Issue 5, Encourage Growth into Urban Growth Areas. Steady growth is predicted for the Port Angeles planning region. This area experienced an annual growth rate of 0.44 percent between 1980 and 1990. Much of the growth within these areas occurred outside of the community of Port Angeles. This trend has the long-term potential of diminishing “rural character” of the region. Reversing this trend requires providing incentives to encourage and attract development in urban areas where growth can be serviced more efficiently.

(9) Issue 6, Agricultural Practices in the Rural Watershed. A growing number of small parcels in rural communities are used as noncommercial part-time farms. Often horses or other livestock are kept primarily for recreational purposes. The cumulative impacts of these small farms on water quality may be greater than those of well-managed, large-scale commercial operations. The local conservation district plays a key role in working with individual farmers on water quality issues.

(a) Policy 19. droplet Collect and maintain farm inventory data and implement source controls.

droplet Clallam Conservation District

(i) Needs Assessment.

(A) Determine farms with implemented conservation plans, plans in progress, out-of-date plans, and no plans at all. Review and update farm surveys, and prioritize farms for potential water quality impacts.

(B) Assign high priority to small farms with uncontrolled livestock access to streams or ditches, confined animals and associated potential waste management problems, high animal densities, or potential to impact groundwater through improper fertilizer or pesticide and irrigation water management.

(ii) Prevention and Correction.

(A) Offer technical, financial, and construction assistance for prevention and correction of potential water quality problems. Market these programs through the mass media and through individual consultation with operators of high priority farms.

(B) Encourage all farms to develop, update and implement conservation plans to improve water quality. A schedule and timeline for ongoing implementation of conservation plans on both small and commercial farms is an integral component of conservation plans.

(C) Monitor farm plan implementation with site visits at regular intervals, annually during such implementation.

(D) Utilize education and incentives to prevent and correct agricultural water quality problems.

(E) Urge the USDA Consolidated Farm Services Agency to modify funding eligibility to include horse farms, or any animal-keeping operation which is affecting water quality.

(iii) Compliance and Enforcement.

(A) Assist farm operators with conservation plan development and implementation according to the compliance memorandum of understanding (Level III) between Clallam Conservation District, Conservation Commission, and Department of Ecology.

(B) Evaluate the effectiveness, revise as needed, and continue to use, the County-Conservation District water quality complaint referral memorandum of understanding for the Port Angeles watershed.

(C) Refer water quality violations to Department of Ecology for enforcement. Direct citizen water quality complaints to Ecology.

(10) Issue 7, Residential Practices in the Rural Watershed.

(a) Policy 20. droplet Ensure that new and existing on-site sewage disposal systems are located, designed, installed, operated, inspected, and maintained to prevent the discharge of pollutants to surface and ground waters.

droplet Clallam County, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(b) Policy 21. droplet As part of an overall source control program related to on-site sewage disposal, determine where soil or site conditions do not provide an acceptable level of treatment; sensitive resources are present; and/or high repair rates for existing systems are found; and undertake a program of discovery, remediation, maintenance and/or enforcement as described in the actions below. In the future, when any site or area has potential water quality problems due to suspected malfunction of an existing on-site sewage system, County policies and procedures should be in place for identifying such malfunctions and ensuring compliance with the on-site sewage regulations (Chapter 276-272 WAC).

droplet Clallam County, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(i) Discovery.

(A) In conjunction with proposed surface and ground water monitoring programs undertake ongoing water quality sampling in areas of concern. Where sampling indicates probable contamination due to on-site sewage disposal systems, conduct targeted sanitary surveys. Sanitary surveys should also inspect for the hidden failure to treat effluent. Where sanitary survey indicates likelihood of failure, conduct individual dye testing.

(B) Establish a feasible County procedure for determining sewage disposal integrity for suspect systems or possible failures; request on-site system permit from landowner, or proof of maintenance performed. If permit or other proof is unavailable, request permission to inspect the system. If refused, pursue inspection through legal search and inspection channels.

(C) At a minimum, systems should be inspected when the ownership of a property is changed, and corrective action taken prior to transfer of ownership. Educate lenders and appraisers about the need for sanitary surveys to ensure adequate function and capacity of on-site sewage disposal systems. Urge sanitary survey if inspection and/or maintenance has not been performed within the previous five years. Record of survey results should be transmitted to the County Environmental Health Division.

(D) Conduct an individual education, maintenance and inspection project involving targeted landowner groups. Make inspection kits available and provide assistance with system inspection.

(ii) Remediation.

(A) Continue to use State revolving funds and other sources to maintain, evaluate, and expand the water quality cleanup fund. This program is administered by Clallam County to provide low- or no-interest loans for on-site sewage disposal system repair or replacement. Loans are offered based upon financial need and potential threat to water quality.

(B) Replace failing conventional systems with alternative systems where appropriate. If replaced with a conventional system, ensure the resident is educated on proper use and maintenance of the system to avoid subsequent malfunctions.

(C) Implement regional/neighborhood solutions such as community drainfields in areas with high failure rates, rather than repeated, numerous individual system replacements.

(iii) Prevention and Maintenance.

(A) Encourage landowners to establish maintenance contracts for individual and community on-site systems. Provide incentives such as lower permit fees for those who have secured maintenance agreements.

(B) Through utility bill or other mailings, periodically remind property owners about the need for inspection, maintenance, and proper operation of their sewage disposal systems.

(C) Maintain a plat map-level visual record of installations and repairs to provide a useful tool for identifying areas historically at risk for failure.

(iv) Other.

(A) droplet Direct educational efforts at designers, installers, pumpers, permitters, homeowners and renters.

droplet Clallam County, WSU-Cooperative Extension

(B) Educate the public about proper management of waste going into on-site sewage disposal systems and methods of prolonging system usefulness, avoiding frequent pumping, and associated expenses.

(C) Use press releases, public notices, and mailings to remind the public that unapproved septic system additives are banned in this State.

(D) Encourage the use of best conventional technology which goes beyond the minimum code requirements for on-site sewage disposal system design and construction. This could include sand-lined trenches or longer drainfields, or building for greater capacity.

(E) Install low-volume plumbing fixtures and employ water conservation measures to reduce loading to on-site systems.

(F) Provide information and opportunities for home composting, to reduce the use of garbage disposals, which can contribute significantly to pollutant and volume loading on systems.

(G) Provide on-site sewage disposal system brochures and stickers for owners of all on-site systems in the watershed. The self-sticking seal, placed on the electrical box or other visible location, has space to record the location of the drainfield and date of last septic pumping.

(H) Assist on-site sewage disposal system pumpers and real estate representatives to promote water quality and distribute system maintenance stickers and information.

(c) Policy 22. droplet Site development, including roads, highways, and bridges, should protect the natural integrity of water bodies and natural drainage systems.

droplet Clallam County

(i) Avoid conversion, to the extent practical, of areas that are susceptible to erosion and sediment loss;

(ii) Preserve areas that provide important water quality benefits and/or are necessary to maintain riparian and aquatic habitat;

(iii) Plan, design, and develop sites to limit impervious areas;

(iv) Limit land disturbance activities such as clearing and grading, and cut and fill;

(v) Limit disturbance of natural drainage features and vegetation; and

(vi) Guidance on appropriate pollution prevention practices should be incorporated into site development and use.

(d) Policy 23. droplet Develop and adopt a clearing and grading ordinance which requires drainage and erosion control for land preparation prior to permitting for development, and which implements the Clallam County Critical Areas Ordinance.

droplet Clallam County

(e) Policy 24. droplet Minimize the application of fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides that result from new land development. Preserve and protect existing natural vegetation to the extent practical to help maintain predevelopment runoff volumes. Landscapes that demand significant amounts of chemical treatment should be avoided.

droplet Clallam County

(f) Policy 25. droplet Manage open space to retain the natural characteristics of land cover and soil, in order to maintain soil porosity and limit runoff.

droplet Clallam County

(g) Policy 26. droplet Attach points for good stewardship to open space taxation programs, to recognize the implementation of best management practices, corridor preservation, and other public benefits as qualification for open space tax status.

droplet Clallam County

(h) Policy 27. droplet Establish greenways through rural stream corridors. Provide interpretive materials describing upstream-downstream, rural-urban stream relationships, and healthy stream characteristics and management practices.

droplet Clallam County

(i) Policy 28. droplet New development shall utilize existing community water systems where available and feasible, rather than establishing new community water systems in areas already served by existing systems.

droplet Clallam County, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(j) Policy 29. droplet Clallam County should work with Department of Ecology to assume some local responsibility for water rights analysis and appropriation to reduce disincentives resulting from State management, and to improve accountability and oversight for local small water systems. Responsibilities delegated to Clallam County should be accompanied by funding for those duties.

droplet Clallam County, WA Department of Ecology

(k) Policy 30. droplet Assist with the formation of an association of community water systems to create a forum for management concerns, strategies, successes and problems. Develop annual meetings to provide training and to address wellhead protection.

droplet Clallam County, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(l) Policy 31. droplet Encourage community well owners to develop wellhead protection programs. Assist community water system owners and operators with development and implementation of wellhead protection programs and emergency intervention plans. Provide operators and owners with information and assistance in contaminant source inventories. Provide support for water quality and quantity protection. Provide guidance on land use decisions, and help with maintaining public involvement in decision-making.

droplet Clallam County

(i) Educate well owners regarding prevention of aquifer contamination via well casings, caps, and other points of entry. Provide well owners with information about proper well construction, the advantage of drilling to deeper aquifers, and homeowner liability for proper well construction.

droplet Clallam County

31.04.240 Urban growth – Discussion.

(1) GMA Goals. Encourage development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner.

Encourage the availability of affordable housing to all economic segments of the population of this State, promote a variety of residential densities and housing types, and encourage preservation of existing housing stock.

Encourage economic development throughout the State that is consistent with adopted comprehensive plans, promote economic opportunity for all citizens of this State, especially for unemployed and for disadvantaged persons, and encourage growth in areas experiencing insufficient economic growth, all within the capacities of the State’s natural resources, public services, and public facilities.

Private property shall not be taken for public use without just compensation having been made. The property rights of landowners shall be protected from arbitrary and discriminatory actions.

Identify and encourage the preservation of lands, sites, and structures, that have historical or archaeological significance.

(2) Watershed Goals. Protect beneficial uses of water from nonpoint sources of pollution in the Port Angeles watershed, including the effects of pathogens, chemicals, sediment, and nutrients on both surface and ground water resources.

Promote stewardship by residents, decision makers, visitors, and agencies in the Port Angeles watershed.

Protect and enhance watershed resources, and reverse degradation where it has occurred.

Ensure cooperation and coordination in resource management.

(3) A Vision of the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area in 2014. The Port Angeles urban growth area in the year 2014 is known for its livable neighborhoods which express their own unique character, high quality of life, pedestrian orientation and superior design. Many residential areas have been separated from the hustle and bustle of commercial activities near Highway 101 by allowing public uses such as schools, parks and public golf courses as commercial to residential buffers. Commercial business areas adjacent to neighborhoods provide goods and services to neighborhood residents while many businesses have residences located on upper stories. The Highway 101 corridor is now a tree-lined boulevard with landscaped medians as it passes through the urban area and businesses all along this corridor have upgraded their landscaping and physical appearance.

Most moderate density, low cost housing has been infilled into moderate density neighborhoods located just off Highway 101 in urban growth areas where easy access to transit and job opportunities are available. Well designed and landscaped manufactured home parks and multifamily developments provide an attractive low cost living environment. Visitors to our area note the distinct open space boundaries between neighborhoods which make use of the steep-sided creek ravines which are left in the natural state. Within the Port Angeles urban growth area, neighborhood population centers are linked to the waterfront trail system through trails located in the stream ravines, allowing for efficient non-motorized transportation options for reaching work or for recreation.

Businesses which provide regional services have been grouped at convenient locations at intersections of major collector or arterial roads with SR101 within the urban growth area and conform to visually pleasing landscape and building design standards. Regional service center sites have been identified both within the City of Port Angeles and within the unincorporated urban growth area. Developers seeking to build a regional business facility are directed to these community approved sites which have been thoroughly evaluated for environmental constraints. All neighborhood and regional businesses centers are linked by an efficient local transit system. A new arterial paralleling Highway 101 but located farther to the south provides an alternate east side, cross town route for local access to Port Angeles. Tribal business centers have also grown to become major employers within Clallam County.

Most new manufacturing and industrial concerns are located at the expanded Airport Industrial Park. Several value-added wood product firms operate on industrial lands just outside of the urban growth area where rural densities of the surrounding area limit conflict which could occur if this type of use where sited in an urban area.

Nine streams flow through the Port Angeles urban growth area providing unique opportunities for urban residents to enjoy a riverine environment. The last 20 years have seen a renewal of these streams in terms of water quality, water quantity, stream restoration, stream enhancement for fish and wildlife, public access to stream corridors and development of opportunities for environmental education.

The urban area of Port Angeles provides a mixture of employment, residential, commercial, cultural and recreational opportunities. Much of the new development and redevelopment which occurred after 1995 took place within the existing urban growth area of Port Angeles where infrastructure was in place or could be easily extended. Today, there is still ample room for development within that original urban growth area. Port Angeles is the ultimate supplier of services within the urban growth area.

The Port Angeles region enjoys a healthy and stable economy, emphasizing diversity in the range of goods produced and services provided. Businesses continue to locate in the urban growth area because of the high quality of life, provision of business infrastructure, the emphasis on superior schools, and the ability of a tightly knit community to provide a safe living environment for all. Residents and business interests trust their local governments to follow through on solutions because the plans and promises made to manage growth in 1995 have been followed and changes to the original plan occur as a result of demonstrated community need. Change is accepted and proceeds in an orderly fashion based on the growth management plan.

(4) Urban Growth Issues and Current Trends. The Growth Management Act requires the designation of urban growth areas, within which urban growth will be encouraged and outside of which growth can occur only if it is not urban in nature. The Act defines “urban growth” as growth that makes intensive use of land for the location of buildings, structures, and impermeable surfaces to such a degree as to be incompatible with the primary use of such land for the production of food, other agricultural products, or fiber, or the extraction of mineral resources. When allowed to spread over wide areas, urban growth typically requires urban governmental services. The Growth Management Act defines “characterized by urban growth” as referring to land having urban growth located on it, or to land located in relationship to an area with urban growth on it as to be appropriate for urban growth.

The Growth Management Act and County-wide Planning Policies define “urban governmental services” to include those services historically and typically delivered by cities or other identified service provider, such as a utility district, and which at a minimum include the provision for sanitary waste, solid waste disposal systems, water systems, urban roads and pedestrian facilities, public transportation systems, stormwater systems, police and fire and emergency service systems, electrical and communication systems, school and health care facilities, and neighborhood and/or community parks.

Urban lands are the focus of primary economic activities such as retail, wholesale, professional offices and industry. Commercial and industrial uses often encourage other urban development around it, and increase the need for extension or improvement of public services and facilities. Therefore, those types of commercial and industrial uses should generally be found only in urban growth areas.

One of the prime considerations in establishing the Port Angeles urban growth area was the location of existing urban density residential, industrial and commercial land uses outside the city limits. The Growth Management Act provides the guidance that urban growth areas should be located first in areas already characterized by urban growth (see definition) that have existing public facility and service capacities to serve such development, and second in areas already characterized by urban growth that will be served by a combination of both existing public facilities and services and any additional needed public facilities and services that are provided by either public or private sources. Further, it is appropriate that urban government services be provided by cities, and urban government services should not be provided in rural areas. While the projected 20-year population growth of the Port Angeles urban growth area could be accommodated within the existing city limits, the existence of large areas already developed at urban densities and with urban type commercial and industrial land uses immediately adjacent to the city require the designation of an urban growth area which extends beyond the city limits to include these urban areas.

Over the past 10 years, the rural areas of the Port Angeles planning area have experienced 65 percent of the decade’s growth. These rural growth trends do not satisfy growth management objectives of encouraging development in urban areas where adequate public facilities and services exist or can be provided in an efficient manner. Moderate to high density development will be encouraged within the urban growth area and each urban growth area shall permit urban densities and shall include greenbelt and open space areas. The availability of high density and cost efficient services within the urban growth area should make it more cost effective to develop within the urban growth area than outside of it. This “cost of development” advantage and the retention of a high quality of life in the urban area neighborhoods should help to reverse the trend toward rural development and increase affordable housing opportunities.

(5) County-wide Planning Policies that Relate to Urban Growth Areas. Clallam County and the cities in the County developed a set of County-wide Planning Policies which were adopted in June of 1992. The County-wide Planning Policies provide a framework for all comprehensive plans developed within the County. County-wide Policies were developed which addressed issues involving urban growth areas, joint planning, siting of public capital facilities, transportation, affordable housing, economic development and open space.

The following policies provide a partial listing of the urban growth area policies found within the County-wide Planning Policies and are those most relevant to land use in urban areas:

•    

Urban growth areas should be established to avoid critical areas, except where addressed as part of the City’s Comprehensive Plan or critical areas ordinance. Urban growth areas should not include designated resource lands unless the City or County has enacted a program authorizing transfer or purchase of development rights.

•    

Urban growth area designations shall consider the linkage with open space corridors within and between urban growth areas as required in this policy and the Growth Management Act.

•    

Urban services to be provided within UGAs should include, at a minimum, provision for sanitary waste, solid waste disposal systems, water systems, urban roads and pedestrian facilities, transit systems, stormwater systems, police and fire and emergency services systems, electrical and communication systems, school and health care facilities, and neighborhood and/or community parks.

•    

Urban services/facilities required to meet the needs of new development shall be provided, or shall be planned to be available within six years, to meet the levels of services established for such services within each UGA.

•    

The County and the cities will ensure appropriate techniques for managing future growth consistent with the designation of urban growth areas, such as a minimum density within the UGA and a maximum density outside the UGA. A range of densities should be provided for by the City and County for lands within the UGA, including some lands for relatively low density single-family development and some lands at a range of densities both allowing and encouraging multifamily development.

•    

Where critical areas occur within the designated UGA, policies and regulations will be developed to ensure protection of such areas.

•    

The County, in coordination with the adjacent city, shall consider the need for future expansion of urban growth areas beyond the projected 20-year period required by the Growth Management Act. Special density considerations shall be given at the edge of urban growth areas, if determined necessary based on a land use analysis, so that future extension of urban growth areas and urban services allows conversion to more efficient urban patterns. Special density considerations could include reduced densities or cluster development options. Such considerations shall occur during preparation and adoption of joint City/County Comprehensive Plans for the unincorporated urban growth area.

•    

Land designated for commercial or industrial uses which encourage adjacent urban development shall not be located outside a UGA.

•    

Lands within urban growth areas which are adjacent to existing cities should be able to be annexed to those cities. The cities and county, in coordination with existing and ultimate service providers, should develop an annexation plan which includes annexation of land characterized by urban development and a phased program of annexation consistent with the extension of services and the development of land in accordance with the city’s comprehensive plan and capital facilities plan.

•    

Urban services shall be provided and constructed in accordance with the design and construction standards as specified in the UGA Urban Services and Development Agreement required by the policies for joint planning and contiguous and orderly development.

•    

Services and facilities which are not available at the time of the development project giving rise to the need for such services shall be included in a financially feasible capital facilities element of the comprehensive plan for the city responsible for such service provision, and/or in the appropriate plans of the service provided.

(6) UGA Objectives. Urban densities allowed in urban growth areas make it possible to provide more efficient transportation, fire and police, water, sewage disposal, and other public services. Public transit studies point out that public transportation systems are not cost-effective until densities of seven dwellings per acre are achieved. When urban areas are set aside it is vital that urban densities and services get established. Continuing to allow rural densities and rural services within urban areas will not achieve UGA or GMA objectives.

Encouraging urban growth also helps protect rural and resource lands from conversion. When sufficient land within urban areas is provided at a reasonable price and in well-designed neighborhoods, there is less demand for rural lands. In the past 20 years, a large portion of the rural growth occurred because rural properties were less expensive than urban lots, and affordable housing opportunities (such as manufactured housing) were allowed in rural areas but discouraged in urban areas. The Clallam County Comprehensive Plan works toward conserving rural and resource lands, and making the most efficient use of scarce public resources through encouraging development within urban growth areas.

31.04.300 Urban land use designations, purpose and designation criteria.

The proposed urban land use designations are listed and described in the charts on the following pages. The designations are followed with a discussion of issues that need to be addressed to meet the 20-year vision. Draft goals and policies to address these issues are included for review and discussion. These charts should be utilized by the Planning Commission and Board of County Commissioners, in combination with appropriate goals and policies, to evaluate proposed changes to the comprehensive plan and implementing ordinances. The land use designations mapped in this plan are tied to actual parcel lines and recognizable physical features. Proposals for changes in zoning which are not consistent with the mapped land use designations in this plan will require changes to the comprehensive plan.

The neighborhood maps which follow this section have symbols which indicate the proposed land use designation. The following table describes the map designations:

Land Use Classification

Minimum Lot Size

Maximum Densities and Allowed Land Use

Urban Very Low Density (VLD)

1/2 acres

Two dwelling units per acre. Single-family residential and horticultural activities allowed.

Urban Low Density (LD)

none

Nine dwelling units per acre.

Urban Very Low/Low Density (VLD/LD)

none

Two dwelling units per acre without transfer of development rights, or nine dwelling units per acre with transfer of development rights.

Urban Moderate Density (MD)

none

Fifteen dwelling units per acre.

Open Space Overlay (OS)

none

Identifies areas where development rights can be transferred from to protect critical areas.

Urban Neighborhood Commercial (UNC)

none

Allows a mix of neighborhood scale commercial uses and multifamily residential of up to 15 dwelling units per acre where residential uses are located off the commercial frontage streets.

Urban Commercial Center (UC)

none

Regional scale business will be grouped at these locations.

Industrial (I)

none

Industrial uses include manufacturing facilities, truck shops, large scale storage facilities, gravel extraction and log storage.

Public (P)

none

Caretaker dwelling allowed.

 

Land Use Designation

Purpose of the Designation

Land Capability/Natural Limitations

Natural Resources/Mapping Criteria

Public Services

Existing Land Uses

Urban Very Low Density (VLD)

Urban very low density designations (zero to two units/acre) should be utilized in areas with natural limitations in order to protect areas with wetlands, steep slopes or areas highly impacted by stormwater. Urban very low density designations should also be utilized in areas that are already largely developed at this density and whose natural limitations do not allow for redevelopment at higher densities.

The land should be capable of supporting very low density but urban type development with minimal natural constraints. Land should be flat (zero to five percent slopes), have well drained soils, have only a small component of wetlands and be relatively free of flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has minimal natural resource management potential. Development of the area will have little detrimental impact on resource lands. These low density areas could be placed adjacent to resource lands since their impact would be less than more intensive development. This designation is mapped at the periphery of the urban growth area, in areas where low density is desirable such as under airport flight lines, or in portions of the urban growth area that have already developed at this density.

Urban services should be available or capable of being extended within the planning time frame. Collector roads should be within a half mile of this designation. Transportation networks should be able to handle traffic flows.

This designation should tend to residential uses and may include single-family and mobile home subdivisions at the same densities as surrounding developments. This designation is appropriate where existing small scale agricultural uses (animal raising, truck farming, greenhouses) are occurring.

Urban Low Density (LD)

This land use designation provides for a mix of duplex, fourplex and single-family residences in UGA’s. Densities will range from two to nine units per acre. These areas should be located near existing cities, where possible, since sewer systems are needed in such areas. Urban low density designations will be located in close proximity to existing neighborhood commercial areas but residences would be buffered from this intensive commercial use by public uses whenever this is possible.

Since a large percentage of each lot will be covered with structures and additional area will be impervious surfaces supporting roads, the land should be capable of supporting intensive development with minimal natural constraints. Land should be flat (zero to five percent slopes), have well drained soils, be relatively free of wetlands and flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has minimal natural resource management potential. Development of the area will have little detrimental impact on resource lands. This designation is mapped in areas which have experienced development at these densities within the urban growth area, such as 4 Seasons Ranch and Gales Addition.

Urban services, including sewer should be available or capable of being extended within the planning time frame. Arterials or collector roads should abut this designation. Transportation networks should be able to handle traffic flows.

Area should tend to residential uses and may include single-family and multifamily (up to fourplexes) residential developments and mobile home subdivisions at the same densities as surrounding developments. Existing and planned neighborhood commercial areas and employment centers should be in close proximity but should be buffered from this intensive residential land use where possible by public uses.

Urban Very Low/Low Density (VLD/LD)

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for low density urban areas within UGAs. This land use designation will allow development rights from critical areas and some areas experiencing downzoning to be utilized. Density allowed by right will be up to two units per acre but a property owner in this designation can purchase development rights from owners of such rights and build up to nine units/acre.

The land should be capable of supporting low density but urban type development with minimal natural constraints. Land should be flat (zero to five percent slopes), have well drained soils, have only a small component of wetlands and be relatively free of flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has minimal natural resource management potential. Development of the area will have little detrimental impact on resource lands. These low density areas could be placed adjacent to resource lands since their impact would be less than more intensive development. These areas should be located at the periphery of the urban growth area.

Urban services should be available or capable of being extended within the planning time frame. Collector roads should be within a half mile of this designation. Transportation networks should be able to handle traffic flows.

This designation should tend to residential uses and may include single-family and mobile home subdivisions at the same densities as surrounding developments. This designation is appropriate where existing small scale agricultural uses (animal raising, truck farming, greenhouses) are occurring.

Urban Moderate Density (MD)

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for a mix of multifamily and single-family residences at moderate urban densities inside urban growth areas. Densities of up to 15 units per acre would be permitted. These areas should be located immediately adjacent to existing cities and within walking distance of existing arterials, since it is anticipated that densities will be high enough to support public transit and that sewer systems will be needed.

Since a large percentage of each lot will be covered with structures and additional area will be impervious surfaces supporting roads, the land should be capable of supporting intensive development with minimal natural constraints. Land should be flat (zero to five percent slopes), have well drained soils, be free of wetlands, flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has minimal natural resource management potential. Development of the area will have little detrimental impact on resource lands. Urban residential moderate density has been mapped in areas bordering the commercial designations north and south of Highway 101 on the east side of the Port Angeles urban growth area to serve as a buffer between commercial development and residential areas already developed at lesser densities.

Urban services, including sewer, should be available or capable of being extended within the planning time frame. Arterials or collector roads should abut this designation. Transportation networks should be able to handle traffic flows.

Area should tend to residential uses and may include single-family and multifamily residential developments and mobile home parks at the same densities as surrounding developments. Existing and planned neighborhood commercial areas and employment centers should be in close proximity but should be buffered from this intensive residential land use where possible by public uses.

Urban Neighborhood Commercial (UNC)

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for limited commercial services which meet the shopping needs of local neighborhoods within urban growth areas. These areas are characterized by a high degree of compatibility with surrounding residential areas. Compatibility is achieved through controlling the scale of commercial buildings, ensuring that most commercial uses are focused on Highway 101, requiring commercial design and layout which screens residential areas from intensive lights, storage and parking areas.

Since each lot will be covered with structures or paved parking the land should be capable of supporting intensive development with no natural constraints. Land should be flat (zero to five percent slopes), have well drained soils, be free of wetlands and flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has minimal natural resource potential. Development will not impact resource lands. Urban neighborhood commercial designations should be located only in existing commercial use areas primarily in the eastern UGA. The small urban neighborhood commercial area on the west side of Port Angeles should not be allowed to expand westward in order to avoid the strip commercial development which has occurred on the eastern side of the UGA.

Urban services, including sewer should be available or capable of being extended within the planning time frame. Public water systems should be available. Arterials should pass through or abut this designation. The transportation network should be able to handle high traffic flows. Businesses and high density residential uses should be designed for transit and pedestrian accessibility and should have streetside landscaping.

Area should tend to neighborhood commercial uses including restaurants, small scale grocery stores, small scale employment centers with associated retail uses. Multifamily residential developments, small scale storage facilities. Screened mobile home parks and multifamily uses are preferred uses in the portion of the neighborhood commercial areas not directly fronting on Highway 101.

Urban Commercial Center (UC)

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for commercial uses serving the entire region in urban growth areas with an incorporated city. These areas should be located on Highway 101 at intersections with collectors or at existing stop light locations. Urban commercial centers must hold large vacant parcels for utilization by major retailers.

Since each lot will be covered with structures or paved parking the land should be capable of supporting intensive development with no natural constraints. Land should be flat (zero to five percent slopes), have well drained soils, be free of wetlands and flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards.

The area has minimal natural resource management potential. Development of the area will have little detrimental impact on resource lands. This designation should only occur at major intersections of Highway 101 and collectors or where existing stop lights serve existing regional development.

Urban services, including sewer should be available or capable of being extended within the planning time frame. Public water systems should serve the area. Arterials should pass through or abut this designation and road should be able to handle high traffic flow.

Area should be a mix of regional commercial uses including indoor malls, auto malls, regional service suppliers, restaurants, large scale grocery stores, motels, and large scale employment centers with associated retail uses.

Industrial (I)

The purpose of this land use designation is to provide for industrial development which has impacts which are difficult to control such as heavy truck traffic, noise, vibration, light, glare and odors. This designation must usually be well separated from residential development to avoid conflicts; light industrial designations can be used for this purpose.

Since each lot will be covered with large structures or paved parking the land should be capable of supporting intensive development with no natural constraints. Land should be flat (zero to five percent slopes), have well drained soils, be free of wetlands and flood, landslide, seismic or erosion hazards. It is particularly important that heavy industrial sites be located where adverse effects on ground or surface water can be avoided.

The area has minimal natural resource management potential. Development of the area will have little detrimental impact on resource lands. This designation is mapped where existing industrial land uses are well established.

Urban services, including sewer and water should be available or capable of being extended within the planning time frame. Arterials should pass through or abut this designation. Location near an airport is preferred to allow easy access to air freight services. This designation should only occur within established urban growth areas and should generally abut the city limits.

Some of the uses which have occurred in unincorporated urban growth areas include sawmills, truck repair shops, small scale manufacturing and storage facilities. Much of this land is currently vacant although some sites have been used in the past for log storage and sawmills.

Open Space Overlay (OS)

The purpose of this land use designation is to identify open space features which are usually unbuildable due to natural constraints such as wetlands, steep slopes, extreme landslide hazard and extreme erosion hazard which should be preserved to protect property, habitat or some other desired quality.

The land are usually unbuildable due to natural constraints such as wetlands, steep slopes, extreme landslide hazard and extreme erosion hazard. Slopes will range from level (wetlands) to steep (greater than 40 percent), have well drained to poorly drained soils, and may have a substantial component of wetlands, floodplains, seismic and landslide hazards.

The area has resource management potential but may have higher value for wildlife habitat, scenic value or watershed protection. The Growth Management Act requires such lands to be located within and between urban growth areas and suggested that they be used for recreation, wildlife habitat, trails and connection of critical areas. Designation as open space does not necessarily imply public ownership or the right to public use. This designation is mapped in conjunction with critical areas, wildlife habitat corridors and in some areas near Port Angeles experiencing downzoning.

Open space lands should be located within and between urban growth areas. The steep landslide prone ravines in the Port Angeles planning area are one example of open space lands. Access points to open space lands are needed but few other public services are needed.

This area is generally vacant ground due to its natural constraints on building.

31.04.310 City of Port Angeles urban growth area.

(1) A Vision of the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area in 2014. The Port Angeles urban growth area in the year 2014 is known for its livable neighborhoods which express their own unique character, high quality of life, pedestrian orientation and superior design. Many residential areas have been separated from the hustle and bustle of commercial activities near Highway 101 by allowing public uses such as schools, parks and public golf courses as commercial to residential buffers. Commercial business areas adjacent to neighborhoods provide goods and services to neighborhood residents while many businesses have residences located on upper stories. The Highway 101 corridor is now a tree-lined boulevard with landscaped medians as it passes through the urban area and businesses all along this corridor have upgraded their landscaping and physical appearance.

Most moderate density, low-cost housing has been infilled into moderate density neighborhoods located just off Highway 101 in urban growth areas where easy access to transit and job opportunities is available. Well designed and landscaped manufactured home parks and multifamily developments provide an attractive low-cost living environment. Visitors to our area note the distinct open space boundaries between neighborhoods which make use of the steep-sided creek ravines which are left in the natural state. Within the Port Angeles urban growth area, neighborhood population centers are linked to the waterfront trail system through trails located in the stream ravines, allowing for efficient nonmotorized transportation options for reaching work or for recreation.

Businesses which provide regional services have been grouped at convenient locations at intersections of major collector or arterial roads with SR101 within the urban growth area and conform to visually pleasing landscape and building design standards. Regional service center sites have been identified both within the City of Port Angeles and within the unincorporated urban growth area. Developers seeking to build a regional business facility are directed to these community approved sites which have been thoroughly evaluated for environmental constraints. All neighborhood and regional business centers are linked by an efficient local transit system. A new arterial paralleling Highway 101 but located farther to the south provides an alternate east side, cross-town route for local access to Port Angeles. Tribal business centers have also grown to become major employers within Clallam County.

Most new manufacturing and industrial concerns are located at the expanded Airport Industrial Park. Several value-added wood product firms operate on industrial lands just outside of the urban growth area where rural densities of the surrounding area limit conflict which could occur if this type of use where sited in an urban area.

Nine (9) streams flow through the Port Angeles urban growth area providing unique opportunities for urban residents to enjoy a riverine environment. The last twenty (20) years have seen a renewal of these streams in terms of water quality, water quantity, stream restoration, stream enhancement for fish and wildlife, public access to stream corridors and development of opportunities for environmental education.

The urban area of Port Angeles provides a mixture of employment, residential, commercial, cultural and recreational opportunities. Much of the new development and redevelopment which occurred after 1995 took place within the existing urban growth area of Port Angeles where infrastructure was in place or could be easily extended. Today, there is still ample room for development within that original urban growth area. Port Angeles is the ultimate supplier of services within the incorporated urban growth area. The City and the PUD provide water, power and sewer services within the unincorporated urban growth area.

The Port Angeles region enjoys a healthy and stable economy, emphasizing diversity in the range of goods produced and services provided. Businesses continue to locate in the urban growth area because of the high quality of life, provision of business infrastructure, the emphasis on superior schools, and the ability of a tightly knit community to provide a safe living environment for all. Residents and business interests trust their local governments to follow through on solutions because the plans and promises made to manage growth in 1995 have been followed and changes to the original plan occur as a result of demonstrated community need. Change is accepted and proceeds in an orderly fashion based on the growth management plan.

(2) Urban Growth Area General Land Use Issues. Urban residential land uses are well established within the Port Angeles urban growth area. Neighborhoods such as Gales Addition, Lee’s Creek and Four Seasons are largely built out with only a few moderate sized areas available for development. Average density in Gales Addition, Four Seasons, View Ridge and Cedar Ridge neighborhoods would be three (3) to four (4) housing units per acre. These areas will support infill development at these densities. Other neighborhoods such as Lee’s Creek and portions of Monroe Road neighborhood are characterized by two (2) unit per acre densities due to environmental constraints such as wetlands, stormwater impacts from Highway 101 and its associated impervious surfaces and poorly perking soils. Neighborhoods with these types of environmental constraints may not be able to support much more density than they currently experience and consideration should be given to maintaining the prevalent two (2) unit per acre urban densities. Wetlands and other natural means of storing or transporting stormwater should be maintained intact in these neighborhoods. Densities of up to fifteen (15) units per acre would be feasible in the residential areas south of the Highway 101 commercial strip near Mt. Pleasant Road.

The commercial strip development which has occurred on the east side of Port Angeles has not created a healthy environment for business as witnessed by the continual turnover of many businesses in this area. A more stable pattern of business location would group regional businesses at K-Mart Drive and Deer Park intersections with Highway 101. Encouraging a transition to business growth in regional centers located at K-Mart Drive and Deer Park would relieve the well-developed neighborhoods on the north and south side of the commercial strip from pressure to widen the strip at intermediate locations by rezoning of vacant residential areas near the strip. In simple terms, the existing commercial strip should only bulge at these two (2) identified intersections and commercial areas between regional sites should remain at minimal width from the highway. The neighborhood serving commercial areas between the K-Mart Plaza regional commercial center and the City limits ought to be opened up to allow multifamily residential development on commercially zoned properties lacking highway frontage and on the second floors of businesses. This change would provide apartment dwellers easy access to transit and will encourage interaction between businesses and multifamily uses which would stabilize the business sector in this area.

Urban residential land uses are mixed with industrial and commercial land uses in the western unincorporated urban growth area. The area east of Reddick Road contains some subdivisions at urban density and other areas with more rural type densities. Urban density development of this area has been hindered by its industrial zoning and the poor perking ability of its soils.

The 1982 Clallam County Comprehensive Plan designated large areas west of Port Angeles for industrial uses in anticipation of industrial growth. Many of the lands so designated contained single-family residences on rural sized lots with a few smaller parcels located in subdivisions. Very little of this land has seen industrial development in the last twelve (12) years and most of this area is not served with the necessary infrastructure which would encourage industrial development. Industrial use in the area has actually diminished in this period as logging activity has declined. Property owners have been limited in their ability to construct additional homes as residential uses are only allowed in industrial zones as an accessory use to an industrial use. Many of these property owners have participated in development of the Port Angeles Regional Plan and are requesting changes to the industrial designation of the 1982 Plan. This Plan recommends removal of the industrial designation from that portion of the urban growth area located between Reddick Road and Airport Road which is not in actual industrial land use.

The Highway 101 corridor on the west side of Port Angeles has not developed in the “strip commercial” pattern prevalent on the east side of Port Angeles. Many homes and several multifamily developments are located on Highway 101 but are set well back from the roadway to limit problems with road noise. This pattern of limited urban neighborhood commercial development intermixed with homes set well back off the highway should be retained.

The Port Angeles urban growth area was established to meet the area required to contain the projected 20-year population growth of the urban area plus those neighborhoods that were already urban in nature. It is expected the City will annex all of the urban growth area in the next 20 years. Although some annexations may happen in the near future, the farthest edges of the urban growth area may not be annexed until the end of the planning period. The urban growth area should develop utilizing City development standards. This plan requires new subdivisions to meet City development standards for all improvements.

Grant funding and public/private partnerships should be utilized to upgrade the landscaping and building facades within the urban growth area fronting Highway 101. Many area residents completing questionnaires on transportation issues compared the present appearance of the commercial strip to that of Aurora Avenue in Seattle. Area residents desire to see the Highway 101 urban streetscape upgraded to include street trees along both sides of Highway 101, landscaped median islands in the center of the Highway and improvements to several building facades. Upgrading the appearance of the urban commercial area would blend this area into the bordering neighborhoods and encourage residents as well as visitors to stop and enjoy visually appealing commercial attractions. (These issues are addressed by the policies below and those contained in the individual neighborhood sections.)

(3) UGA Boundary.

(a) [Policy No. 1] The interim urban growth area boundary adopted in October 19, 1993, should be modified to include several additional industrial parcels located in the vicinity of the Shotwell and Lakeside Industries properties west of Port Angeles and to delete the area east of the west rim of the Morse Creek canyon. The physical boundaries of the urban growth area should be the west rim of the Morse Creek canyon to the east, Reddick Road and the City limits to the west, the BPA powerline and the adopted line near the City limits to the south, and the Strait to the north.

(b) [Policy No. 2] In order to provide stability to where urban growth and services will occur, the urban growth area should not be expanded in size any sooner than 10 years from the date the Clallam County Comprehensive Plan is adopted.

(4) General Land Use Goals and Urban Density Issue.

(a) [Policy No. 3] Urban areas should provide for a balance between commercial growth, employment centers and residential development that ensures livability, preservation of environmental quality, open spaces, variety of housing, provision for high-quality public services at least cost and orderly transitions between land uses within the urban areas.

(b) [Policy No. 4] All new residential development within the urban growth area should be at urban densities or be designed to have the capability of being converted to urban densities.

(c) [Policy No. 5] Land use designations in the Port Angeles urban growth area have been established to encourage an increase in net densities from their present levels of less than four units per acre to a level of greater than four units per acre. Although densities will vary from neighborhood to neighborhood depending on the carrying capacity of the land, it is desirable to see an overall increase in density within the urban area.

(d) [Policy No. 6] Commercial, industrial and high-density residential development make intensive use of land and should be located in areas where sewer and water facilities are already located or can be extended and where critical areas do not limit development.

(e) [Policy No. 7] A transfer of development rights (TDR) program should be established with the City of Port Angeles. Under the TDR program, rural areas near the city experiencing downzoning, rural areas where less density would be preferable or areas designated as open spaces to be protected would become TDR sending zones where development rights could be bought from property owners. TDR receiving zones would be established inside the urban growth area including the area inside the City where the development rights could be utilized. Property owners or developers would utilize development rights to increase the density of development inside the UGA above those allowed without transfer rights.

(f) [Policy No. 8] The City of Port Angeles should be the primary commercial and service center for the Port Angeles region. Commercial development should be concentrated in the core of the City and in specified regional centers. Further strip development of Highway 101 west of the City should not be allowed in order to reduce congestion on Highway 101 and other arterials of regional significance.

(g) [Policy No. 9] The City should attempt to site industrial activities within the Airport Industrial Park or within the greater urban growth area in order to provide economic opportunities (see Economic Development Policies).

(h) [Policy No. 10] The City’s Comprehensive Plan should be modified to add a very low density urban residential designation so that annexing areas with development limitations may retain urban densities appropriate to the natural carrying capacities of the land.

(i) [Policy No. 11] Multifamily and manufactured home park development should be located within or near urban neighborhood commercial designations in the urban growth area in order to provide efficient access to urban services and to serve as a buffer between commercial development and less dense residential development.

(j) [Policy No. 12] A range of housing opportunities should be available throughout the urban growth area. The percentage of multifamily housing and manufactured home parks in the unincorporated urban growth area should increase from the present level of 30 percent of the existing housing stock in the unincorporated urban growth area to a goal percentage of at least 35 percent to foster affordable housing opportunities.

(5) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 13] The creeks flowing through the Port Angeles urban growth area should be preserved and enhanced as critical habitat for freshwater and saltwater species of fish. The bottoms and steep-sided ravines associated with each creek should be preserved in a natural state whenever possible to protect the geologically unstable ravine sidewalls and to maintain the filtering properties of the natural vegetation buffering the streams.

(b) [Policy No. 14] Preserve the value and functions of critical areas such as steep-sided creek ravines, bluffs, narrow creek bottoms, wetlands and natural drainage ways by identifying such sites with an open space overlay designation and enacting programs to further protect such critical areas.

(i) Property in critical areas identified in an open space overlay designation would be targeted for public acquisition through voter approval of a general obligation bond or the enactment of conservation futures tax or the enactment of an additional one percent real estate tax on transfer of property.

(ii) Property owners of critical areas identified in an open space overlay designation should be able to qualify for open space taxation regardless of the size of their property.

(iii) Property owners of critical areas identified in an open space overlay designation should be allocated development rights which could be utilized in receiving zones within the urban growth area.

(c) [Policy No. 15] Implementation of the urban growth area should include specific measures to protect the water quality and resources of the creeks flowing through the Port Angeles urban growth area.

(d) [Policy No. 16] Wetlands in the urban growth area serve important functions in the urban area including indirect stormwater storage, filtering water prior to its entry into the Strait and in provision of wildlife habitat and should be protected and retained.

(e) [Policy No. 17] Groundwater resources should be protected through city/county adoption of stormwater and erosion control measures, water quality education programs, and other best management practices which avoid or minimize impacts to groundwater.

(6) Urban Watershed Management.

(a) [Policy No. 18] droplet Site development, including roads, highways, and bridges, should protect the natural integrity of waterbodies and natural drainage systems.

droplet City of Port Angeles

(i) Avoid conversion, to the extent practicable, of areas that are susceptible to erosion and sediment loss;

(ii) Preserve areas that provide important water quality benefits and/or are necessary to maintain riparian and aquatic habitat;

(iii) Plan, design, and develop sites to limit impervious areas;

(iv) Limit land disturbance activities such as clearing and grading, and cut and fill;

(v) Limit disturbance of natural drainage features and vegetation; and

(vi) Guidance on appropriate pollution prevention practices should be incorporated into site development and use.

(b) [Policy No. 19] droplet Where feasible, identify failing residential on-site sewage disposal systems within the City limits, and provide sewer service consistent with the City’s Urban Services Ordinance.

droplet City of Port Angeles

(i) Repealed by Ord. 584, 1996.

(c) [Policy No. 20] droplet Develop and implement a commercial source control program (e.g., “Business for Clean Water”) which offers pollution prevention assessments, reduction strategies, and training materials for the workplace. The program should provide incentives and rewards for businesses which implement new practices to improve pollution prevention associated with their operation.

droplet City of Port Angeles

(d) [Policy No. 21] droplet Manage stream corridors in the urban areas as greenways.

droplet City of Port Angeles

(i) Establish soft trails which connect to the waterfront trail, providing a water-oriented recreational amenity which also focuses on interpretation and protection of local natural resources within the urban environment.

(ii) The City, Port, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, and County should work cooperatively to educate landowners, fund acquisition of property, and develop amenities while maintaining the natural state of the corridor.

(7) Valley Creek. [Policy No. 22] droplet Conduct general habitat improvements, such as revegetation, restoration of channel configuration, and placement of instream structures. Continue rehabilitation of estuarine habitat. Replace or improve culverts to correct fish passage problems.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Port of Port Angeles, City of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(8) Peabody Creek.

(a) [Policy No. 23] droplet Target this stream for activities which will improve the ecosystem functions of its lower stretches and complement the good quality found upstream.

droplet City of Port Angeles, Clallam County Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(b) [Policy No. 24] droplet Use the stream to enhance watershed awareness among urban residents and tourists. Develop enhancement projects which, while not necessarily improving salmon production, could serve multiple objectives related to water quality education, resident fish and wildlife habitat, stormwater management, and recreation and aesthetics.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, City of Port Angeles

(c) [Policy No. 25] droplet Improve fish access to upstream habitat by eliminating blockage under 5th Street and Park Avenue. Create off-channel rearing at Peabody and 5th to improve habitat potential.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, City of Port Angeles

(d) [Policy No. 26] droplet Undertake projects and conduct activities to improve the salmon productivity of this stream.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, City of Port Angeles

(9) Ennis Creek. [Policy No. 27] droplet Revegetate riparian corridors and buffers in residential areas.

droplet City of Port Angeles, Clallam Conservation District

(10) Transportation. [Policy No. 28] Improve circulation patterns around the Port Angeles urban growth area (see Figure 10):

(a) Improve east-west circulation patterns in the eastern urban growth area by developing a new east-west local access road to be located south of Highway 101 within the urban growth area. This roadway would provide local residents an alternate means of accessing the urban area from the east, would provide an emergency route around the sole eastern access point of Highway 101 and would take local traffic off of Highway 101 during congested periods.

(b) Encourage improvements to the circulation patterns within the City, including rerouting of truck traffic from Front and 1st Streets.

(c) See Paths, Trails and Sidewalk policies in CCC 31.04.115.

(11) Open Space and Greenbelts. [Policy No. 29] The City shall designate greenbelts within the urban growth area. Areas that should be considered include all of the creek ravines. (See Figure 22 for critical habitat corridors.)

(12) Public Services, Facilities and Urban Development Standards.

(a) [Policy No. 30] The City, Public Utility District, and the County should agree on water service boundaries and identification of service providers within the urban growth area. Individual or private community water within the UGA should be prohibited for new land divisions. All urban services should be provided by the City of Port Angeles; however, water and electric service may be provided by the Public Utility District pursuant to a UGA Urban Services and Development Agreement with the City until annexation occurs.

(b) [Policy No. 31] All new subdivisions within the urban growth area shall be connected to the City’s sewer system; provided, however, that the interceptor facilities may be provided by the PUD pursuant to a UGA Urban Services and Development Agreement with the City until annexation occurs.

(c) [Policy No. 32] All new subdivisions and other developments within the urban growth area shall be provided with improvements constructed to City of Port Angeles standards. The city development standards should include roads, sidewalks, water, sewer, lot area, lot shape, setbacks, and land uses.

(d) [Policy No. 33] The County and City should prohibit development within the urban growth area if it is not built to urban standards, including the prohibition of rural density subdivisions with individual wells.

(e) [Policy No. 34] New or expanding commercial and industrial development should conform to newly developed landscaping and design requirements to enhance the appearance and traffic access characteristics of commercial and industrial sites inside the urban growth area. The City and the County should work together to develop landscaping and design guidelines which would provide consistent guidelines to developers along the Highway 101 corridor. Grant funding and public/private cooperation should be sought to assist in upgrading landscaping, building facade improvements, improving roadside landscaping, and to provide vegetative screening of the industrial areas bordering Highway 101.

(f) [Policy No. 35] New stoplights utilized for access to commercial developments should only be located at intersections of Highway 101 and major arterials in order to allow Highway 101 to be an efficient conveyor of traffic.

(g) [Policy No. 36] Public parkland dedications or fees in lieu of dedication should be required for new development within the urban growth area to provide recreational parkland for residents of such development.

(13) General Land Use Policies.

(a) [Policy No. 37] Regional serving, large scale, commercial development in the unincorporated Port Angeles urban area should be located at regional commercial center development sites clustered around the traffic light near the existing K-Mart Plaza Highway 101 and other appropriate areas along Highway 101 as may be approved by the County through required land use decision-making processes.

(i) Urban regional commercial centers may extend up to 1,000 feet in depth from the highway in order to facilitate the location of businesses requiring large sites and are located at the intersections of major arterials or existing traffic lights to facilitate traffic entering and exiting the development. Urban regional commercial centers would contain businesses serving the entire County. Uses would include major regional malls, grocery superstores, large scale auto malls, cinemas, motels, hotels, and large scale restaurants.

(ii) Upon establishment of urban regional commercial centers, subdivision of such sites should be limited either to binding site plans or to parcels sizes greater than 20 acres in order to retain large parcels for future development of region-serving commercial enterprises. Land uses of limited duration which would allow developers to retain property in large parcels while receiving revenues in the short term should be allowed to encourage retention of sites in large parcel size.

(b) [Policy No. 38] Commercial land uses supplying neighborhood and subregional needs in the watershed will continue to be found on both sides of Highway 101 between the City limits and the K-Mart Plaza urban regional commercial center. These areas will be designated for urban neighborhood commercial land use recognizing the continued viability of existing, well-established residential neighborhoods to the north and south of Highway 101 and avoiding the creation of a large continuous strip of intense commercial development which would heavily impact neighborhoods and diminish the viability of Highway 101 as an efficient conveyor of traffic. The existing strip commercial nature of these areas will be reduced through the following methods:

•    

Allowing for commercial land uses which support and are compatible with the adjacent residential neighborhoods; and

•    

Allowing mixed uses including multifamily residential development of commercial properties which do not front on Highway 101; and

•    

Allowing second story residential apartments over commercial uses; and

•    

Encouraging the use of a native materials and consistent architectural styles within neighborhood commercial districts; and

•    

Enhancing the natural stream ravines of Lee’s Creek and Ennis Creek as greenway buffers between neighborhood business districts and for use as waterfront trail access points to encourage the use of alternative modes of travel to access the commercial core of Port Angeles.

(c) [Policy No. 39] The character of structures in urban neighborhood commercial categories of land use should be small scale (less than 10,000 square feet per building) in order to fit in with associated residential land uses. Land uses directed from neighborhood commercial sites to regional commercial or industrial sites would include hotels, motels, superstore-sized grocery centers, large scale retail, large scale wholesale, manufacturing, mineral extraction, wrecking yards, salvage and crushing operations. Land uses in neighborhood commercial areas should be limited to those which serve the needs of the associated neighborhoods and would include the following:

•    

Small scale restaurants, gift shops, antique stores, gas stations and vehicle repair;

•    

Local community services such as professional offices, barbers, taverns;

•    

Small scale retail uses serving the local population such as convenience grocery, etc.;

•    

Fully screened mini-storage;

•    

Second story apartments and off-highway multifamily housing;

•    

Small scale employment centers and public buildings.

(d) [Policy No. 40] The existing strip development of Highway 101 in the eastern portion of the Port Angeles urban growth area should not extend more than 600 feet to the north or south of the highway in order to limit the impacts of this development on adjacent, well established, residential neighborhoods.

(e) [Policy No. 41] Undeveloped portions of Highway 101 in the western portion of the urban growth area should be carefully planned to prevent the establishment of a narrow strip commercial development pattern. When commercial land use demand increases in the western urban growth area, consideration should be given to the establishment of an urban regional commercial center at an arterial intersection with Highway 101.

(14) Joint Planning.

(a) [Policy No. 42] The City of Port Angeles and Clallam County jointly developed the plan for the urban growth area. City representatives served on every committee which developed the various elements of the plan. The City and County should review their comprehensive plans and coordinate future amendments so that the plans are, and continue to be, consistent with each other.

(b) [Policy No. 43] The City and County shall develop and agree upon a phased annexation plan consistent with the extension of urban services to the annexed areas prior to the approval of any urban growth within the Port Angeles urban growth area that requires extension of sewer or water facilities. A further condition of urban growth within the unincorporated Port Angeles growth area shall be the development and execution of UGA Urban Services and Development Agreements for sewer and/or water facilities by the City of Port Angeles and Clallam County PUD.

31.04.320 Gales Addition neighborhood – Port Angeles urban growth area.

(1) Neighborhood Concerns Identified in the Planning Process. The Gales Addition neighborhood is located within the narrow confines of the area between Highway 101 and the Strait. The neighborhood has a distinctly residential character with most residences located north of Pioneer Road. While the commercial businesses on Highway 101 provide needed neighborhood services, the neighborhood would like to retain its essentially residential character by ensuring that commercial development does not encroach north of an east-west line established at the intersection of Gales Street and Pioneer Road (see land use section for goal addressing commercial development in Gales Addition).

The neighborhood is also concerned with the proliferation of old, substandard, single-wide mobile homes being installed on substandard sized lots within the neighborhood. Although the County is limited in its ability to control this problem, the neighborhood may want to investigate the use of privately enforced covenants and the formation of a homeowners’ association. Such an organization could be formed and utilize self regulation to reduce future problems in areas that had agreed to be bound by a covenant.

Concerns over smoke produced by the pulp mill located near the eastern boundary of the city were also a chief concern of many neighborhood residents. Certain weather and wind patterns can create breathing and health problems.

Failing on-site sewage disposal systems are a problem in this neighborhood with an aging housing stock, limited maintenance and poor soils. Clallam County should develop an education program to make homeowners and rental managers aware of low cost loans available through the water quality cleanup fund (see rural land section for policies addressing on-site sewage disposal repair).

The neighborhood also lacks neighborhood parks (see public facility section for goal addressing neighborhood parks).

(2) Boundary. [Policy No. 1] The Gales Addition neighborhood is bounded by the city limits to the west, Lee’s Creek to the east, Highway 101 to the south and the Strait to the north.

(3) Land Uses.

(a)  [Policy No. 2] An urban neighborhood commercial land use designation shall be established in the area between Highway 101 and an east-west line established at the intersection of Gales Street and Pioneer Road. The large grocery store at the northwest corner of Gales Street and Highway 101 is an important neighborhood serving business and although it is oversized to serve a purely neighborhood need it should be allowed to expand on this site if needed to retain this use in the neighborhood.

(b)  [Policy No. 3] Urban moderate density land use shall be established in the area between the urban neighborhood commercial designation and an east-west extension of 7th Avenue. This designation would allow redevelopment of moderate density dwellings within walking distance of public transit on Highway 101 and provide affordable housing opportunities for area residents.

(c)  [Policy No. 4] The area north of an east-west extension of 7th Avenue shall be designated urban low density residential which allows up to nine units per acre and is usually a mix of single-family and duplex units. This designation supports the current single-family residential character of this portion of the neighborhood.

(d)  [Policy No. 5] The creek ravines should be designated for urban very low residential densities with an open space overlay zone to indicate that they are areas which will be targeted for transfer of development rights in order to further protect these largely unbuildable sites and allow them to remain in a natural state. Allowing for transfer of development rights addresses the issue of a taking occurring when minimal development will be allowed.

(4) Critical Areas.

(a)  [Policy No. 6] The steep-sided creek ravines and creek bottom lands of Ennis and Lee’s Creek as well as the marine bluffs on the Strait should be protected for public safety, maintenance of water quality and as linear wildlife corridors through the neighborhood. These areas when left in a natural state stabilize the geologically unstable ravine and bluff environments, filter out sediments before they reach streams and shorelines and provide critical habitat for eagles, falcons, and other birds utilizing trees for perch or nesting. Allowing transfer of development rights from these areas and providing open space tax benefits to owners will further the protection of these critical areas.

(b)  [Policy No. 7] Stormwater runoff is causing considerable bluff-front gully erosion and deposition. Controlling the scale of commercial development in urban neighborhood commercial land use designations located on Highway 101 should limit the impacts of stormwater on adjacent residential developments to the north. When developments are reviewed, maintenance of natural water control in the form of wetlands should be a prime concern along with ensuring on-site retention and slow release of stormwater from urban development.

(5) Lee’s Creek.

(a)  [Policy No. 8] droplet Conduct periodic cleanups of the stream corridor. Utilize neighborhood volunteers, and publicize their efforts. Identify dumping sites, and post with a sign indicating the presence of the stream and that the cleanup was conducted by neighborhood residents.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(b)  [Policy No. 9] droplet Create a focal point in the lower, urban reach of the stream – with a bench area, waste disposal, vegetation, signage – to draw attention to the site as a community resource and a source of neighborhood pride.

droplet City of Port Angeles, Clallam County

(c)  [Policy No. 10] droplet Correct the blockage to fish passage at the culverts at the mouth and under Highway 101. Install a fish ladder or new culvert to enable fish to reach above the highway, even in low-flow months. Reestablish vegetation.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, WA Department of Transportation, Clallam County

(6) Ennis Creek. [Policy No. 11] droplet Revegetate riparian corridors and buffers in residential areas.

droplet City of Port Angeles, Clallam Conservation District

(7) Public Services and Facilities.

(a)  [Policy No. 12] Water service is provided in this portion of the urban growth area by the PUD and the City. Further land divisions should be permitted only when PUD or City water is extended pursuant to a UGA Urban Services and Development Agreement or upon annexation.

(b)  [Policy No. 13] Sewer service is not available in this portion of the urban growth area. There are areas of poor soils with limitations for on-site sewage disposal systems. The City of Port Angeles should provide sewer service to new land divisions in Gales Addition under utility extension agreements or upon annexation.

(8) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a)  [Policy No. 14] The steep-sided creek ravines and marine bluffs form a natural greenbelt for this neighborhood.

(b)  [Policy No. 15] Public access along the saltwater shoreline should be encouraged through development of public access corridors to the waterfront trail at Lee’s and Ennis Creek and completion of this section of the waterfront trail.

(9) Transportation.

(a)  [Policy No. 16] Access to the Gales Addition neighborhood is good with three major access points, Monroe Road, Gales Street and Baker Street. With continued development additional measures to ensure good access may be necessary.

(b)  [Policy No. 17] The shoulder on Highway 101 is too narrow for safe bicycle transportation into Port Angeles. This highly hazardous situation should be corrected to allow for increased transportation options and urban bicycle commuting.

(c)  [Policy No. 18] Completion of the waterfront trail and feeder connection to the trail at Ennis and Lee’s Creek would provide an important transportation option for the Gales Addition neighborhood.

(d)  [Policy No. 19] Additional bus stops are needed to serve this neighborhood. Locational studies should be undertaken by Clallam Transit.

31.04.330 Lee’s Creek neighborhood – Port Angeles urban growth area.

(1) Neighborhood Concerns Identified in the Planning Process. The Lee’s Creek neighborhood is located within the narrow confines of the area between Highway 101 and the Strait. The neighborhood has a distinctly low density residential character with most residences located north of Myrtle Street. Average density is less than two units per acre due to large areas being in wetlands. It is unlikely that densities higher than two units per acre could be supported north of Columbia Street due to the number of developed parcels and the unbuildable nature of much of the remaining land.

The neighborhood has several large wetlands which must be protected and retained in order to control the volume of stormwater which is currently being generated from commercial development near Highway 101. A 20-acre wetland site on Brook Avenue was recently purchased by a neighborhood landowner in order to protect this area in its natural state. In addition, drainage ditches in the fields west of Brook Avenue and on Bay Street and Larch Avenue must be regularly maintained as they tend to become blocked and cause road damage in high rainfall events.

The appearance of the commercial area near Highway 101 concerns neighborhood residents. They support efforts to upgrade the appearance of Highway 101 with street trees, landscaping and new neighborhood scale businesses along the neighborhood commercial corridor. Providing for a mix of moderate density residential in the neighborhood commercial areas would enhance the trend already apparent in this neighborhood. While the commercial businesses on Highway 101 provide needed neighborhood services, the neighborhood would like to retain its essentially residential character by ensuring that commercial development does not encroach north of an east-west line extending from either end of Myrtle Street. The Lee’s Creek neighborhood does not want to develop like the hospital area in Port Angeles and see commercial businesses force residential dwelling from the neighborhood (see land use section for goal addressing commercial development in Lee’s Creek).

Egress from the Lee’s Creek neighborhood is becoming increasingly difficult due to heavy traffic volumes on Highway 101. Realignment of Larch Avenue to bring it in line with Mt. Pleasant Road at the lighted intersection would ease this problem. Raised medians should be used to protect the left turn lane at Brook Avenue as many people are utilizing the turn lane as an acceleration lane creating the possibility for head-on collisions.

The neighborhood also lacks neighborhood parks (see public facility section for goal addressing neighborhood parks).

(2) Boundary. [Policy No. 1] The Lee’s Creek neighborhood is bounded by Lee’s Creek to the west, the top of the Morse Creek Ravine to the east, Highway 101 to the south and the Strait to the north.

(3) Land Uses.

(a) [Policy No. 2] An urban neighborhood commercial land use designation shall be established in the area between Highway 101 and an east-west line extended from Myrtle Street.

(b) [Policy No. 3] An urban commercial center land use designation will be established on both sides of Highway 101 to incorporate the K-Mart Plaza, businesses currently fronting on Oakridge Drive and Acorn Lane, and the area north of View Vista Mobile Park on the south side of Highway 101. The urban center should not be expanded beyond these limits in this planning time frame to protect residential properties to the north which have been impacted by stormwater runoff from current Highway 101 development.

(c) [Policy No. 4] Urban moderate density land use shall be established in the area between Hazel Street and the topographic break just south of Myrtle. This designation would allow redevelopment of moderate density dwellings within walking distance of public transit on Highway 101 and provide affordable housing opportunities for area residents.

(d) [Policy No. 5] The area north of Myrtle and Hazel Streets shall be designated urban very low density which allows up to two units per acre and is usually a mix of single-family and duplex units. This designation supports the current single-family residential character of this portion of the neighborhood and protects critical areas.

(e) [Policy No. 6] The ravines of Lee’s Creek and Morse Creek should be designated for urban very low residential densities with an open space overlay zone to indicate that they are areas which will be targeted for transfer of development rights in order to further protect these largely unbuildable sites and allow them to remain in a natural state. Allowing for transfer of development rights addresses the issue of a taking occurring when minimal development will be allowed.

(4) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 7] The steep-sided creek ravines and creek bottom lands of Morse and Lee’s Creek as well as the marine bluffs on the Strait should be protected for public safety, maintenance of water quality and as linear wildlife corridors through the neighborhood. These areas when left in a natural state stabilize the geologically unstable ravine and bluff environments, filter out sediments before they reach streams and shorelines and provide critical habitat for eagles, falcons, and other birds utilizing trees for perch or nesting. Allowing transfer of development rights from these areas and providing open space tax benefits to owners will further the protection of these critical areas.

(b) [Policy No. 8] Stormwater runoff is causing considerable bluff-front gully erosion and deposition. Controlling the scale of commercial development in urban neighborhood commercial land use designations located on Highway 101 should limit the impacts of stormwater on adjacent residential developments to the north. When developments are reviewed, maintenance of natural water control in the form of wetlands should be a prime concern along with ensuring on-site retention and slow release of stormwater from urban development.

(c) [Policy No. 9] Neighborhood residents controlling wetland areas should be encouraged to examine the feasibility of a conservation easement on these lands to retain wetlands and to provide tax advantages to the owners.

(5) Lee’s Creek.

(a) [Policy No. 10] droplet Conduct periodic cleanups of the stream corridor. Utilize neighborhood volunteers, and publicize their efforts. Identify dumping sites, and post with a sign indicating the presence of the stream and that the cleanup was conducted by neighborhood residents.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(b) [Policy No. 11] droplet Create a focal point in the lower, urban reach of the stream – with a bench area, waste disposal, vegetation, signage – to draw attention to the site as a community resource and a source of neighborhood pride.

droplet City of Port Angeles, Clallam County

(c) [Policy No. 12] droplet Correct the blockage to fish passage at the culverts at the mouth and under Highway 101. Install a fish ladder or new culvert to enable fish to reach above the highway, even in low-flow months. Reestablish vegetation.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, WA Department of Transportation, Clallam County

(d) [Policy No. 13] droplet Provide information, technical assistance, and funding through Consolidated Farm Services Agency, to restrict livestock access.

droplet Clallam Conservation District

(6) Morse Creek.

(a) [Policy No. 14] droplet Assign high priority to Morse Creek for restoration efforts due to potential for salmon habitat. Build support for restoration activities among agencies, organizations, and residents.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County

(b) [Policy No. 15] droplet Focus education and technical assistance on the lower two miles of this creek. Discourage residents from “cleaning” the riparian corridor. Provide landowners with information about shoreline management, riparian corridors, flood management, and other pertinent issues. Provide technical assistance to insure that existing habitat is protected. Revegetate with stabilizing plants; create established view corridors to minimize expansion of clearing for views. Pursue development of off-channel fish habitat.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(c) [Policy No. 16] droplet Because fish populations in this stream are particularly vulnerable to habitat degradation, establish limitations on surface water withdrawals to maintain optimum instream flow for fish. Encourage water conservation during low-flow months.

droplet WA Department of Ecology, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Clallam County, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(7) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 17] Water service is provided in this portion of the urban growth area by the PUD. Further land divisions should be permitted only when PUD or City water is extended pursuant to a UGA Urban Services and Development Agreement or upon annexation.

(b) [Policy No. 18] Sewer service is not available in this portion of the urban growth area. There are areas of poor soils with limitations for on-site sewage disposal systems. The City of Port Angeles should provide sewer service to new land divisions in Lee’s Creek neighborhood under utility extension agreements or upon annexation.

(c) [Policy No. 19] Pollution from failing sewage systems should be addressed. Many soils in Lee’s Creek neighborhood are poorly suited to on-site sewage disposal systems and many systems are in need of repair or replacement. Clallam County should develop an education program to make homeowners and rental managers aware of low cost loans available for on-site sewage disposal system repair or replacement through the Water Quality Cleanup Fund.

(8) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) [Policy No. 20] The steep-sided creek ravines and marine bluffs form a natural greenbelt for this neighborhood.

(b) [Policy No. 21] Owners of wetlands, marine bluffs and ravines should be encouraged to file conservation easements on these portions of their property to protect them from development, provide open spaces and gain tax advantage. Owners of critical areas identified by an open space overlay should receive the advantage of qualifying for open space taxation regardless of property size.

(c) [Policy No. 22] Public access along the saltwater shoreline should be encouraged through development of public access corridors to the waterfront trail at Lee’s Creek and completion of this section of the waterfront trail.

(9) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 23] Realignment of Larch Avenue to bring it in line with Mt. Pleasant Road at the lighted intersection would ease the egress problems from this neighborhood.

(b) [Policy No. 24] Raised medians should be used to protect the left turn lane at Brook Avenue as many people are utilizing the turn lane as an acceleration lane creating the possibility for head on.

(c) [Policy No. 25] The shoulder on Highway 101 is too narrow for safe bicycle transportation into Port Angeles. This highly hazardous situation should be corrected to allow for increased transportation options and urban bicycle commuting.

(d) [Policy No. 26] Completion of the waterfront trail and feeder connection to the trail at Lee’s Creek would provide an important transportation option for the people commuting from the Lee’s Creek neighborhood.

31.04.340 4 Seasons neighborhood.

(1) Neighborhood Concerns Identified in the Planning Process. The 4 Seasons neighborhood is located within the ravine of Morse Creek. It consists of two urban density subdivisions, 4 Seasons Park and 4 Seasons Ranch. Open space amenities were designed into both subdivisions. 4 Seasons Ranch has a nine-hole golf course bordering Morse Creek which provides views of open space from many of the residences in the Ranch. Stables and pasture are available to area residents that own horses. 4 Seasons Park has open space bordering Morse Creek. Neighborhood concerns include flooding of Morse Creek, hilltop development visible from the Ranch, road failures near the entrance to 4 Seasons Park, traffic access and noise from Highway 101. The neighborhood is almost totally residential with the single exception of a real estate sales office. 4 Seasons Ranch is nearly built out while 4 Seasons Park has more vacant lots for sale. Average density is over four units per acre with many lots under 10,000 square feet in size.

The neighborhood has a strong desire to retain its residential character and maintain the scenic views available of the mountains from these developments. Commercial development on Highway 101 is not a preferred land use. The appearance of the Highway 101 corridor through the Morse Creek curve is excellent. State-owned right-of-way contributes to this natural appearance and should be retained. The State right-of-way at the entrance to 4 Seasons Ranch could be utilized as a park site along the waterfront trail.

The waterfront trail from Port Angeles will utilize the old railroad right-of-way providing this neighborhood with excellent bicycle access to downtown Port Angeles. Commuters utilizing this trail to access downtown from 4 Seasons would likely experience travel times equal to cars traveling to the same point utilizing Highway 101.

Egress from the 4 Seasons is becoming increasingly difficult due to heavy traffic volumes on Highway 101. Installation of a traffic light at Deer Park might improve this situation.

(2) Boundary. [Policy No. 1] The 4 Seasons neighborhood is bounded by the ravine walls of Morse Creek.

(3) Land Uses.

(a)  [Policy No. 2] Rural density development of up to one unit per acre should be permitted within the developed portions of 4 Seasons neighborhood which is in accord with current development patterns.

(b)  [Policy No. 3] Further commercial land use should not be allowed in the Morse Creek curve to protect the scenic nature of this gateway entrance into Port Angeles and to prevent the potential for extreme traffic problems in this tight curve.

(c)  [Policy No. 4] The steep, unstable slopes of the Morse Creek Ravine should be designated for urban very low residential densities with an open space overlay zone to indicate that they are areas which will be targeted for transfer of development rights in order to further protect these largely unbuildable sites and allow them to remain in a natural state. Allowing for transfer of development rights addresses the issue of a taking occurring when minimal development will be allowed.

(4) Critical Areas.

(a)  [Policy No. 5] The steep-sided creek ravines and creek bottom lands of Morse Creek should be protected for public safety, maintenance of water quality and as linear wildlife corridors through the neighborhood. These areas when left in a natural state stabilize the geologically unstable ravine and bluff environments, filter out sediments before they reach streams and shorelines and provide critical habitat for eagles, falcons, and other birds utilizing trees for perch or nesting. Allowing transfer of development rights from these areas and providing open space tax benefits to owners will further the protection of these critical areas.

(b)  [Policy No. 6] Stormwater runoff is causing considerable bluff-front gully erosion and deposition. Controlling the scale of commercial development in urban neighborhood commercial land use designations located on Highway 101 should limit the impacts of stormwater on adjacent residential developments to the north. When developments are reviewed, maintenance of natural water control in the form of wetlands should be a prime concern along with ensuring on-site retention and slow release of stormwater from urban development.

(5) Morse Creek.

(a)  [Policy No. 7] droplet Assign high priority to Morse Creek for restoration efforts due to potential for salmon habitat. Build support for restoration activities among agencies, organizations, and residents.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County

(b)  [Policy No. 8] droplet Focus education and technical assistance on the lower two miles of this creek. Discourage residents from “cleaning” the riparian corridor. Provide landowners with information about shoreline management, riparian corridors, flood management, and other pertinent issues. Provide technical assistance to insure that existing habitat is protected. Revegetate with stabilizing plants; establish view corridors. Pursue development of off-channel fish habitat.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(c)  [Policy No. 9] droplet Encourage the Four Seasons Homeowners’ Association to “adopt” the creek, by assuming some responsibility for observation and monitoring of creek conditions, restoration projects, and pollution prevention. Publicize their positive efforts.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam County

(d)  [Policy No. 10] droplet Because fish populations in this stream are particularly vulnerable to habitat degradation, establish limitations on surface water withdrawals to maintain optimum instream flow for fish. Encourage water conservation during low-flow months.

droplet WA Department of Ecology, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(6) Public Services and Facilities.

(a)  Repealed by Ord. 584, 1996.

(b)  Repealed by Ord. 584, 1996.

(c)  [Policy No. 13] Pollution from failing sewage systems should be addressed. Septic systems in 4 Seasons Park and the community system in 4 Seasons Ranch should be carefully monitored to ensure that no untreated materials reach Morse Creek or the Strait. Clallam County should develop an education program to make homeowners aware of low-cost loans available for on-site sewage disposal system repair or replacement through the Water Quality Cleanup Fund.

(7) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a)  [Policy No. 14] The steep-sided creek ravines, Morse Creek bottoms, the golf course and marine shoreline form natural greenbelts for this neighborhood.

(b)  [Policy No. 15] Owners of wetlands, marine bluffs and ravines should be encouraged to file conservation easements on these portions of their property to protect them from development, provide open spaces and gain tax advantage. Owners of critical areas identified by an open space overlay should receive the advantage of qualifying for open space taxation regardless of property size.

(c)  [Policy No. 16] Public access along the saltwater shoreline should be encouraged through completion of this section of the waterfront trail.

(8) Transportation.

(a)  [Policy No. 17] Development of a new east-west local access road providing an additional entry point into the Port Angeles area from the east could relieve some of the traffic congestion at the Morse Creek curve.

(b)  Repealed by Ord. 584, 1996.

31.04.400 Fairview neighborhood.

(1) Neighborhood Concerns Identified in the Planning Process. The Fairview neighborhood is located between Highway 101 and the Strait and is bounded to the west and east by Morse Creek and Siebert Creek. Commercial and industrial uses at the intersection of Highway 101 and Buchanan Drive include a restaurant, the Gun Club and the large gravel pit just north of the Gun Club. The Bluffs subdivision, Cedar Glen subdivision and an area of one acre lots on upper Lake Farm Road are found within this neighborhood and have developed at urban densities. As of July 1, 1990, existing areas of more intensive rural development at the Bluffs and Cedar Glen subdivision are clearly identifiable and contained with logical boundaries delineated predominately by the built environment and these urban density subdivisions will be designated as rural suburban communities and expansion of these areas beyond their present boundaries will be limited. Average density outside of the areas designated for rural suburban community land use would be one home per five acres.

The neighborhood contains several large wetlands which must be protected and retained. Other critical areas in the neighborhood include Bagley Creek, Siebert Creek, the marine bluff and erosion hazard areas between Gasman Road and Lake Farm Road.

The appearance and functionality of the commercial area near Highway 101 concerns neighborhood residents. Survey results from the area-wide questionnaire would indicate that area residents would support the Deer Park Gateway concept to upgrade the appearance of Highway 101 with street trees, landscaping and better intersection traffic control.

Access to residential properties north of Highway 101 is a problem due to the deficient nature of Lake Farm Road and North Bagley Creek Road. Egress from Buchanan Drive onto Highway 101 is also becoming difficult due to increased commercial activity in the area.

(2) Boundary (Policy 1). The Fairview neighborhood is located between Highway 101 and the Strait and is bounded to the west by Morse Creek and to the east by Siebert Creek.

(3) Land Uses.

(a) Policy 2. A rural limited commercial land use designation shall be established at the Deer Park intersection with US 101.

(b) Policy 3. A rural suburban residential land use will be established on the north side of the rural limited commercial land use along Cedar Park Drive. This designation recognizes current densities and encourages infill development.

(c) Policy 4. Rural suburban community designations will be established for the Bluffs subdivision and Cedar Glen subdivision. This designation will not expand beyond these boundaries to ensure that urban density growth occurs within urban growth areas.

(d) Policy 5. Rural neighborhood conservation designations will be established along US 101 to the eastward extension of Levig Road. The rural neighborhood conservation designation will terminate near the ridge on Lake Farm Road. Rural neighborhood conservation land use will also be found near Old Olympic Highway and in the area near lower Gasman Road.

(e) Policy 6. Rural low density land use is found in the erosion hazard areas located between Gasman Road and Lake Farm Road.

(f) Policy 7. Rural character conservation designations border the Strait in the area of the old lakebed, in the Green Point/Siebert Creek Road area and between Levig Road and Old Olympic Highway.

(4) Critical Areas.

(a) Policy 8. The steep-sided creek ravines and creek bottom lands of Siebert and Bagley Creeks as well as the marine bluffs on the Strait should be protected for public safety, maintenance of water quality and as linear wildlife corridors through the neighborhood. These areas when left in a natural state stabilize the geologically unstable ravine and bluff environments, filter out sediments before they reach streams and shorelines and provide critical habitat for eagles, falcons, and other birds utilizing trees for perch or nesting. Allowing transfer of development rights from these areas and providing open space tax benefits to owners will further the protection of these critical areas.

(b) Policy 9. Stormwater runoff is causing considerable bluff-front gully erosion and deposition. Controlling the scale of commercial development on Highway 101 should limit the impacts of stormwater on adjacent residential developments to the north. When developments are reviewed, maintenance of natural water control in the form of wetlands should be a prime concern along with ensuring on-site retention and slow release of stormwater from development.

(c) Policy 10. Several large wetlands are located in the Fairview area including those north of Lake Farm Road, at Fairview, near the State Patrol building, at the entrance to Gasman Road and at Green Pointe. Neighborhood residents controlling wetland areas should be encouraged to examine the feasibility of conservation easements on these lands to retain wetlands and to provide tax advantages to the owners.

(5) Bagley Creek.

(a) Policy 11. droplet Monitor the fill crossing of Bagley Creek in R5W T30 S34 for the effectiveness of erosion control measures.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clallam County

(b) Policy 12. droplet Improve fish access by removing blockages and replacing culverts where needed.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clallam County

(6) Siebert Creek.

(a) Policy 13. droplet Persuade a landowner or landowners with greater than 10 percent ownership of the subwatershed to sponsor a watershed analysis of the Siebert Creek subwatershed. The analysis should utilize methodology consistent with the DNR’s watershed analysis for cumulative effects.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, WA Department of Natural Resources

(b) Policy 14. droplet Remove obstacles to fish passage in Siebert Creek by replacing culverts at Old Olympic Highway when the new bridge crossing is constructed, eliminating the concrete fish ladder at Old Olympic Highway, and correcting similar problems wherever they are identified.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clallam County

(c) Policy 15. droplet Continue maintenance and corrective actions at Siebert Creek slides and ensure continued stabilization of sediment spoils.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources

(7) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) Policy 16. Water service is provided to this neighborhood by the PUD.

(b) Repealed by Ord. 584, 1996.

(8) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) Policy 18. The steep-sided creek ravines and marine bluffs form a natural greenbelt for this neighborhood. Open space will occur as a result of wetland protection, stream buffering and rural character conservation development which requires large, rural sized lots to be retained in rural areas.

(b) Policy 19. Owners of wetlands, marine bluffs and ravines should be encouraged to file conservation easements on these portions of their property to protect them from development, provide open spaces and gain tax advantage. Owners of critical areas identified by an open space overlay should receive the advantage of qualifying for open space taxation regardless of property size.

(9) Transportation.

(a) Policy 20. Old Olympic Highway is scheduled for widening in the six-year plan. This widening effort will also correct the alignment at Siebert Creek and provide shoulders wide enough for safe bicycle travel.

(b) Repealed by Ord. 584, 1996.

(c) Policy 22. Clallam County should continue to seek funds to connect the waterfront trail from the Morse Creek overlook to Old Olympic Highway as this would complete a safe bicycle route between Port Angeles and Sequim.

(d) Policy 23. Clallam County should examine the feasibility of connecting Lake Farm Road to Gasman Road to relieve congestion on Highway 101.

(e) Policy 24. The WSDOT should retain ownership of parcels bordering Highway 101 as they add to its scenic quality, and provide areas for transit pullouts and for rest areas.

31.04.410 Deer Park neighborhood.

(1) Neighborhood Concerns Identified in the Planning Process. The Deer Park Neighborhood is located south of Highway 101 and is bounded to the west and east by Morse Creek and Siebert Creek. Commercial uses near Deer Park include the Deer Park Cinema and approximately 30 acres of additional undeveloped commercial land. View Ridge subdivision and the upper portion of 4 Seasons Park are located on the west side of Deer Park. Average would be less than one home per five acres. There are large areas of undeveloped land between Deer Park and O’Brien Roads which provide a unique opportunity to utilize a type of planned unit development which could conserve rural character to a far greater extent than the conventional zoning currently allowed.

The neighborhood contains several large wetland complexes which must be protected. Other critical areas in the neighborhood include Bagley Creek, Siebert Creek and the erosion hazard areas south of Township Line Road.

The appearance and functionality of the commercial area near Highway 101 concerns neighborhood residents. Survey results from the area-wide questionnaire would indicate that area residents would support the Deer Park Gateway concept to upgrade the appearance of Highway 101 with street trees, landscaping and better intersection traffic control.

Egress from Deer Park Road and O’Brien Road can be hazardous. Improvements to both intersections will be needed to maintain safety.

(2) Boundary (Policy 1). The Deer Park neighborhood is located south of Highway 101 and is bounded to the west and east by Morse Creek and Siebert Creek.

(3) Land Uses.

(a) Policy 2. A rural limited commercial land use designation shall be established at the Deer Park intersection with US 101.

(b) Policy 3. A rural suburban density residential land use will be established southwest of the commercial center west of Deer Park Road. This designation recognizes current densities and encourages infill development.

(c) Policy 4. Public land use designations will be established on State-owned land in the area of the US 101 right-of-way northwest of Deer Park Cinema.

(d) Policy 5. A rural limited commercial designation will be established for the commercial area just east of O’Brien Road. This designation will allow the commercial and industrial uses found in this area to continue but the outer bounds of this designation will not be expanded to control urban type growth in rural areas.

(e) Policy 6. Rural neighborhood conservation designations will be established along US 101 eastward to just beyond Sutter Road and in the area surrounding the rural limited commercial designation east of O’Brien Road. These two rural neighborhood conservation designations will terminate to the south near the 90 degree curve on O’Brien Road. One additional rural neighborhood conservation designation will follow Deer Park Road to the vicinity of the north section line of Section 29.

(f) Policy 7. A rural low density designation is found south of the 90-degree turn following O’Brien Road to the north section line of Section 34. An additional rural low designation covers the area surrounding the last one-half mile of Bagley Creek Road and angles over to connect with a small rural portion of Deer Park Road.

(g) Policy 8. Rural character conservation designations are applied to just over half of the land between Deer Park and O’Brien Roads. Many of these lands have not been able to develop to their maximum density due to the large percentage of land being within critical areas. Streams, ravines, wetland complexes and erosion hazard areas are extensive in this area. Utilizing a rural character conservation approach would allow development to occur at current densities but would allow critical areas to be protected in large lot sizes and by homeowners’ associations. To include these critical areas in small individual lots as is the case under conventional zoning would lead to loss of rural character, diminish water quality and destroy wildlife habitat.

(4) Critical Areas.

(a) Policy 9. The steep-sided creek ravines and creek bottom lands of Morse, Siebert and Bagley Creeks as well as the marine bluffs on the Strait should be protected for public safety, maintenance of water quality and as linear wildlife corridors through the neighborhood. These areas when left in a natural state stabilize the geologically unstable ravine and bluff environments, filter out sediments before they reach streams and shorelines and provide critical habitat for eagles, falcons, and other birds utilizing trees for perch or nesting. Allowing transfer of development rights from these areas and providing open space tax benefits to owners will further the protection of these critical areas.

(b) Policy 10. Controlling the scale of commercial development on Highway 101 should limit the impacts of stormwater on adjacent residential developments to the north. When developments are reviewed, maintenance of natural water control in the form of wetlands should be a prime concern along with ensuring on-site retention and slow release of stormwater from development.

(5) Morse Creek.

(a) Policy 11. droplet Assign high priority to Morse Creek for restoration efforts due to potential for salmon habitat. Build support for restoration activities among agencies, organizations, and residents.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County

(b) Policy 12. droplet Focus education and technical assistance on the lower two miles of this creek. Discourage residents from “cleaning” the riparian corridor. Provide landowners with information about shoreline management, riparian corridors, flood management, and other pertinent issues. Provide technical assistance to ensure that existing habitat is protected. Revegetate with stabilizing plants; establish view corridors. Pursue development of off-channel fish habitat.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(c) Policy 13. droplet Because fish populations in this stream are particularly vulnerable to habitat degradation, establish limitations on surface water withdrawals to maintain optimum instream flow for fish. Encourage water conservation during low-flow months.

droplet WA Department of Ecology, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(6) Bagley Creek (Policy 14). droplet Monitor the fill crossing of Bagley Creek in R5W T30 S34 for the effectiveness of erosion control measures.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clallam County

(7) Siebert Creek.

(a) Policy 15. droplet Persuade a landowner or landowners with greater than 10 percent ownership of the subwatershed to sponsor a watershed analysis of the Siebert Creek subwatershed. The analysis should utilize methodology consistent with the DNR’s watershed analysis for cumulative effects.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, WA Department of Natural Resources

(b) Policy 16. droplet Remove obstacles to fish passage in Siebert Creek by replacing culverts at Old Olympic Highway when the new bridge crossing is constructed, eliminating the concrete fish ladder at Old Olympic Highway, and correcting similar problems wherever they are identified.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Clallam County

(c) Policy 17. droplet Continue maintenance and corrective actions at Siebert Creek slides and ensure continued stabilization of sediment soils.

droplet WA Department of Natural Resources

(8) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) Policy 18. Water service is provided to this neighborhood by the PUD.

(b) Repealed by Ord. 584, 1996.

(9) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) Policy 20. The steep-sided creek ravines form a natural greenbelt in this neighborhood. Open space will occur as a result of wetland protection, stream buffering and rural character conservation development which requires large, rural sized lots to be retained in rural areas.

(b) Policy 21. Owners of wetlands, marine bluffs and ravines should be encouraged to file conservation easements on these portions of their property to protect them from development, provide open spaces and gain tax advantage. Owners of critical areas identified by an open space overlay should receive the advantage of qualifying for open space taxation regardless of property size.

(10) Transportation.

(a) Policy 22. O’Brien Road is scheduled for widening and realignment in the six-year plan.

(b) Repealed by Ord. 584, 1996.

(c) Policy 24. The WSDOT should retain ownership of parcels bordering Highway 101 as they add to its scenic quality and provide areas for transit pullouts and for rest areas.

31.04.420 Monroe Road/Foothills neighborhood.

(1) Neighborhood Concerns Identified in the Planning Process. The Monroe Road/Foothills neighborhood is located south of Highway 101 and the City of Port Angeles. It is bounded by Valley Creek to the west and Morse Creek to the east. Only the northernmost portion of this neighborhood is inside the urban growth area. Urban portions of the Monroe Road neighborhood contain the south half of the urban commercial center located in the area north of View Vista Mobile Park. Urban neighborhood commercial land uses are located between Highway 101 and the topographic rise located approximately one-third mile south of Highway 101. On the bench above Highway 101 urban residential density areas are found in the area east of Lee’s Creek and extend south down Mt. Pleasant Road for approximately one-half mile. Average density of the rural areas south of the urban growth area is slightly greater than one home per five acres. There are large areas of undeveloped land west of Mt. Pleasant Road and between Mt. Pleasant Road and Valley Creek which provide a unique opportunity to utilize a type of planned unit development which could conserve rural character to a far greater extent than the conventional zoning currently allowed.

The neighborhood contains several large wetland complexes which must be protected. Other critical areas in the neighborhood include Morse Creek, Upper Lee’s Creek, Ennis Creek, White Creek, Peabody Creek and Valley Creek. Forest resource lands in the southern half of this neighborhood serve to protect erosion hazard areas while providing for productive use of the land.

The appearance and functionality of the commercial area near Highway 101 concerns neighborhood residents. Survey results from the area-wide questionnaire would indicate that area residents would support upgrading the appearance of Highway 101 with street trees, landscaping and landscaped medians.

North-south roads provide excellent access to this neighborhood. Egress from these roads is usually signalized.

(2) Boundary. [Policy No. 1] The Monroe Road/Foothills neighborhood is bounded by Highway 101 and the City of Port Angeles to the north, Valley Creek to the west, Morse Creek to the east, and Olympic National Park to the south.

(3) Land Uses.

(a) Policy 2. An urban commercial center land use designation shall be established in the area north of View Vista Mobile Park extending west to the border of the Traylor’s property.

(b) Policy 3. Urban neighborhood commercial will extend along US 101 from Traylor’s to the City limits with the exception of the Lee’s Creek ravine. The urban neighborhood commercial will terminate southward at the base of the topographic rise approximately one-third mile south of US 101 and at its boundary with school property.

(c) Policy 4. A band of urban moderate density designation will be established on the bench above US 101 in the area east of Lee’s Creek and extend south down Mt. Pleasant Road for approximately one-half mile.

(d) Policy 5. The areas bordering the edge of Morse Creek and the urban growth area boundary will be designated with the dual density category of urban very low density/urban low density. This designation allows development of up to two units per acre by right with additional density up to nine units per acre available with purchase of development rights.

(e) Policy 6. Public land use designations will be established on the Monroe/Franklin school site south of US 101.

(f) Policy 7. Rural neighborhood conservation designations will be established along the southern boundary of the urban growth area.

(g) Policy 8. A rural low density designation is mapped along Mt. Pleasant Road in the area between Draper Road and Dietz Road and extends eastward to Monroe Road.

(h) Policy 9. Rural character conservation designations are applied to the areas south of the City limits in the Old Mill Road area, south of Key Road on upper Mt. Angeles Road, in the area between Mt. Angeles Road and Monroe Road and on the western edge of the Morse Creek ravine. Many of these lands have not been able to develop to their maximum density due to the large percentage of land being within critical areas. Streams, ravines, wetland complexes and erosion hazard areas are extensive in this area. Utilizing a rural character conservation approach would allow development to occur at current densities but would allow critical areas to be protected in large lot sizes and by homeowners’ associations. To include these critical areas in small individual lots as is the case under conventional zoning would lead to loss of rural character, diminish water quality and destroy wildlife habitat.

(4) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 10] Forest lands of long-term commercial significance have been designated in the foothills on the southern boundary of this neighborhood. Ownership of forest lands is diverse: from the State of Washington to major private timber companies to individuals. Some of the State forest land is interspersed throughout the rural lands, and offers opportunities to demonstrate innovative forest management techniques. Land uses adjoining that land shall ensure continued viability of long-term forest production, with increased setbacks from the forest line and notification of potential incompatible uses required during new development. Further encroachment of residential uses into commercial forest areas shall be prohibited as they would severely impact the commercial viability of the area for commercial forestry.

(b) [Policy No. 11] Development adjacent to designated forest lands of long-term commercial significance should be at a very low density (one home per 20 acres). Those areas where rural low is mapped due to the existing pattern of five-acre development or where rural character conservation is mapped adjacent to commercial forestry may be designated for low densities (one home per five acres). The large parcels or open space required along with rural character conservation development shall be utilized to buffer the commercial forestlands wherever possible.

(5) Critical Areas.

(a) [Policy No. 12] The steep-sided creek ravines and creek bottom lands of Valley, Peabody, Lee’s, Ennis, and Morse Creeks as well as the marine bluffs on the Strait should be protected for public safety, maintenance of water quality and as linear wildlife corridors through the neighborhood. These areas when left in a natural state stabilize the geologically unstable ravine and bluff environments, filter out sediments before they reach streams and shorelines and provide critical habitat for eagles, falcons, and other birds utilizing trees for perch or nesting. Allowing transfer of development rights from these areas and providing open space tax benefits to owners will further the protection of these critical areas.

(b) [Policy No. 13] Stormwater runoff is causing considerable bluff-front gully erosion and deposition. Controlling the scale of commercial development on Highway 101 should limit the impacts of stormwater on adjacent residential developments to the north. When developments are reviewed, maintenance of natural water control in the form of wetlands should be a prime concern along with ensuring on-site retention and slow release of stormwater from urban development.

(c) [Policy No. 14] Several large wetland complexes are located in the Monroe Road/Foothills neighborhood. Neighborhood residents controlling wetland areas should be encouraged to examine the feasibility of conservation easements on these lands to retain wetlands and to provide tax advantages to the owners. When these critical areas are within a rural character conservation designation, they should be included in the large lot or open space area of the development.

(6) Valley Creek. [Policy No. 15] droplet Conduct general habitat improvements, such as revegetation, restoration of channel configuration, and placement of instream structures. Continue rehabilitation of estuarine habitat. Replace or improve culverts to correct fish passage problems.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Port of Port Angeles, City of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(7) Peabody Creek. [Policy No. 16] droplet Undertake projects and conduct activities to improve the salmon productivity of this stream.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, City of Port Angeles

(8) Ennis Creek.

(a) [Policy No. 17] droplet Stabilize slope failures in forest lands on Ennis Creek through bioengineering and other techniques.

droplet Clallam County, Clallam Conservation District, WA Department of Natural Resources

(b) [Policy No. 18] droplet Revegetate riparian corridors and buffers in residential areas.

droplet City of Port Angeles, Clallam Conservation District

(9) White’s Creek.

(a) droplet Install instream structures such as boulders and logs to improve fish habitat. Revegetate streambanks to prevent further erosion.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam Conservation District

(b) droplet Peninsula College should take an active role in monitoring, evaluating, and managing White’s Creek adjacent to the school. Develop programs which encourage students to adopt the creek, and which enable students to receive educational credit for projects on the creek.

droplet Peninsula College

(10) Lee’s Creek. [Policy No. 19] droplet Provide information, technical assistance, and funding to restrict livestock access.

droplet Clallam Conservation District

(11) Morse Creek.

(a) [Policy No. 20] droplet Assign high priority to Morse Creek for restoration efforts due to potential for salmon habitat. Build support for restoration activities among agencies, organizations, and residents.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County

(b) [Policy No. 21] droplet Focus education and technical assistance on the lower two miles of this creek. Discourage residents from “cleaning” the riparian corridor. Provide landowners with information about shoreline management, riparian corridors, flood management, and other pertinent issues. Provide technical assistance to insure that existing habitat is protected. Revegetate with stabilizing plants; establish view corridors. Pursue development of off-channel fish habitat.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(c) [Policy No. 22] droplet Because fish populations in this stream are particularly vulnerable to habitat degradation, establish limitations on surface water withdrawals to maintain optimum instream flow for fish. Encourage water conservation during low-flow months.

droplet WA Department of Ecology, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, PUD #1 of Clallam County

(12) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 23] Water service is provided to this neighborhood by the PUD. For those areas inside the UGA, further land divisions should be permitted only when PUD or City water is extended pursuant to a UGA Urban Services and Development Agreement or upon annexation.

(b) [Policy No. 24] Sewer service is not available in this portion of the urban growth area. The City of Port Angeles should plan to extend sewer service to serve commercial and high density residential areas within the urban growth area.

(13) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) [Policy No. 25] The steep-sided creek ravines form natural greenbelts in this neighborhood. Open space will occur as a result of wetland protection, stream buffering and rural character conservation development which requires large, rural sized lots to be retained in rural areas.

(b) [Policy No. 26] Owners of wetlands and ravines should be encouraged to file conservation easements on these portions of their property to protect them from development, provide open spaces and gain tax advantage. Owners of critical areas identified by an open space overlay should receive the advantage of qualifying for open space taxation regardless of property size.

(14) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 27] Monroe, Mt. Pleasant, Draper, Dietz and Henry Boyd Road are scheduled for widening, realignment and intersection improvements in the six-year plan.

(b) [Policy No. 28] County gravel roads serving low density development or accessing commercial forest designation should remain a gravel standard to minimize conversion pressures.

(c) [Policy No. 29] Road widening projects on Mt. Pleasant, Monroe, Mt. Angeles and Old Mill Roads should provide for safe bicycle lanes to allow neighborhood residents to utilize the road system for commuting into Port Angeles.

31.04.430 Black Diamond neighborhood.

(1) Boundaries. The Black Diamond neighborhood is located south of US 101 and the city of Port Angeles. It is generally bounded by Valley Creek to the east, and Dry Creek and the Elwha River to the west, the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area to the north, and the Olympic National Park to the south. The neighborhood includes the entire Black Diamond, Benson, and Little River Road systems, except for Lake Dawn Road.

(2) Vision Statement. The Black Diamond Neighborhood is envisioned to have the following characteristics:

(a) Neighborhood natural and cultural features will be preserved;

(b) Neighborhood rural character including, but not limited to, agriculture, open/green space, visible night sky, quietness, clean air and water, and wildlife habitat will enhance property values and will remain the most important reason people choose to live in the neighborhood;

(c) Neighborhood transportation improvements will provide for safe, comfortable access for pedestrians and bicyclists, especially children, while accommodating safe access (rather than just mobility for commuters) for motorized vehicles; and

(d) Neighborhood roads such as Black Diamond and Little River Roads will retain their rural character (small footprint, landform fitting quality) to preserve an intimacy and awareness of rural roadside landscape not obtainable on noisy, higher speed roads.

(3) Neighborhood Values. The Black Diamond Community Club sponsored a planning process in 2003/04 to gather input from residents on common values and concerns and to promote community interests on updates to the comprehensive plan. A survey was sent to all known households within the Black Diamond Neighborhood, except for the Benson Road area. Two copies of the survey were sent to each household, so that each adult resident could respond individually. Of the 197 households contacted, 111 (56 percent) responded, approximately 394 surveys were distributed, with a total of 193 individual surveys returned. A summary of the survey results and highlights follows:

(a) Community Values. The community response ranged from positive to very positive in regards to the following aspects of neighborhood rural character: recreational opportunities on nearby public land (74 percent); proximity to the foothills and national park (84 percent); natural beauty of river/creek valleys (95 percent); living along a scenic country road (85 percent); lack of city traffic (90 percent); lack of city noise (91 percent); low density, diverse development patterns (83 percent); opportunities for farming, gardening, and animal raising (80 percent); presence of farms, pastures, and farm animals (86 percent); presence of wildlife (88 percent); clean air (94 percent); and space between neighbors (90 percent). Respondents also viewed proximity to Port Angeles (95 percent), independence of country living (89 percent), presence of the Black Diamond Fire Department (87 percent) and Community Hall (68 percent), and sense of belonging to a community (61 percent) as positive community values.

(b) Community Road System. Community residents noted they use neighborhood roads to access Port Angeles and neighborhood destinations, averaging 11 trips per week. Most respondents (92 percent) stated that traffic delays are not a significant problem currently on either Black Diamond or Little River Road.

Nonmotorized use of neighborhood roads included recreational walking (77 percent), bicycling (50 percent), and horse riding (12 percent), but only a small percentage of respondents indicated they walked (32 percent) or bicycled (28 percent) as an alternative mode of transportation (e.g., commuting); 58 percent said that the Black Diamond Road corridor was unsafe for nonmotorized uses (e.g., walking, biking, horse riding), with 69 percent indicating they would use this road corridor for nonmotorized transportation if it felt more pedestrian-friendly; 77 percent or more expressed concern about speeding, tailgating, and illegal passing as road safety issues.

(c) Vision for the Future. The community response favored incentives (60 percent) to reduce further neighborhood development and expressed support (76 percent) for a pedestrian, bicycle, and/or equestrian route through the Black Diamond – Little River Road corridor. The community opposed changes that support more intensive development on existing residential land (70 percent opposed), sale of state forest land for residential development (84 percent opposed), and road modifications enabling higher speeds and/or traffic volumes (84 percent opposed). Approximately 53 percent viewed extension of high-speed internet service as a positive change, with 37 percent being neutral on this issue. A neighborhood park or playfield was supported by nearly half (49 percent) of respondents, with 33 percent being neutral. Neighborhood bus service was supported by 42 percent of the respondents, with 38 percent being neutral.

(d) Upper Little River Road. The community supports keeping the upper Little River Road (between Lake Dawn and Black Diamond Roads) as a local-access-only road (87 percent support) and continuing the County policy to refrain from paving (77 percent support) this road segment to discourage increased traffic; 86 percent responded they would negatively view any change to the upper Little River Road that would encourage greater use as an alternative route for traffic to and from Hurricane Ridge and the Elwha Valley.

(4) Description and Issues. The Black Diamond neighborhood is an unincorporated rural area with unique history and character. The neighborhood is characterized by a mix of rural residential, pastures, small farms and woodlots, bordered by extensive public and private forest lands that are situated between the Olympic National Park and the city of Port Angeles Urban Growth Area. The neighborhood is renowned for its natural beauty, rural character, and access to public trails and forest lands. Local residents, cyclists, pedestrians, hikers, equestrians, and sightseers treasure these rural qualities. The proximity of such a unique and accessible rural neighborhood to the Port Angeles city limit provides a rare opportunity to join maritime, city, rural, and forest neighborhoods into a corridor of recreational and scenic opportunities easily available to County residents and tourists.

(a) Community History. The Black Diamond Valley was homesteaded in the late 1800s. Locals believe the area name originated from a nearby shake mill. Homesteading families wrestled a living from subsistence farming combined with cash paying jobs at a local mill, fish cannery, or logging operation. As time passed, some of the valley’s subsistence farms grew to become viable commercial operations. Dairy farms, beef ranches, poultry farms, and apple orchards dotted the valley. Donated land provided a site for the Community Hall that exists today. Homesteading families found time to help each other despite long days of hard work and everyone pitched in to build the Community Hall. The hall hosted neighborhood dances even before completion of the roof! High-spirited and rowdy dances attracted people from the valley and Port Angeles each week. People visited neighbors, courted potential suitors, danced, and perhaps sampled the locally produced moonshine. Later the U.S. Army commandeered the hall to bivouac soldiers during World War II. Today the Black Diamond Community Hall continues to serve as the focus for community club meetings, dances, cultural events, weddings, and political meetings.

(b) Rural Lands. The Port Angeles Regional Comprehensive Plan Land Use and Zoning Map establishes three rural land designations for the Black Diamond Neighborhood that reflect both current and preferred future land use patterns. Neighborhood areas immediately south of US 101 and the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area are designated for rural neighborhood conservation densities (with a base density of one dwelling unit per five acres subject to optional innovative zoning techniques). The upper portion of Benson Road, and the Black Diamond Road area generally between Old Black Diamond Road to Baskins Road, are designated for rural low density (one dwelling unit per five acres). Rural Character Conservation (RCC) designations are established between neighborhood commercial forest land and rural low designations and along or near the Tumwater and Valley Creeks. The purpose of the RCC designation is to retain larger rural lot sizes (10 acres or larger), conserve natural areas and corridors, and provide for transition areas adjacent to commercial forest lands when land is divided to create lots for future development. These rural land designations are further described under CCC 31.04.220 through 31.04.230(2).

The community values current low residential densities, the natural beauty of the forested stream corridors, the presence of farms, pastures, and farm animals, open spaces between neighbors, and other natural and human rural open spaces. Balancing neighborhood growth and conservation of these features is a priority issue.

(c) Resource Lands. Forest lands of long-term commercial significance have been designated throughout the neighborhood. These forest lands are primarily located within neighborhood foothill and mountain areas, and are characterized by large tracts of federal, state, and private timber company forest land holdings, with some smaller private timber ownerships intermixed. State forest lands represent the largest neighborhood landowner.

Forestry is an appropriate utilization of the productive nature of neighborhood lands, and is an important part of the local economy. Nonforestry uses are limited in commercial forest lands consistent with the County-wide and Regional Comprehensive Plan goals and policies under CCC 31.02.140 and 31.04.215, respectively. Avoiding conversion and fragmentation of neighborhood forest lands by nonforestry uses is important to maintain forestry as a viable and preferred neighborhood land use.

Neighborhood areas located at the top of Harbor View Drive, in the vicinity of the Black Diamond and Little River intersection, and the east sections of the lower Little River Road are designated on the Port Angeles Regional Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Map as Commercial Forest/Mixed Residential (CFM) 5 or 20 Lands. These areas contain valued neighborhood forest lands, but have experienced some encroachment and fragmentation by residential development. Regional Plan policies under CCC 31.04.215(1)(c) for CFM designated lands support maximum residential densities at one dwelling per five acres (CFM-5) and one dwelling per 20 acres (CFM-20), and direct that new lot creation for development be clustered to retain most of the original parcel in a larger tract conducive to forestry.

(d) Critical Areas. The Little River, Valley Creek, Tumwater Creek, and Upper Dry Creek and most of their contributing watershed areas are located within this neighborhood. Wetlands are found throughout the neighborhood and are common along neighborhood streams and valleys. Large wetland complexes are located in the vicinity of Fredricksen, Wellman, and Diamond Vista Roads. Erosion and landslide hazard areas are common to the neighborhood foothill and mountain areas and along stream corridors.

(e) Open Space and Greenbelts. Neighborhood public and private forest lands, natural areas (e.g., wetlands), foothill areas, and stream corridors create neighborhood greenbelts and connected open spaces. These areas provide for a variety of outdoor recreation opportunities for neighborhood residents and visitors, protect and recharge surface water and groundwater resources, provide for fish and wildlife habitat, and contribute greatly to the neighborhood’s scenic character. In addition to natural areas, human activities such as pastures, barns, animal raising, vineyards, and fields represent other valued features of neighborhood open spaces and landscapes. Retaining these features as homes are built on existing lots and land is divided to create lots for future development is a priority issue.

(f) Transportation. The Black Diamond Neighborhood is a rural area with limited public facilities and services. County roads are a major part of the neighborhood infrastructure. The neighborhood contains three primary road systems – Benson, Black Diamond, and Little River Roads. The Benson Road system serves the rural neighborhood west of the Tumwater Creek valley providing access to US 101 and the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area.

The Black Diamond Road system is functionally classified as a minor collector and serves as the only direct access to the city of Port Angeles for neighborhood residents living between Tumwater and Valley Creeks. It provides for a central north and south travel route ending at the Little River Road in the southern portion of the neighborhood.

The upper Little River Road (east of Black Diamond Road) provides access to state forest and recreational lands and connects to the Lake Dawn area and the road to Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park. The lower Little River Road (west of Black Diamond Road) ends at Olympic Hot Springs Road, the road that leads to the Olympic National Park Elwha Valley entrance. The Little River Road is predominantly bordered by undeveloped private and public forest lands, but also provides access to a low density rural population near and west of Black Diamond Road. Transportation improvements or public information (e.g., signage) that would encourage more non-neighborhood traffic to and from park entrances is a concern of many residents.

Retaining the rural character along neighborhood roads is a major area of community interest. Local residents regard Black Diamond and Little River Roads as not just a commuter route, but as a community public space and local access corridor for pedestrians, bicyclists, and equestrians of all ages. The winding, “landform” fitting, and typically narrower geometrics of these roads are an essential feature of neighborhood character and scenery and provide a rural quality that deserves preservation. These characteristics encourage slower traffic speeds that are a vital element of neighborhood rural character and public safety. Slower traffic speeds also decrease the traffic noise and thus contribute to the quietness of the neighborhood.

Neighborhood roads are important public spaces where residents take a walk, jog, meet their neighbors, and let the children walk or bike. Providing for safe comfortable access for nonmotorized users, especially on the Black Diamond and lower Little River Roads, is a neighborhood priority issue because with increasing motorized traffic this safe access is being lost. The community supports a separate trail through the Black Diamond – Little River (lower) road corridor.

Transportation improvements that would increase traffic volumes, especially non-neighborhood traffic, are a concern of neighborhood residents. The community opposes connecting neighborhood road systems across Valley Creek to Port Angeles, or across Tumwater Creek to the Benson Road system.

(g) Water Supply. Water service is provided to this neighborhood primarily by the Black Diamond Water District and by individual private wells. The Dry Creek Water Association also serves a small area of the neighborhood in the Benson Road area near US 101. The Black Diamond Water District draws water from the south branch of the Little River, and appears to have allocated nearly all the water rights that it currently has available. The availability of additional water from Little River and other sources is a limiting factor for neighborhood development.

(h) Wastewater Treatment and Disposal. Existing and new development within the neighborhood is served by either individual or community on-site sewage treatment systems. Public sewer from the city of Port Angeles is not available to serve neighborhood development.

(i) Black Diamond Community Club and Hall. The Black Diamond Community Club has been a community organization for over sixty-five (65) years, with the Black Diamond Community Hall being the focal point. Community volunteers built the Black Diamond Community Hall in 1940 and residents maintain and support this facility and the community water system. The Hall serves as the focal point for potlucks, bake sales, and other community functions including a monthly contra dance that draws participants from the entire North Olympic Peninsula. The Black Diamond Community Club uses the Hall for its monthly meetings.

(j) Police, Fire, and Emergency Services. The Clallam County Sheriff Department provides for neighborhood protective services. The Black Diamond Fire Station is one of five volunteer fire stations in Fire District No. 2. The station became operational in 1981. The station house is located on Black Diamond Road adjacent to the Community Hall. It was built by community members on land leased to the fire district by the Black Diamond Community Club. The station is staffed by community volunteers (currently five) who are on call for emergencies.

(k) Parks and Recreation. The neighborhood contains city, state, and federal public forest and recreational lands, and borders the Olympic National Park. Keeping neighborhood access to these public lands is a priority. The neighborhood also contains and provides access to the following public trails:

(i) Vern Samuelson Memorial Trail. The city of Port Angeles owns approximately eighty (80) acres along Valley Creek between Wellman Road and US 101. This area is designated as Public Land on the Port Angeles Regional Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Map. A public trail follows Valley Creek with limited public parking at both trail ends on US 101 and Wellman Road (a County road). The east side of the creek is located within the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area.

(ii) Foot Hill Trail. State forest lands accessible from the upper Little River Road contain a public trail system known as the “Foot Hill Trail.” The Foot Hill Trail system is particularly popular to both local and visiting mountain bike and off-road vehicle enthusiasts.

(iii) Little River Trail. The Little River Trail is located on the upper Lower River Road just south of the Black Diamond intersection. A public parking area is provided at the trail head. The trail provides access to state and federal forest lands and connects to Hurricane Ridge in Olympic National Park.

(5) Public Involvement (Goal 1). Involve neighborhood residents and landowners in the planning process.

(a) Policy 1. Consider community-sponsored neighborhood planning activities such as the 2003 Black Diamond Community Survey.

(b) Policy 2. Support continued Black Diamond neighborhood involvement consistent with the Regional Plan goals and policies under CCC 31.04.150(3) and 31.04.155(4).

(c) Policy 3. Incorporate context-sensitive design into the community planning process for transportation improvements to neighborhood public roads consistent with Clallam County Administrative Policies for public input on Six-Year Transportation Improvement Projects.

(6) Rural Lands (Goal 2). Keep residential densities low and retain opportunities for rural lifestyles and resource production within designated neighborhood rural lands.

(a) Policy 4. Avoid changes to the Port Angeles Regional Comprehensive Plan Land Use and Zoning Map and implementing development regulations that support more intensive rural residential densities and uses that diminish rural character as defined under CCC 31.02.050.

(b) Policy 5. Promote retention of larger rural lots and contiguous open spaces to retain rural character and support small-to-moderate-scale neighborhood-based timber management, farms, pasture, animal raising, and other rural resource uses consistent with CCC 31.04.220(10) and 31.04.230(2).

(c) Policy 6. Support incentives and voluntary programs that reduce development pressures in this neighborhood such as the County’s current use tax incentive ordinance.

(7) Resource Lands (Goal 3). Protect forestry as a preferred and viable neighborhood land use.

(a) Policy 7. Retain the large tracts of contiguous, private, and public forest lands common to the southern and western areas of the Black Diamond Neighborhood in commercial forestry designations.

(b) Policy 8. Support keeping the significant acreage of neighborhood State forest lands in public ownership. State forest lands should remain designated as Commercial Forest land if sold or traded to reduce pressures to convert these areas and adjacent lands to nonforestry uses.

(c) Policy 9. Minimize land use conflicts and safety risks at the interface of neighborhood rural and commercial forest land designations. Development regulations on adjacent rural lands should:

(i) Promote retention of larger lots and rural open spaces along commercial forest land interface;

(ii) Establish increased building setbacks from the designated commercial forest land boundary; and

(iii) Require notification to prospective or future land owners of potential nuisances related to forest management and that forestry is a preferred neighborhood land use at time of new development.

(8) Critical Areas (Goal 4). Direct development away from neighborhood stream corridors, wetlands, steep slopes, and other environmentally sensitive areas.

(a) Policy 10. Retain forest cover within and along the ravines and valleys of Tumwater Creek, Little River, Valley Creek, and Upper Dry Creek corridors to protect public safety, maintain water quality, and as linear fish and wildlife corridors through the neighborhood. These areas when left in a natural state stabilize the geologically unstable ravine and bluff environments, filter out sediments and pollutants before they reach streams and shorelines, and provide for fish and wildlife habitat and movement corridors through neighborhood rural lands.

(b) Policy 11. Allow for transfer of development rights from critical areas and connecting open space corridors designated on the Port Angeles Regional Comprehensive Plan Open Space Overlay Corridor Map (Ordinance 643, 1998), as amended, to designated receiving areas within the Port Angeles Urban Growth Area.

(c) Policy 12. Support open space tax benefits to landowners who conserve neighborhood stream corridors, wetlands, erosion and landslide hazard areas, and other neighborhood environmentally-sensitive areas.

(d) Policy 13. Encourage development patterns that protect contiguous networks of neighborhood natural open spaces and environmentally sensitive areas.

(9) Watershed Management and Protection.

(a) Valley Creek. Policy 14. droplet Conduct general habitat improvements, such as revegetation, restoration of channel configuration, and placement of instream structures. Continue rehabilitation of estuarine habitat. Replace or improve culverts to correct fish passage problems.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Port of Port Angeles, City of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(b) Tumwater Creek. Policy 15. droplet Recognize that Tumwater Creek has good potential for successful restoration of natural functions. Incorporate large woody debris recruitment, and thinning for conifer growth to achieve habitat enhancement. Improve fish habitat through restoration of the natural configuration of the stream, establishment of new vegetation, and placement of instream structures and gravel for spawning.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, Clallam Conservation District, WA Department of Natural Resources

(c) Tumwater Creek. Policy 16. droplet In lower sections, conduct habitat improvement projects which mitigate the effects of industrial development while providing a focal point for educational and tourist activities.

droplet WA Department of Fish and Wildlife, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(d) Tumwater Creek. Policy 17. droplet In rural sections where agricultural practices are contributing to degradation, eliminate animal access and revegetate stream banks.

droplet Clallam Conservation District

(e) Dry Creek. Policy 18. droplet To improve summertime flows, work with landowners to eliminate the impoundment on Cameron Road at the headwaters of Dry Creek.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(f) Little River. Policy 19. droplet The Little River is currently in good condition; land use regulations and watershed management should be stringently applied to protect it from potential negative impacts.

droplet Clallam County, Washington Department of Natural Resources

(i) Provide additional protection for water quality and habitat by establishing riparian management zones.

(ii) Recognize the connection between flows and habitat on the Little River related to the Elwha River. No further water rights appropriations should be granted on Little River until minimum flow standards are established to prevent loss of fish habitat and diseases associated with low-flow periods.

(10) Public Services and Facilities. Policy 20. Public services and facilities needed to support neighborhood development should be limited to community water systems, community on-site sewage systems, and other rural services (see CCC 31.02.050, Definitions).

(11) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) Policy 21. The steep-sided creek ravines form natural greenbelts in this neighborhood. Commercial forestry resource lands provide for retention of many open space values. Open space will occur as a result of wetland protection, stream buffering, and rural character conservation development that require large, rural sized lots to be retained in rural areas.

(b) Policy 22. Owners of wetlands and stream ravines should be encouraged to file conservation easements on these portions of their property to protect them from development, provide open spaces and gain tax advantage. Owners of critical areas identified on the Port Angeles Regional Comprehensive Plan Open Space Overlay Corridor Map (Ordinance 643, 1998) should receive the advantage of qualifying for open space taxation. Critical areas contained in the open space overlay should be protected and linked whenever possible in rural character conservation designations by ensuring that the large, rural-sized parcels retained as a result of development protect critical areas.

(c) Policy 23. Clallam County should support keeping recreational opportunities associated with neighborhood public lands and trails open and accessible.

(d) Policy 24. Explore community and landowner interest in expansion and connection of public trail systems within the neighborhood.

(12) Transportation.

(a) (Goal 5). Promote safe, motorized and nonmotorized use of neighborhood roads.

(i) Policy 25. Prioritize safe, motorized and nonmotorized access for users of all ages, especially children, along Black Diamond and lower Little River Roads.

(ii) Policy 26. Ensure resulting road configuration will not promote higher vehicle speeds, by conforming to context sensitive design standards.

(iii) Policy 27. Pursue and retain opportunities for a separate path or trail for nonmotorized users through the Black Diamond – Little River (lower) road corridor.

(b) (Goal 6). Retain the rural character of the Little River and Black Diamond transportation corridors.

(i) Policy 28. Retain a homogeneous design throughout the transportation corridor, consistent with the rural characteristics of the community.

(ii) Policy 29. Keep traffic speeds low on neighborhood roads for public safety, as an element of rural character, and to decrease traffic noise.

(iii) Policy 30. Preserve the winding, “landform fitting” quality of the Little River and Black Diamond roads as essential feature of neighborhood rural character.

(iv) Policy 31. Avoid connection of the Black Diamond Road across Valley Creek to Port Angeles, or across Tumwater Creek to the Benson Road system.

(c) (Goal 7). Keep traffic volumes low on the upper Little River Road and retain the rural character of this forest and recreational access travel corridor.

(i) Policy 32. Maintain the unimproved portions of the upper Little River Road connecting Black Diamond and Lake Dawn as a primitive gravel road.

(ii) Policy 33. Continue to designate and manage the upper Little River Road as a low-volume road, used primarily for access to state forest and recreational land.

(iii) Policy 34. Avoid road improvements (such as widening, straightening, paving, etc.) that support increased motorized vehicle speeds and traffic volumes.

(iv) Policy 35. Maintain road signs that alert the public that the upper Little River Road is a primitive road not suitable for RV and trailer traffic.

(v) Policy 36. Support noxious weed control and reforestation of Clallam County rights-of-way.

31.04.440 Dry Creek neighborhood.

(1) Neighborhood Concerns Identified in the Planning Process. The Dry Creek neighborhood is bounded by the City of Port Angeles to the east, the Elwha River to the west, the Strait to the north and the headwaters area of Dry Creek to the south. The area east of Reddick Road is within the urban growth area. Lower Elwha S’Klallam Tribal lands are located near the mouth of the Elwha River and are designated “ET” on the neighborhood maps. Land use on the Lower Elwha S’Klallam Tribal lands is controlled by the Tribe. Commercial uses are limited in this area but industrial uses are common along the US 101 corridor in this area. Two industrial areas are found within the urban growth area. They include the contiguous industrial area between Fey and Airport Road on the north side of US 101, the area between Benson Road and Cameron Road on the south side of US 101, and a smaller industrial area at the intersection of Reddick Road. A 100-acre industrial area is located outside the urban growth area just west of Dry Creek Road bordering US 101. The former industrial site located east of Dry Creek Road has been redesignated to rural neighborhood commercial in order to allow a variety of commercial uses on this site while reducing the potential for water quality problems associated with retaining this site in industrial land use. Although designation of this site for rural neighborhood commercial does not meet the spacing requirements between uses of this type (CCC 31.04.230(7), Rural Issue No. 4), no better designation could be determined for this site due to the amount of site disturbance. This designation should not be used to justify other deviations from CCC 31.04.230(7), Rural Issue No. 4.

The lack of industrial development potential in the Dry Creek area was a major concern of area residents. In response to these concerns, a large acreage which was formerly designated for industrial land use has been redesignated for residential use. The residential area east of Airport Road has been designated for urban low density (two to nine units per acre). The residential area north of the industrial sites between Reddick and Airport Road is slated for a dual density designation of urban very low density/low density which allows development of up to two units per acre by right with additional density up to nine units per acre available with purchase of development rights.

Outside the urban growth area, the neighborhood is very rural in character. Neighborhood meetings at the Dry Creek Grange indicated a strong preference to retain rural character and rural densities in the area. Much of the rural area has been designated as rural character conservation. This designation provides for the retention of rural character at densities where it would be severely diminished under conventional zoning at the densities prevalent in this area. Use of this technique, which is a type of planned unit development, is made possible with the large ownerships found throughout this area.

Some of the rural area has been designated with either rural low (one dwelling per five acres) or rural neighborhood conservation (with a base density of one dwelling per five acres subject to optional innovative zoning techniques) which recognizes the predominance of existing parcels in these size ranges. These areas are found in the vicinity of Laird’s Corner, near Evergreen Drive, at the entrance to Dan Kelly Road and near the Strait on Place and Lower Elwha Roads.

Maintaining the forested foothills region managed by the DNR, Green Crow and M&R in commercial forest use is vital to maintaining the water quality in this neighborhood as Dry Creek originates in these foothills. Commercial forest use also contributes to the visual quality experienced in this neighborhood as well as maintaining a balance between residential uses and utilization of the actual productive nature of the land for growing commercial timber. Further encroachment of residential uses in commercial forestry areas will be prohibited during this planning time frame.

The neighborhood contains several large wetland complexes which must be protected. Other critical areas in the neighborhood include Dry Creek and the minor streams flowing into the Elwha River. Forest resource lands in the southern half of this neighborhood serve to protect erosion hazard areas while providing for productive use of the land.

US 101, SR 112, Laird Road, Lower Elwha Road, Edgewood Drive, Reddick Road, Dry Creek Road and Bean Road provide excellent access to this neighborhood on paved County roads. The Edgewood Drive/Airport Road intersection and Lower Elwha Road are scheduled for improvements in the Six-Year Transportation Improvement Plan.

(2) Boundary. [Policy No. 1] The Dry Creek neighborhood is bounded by the City of Port Angeles to the east, the Elwha River to the west, the Strait to the North and the headwaters area of Dry Creek to the south.

(3) Land Uses.

(a) Policy 2. Urban neighborhood commercial has been mapped on the north side of US 101 from the vicinity of the city limits to the draw just west of the Pond Motel. This designation should not be expanded along US 101 or to the south side of US 101 to avoid the strip commercial appearance of commercial uses in the eastern portion of the UGA.

(b) Policy 3. Urban low density (two to nine units per acre) designation will be established in the residential area east of Airport Road.

(c) Policy 4. The residential area north of the industrial sites between Reddick/Critchfield and Airport Road is slated for a dual density designation of urban very low density/low density which allows development of up to two units per acre by right with additional density up to nine units per acre available with purchase of development rights.

(d) Policy 5. Industrial designations include the contiguous industrial area between Fey and Airport Road north of US 101 and the area between Cameron and Benson Roads south of US 101 and a smaller industrial area at the intersection of Reddick Road.

(e) Policy 6. A rural neighborhood commercial land use designation has been retained in the “Y” at Laird’s Corner.

(f) Policy 7. Rural neighborhood conservation designation will be established in the vicinity north of Whispering Firs on Lower Elwha Road.

(g) Policy 8. A rural low density designation is mapped out around Evergreen and on the Strait just west of the City limits. These designations recognize the need to maintain parcels of sufficient size to allow redevelopment at urban densities along the City limits. The designation around Laird’s Corner Drive recognizes current parcelization in the area.

(h) Policy 9. Rural character conservation designations are applied widely in this neighborhood due to the strong desire expressed by neighborhood residents to maintain rural character. Densities of one home per 2.4 acres which are prevalent in the area would result in a very suburban character under conventional development scenarios. In order to maintain rural character without down-zoning it will be necessary to require planned unit developments which preserve large rural lot sizes on a portion of the property while reducing lot sizes on the remainder of the property. By mixing smaller lots and larger lots in the same area, rural character can be maintained. This technique would also allow critical areas to be protected in large lot sizes and by homeowners’ associations without diminishing the property rights of the landowners. To include these critical areas in small individual lots, as is the case under conventional zoning, would lead to loss of rural character, diminish water quality, and destroy wildlife habitat.

(4) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 10] Forest lands of long-term commercial significance have been designated in the foothills on the southern boundary of this neighborhood. Ownership of forest lands is diverse: from the State of Washington to major private timber companies to individuals. Land uses adjoining that land shall ensure continued viability of long-term forest production, with increased setbacks from the forest line and notification of potential incompatible uses required during new development. Further encroachment of residential uses into commercial forest areas shall be prohibited as it would severely impact the commercial viability of the area for commercial forestry.

(b) [Policy No. 11] Development adjacent to designated forest lands of long-term commercial significance should be at rural low density (one home per five acres) to minimize problems associated with residential development and commercial forestry. Where rural character conservation is mapped adjacent to commercial forestry, the large parcels or open space required along with rural character conservation development shall be utilized to buffer the commercial forestlands.

(5) Dry Creek.

(a) [Policy No. 12] droplet Ensure cleanup of contaminated soils at industrial sites in the Dry Creek subwatershed. Identify and eliminate historical sources of contamination, and utilize best management practices to control and treat new and existing sources of pollution.

droplet Clallam County, WA Department of Ecology

(b) [Policy No. 13] droplet Provide stream aeration, through methods such as splash pools and step logs, which oxygenate water, at points which flow out of industrial land uses.

droplet Clallam County, Port of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(c) [Policy No. 14] droplet To improve summertime flows, work with landowners to eliminate the impoundment on Cameron Road at the headwaters of Dry Creek.

droplet Clallam Conservation District, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(d) [Policy No. 15] droplet Reduce the effects of the new stream channelization. Reduce potential erosion from steep side slopes, decrease the effect of the gradient, and appropriately locate instream structures. Use the site as a demonstration area for revegetation projects. Monitor the new channel over the long term to determine the effects of the project, and stream function overall.

droplet Port of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(6) Elwha River.

(a) [Policy No. 16] droplet Prepare, update, and distribute a fact sheet on the Elwha River ecosystem. Address water quality and quantity, fish habitat, fish passage, and other concerns in regular updates that compare long-term restoration goals and methods to achievement of watershed goals and objectives.

droplet Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County

(b) [Policy No. 17] droplet Coordinate a citizens’ information team of local volunteers to track the status of the restoration and provide information to the community through radio and press releases and distribution of a fact sheet on Elwha River restoration.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, City of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Dry Creek Water Association

(c) [Policy No. 18] droplet Utilize the site and activities of river restoration as a “living laboratory” with long-term educational and scientific value. Sponsor field trips, talks, and public forums to provide information to the community on river restoration and ecosystems in general.

droplet Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, WSU-Cooperative Extension, National Park Service, City of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Clallam Conservation District

(d) [Policy No. 19] droplet Provide support for watershed restoration activities through technical assistance, dissemination of information and education of citizens, groups, and agency staff.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Dry Creek Water Association

(e) [Policy No. 20] droplet Conduct educational programs which address water quality and quantity issues and problems particular to the Elwha River watershed. Subjects covered should include land management; riparian management; water rights; ground water protection, and water conservation.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Dry Creek Water Association

(f) [Policy No. 21] droplet Review existing regulations relating to critical areas, sewage disposal, and land division for adequacy and effectiveness of ground and surface water protection measures. Use existing regulations to protect water quality and quantity and to control specific sources of nonpoint pollution.

droplet Clallam County

(7) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 22] Water service is provided to this neighborhood by the Dry Creek Water District. For those areas inside the UGA, further land divisions should be permitted only when PUD or City water is extended pursuant to a UGA Urban Services and Development Agreement or upon annexation.

(b) [Policy No. 23] Sewer service is not available in this portion of the urban growth area. The City of Port Angeles should plan to extend sewer service to serve commercial and high density residential areas within the urban growth area. Individual on-site sewage disposal systems or community on-site sewage disposal systems should be utilized for waste treatment in the rural portions of this neighborhood.

(8) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) [Policy No. 24] The stream buffers along Dry Creek and the steep-sided Elwha River ravine form natural greenbelts in this neighborhood. Commercial forestry resource lands provide for retention of many open space values. Open space will occur as a result of wetland protection, stream buffering and rural character conservation development which requires large, rural sized lots to be retained in rural areas.

(b) [Policy No. 25] Owners of wetlands and ravines should be encouraged to file conservation easements on these portions of their property to protect them from development, provide open spaces and gain tax advantage. Owners of critical areas identified by an open space overlay should receive the advantage of qualifying for open space taxation regardless of property size. Critical areas contained in the open space overlay should be protected and linked whenever possible in rural character conservation designations by ensuring that the large, rural sized parcels retained as a result of development protect critical areas.

(9) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 26] The Edgewood Drive/Airport Road intersection and Lower Elwha Road are scheduled for improvements in the six-year road plan.

(b) [Policy No. 27] The single lane bridge on the Elwha River Road is currently slated for study to determine its future. The bridge has some structural deficiencies. Federal money is available to remove or renovate the structure.

31.04.450 Place Road/Eden Valley/Little River neighborhood.

(1) Neighborhood Concerns Identified in the Planning Process. The Place Road/Eden Valley/Little River neighborhood is bounded by the Olympic National Park to the south, Dry Creek to the east and Lake Sutherland neighborhood to the west. With the single exception of the rural suburban community on the Strait at the end of Place Road, the neighborhood is composed of commercial forest resource lands with narrow rural density valleys. Lower Elwha S’Klallam Tribal lands are located near the mouth of the Elwha River and are designated “ET” on the neighborhood maps. Land use on the Lower Elwha S’Klallam Tribal lands is controlled by the Tribe.

Rural neighborhood conservation designation will be established on the Strait and overlooking the Elwha on Place Road, and along Dan Kelly Road from SR 112 to the 90-degree corner on Dan Kelly. Rural low density is mapped near the intersection of Dan Kelly and Eden Valley Road and extends down Eden Valley to the Sandhagen Road area. Rural character conservation is designated along SR 112 and south down the first mile of Eden Valley Road. Rural very low density is utilized at the far west extension of Eden Valley to provide low density designations which grade into the commercial forest. The steep sloped, forested areas at the intersection of Little River and Black Diamond Road were designated for commercial forest mixed use to limit incompatible development in this heavily forested area. The same designation was used on Eagle Ridge as well as south of Eden Valley and Dan Kelly to limit incompatible development in this steep, heavily forested area. This neighborhood has large areas of commercial forestland south of SR 112 and on Eagle Ridge. Maintaining the forested foothills managed by the DNR and other land private landowners in commercial forest use is vital to maintaining the water quality in this neighborhood. Commercial forest use also contributes to the visual quality experienced in this neighborhood as well as maintaining a balance between residential uses and utilization of the actual productive nature of the land for growing commercial timber. Further encroachment of residential uses in commercial forestry areas will be prohibited during this planning time frame.

The neighborhood contains several large wetland complexes near Indian Creek, in the Eden Valley area and along the Elwha River which must be protected. Other critical areas in the neighborhood include the Elwha River, Little River, Lake Aldwell, Upper Colville Creek and the marine bluffs. Forest resource lands in the southern three-fourths of this neighborhood serve to protect landslide and erosion hazard areas while providing for productive use of the land.

US 101, SR 112, Place Road, Dan Kelly Road, Little River Road and Olympic Hot Spring Road provide excellent access to this neighborhood. Dan Kelly Road, Little River Road and Place Road are scheduled for road improvements in the Six-Year Transportation Improvement Plan.

(2) Boundary. [Policy No. 1] The Place Road/Eden Valley/Little River neighborhood is bounded by the Olympic National Park to the south, Dry Creek to the east and Lake Sutherland neighborhood to the west.

(3) Land Uses.

(a) Policy 2. Rural neighborhood conservation designation will be established on the Strait and overlooking the Elwha on Place Road and along Dan Kelly Road from SR 112 to the 90-degree corner on Dan Kelly. Rural neighborhood conservation will also be established near Granny’s on US 101.

(b) Policy 3. A rural low density designation is mapped out near the intersection of Dan Kelly and Eden Valley Road and extends down Eden Valley to the Sandhagen Road area. Rural low density is also utilized just west of the Elwha on US 101.

(c) Policy 4. Rural very low density designations were mapped at the far west extension of Eden Valley to provide low density designations which grade into the commercial forestlands to the west. Rural very low is also mapped on private lands on either side of Granny’s on US 101 to buffer the surrounding commercial forest resource lands.

(d) Policy 5. Rural character conservation is designated along SR 112 and south down the first mile of Eden Valley Road and just west and south of Herrick Road. Many of these lands have not been able to develop to their maximum density due to the large percentage of land within critical areas. Streams, ravines, wetland complexes, and erosion hazard areas are extensive in this area. Utilizing a rural character conservation approach would allow development to occur but would allow critical areas to be protected in large lot sizes and by homeowners’ associations. To include these critical areas in small individual lots, such as the case under conventional zoning, would lead to loss of rural character, diminish water quality and destroy wildlife habitat.

(e) Policy 6. Clallam County shall recognize the interdependence of the Black Diamond and Little River neighborhoods and treat impacts as cumulative from both areas. Development in either area will impact the other as they are linked by a single road, depend on a limited water source and contain large tracts of viable timber land.

(4) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 7] Forest lands of long-term commercial significance have been designated in the foothills and mountains which dominate this neighborhood. Ownership of forest lands is diverse: from the State of Washington to major private timber companies to individuals. Land uses adjoining that land shall ensure continued viability of long-term forest production, with increased setbacks from the forest line and notification of potential incompatible uses required during new development. Further encroachment of residential uses into commercial forest areas shall be prohibited as it would severely impact the commercial viability of the area for commercial forestry.

(b) [Policy No. 8] Development adjacent to designated forest lands of long-term commercial significance should be at rural very low density or shall utilize a commercial forest mixed use designation to provide a low density buffer to commercial forestlands. Where rural character conservation is mapped adjacent to commercial forestry, the large parcels or open space required along with rural character conservation development shall be utilized to buffer the commercial forestlands.

(5) Elwha River.

(a) [Policy No. 9] droplet Prepare, update, and distribute a fact sheet on Elwha River restoration and its relationship to County watershed goals. Address water quality and quantity, fish habitat, fish passage, and other concerns in regular updates that compare long-term river restoration goals and methods to achievement of watershed goals and objectives.

droplet Clallam County, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(b) [Policy No. 10] droplet Coordinate a citizens’ information team of local volunteers to track the status of the restoration and provide information to the community through radio and press releases and distribution of a fact sheet on Elwha River restoration.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, City of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Dry Creek Water Association

(c) [Policy No. 11] droplet Utilize the site and activities of river restoration as a “living laboratory” with long-term educational and scientific value. Sponsor field trips, talks, and public forums to provide information to the community on river restoration and ecosystems in general.

droplet Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, WSU-Cooperative Extension, National Park Service, City of Port Angeles, Clallam County, Clallam Conservation District

(d) [Policy No. 12] droplet Provide technical support to the interagency river restoration team. Participate in restoration efforts that support watershed management goals, through dissemination of information on the project and through education of citizens, groups, and agency staff.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Dry Creek Water Association

(e) [Policy No. 13] droplet Conduct educational programs which address water quality and quantity issues and problems particular to the Elwha River watershed. Subjects covered should include land management; riparian management; water rights; ground water protection, and water conservation.

droplet WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Dry Creek Water Association

(f) [Policy No. 14] droplet Review existing regulations relating to critical areas, sewage disposal, and land division for adequacy and effectiveness of ground and surface water protection measures. Use existing regulations to protect water quality and quantity and to control specific sources of nonpoint pollution.

droplet Clallam County

(6) [Policy No. 15] droplet Indian Creek and Little River. These streams are currently in good condition; land use regulations and watershed management should be stringently applied to protect them from potential negative impacts.

droplet Clallam County, WA Department of Natural Resources

(a) Provide additional protection for water quality and habitat by establishing riparian management zones on these streams.

(b) droplet Recognize the connection between flows and habitat on the Little River related to the Elwha River. No further water rights appropriations should be granted on Little River until minimum flow standards are established to prevent loss of fish habitat and diseases associated with low-flow periods.

droplet WA Department of Ecology

(7) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 16] Water service is provided to a portion of this neighborhood by Crescent Water District. Residences along the Little River utilize water directly from Little River. Much of this neighborhood utilizes individual wells or small community water systems.

(b) [Policy No. 17] Individual on-site sewage disposal systems or community on-site sewage disposal systems should be utilized for waste treatment in this resource and rural density neighborhood.

(8) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) [Policy No. 18] The steep-sided creek ravines, Elwha River Valley and marine bluffs form natural greenbelts in this neighborhood. Extensive commercial forestry resource lands provide for retention of many open space values. Open space will occur as a result of wetland protection, stream buffering and rural character conservation development which requires large, rural sized lots to be retained in rural areas.

(b) [Policy No. 19] Owners of wetlands and ravines should be encouraged to file conservation easements on these portions of their property to protect them from development, provide open spaces and gain tax advantage. Owners of critical areas identified by an open space overlay should receive the advantage of qualifying for open space taxation regardless of property size. Critical areas contained in the open space overlay should be protected and linked whenever possible in rural character conservation designations by ensuring that the large, rural sized parcels retained as a result of development protect critical areas.

(9) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 20] Dan Kelly Road, Little River Road and Place Road are scheduled for road improvements in the six (6) year plan.

(b) [Policy No. 21] County gravel roads serving low density development or accessing commercial forest designation should remain a gravel standard to minimize conversion pressures. The eastern end of Eden Valley Road shall remain at gravel standard to limit conversion pressures in this neighborhood.

31.04.460 Lake Sutherland neighborhood.

(1) Neighborhood Concerns Identified in the Planning Process. The Lake Sutherland neighborhood is bounded by the Olympic National Park to the south, Eden Valley to the east, Lake Crescent drainage divide to the west and Bear Valley to the north. With the exception of the area immediately adjacent to Lake Sutherland the neighborhood is all in commercial forest land use.

Rural suburban community designation describes the urban density development which surrounds Lake Sutherland. This designation will allow infill development at these urban densities but the area of the designation cannot be expanded to limit urban density development occurring outside of urban growth areas. Rural low density is mapped on the north side of Highway 101 in the area between the Shadow Mountain Store and the Lake Crescent Drainage divide. The area immediately surrounding the Shadow Mountain Store is designated rural neighborhood commercial and provides commercial services to area residents and the traveling public. Rural very low density is utilized in an area which has been divided into twenty (20) acre lots just north of the rural low density designation. These densities provide a transition from rural density to the commercial forest and should not be upzoned within this planning time frame.

This neighborhood has large areas of commercial forestland. Maintaining the forested foothills managed by the DNR and other large private landowners in commercial forest use is vital to maintaining the water quality in this neighborhood. Commercial forest use also contributes to the visual quality experienced in this neighborhood as well as maintaining a balance between residential uses and utilization of the actual productive nature of the land for growing commercial timber. Further encroachment of residential uses in commercial forestry areas will be prohibited during this planning time frame.

The neighborhood contains several large wetland complexes near Indian Creek and Lake Sutherland which must be protected. Other critical areas in the neighborhood include the Indian Creek and Upper Colville Creek. Forest resource lands in this neighborhood serve to protect landslide and erosion hazard areas while providing for productive use of the land. The neighborhood is concerned about maintaining water quality in Lake Sutherland but no major problems were discovered with lake water quality at this time. As more full time residences are located on the lake, failing on-site sewage disposal systems may become a problem.

The community is interested in establishing a new fire district to serve the Lake Sutherland community as this would reduce fire insurance rates in the area.

Highway 101 and East Beach Road provide excellent access to this neighborhood.

(2) Boundary. [Policy No. 1] The Lake Sutherland neighborhood is bounded by the Olympic National Park to the south, Eden Valley to the east, Lake Crescent drainage divide to the west and Bear Valley to the north.

(3) Land Uses.

(a) [Policy No. 2] Rural suburban community designation describes the urban density development which surrounds Lake Sutherland.

(b) [Policy No. 3] The area immediately surrounding the Shadow Mountain Store is designated rural neighborhood commercial and provides commercial services to area residents and the traveling public. The area surrounding Granny’s store is also designated rural neighborhood commercial. These commercial uses can be expanded within the present area designated for this use but should not be expanded beyond these bounds during the planning time frame to encourage compact commercial service centers, to prevent “strip commercial” sprawl in rural areas and to maintain the scenic nature of this designated scenic corridor.

(c) [Policy No. 4] Rural low density is mapped on the north side of Highway 101 in the area between the Shadow Mountain Store and the Lake Crescent Drainage divide.

(d) [Policy No. 5] Rural very low density is utilized in an area which has been divided into twenty (20) acre lots just north of the rural low density designation.

(e) [Policy No. 6] Rural very low density designations were mapped at the far west extension of Eden Valley to provide low density designations which grade into the commercial forestlands to the west.

(4) Resource Lands.

(a) [Policy No. 7] Forest lands of long-term commercial significance have been designated in the foothills and mountains which dominate this neighborhood. Ownership of forest lands is diverse: from the State of Washington to major private timber companies to individuals. Land uses adjoining that land shall ensure continued viability of long-term forest production, with increased setbacks from the forest line and notification of potential incompatible uses required during new development. Further encroachment of residential uses into commercial forest areas shall be prohibited as it would severely impact the commercial viability of the area for commercial forestry.

(b) [Policy No. 8] Development adjacent to designated forest lands of long-term commercial significance should be at rural very low density or shall utilize a commercial forest mixed use designation to provide a low density buffer to commercial forestlands. Commercial forestland directly abut rural suburban community designations in the area of the lake due to the extremely steep nature of the ground. No transition designation is needed or is practical in this situation.

(5) Lake Sutherland.

(a) [Policy No. 9] droplet Encourage the consolidation of existing individual dock facilities to restore shoreline habitat potential where possible.

droplet Clallam County

(b) [Policy No. 10] droplet Prohibit the construction of bulkheads along the shoreline of Lake Sutherland.

droplet Clallam County

(c) [Policy No. 11] droplet Continue monitoring the waters of Lake Sutherland to establish better baseline information and to evaluate trends. Inform property owners about water quality monitoring results.

droplet Clallam County, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(d) [Policy No. 12] droplet Conduct a voluntary sanitary survey of all on-site sewage disposal systems around the lake to identify failing systems and offer incentives for making repairs.

droplet Clallam County, WSU-Cooperative Extension

(e) [Policy No. 13] droplet Encourage creation of a lake property owners’ association so property owners can better communicate problems to each other and to their public officials.

droplet Clallam County, WSU-Cooperative Extension

(f) [Policy No. 14] droplet Provide educational materials to residents about use and maintenance of on-site sewage disposal systems, lawn fertilization, preserving wildlife and wetland habitat, and stewardship.

droplet Clallam County, WSU-Cooperative Extension

(6) Public Services and Facilities.

(a) [Policy No. 15] Water service is provided by small community systems and individual wells in this area.

(b) [Policy No. 16] Community on-site sewage disposal systems managed by homeowners’ associations or the PUD should be the preferred form of treatment system around the lake. Further from the lake, individual on-site sewage disposal systems could be utilized for waste treatment in this resource and rural density neighborhood.

(c) [Policy No. 17] Clallam County should work with area residents to determine the feasibility of establishing a new fire district to serve the Lake Sutherland community.

(7) Open Space and Greenbelts.

(a) [Policy No. 18] Extensive commercial forestry resource lands provide for retention of many open space values. Open space will occur as a result of wetland protection, stream buffering and very low rural densities allowed in this area.

(b) [Policy No. 19] Owners of wetlands should be encouraged to file conservation easements on these portions of their property to protect them from development, provide open spaces and gain tax advantage.

(8) Transportation.

(a) [Policy No. 20] East Beach Road and South Shore Road should be widened.

(b) [Policy No. 21] County gravel roads serving low-density development or accessing commercial forest designation should remain a gravel standard to minimize conversion pressures. The eastern end of Eden Valley Road shall remain at gravel standard to limit conversion pressures in this neighborhood.

Appendix A1 Implementation strategy.

(1) GMA Goals. Encourage the involvement of citizens in the planning process and ensure coordination between communities and jurisdictions to reconcile conflicts.

(2) Watershed Goals. Ensure cooperation and coordination in resource management.

Promote stewardship by residents, decision makers, visitors, and agencies in the Port Angeles watershed.

(3) Watershed Implementation Policies.

(a) [Policy No. 1] droplet Ensure consistency between County and City regulations related to water resource protection and conservation where appropriate.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles

(b) [Policy No. 2] droplet Develop a coordinated permit application which encompasses all the required information for all agencies with jurisdiction. Such a permit has been developed by the State and is being tested in other counties. After testing, Clallam County should work to provide a single permit based on this model.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

(c) [Policy No. 3] droplet Continue local support of water resource management unit/program/team to oversee and coordinate efforts.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Clallam Conservation District, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

(d) [Policy No. 4] droplet Share staff, information, expertise, and funding between governments, and between agencies and organizations, to efficiently distribute available resources, and to develop understanding of each other’s mandates, issues, and priorities.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, Clallam Conservation District

(e) [Policy No. 5] Share watershed management staff, programs, and funding between Clallam County and the City of Port Angeles.

droplet Establish a Watershed Council to function as an advisory board to the lead agency for plan implementation.

droplet Clallam County, City of Port Angeles, Elwha S’Klallam Tribe, WSU-Cooperative Extension, Clallam Conservation District

Composed of local, Tribal, State and federal governments and agencies, along with other community and public interests, this group will conduct regular forums related to water resource management. Functions provided by the Council could include:

(i) Reviewing and providing information about watershed issues;

(ii) Advising the lead agency on Watershed Protection District programs;

(iii) Identifying opportunities for interjurisdictional cooperation;

(iv) Resolving issues of interjurisdictional coordination;

(v) Examining concerns brought forward from the public;

(vi) Coordinating cooperative data collection and data sharing;

(vii) Communicating the results of studies and monitoring;

(viii) Resolving disputes regarding plan implementation responsibilities.

(f) [Policy No. 6] droplet Draw together representatives of implementing agencies, local leaders (such as the media, councils and committees), consultants, and other interested and affected parties to review plan recommendations, identify responsibilities, and publicly establish the course and scope of implementation.

droplet Clallam County

(i) Identify an individual in each implementing agency or entity responsible for coordinating actions relative to the Plan.

droplet All implementing agencies

(ii) Familiarize local decision makers with plan recommendations and rationale, and urge them to use the Plan as an information source and policy guide.

(iii) Ensure implementing agencies coordinate with other water-related planning efforts.

(g) [Policy No. 7] droplet Integrate the watershed policies and recommendations into respective resource and land use planning instruments where appropriate:

droplet All implementing agencies

•    

City and County comprehensive plans;

•    

Forest Service Land and Resource Management Plan;

•    

SEPA ordinance;

•    

Conservation District annual plan;

•    

DNR Land Management Plan and watershed analyses.

(i) Federal and State agencies, when developing watershed management programs, shall utilize existing local systems created for this purpose. Locally generated data, information, and plans, when developed in accordance with accepted protocols, shall be used for decision making, rather than conducting new studies and plans which will likely have similar results. Implementation of approved local plans shall take precedence over development of new plans.

(ii) Federal and State watershed management processes shall incorporate existing watershed plans into their initiatives. Federal and State watershed management processes shall consult with local watershed management committees or watershed councils early in the planning process.

(iii) Clallam County shall take an active role in the development, review, and implementation of State and federal watershed initiatives.

(h) [Policy No. 8] droplet Dispute Resolution.

droplet Clallam County, all implementing agencies

In the event that there is a conflict in implementing plan recommendations, i.e., an entity or agency is unable to carry out an action, resolution of the issue will be carried out through a three (3) tiered process:

(i) Staff Intervention. A designated staff member of the lead agency, preferably one with the authority to make decisions on behalf of the lead agency, will attempt to mediate a solution consistent with plan objectives.

(ii) Watershed Council Review. If not resolved, the action item and representative parties may bring the subject to the committee for review and resolution.

(iii) Annual Water Quality Forum. Any items not resolved may be raised for discussion at the annual meeting to review and evaluate implementation. Public input should be sought during the forum.

(i) [Policy No. 9] droplet Funding.

droplet Clallam County, all implementing agencies

(i) Ensure adequate funding for short and long-term plan implementation. Many of the policy actions recommended in this plan can be implemented with little or no cost through existing programs and budgets. Short-term projects should be funded through grants and loans, such as Centennial Clean Water Funds and State Revolving Funds. Other actions, such as monitoring, technical assistance, and education, must be ongoing if they are to be effective, and will require a long-term commitment of funding from the local community. Various methods of long-term, stable funding should be explored, including the establishment of a Shellfish Protection District, fees-for-services, punitive assessments. As with all the programs recommended in this plan, public input should be sought regarding potential funding methods, and decisions made should incorporate the needs and concerns of the taxpaying public.

(ii) Evaluate the various mechanisms and their capabilities and limitations.

(iii) Identify the necessary and planned services and facilities that might be funded.

(iv) Develop a comprehensive proposal for the services, facilities, fees, and authorities to be used.

(v) Generate the necessary public and political support to establish the program.

(j) [Policy No. 10] droplet Reporting.

droplet Clallam County, all implementing agencies

Prepare an annual report describing progress in implementing the Plan. The annual report should include a summary of monitoring and other data, statistical analyses, interpretation, and recommendations for changes.

(k) [Policy No. 11] droplet Monitoring and Evaluation.

droplet Clallam County, all implementing agencies

(i) Evaluate the outcomes of implementation activities against goals and objectives and respond to evaluation results.

(ii) Establish a local surface and ground water quality monitoring program which includes a long-term assessment component.

(iii) Establish a routine monitoring and sampling program to determine groundwater quality and quantity information. Maintain databases and maps of data acquired from various sources, including potable water requirement testing, the County laboratory, and the State drinking water database.

(iv) Provide opportunities for home water testing for well owners, especially for bacteria and nitrates, and incorporate information into databases and maps.

(v) Coordinate water quality and quantity data collection to ensure efficiency and sharing of information.

(vi) Make water quality and water quantity data and analyses from all jurisdictions within the watershed available for compilation into a single volume which is then redistributed to agencies, governments, libraries, and the public.

(vii) Conduct additional information gathering and analysis:

(A) Population studies, on-site sewage disposal system ages, land use changes, build-out scenarios, timber harvest, fire effects, groundwater relationships, marine water sampling, shellfish tissue sampling.

(B) Review development in the watershed to update land use information. Compile and analyze annually the information collected, and include in the annual report.

(C) Summarize information related to on-site sewage disposal systems, including failure rates and trends; areas of concern, and evaluate existing management strategies on an annual basis.

(D) Track all forest conversion applications in the watershed and publish the results in a report at the end of each fiscal year. Use the report to determine the cumulative impacts of conversions, as well as to provide an overview of land use changes over time.

(E) Geology and hydrology of the watershed, including hydraulic continuity and recharge, and identify potential groundwater pollution pathways.

(viii) Develop and conduct an ongoing evaluation process which is incorporated in the annual report. Actions and programs undertaken, progress toward objectives, and costs should be summarized, and recommendations made for responsive changes. Evaluation should include documentation of:

(A) Political will to implement programs;

(B) Adequate funding and cost effectiveness;

(C) Changes in knowledge, attitudes, skill, and behavior of participants in public involvement programs;

(D) Effectiveness of source control programs in preventing, discovering, and remediating sources of nonpoint pollution;

(E) Effectiveness of habitat protection and restoration projects;

(F) Effective use of incentive programs.

(l) [Policy No. 12] droplet Other.

droplet Clallam County, all implementing agencies

(i) Form and maintain neighborhood councils

(ii) Incorporate meaningful and substantive participation by the public in plan revision.

(iii) Hold an annual water quality forum with public involvement.

(iv) Clallam County and the City of Port Angeles should meet annually to review programs related to joint management of water resources.

(m) [Policy No. 13] droplet Time Frames. The following milestones and time frames are envisioned:

droplet Clallam County, all implementing agencies

(i) Year One. Implement actions which can be incorporated into existing programs, policies, and regulations. Conduct high-visibility projects and projects with a good chance of success to stimulate awareness and action. Target areas identified in the watershed plan, such as Big Boy Pond,

Tumwater Creek, and Morse Creek. Establish neighborhood councils. Focus on education, and tie education with incentives to encourage behavior change. Begin monitoring and data collection. Establish frequent interagency contact and coordination. Develop evaluation plan and techniques.

(ii) Year Three. Ongoing programs and long-term projects should be established by the third year. Focus on incentives and long-term implementation needs. Agencies and groups take increased responsibility for projects and activities. Data analysis should begin to show improvements.

(iii) Year Five. By the fifth year, watershed management should be fully institutionalized within County, city, and tribal programs. Actions and results should be documented. Evaluation should be fully underway, with recommendations for adaptation and adjustment made. Where education and incentives have not resulted in objectives being met, increase emphasis on regulation and enforcement when necessary.

(n) [Policy No. 14] droplet Lead Agency.

droplet Clallam County, all implementing agencies

(i) Clallam County shall be lead agency for ensuring implementation of this Plan. The lead implementing agency is responsible for coordination among other implementing entities and for providing regular progress reports on implementation to the agencies and the public. Cooperative agreements may be used to facilitate coordination among implementing entities.

(ii) Numerous agencies and entities have been identified as having responsibility and/or jurisdiction over the implementation of plan actions:

•    

Clallam County Department of Community Development: Planning, Environmental Health, and Building

•    

Clallam County Public Works and Roads Department

•    

Clallam County Parks and Recreation

•    

City of Port Angeles

•    

Clallam Conservation District

•    

Port of Port Angeles

•    

WSU – Cooperative Extension Service

•    

WA Department of Natural Resources

•    

WA Department of Fish and Wildlife

•    

WA Department of Transportation

•    

WA Department of Ecology

•    

U.S. Department of Interior – National Park Service

•    

USDA – Natural Resources Conservation Service

•    

Elwha S’Klallam Tribe

•    

Clallam County Board of County Commissioners

•    

Clallam County Planning Commission

•    

Clallam County Shorelines and Sensitive Areas Committee

•    

PUD #1 of Clallam County

•    

Port Angeles School District

•    

Port Angeles Chamber of Commerce

•    

North Olympic Land Trust

•    

Clallam County Economic Development Council

•    

North Olympic Library System

•    

Peninsula College

•    

Western Washington University

•    

Water Associates

•    

North Olympic Peninsula Visitor and Convention Bureau.


1

Appendix B (Environmental Impact Statement) and Appendix C (Concurrence Letters – 20 Letters) are on file in the Department of Community Development.