Chapter 19.34
PARKING, LOADING AND ACCESS REQUIREMENTS

Sections:

19.34.010    Purpose and applicability.

19.34.020    Required off-street parking spaces.

19.34.025    Multifamily off-street parking requirements and reductions.

19.34.030    Bicycle access and parking.

19.34.040    Off-street parking requirements, general provisions.

19.34.050    Exceptions to off-street parking space requirements.

19.34.060    Reductions to off-street parking space requirements.

19.34.070    Shared parking.

19.34.080    Transportation demand management.

19.34.090    Nonconforming parking.

19.34.100    Location of off-street parking.

19.34.105    Vehicle storage in residential zones.

19.34.110    Vehicular access to off-street parking—Alleys and driveways.

19.34.120    Parking area design and construction.

19.34.130    Drive-through facilities.

19.34.140    Pedestrian access.

19.34.150    Off-street loading requirements.

19.34.200    Modification of required off-street parking spaces, location and driveway width standards.

19.34.010 Purpose and applicability.

This chapter establishes the standards for the amount, location and development of off-street vehicle parking, standards for bicycle parking, standards for on-site loading areas and standards for access to parking from city streets and/or alleys.

A.    Purpose. The purpose of this chapter is to ensure parking and loading facilities contribute to a quality and healthy urban environment, to reduce the number of vehicle miles traveled, to reduce hazards to public safety, and to reduce impacts to on-street parking.

B.    Where Off-Street Parking Requirements Apply. The standards of this chapter apply to all development within the city of Everett, including any off-street parking required by the city or put in for the convenience of property owners or users.

C.    City of Everett Design and Construction Standards and Specifications for Development. The City of Everett Design and Construction Standards and Specifications for Development, hereinafter referred to as “city design standards,” contain detailed standards for parking lot design, surfacing, and driveways. These standards are administered by the public works director, who has authority to develop, disseminate, revise and update design and construction standards and specifications for all work performed pursuant to construction-related permits issued by the city of Everett. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.020 Required off-street parking spaces.

The minimum number of required off-street vehicle parking spaces shall be determined in accordance with Table 34-1, unless otherwise set forth in this chapter.

Table 34-1: Off-Street Parking
Spaces Required 

Land Use

Minimum Parking Spaces Required*

RESIDENTIAL

Spaces per dwelling unit unless otherwise indicated

Accessory dwelling unit

1, plus required space(s) for principal dwelling

Bed and breakfast inns

1 per guest room, plus required space(s) for dwelling

Boarding or rooming house, dormitories

1 per 3 bedrooms

Congregate care facility, including convalescent or nursing home, where people are assisted with daily activities

1 for each 4 beds

Day care, family home

2 per dwelling unit, plus 1 for each staff person on shift not living on premises

Dwelling, micro-housing

1 per 2 dwelling units

Dwelling, multifamily and duplex

See multifamily (Section 34.025)

Dwelling, single-family attached or detached

2 per dwelling unit; 4 per dwelling when access is from a private easement

Group housing, including group homes, supportive housing, temporary housing (temporary shelter home)

1 per 4 bedrooms, plus 1 per every 2 employees on shift
(2 spaces minimum)

Live/work unit

1 per unit, plus 1 additional space for any unit with 1,500+ square feet of gross floor area

Manufactured home parks

2 per dwelling unit

Senior housing, including independent living units in congregate care facility, convalescent or nursing homes

0.75 per dwelling unit

Short-term rentals

2 per unit for single-family (attached or detached)
Multiple-family units: per Section 34.025

COMMERCIAL USES

Spaces per square feet of gross floor area of building unless otherwise indicated

Auto, small truck, boat, motorcycle, RV maintenance

1 per 750 square feet

Commercial storage
(e.g., ministorage, self-storage)

1 per 6,000 square feet (not including office)

- loading lanes may be included as required parking spaces if not left unattended

Day care center, commercial

Whichever is greater:
1 for each 10 children or
2 for each 3 employees on shift; in addition,
1 vehicle loading space for each 20 children

Entertainment
(e.g., theaters, clubs, and other completely enclosed amusement uses)

1 per 5 seats or 1 per 400 square feet, whichever is greater

Food or beverage establishment

1 per 200 square feet

Health club or athletic facility

1 per 300 square feet

Hotels/motels

1 per guest room

Medical office and clinics, including:
- medical and dental offices, clinics, alternative health care

1 per 300 square feet

Office use, including:
- general office; laboratories; financial institutions

1 per 400 square feet

Outdoor recreation, commercial

As determined by planning director and city engineer based on parking analysis

Retail trade and services, bulky merchandise (appliance, furniture)

1 per 1,000 square feet

Retail trade and services, general trade

1 per 400 square feet

Retail trade and services, outdoor including:
- auto, boat or trailer sales, retail nurseries, lumberyards, and similar bulk retail uses

1 per 1,000 square feet

PUBLIC AND INSTITUTIONAL USES

Clubs, lodges, similar uses

1 per 3 persons allowed by building and/or fire codes in the main assembly room or auditorium, plus any parking necessary for eating, drinking establishment on premises

Community and regional parks and recreational facilities

As determined by planning director and city engineer based on parking analysis

Government
- limited point of service (e.g., public works yards, fire station, vehicle storage, etc.)

As determined by planning director and city engineer based on parking analysis

Government
- administrative and service

As determined by planning director and city engineer based on parking analysis

Hospitals

As determined by planning director and city engineer based on parking analysis

Neighborhood parks and recreational facilities

As determined by planning director and city engineer based on parking analysis

Places of worship or religious facility

1 per 5 seats in the main worship area

Schools (public and private)
- elementary and middle, high schools, and institutions of higher education

As determined by planning director and city engineer based on parking and traffic analysis

INDUSTRIAL

Heavy industrial, manufacturing, or assembly

1 per 1,000 square feet, plus parking for office as required

Light industrial, manufacturing, or assembly

1 per 750 square feet, plus parking for office as required

Warehousing and distribution

1 per 2,000 square feet, plus parking for office as required

* See exceptions and reductions in Section 34.050 or 34.060.

(Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.025 Multifamily off-street parking requirements and reductions.

A.    Multifamily Off-Street Parking Requirements. The following off-street parking requirements apply to multifamily residential development. See Map 34-1 for Metro Everett parking area designations.

Table 34-2: Multifamily Off-Street Parking Requirements

Off-street Parking by Unit (Bedroom) Size:

Metro Everett Parking Areas
(See Map 34-1)

Spaces per Dwelling Unit

Outside Metro Everett Spaces per Dwelling Unit

Area A

Area B

Studio

0.85

1.00

1.00

1-bedroom

1.00

1.00

1.00

2-bedroom

1.20

1.40

1.50

3- or more bedrooms

1.60

1.90

2.00

B.    Multifamily Off-Street Parking Reduction Options. Multifamily residential development may reduce required off-street parking based on one of three options shown below. These options cannot be used in combination; only one option can be used. A transportation demand management (TDM) plan (Section 19.34.080) is required for use of any option.

Table 34-3: Multifamily Parking Reduction, Option A (Resident Characteristics)

Resident Characteristic:

Additional Reduction Factor

Extremely low-income (30% AMI or below)

0.50

Low-income (60% AMI* or below)

0.65

* AMI means “area median income” for Snohomish County. Use of this option requires the developer to record a covenant that prohibits use of the property for any purpose other than what was approved unless additional parking is provided.

Table 34-4: Multifamily Parking Reduction, Option B (Transportation Characteristics)

Transportation Alternatives:

Additional Reduction Factor

On frequent transit route* (3 trips per hour**)

0.75

Transportation demand management plan approved by city

0.90

* “On transit route” means the building entrance is within one-quarter mile walking distance of a transit stop, except senior housing which must be within five hundred feet walking distance of a transit stop, with the level of frequency noted.

** Frequency of service per hour is calculated between six a.m. and seven p.m. during the work week (Monday through Friday) and is based on scheduled service, not actual performance. Trip counts are one direction.

Table 34-5: Multifamily Parking Reduction, Option C (Development Characteristics)

Transportation Alternatives:

Additional Reduction Factor

Shared parking in a mixed-use building where at least 50% of the gross floor area is nonresidential

0.50*

* This option may only be used where the nonresidential development provides off-street parking consistent with Table 34-1.

How to calculate multifamily off-street parking reductions:

 

Example 1:

A 20-unit apartment, all with 1 bedroom, in Metro Everett would require 20 parking spaces. If these spaces are restricted to very low-income residents, then only 10 parking spaces would be required if Option A were chosen.

20 units @ 1 space per unit x 0.50 reduction factor = 10 spaces

 

Example 2:

The same 20-unit apartment is proposed, but without any income restrictions. However, the apartment is located on a Swift route with frequent transit service. In this scenario, 15 parking spaces would be required.

 

20 units @ 1 space per unit x 0.75 reduction factor = 15 spaces

(Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.030 Bicycle access and parking.

A.    When Bicycle Parking Is Required.

1.    Nonresidential Developments. Bicycle parking shall be provided in any development required to provide six or more off-street parking spaces. Determining if bicycle parking will be required based on off-street parking requirements shall be calculated prior to consideration of the exceptions or reductions to off-street parking allowed in Section 19.34.050 or 19.34.060.

2.    Multifamily Developments. Bicycle parking shall be provided in any multifamily development with four dwelling units or more.

B.    Number of Bicycle Parking Spaces Required.

1.    Nonresidential Developments. At least one bicycle parking space shall be provided for every twelve off-street parking spaces, up to a maximum of twenty bicycle spaces.

How to calculate bicycle parking requirements:

 

A 40,000-square-foot office building in downtown would not be required to provide off-street parking. However, prior to the exception for off-street parking in Parking Area A of Metro Everett (see Map 34-1), the development would have required 100 off-street parking spaces. This project would require eight bicycle parking spaces.

 

40,000 square feet / 400 sq. ft. per parking space = 100 off-street parking spaces
100 off-street parking spaces / 12 = 8.33 bicycle parking spaces (round down to 8)

2.    Multifamily Developments. Four covered bicycle parking spaces shall be provided for every ten multifamily units, with the exception of senior housing, which shall be provided at the rate of one space for every four units. If individual garages are provided, the number of units requiring bicycle parking may be reduced correspondingly.

Figure 1: Bicycle Parking Example (Source: Bend, OR Code)

C.    Bicycle Parking Space Location and Design.

1.    Nonresidential Development. Bicycle facilities for nonresidential development shall include both short-term and long-term facilities.

a.    Short-term facilities are intended for patrons parked less than four hours. Weather protection is not required for short-term facilities.

b.    Long-term facilities are intended for employees and occupants of the nonresidential building. At least fifty percent of the required bicycle spaces shall be long-term facilities. These facilities shall be weather protected and conveniently located for the bicyclist in common areas. It is not necessary for all on-site bicycle spaces to be grouped in one central location.

2.    Residential Development. Bicycle facilities for residential development shall be weather protected and conveniently located for the bicyclist in common areas. It is not necessary for all on-site bicycle spaces to be grouped in one central location.

3.    All bicycle parking shall be located in locations that do not impede pedestrian or vehicle traffic flow, and shall be well lit for nighttime use.

4.    All bicycle parking facilities shall be designed to allow a bicycle frame to be locked to a structure (e.g., bike rack) which is securely anchored to the ground, or within a lockable storage area.

5.    The planning director or city engineer may promulgate rules for the design and location of bicycle facilities required for development. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.040 Off-street parking requirements, general provisions.

A.    Off-Street Parking Calculations Where Uses Not Specified. If the proposed use is not shown in Table 34-1, the planning director, in consultation with the city engineer, may use one of the following options to determine requirements for off-street parking:

1.    Where a use is similar in nature and off-street parking demand to the proposed use, the minimum parking spaces for that similar use may be used.

2.    Where there is not any use that is similar in nature, the following minimum off-street parking requirements will be used:

a.    Nonresidential uses: one parking space per five hundred square feet of gross floor area.

b.    Residential uses: one parking space per one thousand square feet of gross floor area.

B.    Off-Street Parking Calculations on Sites with Combination of Uses. The requirement for different uses on the same site, or a combination of uses within one building or tenant space, shall be the sum of all requirements for the individual uses reduced by any applicable joint or shared parking provisions. See Section 34.060.B for reductions for mixed-use projects.

C.    What Can Be Considered as Off-Street Parking. Off-street parking spaces may include spaces in garages, carports, parking lots, and/or driveways if vehicles are not parked in a vehicle travel lane or a required front setback; provided, that for single-family detached dwellings, duplexes and accessory dwelling units (ADUs), off-street parking is allowed in the front setback on a driveway that meets the standards of this title. Off-street parking for electric vehicles may be included in parking required by this chapter. Refer to the International Building Code for requirements on electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

D.    Off-Street Parking Must Be Maintained. Off-street parking spaces must be retained in the amount required at the time of development approval, except that existing off-street parking, which exceeds current requirements, may be removed if the quantity of parking is not reduced below the current requirements for use on the site, or through shared parking agreements, if any.

E.    How Fractions Are Addressed. If the formula for determining the number of off-street parking spaces results in a fraction, the number of off-street parking spaces shall be rounded to the nearest whole number with fractions of 0.50 or greater rounding up and fractions below 0.50 rounding down. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.050 Exceptions to off-street parking space requirements.

A.    Nonresidential Parking in Metro Everett. To reduce reliance on single-occupant vehicles in Metro Everett, two off-street parking areas are set forth in Map 34-1. Nonresidential development within these areas have reduced off-street requirements as follows (see Section 19.34.025 for multifamily parking reductions):

1.    Parking Area A.

a.    Nonresidential uses are not required to provide off-street parking, with the exception of government offices, which shall either meet the requirement for off-street parking for government, or provide a parking management study and plan for approval of the planning director and city engineer.

b.    Any development not required to provide off-street parking may be required to install bicycle facilities as set forth in Section 19.34.030.

c.    Any nonresidential development with five thousand square feet of gross floor area or more, and which does not provide off-street parking based on the standards in Table 34-1, will be required to submit a transportation demand management plan for approval of the city engineer as set forth in Section 19.34.080.

2.    Parking Area B. At the discretion of the city engineer, required off-street parking for nonresidential uses may be reduced up to twenty-five percent from the requirements set forth in Table 34-1. The reduction may be granted upon approval of a transportation demand management plan (see Section 19.34.080), together with a finding that the off-street parking reduction will not cause a significant adverse impact on adjoining neighbors, residents or business.

B.    Historic Buildings and Sites. Structures and sites that are individually listed on the Everett register of historic places shall be exempt from all parking quantity requirements.

C.    Accessory Dwelling Units. The requirement for one off-street parking space for an accessory dwelling unit (ADU) may be waived by the planning director, when all of the following circumstances apply:

1.    The property is not located in a residential parking permit zone (Chapter 46.30); and

2.    The property has frontage on a public street; and

3.    There are at least two on-street parking spaces in front of the subject property; and

4.    There is a public transit stop located within one-quarter mile walking distance of the property with a safe walking path to the transit stop.

D.    Metro Everett Off-Street Parking Areas (Map).

Map 34-1: Metro Everett Off-Street Parking Areas

(Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.060 Reductions to off-street parking space requirements.

A.    Parking Study as Alternative to Reduce Parking. The planning director, in consultation with the city engineer, may approve a modification to the off-street parking set forth in Table 34-1 or 34-2. A modification greater than twenty-five percent requires a Review Process II described in EMC Title 15, Local Project Review Procedures. Any reduction in off-street parking could impact future development if a change in use requires additional off-street parking.

1.    A parking study for the proposed use(s) must be prepared by a professional with expertise in preparing traffic and parking analysis.

2.    The parking study must demonstrate to the satisfaction of the planning director that a lesser standard is adequate.

3.    A transportation demand management (TDM) plan (see Section 19.34.080) may be required as a condition of any approved modification.

B.    Reduction of Off-Street Parking for Transportation Alternatives and Mixed-Use Projects. Off-street parking may be reduced for the following transportation alternatives and mixed-use projects. A parking study is not required for use of these alternatives.

1.    Car Share Stalls. Car sharing is where cars are made available for rent to other individuals, thus encouraging less car ownership and reducing parking demand. A substitution in off-street parking spaces for required off-street parking is allowed as follows:

a.    For every one car sharing space that is provided, the off-street parking requirement is reduced by four spaces.

b.    The car sharing parking spaces must be shown on development plans.

c.    A copy of the car sharing agreement between the property owner and the car share company must be submitted with development permits.

d.    This reduction may not be used in addition to other exceptions or reductions in parking requirements otherwise provided in this chapter.

e.    This credit is limited to a maximum of ten percent of the required off-street parking spaces.

2.    Motorcycle Parking.

a.    For every four motorcycle/scooter parking spaces provided, the off-street parking requirement is reduced by one space.

b.    This credit is limited to a maximum of five off-street parking spaces, or five percent of the standard off-street parking requirement for the development, whichever is less.

3.    Bicycle Parking.

a.    For every five nonrequired bicycle parking spaces provided, the off-street parking requirement is reduced by one space.

b.    For every development which provides shower facilities and clothing storage areas for bicycle commuters, the off-street parking requirement is reduced by four spaces. The facilities shall be for the use of the employees and occupants of the building, and shall be located where they are easily accessible to bicycle parking facilities.

c.    Each bicycle parking space must meet the location and design requirements of Section 19.34.030.

d.    This credit is limited to a maximum of five off-street parking spaces, or five percent of the standard off-street parking requirement for the development, whichever is more.

4.    Mixed-Use Projects. Mixed-use buildings or developments, including developments such as a mini-mall, may have complementary parking utilization patterns, in which case sharing of the off-street parking can allow for a reduced number of stalls in a development.

a.    Projects with Residential Units. For mixed-use buildings with residential units where fifty percent or more of the gross floor area is dedicated to nonresidential uses, it is reasonable to expect that there would be a substantial amount of parking left vacant during the hours when parking is needed by residents. The residential off-street parking requirement may be reduced by up to fifty percent with an approved transportation demand management (TDM) plan.

b.    Mixed-Use Projects, General. If more than one type of land use (see Table 34-1) occupies a single structure or parcel of land, the total requirements for off-street parking may be reduced by five percent of the sum of the requirements for all uses.

c.    Mixed Use Projects, Specific. See Section 19.34.070 for reduced off-street parking for specific shared parking options. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.070 Shared parking.

A.    Purpose and Intent. Shared parking between more than one type of use can reduce the amount of off-street parking by enabling more efficient time utilization of parking resources. Through leveraging complementary peak time demands of different uses, or by leveraging single-trip, multiple-stop demands between multitenant sites or nearby properties, shared parking allows a reduction of physical off-street parking spaces without a reduction in effective supply.

B.    When Shared Parking Is Allowed. The planning director, in consultation with the city engineer, may allow shared parking for two or more uses, either within the same site or on different sites.

C.    How Shared Parking Is Approved. An application for shared parking shall be submitted to the city. Applications for shared parking shall include supporting data and analysis which demonstrate compliance with subsections D and E of this section:

D.    Reducing Off-Street Parking with Shared Parking.

1.    Residential. Pursuant to Section 34.060.B.4, for mixed-use buildings with residential units where fifty percent or more of the gross floor area is dedicated to nonresidential uses, it is reasonable to expect that there would be a substantial amount of parking left vacant during the hours when parking is needed by residents. The residential off-street parking requirement may be reduced by up to fifty percent with an approved transportation demand management (TDM) plan.

2.    Nighttime Uses. Up to fifty percent of the off-street parking required by this chapter for primarily nighttime uses such as theaters, bowling alleys, bars and restaurants may be supplied by parking serving primarily daytime uses such as banks, offices, retail stores, personal service shops and manufacturing and wholesale uses.

3.    Daytime Uses. Up to fifty percent of the off-street parking required by this chapter for primarily daytime uses may be supplied by parking serving primarily nighttime uses.

4.    Churches and Schools. Up to one hundred percent of the off-street parking required by this chapter for a church or an auditorium incidental to a public or parochial school may be supplied by parking serving primarily nighttime uses.

5.    Other. A development may propose other shared parking proposals for approval of the city engineer.

E.    Requirements for Shared Off-Street Parking.

1.    No Conflict. No substantial conflict between the operating hours of the uses for which joint use of parking is proposed is allowed.

2.    Assigned Stalls. Parking stalls that have been assigned to individual tenants or occupants shall not be eligible for shared parking.

3.    Distance.

a.    Off-street parking facilities shall be located within five hundred feet of the use which they are to serve, measured along the access route with a safe walking path.

b.    Off-street parking facilities for nonresidential uses within Metro Everett shall be located within one thousand feet, measured along the access route with a safe walking path.

Figure 2: Shared Parking and Safe Walking Path

4.    Joint Use Agreement. The right of joint use of shared off-street parking must be demonstrated through a binding agreement that is tied to the land or similar written instrument establishing the joint use. The binding agreement may restrict future changes to use of the property. All agreements are subject to review and approval of the city in order to have off-street parking reduced pursuant to this section. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.080 Transportation demand management.

A.    When a Transportation Demand Management Plan (TDM) Is Required.

1.    A TDM plan must be prepared for the following development projects:

a.    A TDM plan is required for new construction of a principal building in excess of fifty thousand square feet of gross floor area.

b.    A TDM plan is required for substantial renovation of a principal building with a gross floor area of at least fifty thousand square feet and involving a change of use.

c.    A TDM plan is required for any development with an exception or reduction of parking allowed pursuant to Section 19.34.050 or 19.34.060.

d.    A TDM is not required for single-, duplex- or triplex-dwelling units.

2.    A TDM plan must be reviewed and approved, approved with modifications, or disapproved by the city engineer or designee. A preliminary TDM plan shall be submitted before a building permit is approved. TDM plans may be written in two steps:

a.    Preliminary TDM Plan. When a TDM plan is required, a preliminary plan must be submitted along with the development application. The TDM plan should include the requirements outlined in subsections B, C and D of this section. If a preliminary TDM plan is submitted and approved by the city engineer or designee, then a final TDM plan is not required until a certificate of occupancy is requested.

b.    Final TDM Plan. A final TDM plan meeting the requirements outlined in subsections B, C and D of this section is required before a certificate of occupancy may be granted. The TDM plan must be approved by the city engineer or designee.

3.    A building permit or land use approval shall not be granted until a final TDM plan meeting the requirements outlined in sections B, C and D of this section is approved by the city engineer or designee, and a covenant approved by the planning director requiring compliance with the approved TDM plan is recorded by the applicant. The covenant shall include enforcement mechanism(s), which may include, but is not limited to, enforcement pursuant to Chapter 1.20, injunctive relief, monetary penalties, and loss of units available for rental.

B.    What Is Required in a TDM Plan.

1.    A TDM plan must be consistent with a TDM guide established by the city engineer.

2.    A TDM plan must be prepared by a qualified professional with demonstrated experience in transportation planning, traffic engineering, or comparable field, unless otherwise allowed by the city engineer.

3.    A TDM plan must determine:

a.    The anticipated travel demand for the project.

b.    How the anticipated travel demand for the project will be met on site or off site, including:

(1)    Number of on-street vehicle parking spaces, off-street vehicle parking spaces, or shared vehicle parking arrangements.

(2)    Number of short-term and long-term bicycle parking spaces.

(3)    Accommodations for pedestrians, cyclists, motorists, transit riders, and the mobility-impaired.

c.    The strategies that will be employed to reduce single-occupancy vehicle trips, reduce vehicle miles travelled by site users, and promote transportation alternatives such as walking, cycling, ridesharing, and transit.

d.    The modal share objectives that will be sought from the implementation of TDM strategies.

4.    A TDM plan must include ways to ensure ongoing compliance and enforcement of approved TDM strategies.

5.    Fees as required to review and approve the TDM plan, and annual fees to monitor the implementation of the TDM plan, as required by the city.

C.    TDM Strategies. TDM strategies may include, but are not limited to, the following:

1.    Walking, cycling, ridesharing, and transit promotion and education.

2.    Parking cash-out programs or unbundled parking/market rate pricing.

3.    Shared parking arrangements.

4.    Enhanced bicycle parking and services (above the minimum required).

5.    Support for car share and bike share services and facilities.

6.    Carpooling or vanpooling programs or benefits.

7.    Free or subsidized transit passes, transit-to-work shuttles, or enhanced transit facilities (such as bus shelters).

8.    Guaranteed ride home (GRH) programs.

9.    Provision for alternative work schedules (i.e., flextime, compressed work week, staggered shifts, telecommuting).

10.    Promotion of “live near your work” programs.

11.    Roadway improvements adjacent to the site that will help encourage transportation alternatives.

12.    Designation of an on-site employee and/or resident transportation coordinator.

13.    Membership in a transportation management association (TMA).

D.    TDM Performance Standards. In making its decision, the city engineer must make written findings of fact on the following matters:

1.    The project includes performance objectives to minimize single-occupancy vehicle trips and maximize the utilization of transportation alternatives to the extent practicable, taking into account the opportunities and constraints of the site and the nature of the development.

2.    The project must meet the anticipated transportation demand without placing an unreasonable burden on public infrastructure, such as transit and on-street parking facilities, and the surrounding neighborhood.

3.    The TDM plan includes ways to ensure ongoing compliance to reduce transportation impacts. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.090 Nonconforming parking.

If a use which was lawfully established has less parking than required by the zoning code, it need not provide additional parking except under the following circumstances:

A.    Expansion of Building. Any increase in the floor area of a building shall provide additional parking for the added floor area in accordance with the current parking requirements for such use, unless otherwise provided an exception under Section 19.34.050 or reduction under Section 19.34.060.

B.    Change of Use.

1.    In Metro Everett, no additional parking shall be required for changes in use for buildings in existence prior to January 1, 2007.

2.    Outside of Metro Everett, no additional parking shall be required for changes in use for buildings in existence prior to December 2, 1956.

3.    Except as otherwise allowed above, any change in use which requires more parking than the previous use shall provide parking in accordance with the current parking requirements for the changed use minus the number of parking spaces by which the previous use was deficient, unless otherwise provided an exception under Section 19.34.050 or reduction under Section 19.34.060.

C.    Surfacing Materials. Where building or parking lot expansion is proposed, existing parking that does not meet current city requirements for surfacing shall be paved in accordance with city design standards if the value of the proposed expansion exceeds fifty percent of the value of existing buildings. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.100 Location of off-street parking.

A.    Parking Location—General Requirements for Residential Uses.

1.    Required off-street parking for residential uses shall be provided on the same lot as the dwelling it is required to serve.

2.    Parking may only be located on a paved surface that meets the city’s design standards, or as allowed under this section.

3.    Parking may not be located within required setbacks, with the following exceptions:

a.    Single-Family or Duplex. Parking may be located within the front or street side setbacks on a driveway that meets city design standards or within the rear or interior side setbacks. This exception does not apply to:

(1)    Easement access lots;

(2)    Historic overlay zones, if applicable; or

(3)    The front setback for alley access lots.

b.    Multiple-Family. Parking may be located within the rear setback when access is from an alley. Parking which is located below grade may be located within any required setback if situated completely below grade, and the required landscaping can be provided on top of the below grade parking structure.

4.    Multiple-Family Standards. Off-street parking areas shall not be located closer to the public street than the building located closest to the street.

5.    Historic Overlay. Off-street parking in an historic overlay zone shall not be located closer to the public street than the building located closest to the street unless approved by the planning director due to street topography which precludes other placement.

6.    Modification of Standards. Parking location standards may be modified with Review Process II described in EMC Title 15, Local Project Review Procedures.

B.    Parking Location—General Requirements for Nonresidential Uses.

1.    Parking shall not be located within a required building setback or open space.

2.    For nonresidential uses, required off-street parking shall be located on property within five hundred feet of the building or use which it is required to serve. This distance shall be measured along the access route. The property upon which the off-street parking is provided shall be located in the same zone as, or a zone which allows, the use for which the parking is required.

3.    Separation of Surface Parking Lots from Public Right-of-Way.

a.    Surface parking lots shall not be located between buildings and Broadway or Evergreen Way.

b.    For all other streets, surface parking lots shall be set back either ten feet from the public sidewalk, or five feet from the property line, whichever is greater. The intent of this requirement is to provide a minimum ten-foot landscape separation between surface parking lots and public streets in accordance with Chapter 19.35.

c.    There shall be no setback required from a public alley.

4.    Surface parking lots shall be set back from interior lot lines consistent to meet the landscaping and screening requirements of Chapter 19.35.

5.    Parking may only be located on a paved surface that meets the city’s design standards, or as allowed under this section.

6.    Marijuana retailers shall comply with the parking location requirements set forth in Section 19.39.145.

7.    Modification of Standards. Parking location standards may be modified with Review Process II described in EMC Title 15, Local Project Review Procedures.

C.    Parking Location Requirements, Metro Everett.

1.    Separation of Surface Parking from Public Right-of-Way. All surface parking lots within Metro Everett shall have a minimum front setback of forty feet. For corner lots, the minimum setback from a street side lot line shall be five feet. Exception: within the ULI—urban light industrial zone, the minimum front setback for surface parking shall be fifteen feet. Where surface parking is provided, it shall be separated from any public sidewalk by a minimum of five feet to allow screening/landscaping in accordance with Chapter 19.35.

2.    There shall be no setbacks required for rear and side interior lot lines.

3.    Nonresidential Uses. Parking for nonresidential uses in Metro Everett shall be located within one thousand feet of the use for which it is required, measured along the access route.

4.    Modification of Standards. Parking location standards may be modified with Review Process II described in EMC Title 15, Local Project Review Procedures.

D.    Parking Location—Alley Requirements for Multifamily and Nonresidential. Structured parking garages accessed from the rear with no internal turnaround shall be set back at least twenty-five feet from the far side of the alley, except as otherwise approved by city engineer. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.105 Vehicle storage in residential zones.

A.    The following vehicle types may be stored on a residential lot upon which a principal dwelling is located: recreational vehicles, campers, travel trailers, boats, motorcycles, and other types of similar recreational vehicles. If such vehicles are located within the front or street-side setback of the principal building and/or accessory building, they must be stored on an approved driveway (see Section 34.110.C). In addition, any vehicle stored on a residential lot shall be owned by the owner of the property or resident of the dwelling.

B.    Vehicles over sixteen thousand pounds gross vehicle weight which are not specifically mentioned in subsection A of this section shall not be parked or stored on residentially zoned lots. In respect to any motor vehicle designed, used or maintained primarily for the transportation of property which is not equipped with a plate or marker showing the manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating, the weight of a vehicle shall be determined as follows:

1.    Any motor vehicle having less than six wheels is the equivalent of a vehicle having a manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating of less than sixteen thousand pounds.

2.    Any motor vehicle having six wheels or more is the equivalent of a vehicle having a manufacturer’s gross vehicle weight rating of sixteen thousand pounds or more. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.110 Vehicular access to off-street parking—Alleys and driveways.

A.    Alleys. Access to off-street parking areas shall be provided from the alley where available. The intent of this requirement is to:

1.    Enhance the safety of parking areas;

2.    Minimize potential conflicts between vehicles and pedestrians;

3.    Efficiently manage traffic in off-street parking areas;

4.    Reduce visual impacts on surrounding properties and improve streetscape appearance.

B.    Alley Access Exception. Access from the public street where the lot abuts an alley will only be allowed as an exception to the alley access requirement. The city engineer, in consultation with the planning director, may allow access from the street in lieu of, or in addition to, using the alley in the following circumstances:

1.    The topography of the site and/or adjacent alley makes use of the alley infeasible; or

2.    The requirement for access from the alley would create a traffic or pedestrian safety hazard, such as sight distance problems or conflicts with other ingress/egress locations; or

3.    There is an existing improvement that prevents use of the alley for vehicular access; or

4.    For nonresidential or mixed uses, driveway access from the street is necessary to provide access for commercial customer traffic; this exception may not be used to justify a street access point that primarily provides access to employee or resident parking areas; or

5.    Providing access from the street will reduce or minimize adverse impacts on adjacent properties; or

6.    Street access for multiple levels of off-street parking within a structure when access from an alley to all parking levels is not feasible.

C.    Driveways. The design of all driveways and internal vehicle circulation shall be in accordance with Title 13 and the city design standards. Maximum driveway width within the public right-of-way shall be as provided in Chapter 13.16. For residential zones, the following additional requirements shall apply to the portion of the driveway located outside the right-of-way:

1.    For non-alley access lots, the maximum driveway width within the front setback shall not exceed thirty feet, or fifty percent of the lot frontage width, whichever is less. However, a minimum driveway width of ten feet will be allowed in all cases.

2.    Sidewalk Design/Driveways. Where new driveways and/or sidewalks are installed within the public right-of-way, the sidewalk pattern shall carry across the driveway. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.120 Parking area design and construction.

A.    Parking Design Specifications. The minimum requirements for parking stall and aisle dimensions, striping, pavement thickness and subgrade shall be as set forth in the city design standards.

B.    Surfacing.

1.    All parking areas shall consist of durable surface materials approved by the planning director and city engineer. Depending upon site and soil conditions, low impact development (LID) storm water management facilities are encouraged, and may be required by the city’s storm water management manual.

2.    Exception. For single-family and duplex uses, nonrequired parking that is located outside of the front and street side setbacks areas may use surface materials in accordance with city design standards.

C.    Landscaping and Screening. Landscaping and screening for parking lots shall be in accordance with the standards of Chapter 19.35. Parking of trucks or fleet vehicles is considered off-street parking for the purposes of calculating the parking lot interior landscaping required by Chapter 19.35.

D.    Tandem Parking. Tandem parking for parking spaces serving the same dwelling unit may be used if the parking is located within the rear setback area and gains access from an abutting alley, or when one of the parking spaces is located within a private garage, and the other is located in the driveway providing access to the parking space within the private garage. Except for developments in which tandem spaces are located within the rear setback area and gain access from an abutting alley, not more than fifty percent of parking spaces within a multiple-family development may be placed within a tandem configuration.

E.    Accessible Parking. Accessible parking stalls shall meet the requirements of Washington State Regulations for Barrier Free Facilities (Chapter 51-50 WAC).

F.    Parking Area Illumination. All surface parking areas for multiple-family and nonresidential uses shall provide illumination to improve site security and minimize light spill and glare impacts on adjacent properties. Parking area illumination shall meet the following standards:

1.    Parking area lighting fixtures shall be full cut-off (zero percent candlepower at ninety degrees horizontal and ten percent maximum candlepower at eighty degrees from vertical), dark sky rated, and mounted no more than thirty feet above the ground, with lower fixtures preferable so as to maintain a human scale.

2.    All fixtures over fifteen feet in height shall be fitted with a full cut-off luminaire.

3.    Figure 3. Acceptable and unacceptable parking area lighting.

Figure 3: Parking Area Illumination

4.    Except within industrial zones, pedestrian-scaled lighting (light fixtures no taller than fifteen feet) is encouraged in areas of pedestrian activity.

5.    Lighting must not trespass onto adjacent private parcels. All building-mounted lights shall be directed onto the building itself and/or the ground immediately adjacent to it. The light emissions shall not be visible above the roof line of the building. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.130 Drive-through facilities.

A.    Standards for Service Windows, Order Placing Stations and Holding Lanes. All businesses with drive-up service windows shall meet the following standards:

1.    Drive-through facilities, where permitted, including vehicle holding lanes, shall not be located closer to the public street than the building located closest to the street. (See Figure 4.)

2.    Holding lanes shall be designed and located so as to not obstruct off-street parking areas, loading areas or pedestrian movement on the lot or adjoining lots.

3.    Drive-up order stations and holding areas shall not be located within a required setback or landscape area.

4.    Drive-up service windows shall not be located less than fifty feet from lots located in residential zones.

5.    Drive-up order placing stations shall be located not less than one hundred feet from lots located in residential zones.

6.    For restaurants, there shall be one outdoor waste receptacle provided for each eight parking spaces.

Figure 4: Drive-up Facilities

B.    Vehicle Holding and Stacking. Vehicle holding and stacking for all drive-up service lanes shall be provided in accordance with the city design standards. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.140 Pedestrian access.

Design of pedestrian facilities through parking areas shall be in accordance with the city design standards. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.150 Off-street loading requirements.

A.    Nonresidential Truck Loading and Unloading Berths. Every nonresidential building hereafter constructed or altered that is engaged in retail, manufacturing, wholesale or storage activities, excluding self-service storage facilities, which requires delivery of merchandise or materials by trucks shall provide truck loading and unloading berths according to city design standards, except in Metro Everett. All loading areas shall be separated from required parking areas and shall be designated for truck loading space.

B.    Hotel, Office, Restaurant, or Assembly Truck Loading and Unloading Berths. Every hotel, office building, restaurant, assembly structure or similar use shall provide truck loading and unloading berths according to the following standards, except in Metro Everett or when such use is being reviewed using a review process which involves either the hearing examiner or city council as set forth in Title 15, Local Project Review Procedures.

C.    Truck Loading and Unloading for Other Uses. The city engineer is authorized to require loading space as necessary to provide for the safe and efficient delivery of merchandise or materials to the following uses:

1.    Uses with a smaller floor area than the minimum listed in the city design standards;

2.    Uses in Metro Everett; or

3.    Uses being reviewed using the hearing examiner review process as set forth in Title 15, Local Project Review Procedures.

The city engineer shall have the authority to require measures or improvements that will ensure that the specific uses within the building are protected from unsafe conditions resulting from truck loading and unloading and required off-street parking areas and public right-of-way.

D.    Modification of Off-Street Loading Requirements. The requirements of subsections A and B of this section may be modified by the city engineer. In order to grant a modification to the requirement of subsections A or B of this section, the city engineer shall require the applicant to provide sufficient information to demonstrate that the method of providing loading/unloading for a particular use, building or site will be sufficient to assure that required off-street parking areas, public right-of-way and surrounding properties are protected from unsafe conditions resulting from truck loading and/or unloading. The city engineer is not authorized to allow the loading and/or unloading of trucks to occur on public streets except on a nonrecurring basis as approved through the temporary street use permit process. The use of alley right-of-way for the loading and/or unloading of trucks is allowed without permit.

E.    Truck Loading in Building Setback Areas. Truck loading areas shall not be located within required building setbacks. Where loading berths are located within one hundred feet of areas zoned for residential use, the applicant shall provide measures necessary to reduce noise and visual impacts from the commercial area. Noise mitigation measures may include architectural or structural barriers, berms, walls or a restriction on the hours of operation, if necessary to meet the requirements of the city’s noise ordinance.

F.    Truck Loading and Maneuvering in Manufacturing Zones. Within manufacturing zones (M-M, M-1, M-2, M-S), truck loading and maneuvering areas shall not be located within one hundred thirty feet of areas zoned for residential use. Truck loading/unloading shall not be permitted on streets. Truck loading operations and maneuvering areas shall not be permitted to occupy an area exceeding fifty percent of the total linear dimensions of the building perimeter. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)

19.34.200 Modification of required off-street parking spaces, location and driveway width standards.

An applicant may propose and the planning director, using the review process described in EMC Title 15, Local Project Review Procedures, may allow an applicant to deviate from standards of this chapter. For the standards which may be modified, and the criteria used for consideration of a request, please see Section 19.20.900. (Ord. 3616-18 § 2 (Exh. 1) (part), 2018)