Chapter 18.19C
TALUS REPLACEMENT REGULATIONS, SUBSEQUENT TO DEVELOPMENT AGREEMENT TERMINATION

Sections:

Introduction

18.19C.010    Purpose.

18.19C.020    Intent.

18.19C.030    Scope and applicability.

18.19C.040    Interpretations and conflicts.

18.19C.050    Definitions.

Goals, Guidelines, Development Standards

18.19C.100    Planning goals.

18.19C.110    Urban Village Design Guidelines.

18.19C.120    Homeowner’s or Commercial Association Architectural Review Committee (ARC).

18.19C.130    Zoning districts and permitted land uses.

18.19C.140    District standards.

18.19C.200    Hillside sites.

18.19C.210    Site walls.

18.19C.220    Parks and plazas.

18.19C.230    Trails.

18.19C.240    Single family and townhouse standards.

18.19C.250    Woonerf standards.

18.19C.260    Home occupations standards.

18.19C.270    Processing of applications including adjustments and modifications of standards.

18.19C.280    Vesting of permits.

Figures and Attachments

Figure 1:     Talus Land Use Map

Figure 2:     Talus Zoning Map and Chart

Figure 3:     Talus Parks Location Map

Figure 4:     Talus Trails Plan

Attachment 1:     Talus Appendix A – Planning Goals

Attachment 2:     Talus Appendix B – Urban Village Design Guidelines

Introduction

18.19C.010 Purpose.

The purpose of these standards is to provide replacement regulations for sunsetted development agreement for an Urban Village within the City, inspiring an animated and connected urban community where pedestrians are priority, requiring buildings and open space that are openly interrelated, designing sites that make a positive contribution to the public realm, attracting and retaining businesses that complement each Urban Village’s vision, and, ultimately, creating a place where people of all income levels and diversities are drawn to live, work and play. These standards promote the construction of developments that will have an appealing and visually engaging public realm in order to encourage social interaction, outdoor activity and a pedestrian orientation in a sustainable, compact, mixed use area.

More specifically for Talus: The replacement regulations for Talus are as an urban village committed to retaining a distinct neighborhood with a mountain village character. It also recognizes the importance of both quality of design in the built environment and sensitivity to the natural environment. In terms of the built environment, good design must mean not only a visually pleasing community but one that embraces architectural diversity and provides a variety of opportunities for social interaction among residents, employees, and visitors. The Talus vision embraces: clustered development and large areas of open space connected by an extensive pedestrian and vehicular circulation system; housing for many lifestyles, age groups, and incomes; a limited number of opportunities for working and shopping in a pedestrian friendly setting. Appropriate site planning will provide connectivity between uses, proximity of uses to each other, and siting of structures and landscape elements to reinforce the street. These elements work together to create a public realm that encourages social interaction between community members. As developed, Talus has a mountain village character, which though described as “urban” in Attachments 1 and 2 of this chapter (Talus Appendix A and Talus Appendix B) is less dense and includes less diversity of uses than other urban villages. Future changes to either the replacement regulations (this chapter) and/or applicable Central Issaquah standards (Chapter 18.19A IMC) must take into account the actual, not aspirational, character of Talus’ mountain village. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.020 Intent.

The intent of the goals, guidelines, development and design standards of the replacement regulations is to generally maintain the current character and land use relationships of Talus; achieve compatible land uses within zoning districts and surrounding areas by providing uniform regulations throughout each district; encouraging neighborhood stability and consistency, promoting commercial viability and compatibility; and retaining Talus’ distinct character within the historic design and scale of Issaquah. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.030 Scope and applicability.

A.    This chapter contains goals, guidelines, and standards applicable to all Talus’ districts, projects, and properties following the sunset of the development agreement that guided its development. The Urban Village whose development agreement has currently been terminated and is now regulated by these replacement regulations is Talus. The following standards and procedures apply to properties previously entitled through a development agreement as specifically listed in this section. For any development provisions (e.g., stormwater standards, critical area regulations, tree retention, signage, etc.) not specifically listed in this chapter, standard provisions of Chapter 18.19A IMC (Central Issaquah Area Development and Design Standards) (CIDDS) apply, except for CIDDS tree regulations 10.10 through 10.14; instead the Urban Village covered by these replacement regulations shall use tree regulations in Chapter 18.12 IMC (IMC 18.12.1370 through 18.12.1390). To the extent that this chapter and Chapter 18.19A IMC do not establish applicable development and design standards, processes, procedures, or other elements covering a certain subject, element or condition, development shall be governed by the Issaquah Municipal Code and other City codes.

B.    The following rules shall apply to facilitate the use of Chapter 18.19A IMC, Central Issaquah Development and Design Standards (CIDDS), with this chapter, Talus replacement regulations:

1.    Chapter 18.19A IMC excludes Urban Villages covered by development agreements; however, since the Urban Village covered by this chapter is no longer regulated by development agreements, Chapter 18.19A IMC will apply to it to the extent provided in subsection A of this section.

2.    Where language in Chapter 18.19A IMC refers to “Central Issaquah” as a geographic place, it shall mean “Talus.”

3.    Where language in Chapter 18.19A IMC refers to “Central Issaquah vision” or “Central Issaquah Plan,” it shall be deemed to mean “Talus vision, goals, and guidelines (as appropriate)” when applied to properties governed by this chapter. The Talus vision, goals, and guidelines are located in Attachments 1 and 2 to this chapter.

4.    Where language in Chapter 18.19A IMC refers to “Development and Design Standards,” it shall include “or Talus Replacement Regulations, as appropriate” when applied to properties governed by this chapter.

5.    Section 1.1.E.2, Scope, in Chapter 18.19A IMC, as applied to Talus, shall be interpreted to read: “No administrative adjustment may be made for standards or requirements listed below, except as otherwise permitted by this code or 18.19C, where applicable:”

6.    In Table 4.3A, Levels of Review, in Chapter 18.19A IMC, the Urban Villages regulated by this chapter follow those for “Village Residential, Mixed Use Residential, Destination Retail and Mixed Use, …” IMC 18.19C.270, Processing of applications including adjustments and modifications of standards, establishes additional thresholds for levels of review for Talus.

7.    Central Issaquah Figures 6A, 7A and 7B do not apply to Talus. For standards in Chapter 18.19A IMC which reference Figure 6A to determine the location or applicable standard of circulation facilities, existing Talus circulation facilities, existing or anticipated circulation demand, and block lengths, as required by Chapter 18.19A IMC, shall substitute for Figure 6A. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.040 Interpretations and conflicts.

Unless specifically identified otherwise, the Director is authorized to interpret this Code, acting on the City’s initiative, or in response to an inquiry. The purpose of interpretations is to clarify the Code responsibilities, rules, procedures, and requirements, including resolving conflicting or silent text, determining unidentified uses, etc. The vision, goals, and policies within the Talus replacement regulations are fixed; methods to implement can be flexible. Anyone may request an interpretation of this Code by filing a written request with the Permit Center. The Director shall respond, in writing, to all requests for formal interpretation. Clarifying language of one (1) interpretation of this Code may be used for another interpretation of this Code. If any conflict arises between this Code and another rule, regulation, resolution, ordinance or statute which has been lawfully adopted by the City, the provision that best implements the general or specific Talus goals and policies shall apply, as determined by the Director. Requests for interpretations will be available to the public on the City’s website. The Director will not act on the requested interpretation for ten (10) days following its posting on the City’s webpage. Interpretations, once issued, may be appealed to the Hearing Examiner following procedures in this title. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.050 Definitions.

The following terms, as used in this chapter, are defined below. Where definitions are not provided below, Chapter 18.19A IMC applies. If definitions are not provided in either Chapter 18.19A or 18.19B IMC, then the definitions in Chapter 18.02 IMC apply as established above in IMC 18.19C.030:

Assisted living: “Assisted living,” for the purposes of allowed uses in these regulations, is any of a variety of senior care facilities that provides either permanent or temporary residence for senior citizens. These facilities must provide on-site services for residents such as common dining areas (although some facilities may offer kitchen facilities in the individual rooms), and health services, such as a resident nurse. An assisted living facility is not senior housing, independent living, retirement community, adult family home or residential care facility. It may include convalescent home, skilled nursing or hospital.

Hillside and sloped sites: Sites or portions of sites that rise at an inclination of twelve (12) percent or more within a vertical elevation change of at least ten (10) feet.

Natural grade: Existing grade of the site as of the adoption of the Design Manual, excluding temporary features such as stormwater or TESC ponds and stockpiles of soil.

Mountain Village: A less-dense Urban Village form due to topography and critical areas that provides primarily residential at a variety of densities, with limited nonresidential land uses incorporated.

Neighborhood-serving retail: Retail which provides for the sale of goods and personal services for the day-to-day living needs of the neighborhood, as opposed to regional retail focused on drawing, and even requiring, regional customers.

Overlay: Superimposed over conventional zoning districts, it consists of a physical area with mapped boundaries and provides additional zoning information specific to that property, such as zoning cap.

Park: An element of the public realm that is an outdoor, open gathering place that is designed for public access to open air spaces, for social and recreational purposes. Recreation can accommodate passive and/or active uses. The park may contain a variety of design treatments, including both soft and hard surfaces, though more landscape areas and lawn than hardscape. Modest structures such as gazebos are allowed. Parks are located in commercial and residential neighborhoods, and fulfill a wide variety of purposes, serving people of various age groups and abilities.

Retaining wall: Walls whose primary purpose is retaining soil and/or a cut or fill slope.

Senior housing: An establishment providing residence for retired persons who are not in need of medical or nursing treatment except in the case of temporary illness. Senior housing may also be called independent living or a retirement community. “Senior housing” does not include assisted living, nursing, convalescent, hospitals, or sanitariums.

Site walls: Walls that may or may not retain soil, and which may be also used for fall protection, delineation of space, substitute streetwall, etc. Retaining walls are a subset of site walls.

Sociable public realm: See Chapter 18.19A IMC, definition for “Public Realm.”

Urban Village: The Urban Villages were established to encourage innovative uses, sites and comprehensive planning of large land parcels. Master planning and development of larger parcels provide the opportunity for reasonably priced housing, enhanced public services and concurrency, infrastructure solutions and improvements, and allow creative land development through clustering, permanent preservation of wetlands and other natural areas, integration of recreational facilities and phasing of infrastructure. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

Goals, Guidelines, Development Standards

18.19C.100 Planning goals.

Attachment 1 contains Appendix A adopted in the Talus Development Agreement, as modified prior to termination of the agreement. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.110 Urban Village Design Guidelines.

A.    Attachment 2 contains Appendix B adopted in the Talus Development Agreement, as modified prior to termination of the agreement.

B.    See Figure 1 for the location in Talus of land uses referenced in the Urban Village Design Guidelines. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.120 Homeowner’s or Commercial Association Architectural Review Committee (ARC).

Prior to submittal for any permit, a property owner or agent with authority to act for a property owner must demonstrate that they have obtained ARC approval for those permits where the ARC has purview; or they must demonstrate that the ARC is inactive to the satisfaction of the Director. The Architecture and Urban Design Manual located in Chapter 18 of Chapter 18.19A IMC does not apply within Talus. Its functions are performed by the ARC if and until such time as the ARC is determined to be inactive. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.130 Zoning districts and permitted land uses.

A.    Purpose and Intent: The purpose of zoning and land uses is to protect public health, safety and general welfare by implementing the goals and policies adopted in the Issaquah Comprehensive Plan; the Planning Goals of Talus; and the Urban Village Design Guidelines. The intent of the zoning and land uses is to:

1.    Maintain the established character of Talus without preventing its growth, completion, and vitality.

2.    Retain and pursue a balanced mix of land uses that achieve the live/work/play vision.

3.    Preserving and establishing pedestrian- and bike-oriented transportation, while maintaining the functional needs of the automobile.

B.    Zoning and Overlay Created: Property zoning is established by designation on an adopted map; and through an overlay. The “zoning” layer identifies the land use that is approved for every property that previously was covered by the development agreement. The overlay identifies the zoning cap (i.e., square footage and/or number of residential units) that can be accommodated on the property.

C.    Map Adopted: The map and chart, Figure 2, identify the assigned zoning and overlay allowed for all properties previously covered (except for those properties designated CF-F which are covered by IMC 18.06.090) by the terminated development agreement for Talus.

Land Use

Zone

Overlay Description **

Urban Village Single Family

UV-SF

Zoning cap of 1 dwelling unit per existing lot

Urban Village Multifamily

UV-MF

Zoning cap of dwelling units

Urban Village Office

UV-O

Zoning cap of GFA*

Urban Village Village Center

UV-VC

Zoning cap of GFA*

Urban Village Mixed Use Residential

UV-MUR

Zoning cap for number of dwelling units and amount of GFA (commercial/retail) *

Community Facilities – Facilities Privately Owned

CF-FPO

HOA-owned lands in Talus with services and/or recreation-oriented community facilities that serve the community, such as community facilities for recreation, community gathering or events, HOA services

Community Facilities – Recreation Privately Owned

CF-RPO

HOA-owned lands in Talus with services and/or recreation-oriented development that serves the surrounding neighborhoods

Community Facilities – Open Space Privately Owned

CF-OSPO

Undeveloped HOA-owned lands in Talus

Zoning Cap Community Facilities – Facilities

CF-F †

Publicly owned lands with outdoor recreation-oriented community facilities per IMC 18.06.090

Community Facilities – Recreation

CF-R †

Publicly owned lands with services and/or recreation-oriented development that serves the larger community and includes uses that generate high levels of traffic per IMC 18.06.090

Community Facilities – Open Space

CF-OS †

Undeveloped publicly owned lands per IMC 18.06.090

* GFA – Gross floor area

** Zoning cap of units and/or GFA are the overlay as well as other specific limitations or requirements associated with a parcel.

† Existing zone; see IMC for allowed uses and standards.

D.    Allowed Uses:

1.    Intent: The purpose of establishing zoning districts is to protect the public health, safety and general welfare by implementing the goals and policies adopted in the Issaquah Comprehensive Plan and Talus’ goals and guidelines.

2.    Allowed Uses: The following chart identifies allowed uses. Where there is uncertainty that uses are allowed, the Director shall issue an interpretation as described in IMC 18.19C.040 (Interpretations and conflicts).

Land Use

Zone

Talus Allowed Uses

Urban Village Single Family

UV-SF

Single family detached

Single family attached (townhome) on individually owned parcel

Accessory dwelling unit

Home occupation

Temporary/seasonal uses

Group home

Urban Village Multifamily

UV-MF

More than one unit of ownership or rental housing on a commonly owned parcel (apartment, condominium, duplex, triplex, four-plex)

Live/work units

Senior housing

Clubhouse, accessory or recreational uses, or manager’s center associated with a multifamily project

Daycare center

All uses allowed in the IH Single Family zone, except accessory dwelling unit may only be associated with a single unit on a single lot, and not a parcel with multiple units

Urban Village Office

UV-O

Assisted living, skilled nursing (minimum size of 20,000 gross sq. ft.)

Church/religious facility

Community center

Conference center, banquet hall

Cultural centers (e.g., museum, theater, gallery, performance, studio)

Daycare center

Healthcare (e.g., medical/dental office, hospital, laboratory, rehabilitation, clinic, pharmacy, massage therapist, chiropractor, naturopath)

Hospital

Hospitality (e.g., hotel, motel, lodging, retreat)

Library

Office (e.g., public, private, nonprofit, co-working, clean tech, flex commercial without retail)

Office support (e.g., health and fitness center, sundry retail, copy facility, mail service)

Parking garage

 

 

Personal service (e.g., salon, tanning, nails, barber, massage, skin care, doggy daycare)

Restaurants, cafe, coffee shop, delis, specialty food, eateries

Bars and taverns

Bakery, confectionery, candy

School (public or private)

College/university

Accessory transportation services, e.g., transit stop, bicycle parking station, car sharing station, electric vehicle charging, taxi

Temporary/seasonal uses (e.g., espresso carts, food trucks, Christmas trees, flower and produce stands, farmers market, construction trailers)

Office accessory uses (e.g., ATMs, drive-throughs, daycare)

Urban Village, Village Center

UV-VC

Apparel and accessories

Bakery, confectionery, candy

Banking and ATM

Community center

Computer and electronics

Daycare center

Drugstore, pharmacy

Fitness (e.g., karate, dance, yoga, pilates, bicycling)

Furniture and home furnishings

Grocery, butcher, green grocer, and wine and liquor store

Medical/dental office

Neighborhood-serving retail (dry cleaners, books, laundromat, copy center, office center, small appliance repair, flowers, locksmith)

Parking garage

Personal service/service retail (salon, tanning, nails, barber, massage, skin care)

Pet shop and supplies, veterinary clinic

Private school

Restaurant, cafe, coffee shop, delis, specialty food, eateries

Sporting goods

Variety, gift, antique, or convenience store

Veterinary clinic

Accessory transportation services, e.g., transit stop, bicycle parking station, car sharing station, electric vehicle charging, taxi

Temporary/seasonal uses (espresso carts, food trucks, Christmas trees, flower and produce stands, farmers market)

Urban Village Mixed Use Residential

UV-MUR

All uses allowed in Multifamily, Office, and Village Center.

Community Facilities – Facilities Privately Owned

CF-FPO

HOA-owned outdoor recreation-oriented community facilities which may also include utilities and nonmotorized and vehicular access. Allowed uses include buildings, such as gazebos, covered play courts, bathrooms, dugouts, meeting hall, community center, and similar uses. Allowed accessory uses include bicycle parking/station, electric vehicle charging station, kiosks for ticket sales, food sales, vending stands, signage, parking, and similar as determined by the Director.

Community Facilities – Recreation Privately Owned

CF-RPO

HOA-owned lands with services and/or recreation-oriented development that serves the surrounding neighborhoods. Allowed uses include playgrounds, play fields without structures and neighborhood passive use spaces, trailhead, community garden, dog park, bathrooms; may include utilities and nonmotorized and vehicular access, if allowed by tract’s uses. Allowed accessory uses include bicycle parking/station, electric vehicle charging station, signage, maintenance facilities, vending stands for food, drink, and/or ticket sales, parking, and similar as determined by the Director.

Community Facilities – Open Space Privately Owned

CF-OSPO

Undeveloped HOA-owned lands which may include critical areas, utilities and nonmotorized and vehicular access. It is intended that minor and major utilities may be located in the CF-OSPO zone only after it is established that no other reasonable alternative exists. The proponent of the utility shall demonstrate that there is no other reasonable alternative by evaluating the environmental, social and economic impacts of location within the CF-OS zone, as established through the approval criteria in IMC 18.07.480(D), Approval Criteria – Public Utility Facilities. In general, the CF-OS zone is intended for low impact, low intensity uses such as permanent open space, passive hiking trails, and passive interpretative trails.

Community Facilities – Facilities

CF-F

Publicly owned lands with outdoor recreation-oriented community facilities per IMC 18.06.090. At Talus uses include reservoirs.

Community Facilities – Recreation

CF-R

Publicly owned lands with services and/or recreation-oriented development that serves the larger community and includes uses that generate high levels of traffic per IMC 18.06.090.

Community Facilities – Open Space

CF-OS

Undeveloped publicly owned lands per IMC 18.06.090.

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.140 District standards.

A.    Building Heights and Setbacks: The following applies to all properties. See Figure 2 for locations:

Zone

Bldg Height5

Lot Size

Setbacks3

Front

Rear

Side

UV-SF

45 feet

No limitation

5 feet

5 feet

5 feet1

UV-MF

60 feet

0 feet

5 feet

5 feet

UV-O

85 feet

0 feet

5 feet2

5 feet2

Timber Ridge

85 feet

0 feet

5 feet2

5 feet2, 4

UV-VC

40 feet

0 feet

5 feet2

5 feet2

UV-MUR

85 feet

0 feet

5 feet2

5 feet2

CF-FPO

35 feet

0 feet

5 feet2

5 feet2

1     Body of building must meet setback shown; architectural elements may be four (4) feet from property line including to an alley where a four (4) foot setback must be maintained. No setback is required for attached structures.

2     Setback only required when adjacent to single family/low density residential use.

3     Note the Architectural Review Committee may apply more restrictive setbacks than the City.

4    Ten (10) foot setback from the project boundary required for buildings in the office campus, i.e., Parcel 17A and B; see Figure 1.

5    Minimum first floor height is fifteen (15) feet in mixed use residential buildings.

B.    Impervious Surfaces: Each property, parcel, tract, etc., may have up to one hundred (100) percent impervious surface as allowed by current stormwater standards in the City; however, the Architectural Review Committee, Urban Design Guidelines, and other standards may result in less than one hundred (100) percent impervious surface being allowed.

C.    Floor Area Ratio (FAR): A minimum FAR of 1.0 is required for nonresidential development or redevelopment.

D.    Residential Parking: The following single family and multifamily residential parking standards apply to development in Talus:

TALUS LAND USE

MINIMUM PARKING SPACES REQUIRED

MAXIMUM PARKING SPACES ALLOWED

Single Family Detached

2 per unit

No maximum

Single Family Attached

2 per unit

No maximum

Multifamily:

Studio Apartment

1 per unit

No maximum

Multifamily:

One-Bedroom Apartment

1.25 per unit

No maximum

Multifamily: Other

2 per unit

No maximum

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.200 Hillside sites.

A.    Purpose and Intent: Development in Talus should strengthen existing assets, including hillsides. These sites are essential components to the character of Issaquah and views the community cherishes. Development must respect the topographic character of each site through building design and siting, and minimizing the height of retaining walls, with the intention of blending into the native environment and retaining existing trees. For sites which include hillsides, development will minimize disturbance to the hillside, respond to the natural grade, and provide visual mitigations such as terraced walls and revegetation on disturbed areas.

B.    Standards:

1.    Projects on sites or portions of sites equal to or greater than fifteen (15) percent (minimum vertical elevation change of at least fifteen (15) feet) shall step the building foundations, building rooflines, and bench or terrace site cuts or fills resulting in buildings (foundations and overall massing) that follow the natural grade.

2.    For uphill sites, only use maximum building height and do not use average grade or averaging of building heights, for the purpose of minimizing the visual impact of the building.

3.    Exposed cuts and fills shall be minimized, and final grading recontoured and landscaped to blend into the site and appear natural. To achieve that, no changes to the natural grades (cut or fill) may be more than fifteen (15) feet.

4.    Regardless of the site’s character, retaining walls on the site shall be no taller than ten (10) feet, with trees (thirty (30) to thirty-five (35) feet o.c.) and shrubs planted in front of the wall. If taller walls are required, walls shall be terraced with enough space between walls to comfortably accommodate shrubs, vines, and ground cover, and, if the wall design accommodates it, trees. Landscape’s purpose is to soften the visual impact of walls and blend them into their setting.

5.    Buildings placed in hillside areas must be designed to blend with the surrounding hillside using colors and articulation which are consistent with the balance of the building. Select building materials and colors to reduce the visual impact of the building.

6.    All walls will be articulated and receive architectural treatment if they are visible, including the downhill portions of the building. In addition to architectural treatment of the visible portions of foundations and lower building walls, landscape screening is also necessary.

7.    Straight, engineered, unnatural appearing slopes, walls, and/or landscape are not allowed. These must blend with the surroundings, including natural open space when present.

8.    Buildings shall not interrupt natural ridgelines.

9.    The following graphic conceptually illustrates for uphill sites how buildings, foundations, and site cuts would follow the natural grade:

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.210 Site walls.

A.    Purpose and Intent: Site walls may be necessary or desirable even on flat sites. Where they are used they must be factored into creating a public realm that is pedestrian friendly and engaging, through material selection, placement, height, etc. Some wall styles are appropriate in or adjacent to natural open spaces, while other styles are suited to the built environment. Where walls are necessary or desirable, use walls that contribute to the selected architectural style and positively add to the public realm.

B.    Standards:

1.    Site walls adjacent to pedestrian areas (e.g., walkways, sidewalks, trails) shall be no taller than four (4) feet in height. If taller walls are required, e.g., as a retaining wall, two (2) choices are available:

a.    Up to four (4) foot tall wall next to or near the pedestrian area, with taller walls (up to ten (10) feet in height) terraced behind the lower wall.

b.    Up to ten (10) foot tall wall set back from the pedestrian area with enough setback to accommodate evergreen trees spaced every thirty (30) to thirty-five (35) feet. Additional walls may be terraced behind the first wall. Setback must accommodate mature tree size without impinging on pedestrian area. Setback space between trees will be filled with shrubs and ground covers consistent with CIDDS landscape standards.

c.    In all cases of terracing, walls shall be terraced with enough space between walls to comfortably accommodate shrubs, vines, and ground cover, and, if the wall design accommodates it, trees, to soften the visual impact of walls and blend them into their setting.

2.    Wall materials shall complement the selected architectural styles, such as block or shotcrete covered soil nail walls. Wall materials shall not distract from the overall composition and the selected architectural style. Tri-plane faced block is an example of a distracting and busy wall material.

3.    Materials shall be scored or changed at a pedestrian scale frequency. Pedestrian scale materials include brick and other block or modular element. If concrete is used, it shall be treated architecturally with scoring or other detailing, at a human scaled frequency.

4.    Walls up to four (4) feet in height and longer than thirty-five (35) feet in length will be articulated and modulated, at a frequency of, at a minimum, thirty-five (35) feet.

5.    Rockeries or timber walls may not be used except when adjacent to natural open spaces. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.220 Parks and plazas.

A.    Purpose and Intent: The purpose of this section is to encourage a variety of gathering and recreational opportunities through the inclusion of parks and plazas in Talus. It is expected that good design principles will be applied to all spaces, including:

1.    Create gathering and recreational opportunities that are visually inviting to users.

2.    Provide enjoyable places to sit, walk, gather or play.

3.    Achieve the desired community functions.

4.    Encourage variety and interest within the urban environment.

5.    Ensure visual and functional continuity.

6.    Provide for comfort and safety.

7.    Emphasize quality.

8.    Promote the wise and efficient use of natural resources.

B.    Parks Provisions and Locations: Within Talus existing parks will be retained. Park locations are shown on Figure 3, map and chart. Removal or reduction of any existing park shown or listed on Figure 3, or required by subsection (E)(1) of this section, must be approved through a Council modification process as outlined in IMC 18.19C.270 (Processing of applications including adjustment and modification of standards).

C.    Project Buffers:

1.    A vegetative buffer not less than one hundred (100) feet wide shall be preserved on the east side of the Talus property adjacent to the existing westerly right-of-way line of State Route 900 (the parcels north and south of the Talus main entry, and the properties east of Parcel 5D; see Figure 1), except that:

a.    Existing drainage retention/detention facilities approved by the City may be maintained within such buffer. “Existing drainage retention/detention facilities” means facilities which have been accepted by the City. Some construction or reconstruction may be required prior to acceptance. All such work must be permitted by the City.

b.    Trails approved by the City may be maintained within such buffer.

c.    Existing entry features approved by the City may be maintained within such buffer.

2.    A vegetative buffer not less than fifty (50) feet wide shall be preserved on the westerly boundary of Parcels 7, 8, and 10 through 12 (the location of which is shown on Figure 1), except that trails and existing public water utility facilities, approved by the Director, may be maintained within such buffer.

3.    For the purposes of this subsection, “existing” means on the date the replacement regulations for Talus are adopted, except as allowed in this section.

D.    General Standards: The following general requirements shall apply to parks, plazas, and informal gathering areas. Any outside resources referenced in these standards (e.g., ASTM, ISA standards, or ANSI) shall use the most recent version; or the Director may substitute a more current and equivalent code or resource in consultation with the Parks Director and best practices.

1.    Views and linkages to streets and other public spaces and buildings shall be respected and reinforced through site planning and/or design elements.

2.    Children’s play areas and activities should be located away from streets on which the road design speed exceeds thirty-five (35) miles per hour. Children’s play areas and activities located within a facility that is adjacent to a street shall consider measures (e.g., hedges and fences) necessary to protect children’s safety.

3.    Where possible, summer shade areas should be incorporated when providing children’s play areas. Shading may be accomplished by deciduous landscaping, architectural elements, temporary structures, or other means.

4.    All play areas and structures shall conform to the requirements noted in the current editions of Publication F1487, “Standard Consumer Safety Performance Specifications for Playground Equipment for Public Use,” published by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), and “The Handbook for Public Playground Safety,” published by the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission.

5.    Temporary structures and portable carts may be permitted.

6.    Portable carts must maintain at least four (4) feet of unobstructed sidewalk between the cart and the sidewalk edge for pedestrian movement and obtain applicable or associated licenses, permits or approvals.

7.    Adequate drainage shall be provided.

8.    Access for maintenance shall be provided.

9.    Maintenance costs shall be taken into consideration.

10.    Electrical and water service shall be provided as needed for irrigation, event lighting, park lighting, security, maintenance, water features or drinking fountains.

11.    When used, design and locate lighting to minimize adverse impacts on abutting uses, streets, or critical area habitats.

12.    Benches and trash receptacles shall be incorporated where appropriate.

13.    Bollards or other devices shall be used for limited controlled vehicular access and where appropriate for emergency and maintenance access.

14.    Plans shall conform to any applicable requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

15.    Perimeter plantings shall be compatible with the style of adjacent landscaping.

16.    Native, drought tolerant, or plant materials supportive of urban wildlife habitat shall be used where appropriate.

17.    Continued maintenance and selective pruning and removal of vegetation which may be hazardous to the safety, visibility, and clearances of pedestrians, bicyclists, and automobiles. All pruning shall be done in accordance with the International Society of Arboriculture Standards as amended. Topping (the severe reduction of branches without consideration of the specifications for cutting back) of trees is prohibited.

18.    All fertilizer and pesticide applications shall conform to the City standards. Fertilizer and pesticide applications shall be made in a manner that will inhibit their entry into waterways, wetlands and storm drains.

19.    All plants shall be adapted to their sites (sun exposure, cold hardiness, hydrozones, soil type, soil pH, etc.). Plants with differing environmental/cultural requirements shall not be used together if desirable circumstances cannot be provided for both. New plant materials shall consist of native or drought tolerant varieties or nonnative species that have adapted to the climatic conditions of the Greater Issaquah area and in conformance with Chapters 10 and 16 of Chapter 18.19A IMC (Landscape Development and Design Standards).

20.    All plant materials used shall meet the most recent American Association of Nurseryman Standards for nursery stock: ANSI 260.1.

21.    Plants having similar water use characteristics (hydrozones) shall be grouped together.

22.    All landscaped areas shall incorporate water conservation measures.

23.    Parks and plazas shall be located to minimize construction impacts on critical areas.

24.    Soil amendments may be necessary for a healthy growing medium, which will increase the survival rate for new planting and reduce ongoing maintenance requirements:

a.    Incorporate water and nutrient holding materials into the soil as deep as possible. Use fully composted organic material.

b.    Mulch new planting areas to minimize evaporation, reduce weed growth and slow erosion. Use fully composted material.

c.    Feather all mulches used in planter beds to the base of the plants.

d.    Water tubes should also be added to the tree plantings to allow water to penetrate the soil.

E.    Parks – Net New Development:

1.    With net new residential development, new parks will be provided at the minimum rate of two hundred fifty (250) square feet per residential unit. The requirement only applies to “net new” units. That is new dwelling units constructed, above and beyond those in place upon effective date of this code or those dwelling units whose land use permits are vested by a separate development agreement or per IMC 18.19C.280. To meet the requirement, the parks must have the following characteristics:

a.    Parks will comply with the applicable Talus goal and guideline documents.

b.    The park space must be provided on site. For multifamily projects this means as part of the parcel. For single family plats, parks would be an integral part of the plat, though potentially on a separate tract or parcel.

c.    The park shall have visual and recreation variety pedestrian amenities, and appeal to the senses. It will engage all age groups through elements such as seating, lighting, water features, special paving, landscaping, artwork and special recreational features. It will provide both sun and shade.

d.    Locational characteristics: away from surface parking lots, loading/waste collection/service areas. The land shall be configured to be useable, pleasant, and an integral component of the project or plat in which it is located. It will not be located on “leftover” property or in locations that are isolated or hidden which might create security or perceived safety concerns.

e.    The park should have an access easement.

F.    Plazas: Plazas are outdoor open gathering places which are primarily hard surface, but which may contain landscaping. They denote important places, create a focus, and/or increase light and air at street level. They also function as points of orientation. They may be located adjacent to buildings, within a park or other open space, or independent. The following general requirements shall apply to plazas in Talus:

1.    Plazas may be constructed with concrete, pavers, or special paving material. Asphalt is not permitted.

2.    Root barriers shall be provided for all trees planted within plazas.

3.    Seating must be provided. The seating may be fixed or moveable, or a combination of both. Required seating may be provided by ledges, fountains, sculptures, benches, chairs, stairs, etc. At least two (2) of the seats shall meet ADA standards. For purposes of determining the number of seats provided on a bench, ledge, fountain, etc., eighteen (18) lineal inches on a horizontal surface is considered one (1) seat.

4.    The spacing, location and type of required street trees may be modified when adjacent to a plaza.

5.    A portion of a plaza may be used for reserved seating for restaurants or other uses.

6.    Permanent structures may be provided within a plaza provided they do not preclude use of and access to the plaza by the general public. Structures may be enclosed or open air and may be leased for commercial use.

7.    Physical obstructions between a plaza and a sidewalk or public park shall be designed to provide sufficient visibility to protect the public safety of the users of the plaza and to ensure that public access to the plaza is convenient, obvious and welcoming. No walls or structures shall exceed thirty-six (36) inches in height above the abutting sidewalk or public park for a total of more than fifty (50) percent of the lineal footage along one (1) side of a plaza that directly abuts a public street right-of-way or public park.

G.    Plazas with New Development: At a minimum, new plazas will be provided at the rate of twenty-five (25) square feet per one thousand (1,000) square feet of new nonresidential construction, except new public school facilities. The plaza shall be provided on site. It may be broken into multiple spaces; however, when multiple plazas are selected no plaza which counts to the requirement may be smaller than two thousand (2,000) square feet in size. Plazas shall be located to serve both the site’s users and the public.

H.    Park or Plaza Relocation: Where a parcel is being redeveloped and Figure 3 shows an existing park or required plaza being identified on that property, the applicant may propose to relocate the park or plaza with the same or better square footage, functional equivalence, and sense of public access without requiring Council approval. Approval shall occur with the required land use and construction permits. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.230 Trails.

A.    Purpose and Intent: The purpose and intent of this section is to encourage a variety of experiences through public and private trail systems, on which no motorized vehicles are permitted. Minimum requirements and standards are established to promote safety, incorporate maintenance considerations, identify infrastructure requirements, and reduce the impact of development on the environment. It is expected that good design principles will be applied at all times, including:

1.    Safety and accessibility to trail users;

2.    Well-built trails, constructed in a manner appropriate to their use, users, and location;

3.    Environmental stewardship; and

4.    Well-planned connections between properties, open spaces, and to the identified regional trails of Talus.

B.    General Standards: The following requirements apply to all trail types. Any outside resources referenced in these standards (e.g., ISA standards, or ANSI) shall use the most recent version; or the Director may substitute a more current and equivalent code or resource in consultation with the Parks Director and best practices:

1.    Adequate drainage shall be provided.

2.    Locate trails to minimize construction impacts on critical areas. Trail corridors may meander to avoid impacts to critical areas and to correspond with topographical conditions.

3.    Nonmotorized circulation shall be located in areas with minimum slopes, where possible, to provide access to people of various age groups and abilities. Where slopes cannot be avoided, nonmotorized surfaces up to twelve (12) percent may use soft surfaces where that surface type is allowed by subsection C of this section. Slopes between twelve (12) percent and fifteen (15) percent must be hard or stabilized surfaces appropriate for the trail type (e.g., hard surfaces may not be used in critical areas). Where slopes are twelve (12) percent or greater, stairs may be required. Where steps are used, there must be a minimum of two (2) steps, and they must be generally level. Also where stairs are appropriate or necessary, bike rails may be required.

4.    Border plantings shall be compatible with adjacent landscaping in terms of irrigation, maintenance and style.

5.    Trails that will be maintained by the City shall contain low maintenance border plantings.

6.    Incorporate the use of native, drought tolerant, or landscape material supportive of urban habitat, where appropriate.

7.    If used, design and locate pedestrian lighting to minimize impacts to abutting uses or critical area habitats.

8.    The incorporation of rest stop facilities (benches and trash receptacles) should be provided, where appropriate.

9.    Bollards or other devices for controlling vehicular access at street connections and other appropriate locations shall be provided for emergency and maintenance access.

10.    Trails shall be maintained so as to minimize vegetation that may be hazardous to the safety, visibility, and clearances of trail users. All pruning shall be done in accordance with the most recently adopted version of the International Society of Arboriculture Standards and consistent with Chapters 10 and 16 of Chapter 18.19A IMC (Landscape Development and Design Standards). Tree topping (the severe reduction of branches without consideration of the pruning specifications) is prohibited.

11.    Trails shall be located to minimize light and noise impacts on neighboring residential uses.

12.    Trails shall be located in areas with minimum slopes, where possible, to provide recreational access to people of various age groups and abilities.

13.    Provide signage or other indicators for trail user safety at intersections with streets.

14.    Landscape planting or buffers required by trail standards may be used to meet the trail border requirements.

15.    No fences are allowed within a trail corridor.

16.    Trail borders shall be maintained to provide safe trailside and head clearances.

17.    Where appropriate, the trail tread should be comprised of a structural base to support bicycle use on soft surface trails.

18.    Trails located within critical areas shall comply with the standards set forth in Chapter 18.10 IMC (critical area regulations).

19.    The following trails are allowed in critical areas: multi-purpose (critical areas), neighborhood trail, and forest path. All other trail types are prohibited.

20.    Signs indicating permitted uses shall be placed at every trail entrance. Trail signs shall conform to a design approved by the City of Issaquah in conformance with Chapter 9 of Chapter 18.19A IMC (Sign Standards) and Chapter 18.10 IMC (critical area regulations).

21.    Corridors shall allow for adequate sight distances, based on uses and locations.

22.    Signs requiring bicyclists to dismount on boardwalk portions of trails shall be posted.

C.    Trail Dimensions, Surfaces, and Users:

Trail type

Dimensions

Surface Type Alternatives

Users

 

Trail1

Shoulder

Border2

Corridor

Asphalt

Concrete

Special paving

Crushed rock3

Mulch

Board-walk

Primary

Secondary4

Prohibited

Multi-Purpose

10 to 12 ft.

2 ft.; or 1 ft. on one side and 3 ft. on the other

4 ft.

22 to 24 ft.

 

 

 

Pedestrian

Bicycle

Skateboards

Roller Skates

Roller Blades

Motorized

Equestrian

Multi-Purpose (critical areas)

8 to 10 ft.

n/a

abuts noncritical area: 4 ft.

abuts critical area: 4 ft. veg. restored up to edge

16 to 18 ft.

 

 

 

Pedestrian

Bicycle5

Skateboards

Roller Skates

Roller Blades

Motorized

Equestrian

Neighborhood Trail

6 to 8 ft.

n/a

4 ft.

14 to 16 ft.

6

6

6

Pedestrian

Bicycle

Skateboards

Roller Skates

Roller Blades

Motorized

Equestrian

Forest Path

4 ft.

n/a

n/a

12 ft.

 

 

 

Pedestrian

 

Motorized

Equestrian

Bicycles

Skateboards

Roller Skates

Roller Blades

Pedestrian Trail

tread: 8 ft.

n/a

borders: 4 ft.

median: up to 4 ft.

18 ft. minimum

 

 

 

Pedestrian

Skateboards

Roller Skates

Roller Blades

 

1     Trail widths and trail corridors may be increased upon request by the applicant and approval by the Director.

2    “Border” means a planting area adjacent to the trail shoulder or trail. Borders may coincide with required landscaped buffers or landscape on adjacent property. Borders shall be measured from the outside edge of the trail tread, except for multi-purpose trails that shall be measured from the outside edge of the shoulders.

3    Mineral soils will be used when they are present; crushed rock will be used if mineral soils and/or structural base cannot be established and following best practices. Crushed rock may not be used within twenty (20) feet of right-of-way.

4    Secondary uses or unlisted nonmotorized uses are permitted when the trail can be designed to make the secondary uses compatible, safe, and acceptable with pedestrian activity. Secondary users may encounter segments of a trail which will require caution or a detour due to specific trail tread surfacing. The Director must approve changes to the list of primary or secondary users.

5    Bicyclists must dismount on boardwalks.

6    For critical areas and surface water management facilities only.

D.    Description of Trails for Use in Talus:

1.    Trails will retain the designation (trail type) under which they were reviewed and constructed. If it is unclear which trail standard was used, the Director will make a determination based on the closest description below and dimensions and/or materials above.

2.    Description of Trails:

a.    Multi-Purpose Trail: Multi-purpose trails are high-use paved trails designed to provide recreational opportunities for pedestrians and nonmotorized wheel users. Multi-purpose trails are intended to provide or connect with community-wide or regional routes for pedestrians and nonmotorized wheel users. They should be located to link major community facilities, recreational complexes, schools, other multi-purpose trails, and major transportation access points to community-wide or regional routes.

b.    Multi-Purpose Trail (Critical Areas): Multi-purpose trails through critical areas are soft surface trails intended to provide flexibility when a multi-purpose trail moves through a critical area. They provide pedestrian and bicycle movement through critical areas with minimal disturbance.

c.    Neighborhood Trail: Neighborhood trails are hard or soft surface trails designed to provide recreational opportunities for pedestrians. They are intended to provide connections between neighborhoods or between neighborhoods and community land uses and to interconnect sidewalk systems. Typically, neighborhood trails should be located in or adjacent to neighborhoods, open spaces or critical areas.

d.    Forest Path: Forest paths are narrow, soft surface, low impact trails that meander through critical areas, critical area buffers and forested areas with existing vegetation. Forest paths are constructed, pursuant to U.S. Forest Service Standards, to minimize impacts and to adapt to existing conditions such as steep slopes and heavily vegetated areas. Forest paths are low usage trails that provide an environmental and recreational experience. Additionally, where these trails traverse areas subject to frequent inundation from water, a boardwalk-type tread may be used to enable pedestrian passage. The intent of the forest path is to provide pedestrian connections through forested areas (such as uneven surfaces, steeper grades, rocks, etc.).

e.    Pedestrian Trail: Pedestrian trails are developed when pedestrians are likely to be the primary users. These hard surfaced trails provide direct connections for nonbicyclists in typically higher pedestrian traffic areas, such as providing links to the multi-purpose trails within the Village Center.

    Unlike other typically pedestrian-oriented trails, pedestrian trails provide direct visual and physical access from neighborhoods to major community event locations or between major community focal points. This trail type is not intended to be used in medium and low density uses, unless providing a direct physical or visual link to a community focal point. When a pedestrian trail corridor abuts a mixed use, retail or commercial use, hardscape or container plantings may replace the planted border requirement. Hardscape may include, but is not limited to, paving materials, fountains, sculpture or other art forms.

E.    Existing Trails:

1.    All trails in existence in Talus upon the date of adoption of these standards shall be retained. Removal or reduction of an existing trail must be approved through a Council modification process as outlined in IMC 18.19C.270.

2.    The trails shown in the Talus Master Trails Plan, Figure 4, are considered existing trails per subsection (E)(1) of this section.

3.    Where a parcel is being redeveloped and Figure 4 or a previous land use permit shows an existing trail on that property, the applicant may propose to relocate the trail with the same or better classification, connectivity, and sense of public access without requiring Council approval. Approval shall occur with the required land use and construction permits. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.240 Single family and townhouse standards.

A.    Applicability and Purpose: The single family and townhouse standards are for use with residences in the UV-SF zone. The purpose is to retain the design and development standards used in building Talus and which created residential streetscapes that emphasized people, pedestrians, and homes while reducing the impact of the automobile and garage on them.

B.    Design and Development Standards:

1.    Unit Orientation: The front door of the unit will face the street or public pedestrian route, and will have a prominent presence from the street through its placement, orientation, architectural elements, and proportions. Each unit will have a pedestrian walkway between the public pedestrian route and the front door, separate from the driveway. There may also be a pedestrian connection from the driveway to the front door or front walk.

2.    Parking and Driveways:

a.    Single Family Driveway Dimensions:

(1)    Each lot with driveway access from a street, woonerf, or similar facility except an alley shall provide a driveway which has an eighteen (18) foot minimum length and maximum driveway width of twenty (20) feet. Where driveway parking is not needed or possible, driveways shall be limited to eight (8) feet or less in length, and use other techniques which communicate that parking on the driveway apron is prohibited.

(2)    Where lots are narrower than forty (40) feet, the driveway cut within the right-of-way may not be wider than sixteen (16) feet plus two (2) foot wings.

(3)    Where a wider driveway is functionally necessary (such as to serve a three (3) car garage), use landscape or other elements acceptable to the Director to break the driveway into sections, each twenty (20) feet or less in width. See example below.

(4)    Where a lot has alley access, all vehicular access to the lot must be from the alley. Driveways from alleys must have an eighteen (18) foot minimum length where parking is desired, and shall be limited to four (4) feet or less in length where parking is prohibited.

(5)    A lot may have one (1) driveway cut from a street or other circulation facility with a pedestrian component, unless the driveway forms a “U” in which case two (2) driveway cuts are allowed.

b.    Townhouse Driveway Dimensions (Attached Single Family on Individual Lots in UV-SF):

(1)    Each standard lot with driveway access from a street, woonerf, or similar facility except an alley shall provide a driveway which has an eighteen (18) foot minimum length. Maximum driveway width for a single car width shall be no more than ten (10) feet and for a double car width shall be no more than sixteen (16) feet; however, the driveway shall be no greater than sixty-seven (67) percent of the lot or unit width. Where driveway parking is not needed or possible, driveways shall be limited to eight (8) feet or less in length, and use other techniques which communicate that parking on the driveway apron is prohibited.

(2)    Where a townhouse has alley access, all vehicular access to the townhouse must be from the alley. Driveways from alleys must have an eighteen (18) foot minimum length where parking is desired, and shall be limited to four (4) feet or less in length where parking is prohibited.

c.    Materials: Driveways shall not be asphalt; acceptable materials include concrete, exposed aggregate, and pavers.

3.    Garages:

a.    Garages which face a circulation facility with a pedestrian component shall have a maximum width of fifty (50) percent of the overall building width, unless the building’s facade is less than thirty-six (36) feet wide. On building facades (attached or detached) less than thirty-six (36) feet in width, facing a street or circulation facility whose facade includes both a front door and a garage, the width allotted to the garage should be minimized, and the width devoted to the front door and living space should be maximized; however, in no case shall the front door and the space on either side of it be less than six (6) feet in width. In addition, other elements that emphasize the presence and importance of the front door shall include weather protection, lighting, landscape, special paving, etc.

b.    Garages must be sized to accommodate the required on-site number of standard-sized parking stalls, waste containers, and storage. Room for containers to hold three (3) waste streams shall be provided inside the garage.

c.    In all cases, the presence of the garage shall be minimized from the street, woonerf, or similar facilities, which have a pedestrian component. Garages shall be set back a minimum of five (5) feet behind the front exterior walls of the residential living space and use elements such as overhangs (e.g., living spaces, terraces, trellises) to shade the garage doors to minimize their presence. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.250 Woonerf standards.

A.    Purpose and Intent: “Woonerf” is a Dutch term which means a circulation area shared by pedestrians, wheeled users and vehicles, and accessible to surrounding uses. While pedestrians and vehicles mingle, the pedestrian, rather than the vehicle, is accorded the dominant role. Special layout and street furniture emphasize the prime function of the area as being a place for people. Driving speed is reduced to walking speed, and parking is allowed only in designated areas. Woonerfs are located in areas where urban space is encouraged to extend into the street. Elements of woonerfs may vary depending on the abutting uses. Access and use provisions shall be the same as those pertaining to public or private streets.

B.    General Requirements: The following special requirements shall apply to woonerfs:

1.    Woonerf designs shall accommodate vehicles but emphasize pedestrian use.

2.    Paving materials shall not include asphalt. Concrete, stamped concrete, pavers, or other durable materials which will support vehicular loads may be proposed for use.

3.    The entrance(s) shall be clearly signed with “pedestrians have right of way” or other approved signage. The entrance will also be distinguished by a driveway cut (see Chapter 18.19A IMC, Section 6.4.K for the appropriate standard) and other changes such as surface materials or grade.

4.    Woonerfs are designed with an inverted crown. No curbs may be used except in special circumstances:

a.    Adjacent to parking;

b.    Where surrounding grades cannot accommodate inverted crown drainage; or

c.    As approved by the Director.

    Where curbs are approved, all curbs shall be vertical; no extruded curbs are allowed.

5.    With the review of site work, landscape, and/or building permits, houses fronting on any woonerf shall limit height or presence of elements (e.g., walls, landscaping) directly abutting the woonerf that would inhibit drivers and pedestrians (especially small children) exiting lots from seeing each other.

6.    A clear area of at least two (2) feet in depth shall be provided on the lot, so that emerging drivers or pedestrians can see and be seen by approaching traffic. This shall be provided in front of any adjacent entrances to dwellings, businesses, or garages, where potential pedestrian/vehicular conflicts may occur, and ensure adequate sightlines and landings.

7.    Where parallel parking is allowed, it may be incorporated where there are uses that would use and benefit from its presence. No head-in or angled parking is allowed. The parking will be located on the side of the woonerf without curb cuts to maximize the number of available parking stalls. Parking areas, if provided, shall be clearly recognizable and parking spaces shall meet the dimensional requirements of Chapter 18.19A IMC, Chapter 8 (Parking).

8.    Traffic calming devices shall be provided as necessary to reduce driving speed to walking speed, taking into consideration emergency services access needs and in consultation with the Fire Marshal.

9.    Pedestrian and vehicular routes shall not be differentiated by curbs or striping.

10.    The woonerf shall be sufficiently well lit after dark to enable drivers to see potential obstacles such as changes in level, and for drivers and pedestrians to see each other. See Chapter 18.19A IMC, Chapter 17 (Lighting).

11.    A woonerf may serve up to twenty-nine (29) homes. More intense uses require further analysis and approval by the Director.

12.    A five (5) foot easement shall be provided on each side of the woonerf to accommodate street trees and other landscape to benefit the pedestrian and ensure the trees are protected. This may be reduced if the side yard of a lot is adjacent to one (1) or both sides of the woonerf. In that case a three (3) foot landscape easement is required on each side, between the edge of the woonerf and any fencing on the private lot. Front door walkways and driveways may cross the easement to access each residence.

13.    Dead-end woonerfs, where a fire truck turnaround is not required, shall provide a method for private vehicles to turn around, such as easements on driveways, hammerheads, etc., as acceptable to the Director.

14.    Public utilities associated with dead-end woonerfs shall be designed so that City maintenance vehicles do not have to enter the woonerf to maintain City utilities.

15.    Public utilities which are owned and maintained by the City and which are located on dead-end woonerfs shall be designed so that City maintenance vehicles do not have to enter the woonerf to maintain the City utilities.

16.    Woonerfs shall be privately owned and maintained.

C.    Woonerf Standards: There are three (3) configurations of woonerf that may be constructed. See Figure 5, below.

1.    Type 1: woonerf with through traffic or fire turnaround:

a.    Two (2) ten (10) foot travel lanes;

b.    Seven (7) foot parking one (1) or both sides (optional).

2.    Type 2: dead-end, more than three (3) residences:

a.    Eighteen (18) feet wide;

b.    Maximum length shall be determined in consultation with the Fire Marshal based on whether fire trucks may enter and the distance a fire hose may be pulled;

c.    Parallel parking may be allowed within the woonerf with extra width of eight (8) feet and if there is no impact to emergency service access needs.

3.    Type 3: dead-end, limited to three (3) residences:

a.    Fifteen (15) feet wide;

b.    Maximum length shall be determined in consultation with the Fire Marshal based on whether fire trucks will enter and the distance a fire hose may be pulled;

c.    No parking is allowed within the woonerf.

Figure 5 – Woonerf Sections

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.260 Home occupations standards.

A.    Home occupations are permitted in Talus. A business license issued from the City shall be required and the type of business shall be as described in IMC 18.07.470. Additional business types not listed in the IMC shall be allowed subject to approval by the Director, and determined by:

1.    Client parking demand;

2.    Nuisance characteristics (e.g., air emission, vibration, noise, heat, light and glare); and

3.    Conformance with the home occupation criteria listed below.

B.    Home occupations shall meet all of the following criteria:

1.    Number of employees: maximum one (1) person from outside the residential unit.

2.    Gross floor area: no maximum.

3.    Signs:

a.    Nameplate as allowed by Chapter 18.19A IMC, Chapter 9.

b.    Where there are ground-related residential units on streets designated for sidewalk use in Chapter 12.05 IMC, legal and permitted home occupations may choose to add a pedestrian-oriented sign as regulated by Chapter 18.19A IMC, Chapter 9, as an additional sign for home occupation.

4.    Outside storage or display: none permitted.

5.    Off-street parking: none required (except as required for residential use).

6.    Deliveries to site: permitted; provided, that the quantity of deliveries and the type of delivery vehicle do not negatively impact the neighborhood in which the home occupation is located.

7.    Customers: maximum one (1) customer vehicle at any given time.

8.    Other Requirements:

a.    Owner/operator of the home occupation must reside on site;

b.    Business area will not be counted towards zoning cap in the overlay. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.270 Processing of applications including adjustments and modifications of standards.

A.    Adjustment of Standards: Any revisions not specifically excluded by subsection F of this section (Council Modifications), or Chapter 18.19A IMC (Section 1.1(E)), may be approved by the Director. The criteria and process for review are in Chapter 18.19A IMC.

B.    Commission Review of Certain Land Use Permits as Established by Chapter 18.19A IMC or This Title: Following the termination of a development agreement, where review of subsequent permits is required to be at a Commission, the review will occur at the Development Commission.

C.    Preliminary Plats and Required Community Conference:

1.    Following determination that a complete submittal for preliminary plat has been received, City staff shall schedule a community conference with the Development Commission, unless another commission or board has reason to hold a meeting for this project. Then that commission or board would hold the community conference, e.g., Rivers and Streams Board.

2.    The community conference is an informal public meeting hosted by the Commission. The purpose of the community conference is to generate discussion, raise issues, and propose creative options relative to the proposed preliminary plat. It is intended to provide a means by which the applicant, staff, the Commission, and the public work together in a productive and creative manner to initially review the proposal’s compliance with the Comprehensive Plan; this chapter, replacement regulations; and, as applicable: Chapter 18.19A IMC, CIDDS; and the IMC.

3.    Following the community conference, staff with the assistance of the applicant (if they choose) will prepare a community conference response memo. The memo will summarize topics, concerns, and opportunities raised at the community conference; review them within the context of the proposal and applicable codes; provide responses from staff and the applicant (if they choose to respond); and provide a conclusion for each topic as to what should or should not happen relative to the proposal and applicable codes.

4.    The community conference response memo will be provided to parties of record and the Development Commission. They will be given a two (2) week comment period in which to provide additional comment as to the content and responses contained in the memo.

5.    If consistent with Code, any further comments received shall be incorporated into the community conference response memo, and applied either as corrections to the plat drawings or proposed conditions of approval.

6.    The final community conference response memo shall be an attachment to the Hearing Examiner staff report.

D.    Thresholds Triggering a Site Development Permit Review: A site development permit or Level 3 review is required for those development proposals or uses with any one (1) or more of the following characteristics:

1.    The site is equal to or greater than three (3) gross acres.

2.    The proposed building(s) on a site are equal to or greater than forty-five thousand (45,000) square feet of gross floor area.

3.    The site’s primary access and/or street frontage are located on and/or the site abuts one (1) or more of the following streets: NW Talus Dr.

E.    Subdivision of Land or Adjustment of Property Boundaries and Changes to the Overlay or Zoning Cap: Property covered by these replacement regulations and which chooses to subdivide their land or adjust their property lines would have their overlay or zoning cap distributed as follows:

1.    Single Family Lots (UV-SF): Lots may be subdivided or adjusted, but the overlay or zoning cap may not be subdivided. This would result in a lot without the right to build an additional unit.

2.    Nonresidential Overlay or Zoning Cap: Parcels which are subdivided or adjust their property lines subsequent to the adoption of the replacement regulations would have their zoning cap divided between the old and new lots at the discretion of the property owner(s) as long as at no time the resulting zoning cap would cause the property’s development capacity to fall below the minimum FAR (floor area ratio).

3.    Multifamily or Mixed Use Residential Overlay or Zoning Cap: Parcels which are subdivided or adjust their property lines subsequent to the adoption of the replacement regulations would have their zoning cap divided between the old and new lots at the discretion of the property owner(s) as long as at no time the resulting zoning cap would cause the property’s development capacity to fall below the minimum density. The minimum residential densities are:

a.    Low density: three (3) dwelling units per acre;

b.    Medium density: thirteen (13) dwelling units per acre;

c.    High density: twenty-three (23) dwelling units per acre.

Note: See Figure 1, Talus Land Use Map, for Talus density assignments.

4.    The same principles would apply to mixed use parcels, although the resulting parcels are not required to be mixed use after subdivision.

5.    Segregation of the property, resulting in parcels without entitlement, is allowed only if the resulting parcel is used for a purpose not requiring a zoning cap, e.g., parking, stormwater vault, plaza.

    During the land use permit review process for subdividing (e.g., short plat or long subdivision) or adjusting property lines (e.g., lot line adjustment), staff will review the division of the zoning cap per the above criteria. With approval of the subdivision or property line adjustment, Figure 2 would be administratively updated to reflect the changes.

F.    Council Modifications: The following changes must be decided by the City Council following a review and recommendation from either the Planning Policy or Development Commission, as determined by the Director. The process for reviewing the proposed Council modifications shall follow Chapter 18.04 IMC, Level 6 review process.

1.    Changes to zoning shown in Figure 2, or as described in IMC 18.19C.130.

2.    Changes to the overlay or zoning cap shown in Figure 2 except as allowed in subsection E of this section.

3.    The inclusion of any land uses in IMC 18.19C.130 which the Director determines are outside the scope of IMC 18.19C.040.

4.    Increases in building heights from those specified in IMC 18.19C.140.

5.    Removal or reduction in size of parks, plazas, or informal gathering areas where they are shown on the following: Figure 3.

6.    Removal or reduction of trails in existence as of the date of adoption of this chapter, including those shown on Figure 4. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

18.19C.280 Vesting of permits.

A.    Only vesting established by Washington State law shall apply to the vesting of development applications for properties located within Talus previously covered by the terminated development agreements. These are:

1.    Building permits which comply with RCW 19.27.095; or

2.    Long or short plats which comply with RCW 58.17.033; or

3.    Development agreements per RCW 36.70B.180. (Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

Figures and Attachments

Figure 1: Talus Land Use Map

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

Figure 2 Talus Zoning Map and Chart

 

Figure 2B: Talus Zoning and Zoning Cap Chart

[6/5/2018]

† Indicates additional information is provided at the end of the main chart regarding the project or a portion of the project. For instance, the property has unbuilt zoning cap at the time of adoption of this code, there are additional land use requirements for these properties, assignment of Mixed Uses to specific portions of the property.

Number

Parcel Number

Land Use

Zoning Cap

Current Project Name

1 †

2924069052

UV-SF

24 units

Emrick [Expansion Area]

2 †

2924069071

UV-SF

UV-MF

73 units

Parcels 7&8

Tract H

3 †

8562730090

UV-SF

90 units

Parcel 9

4

2924069154

UV-MF

51 units

Rose Crest/Imagine Housing [Parcel 6A]

5

1750000000

UV-MF

112 units

Copper Ridge [Parcel 16 2-4]

6 †

8562730010

UV-MF

20 units

Calabria Condominiums [Parcel 1]

7

8562730110

UV-MF

247 units

Estates at Cougar Mountain [Parcel 14]

8 †

8562730160

UV-O

315.32 units

Timber Ridge [Parcel 17A]

9 †

7938700000

UV-MUR

25 units/6,000 GSF VC

Spring Peak Condominiums [Parcel 16-1]

10 †

8562730170

UV-O

516,000 GSF Off

Trimet Office Campus [Parcel 17B]

11 †

8562780840

UV-VC

6,000 GSF VC

Talus Parcel 13/Village Square

12 †

8562780830

UV-VC

6,000 GSF VC

Talus Parcel 13/Village Square

13

8562710780

UVSF-O

0 units

Access Tract [Aliante, Parcel 5A]

14

029130TRAB

UVSF-O

0 units

Access Tract [Ascent, Parcel 3]

15

029130TRAF

UVSF-O

0 units

Access Tract [Ascent, Parcel 3]

16

029130TRCT

UVSF-O

0 units

Access Tract [Ascent, Parcel 3]

17

856274TRCT

UVSF-O

0 units

Access Tract [Wilderness Peak, Parcel 5D]

18

856275TRCT

UVSF-O

0 units

Access Tract [Hawksridge, Parcel 5C]

19

856278TR-B

UVSF-O

0 units

Access Tract [Centerra, Parcel 13]

20

856278TR-C

UVSF-O

0 units

Access Tract [Centerra, Parcel 13]

21

8562730112

UVSF-O

0 units

Access Tract [Parcel 14, Estates]

Table 2B: Additional Parcel/Property Information

(Address references as of September 12, 2017; overall chart revised 6/5/2018)

Map #

Parcel Number

Current Project Name

Land Use

Zoning Cap (GSF = Gross Square Feet)

Additional Property Information

1

2924069052

Emrick

UV-SF

24 units

Built: 0 units

Unbuilt: 24 units

SEPA review and current impact fees are required to develop this property.

2

2924069071

Parcels 7, 8, Tract H

UV-SF

UV-SF

UV-MF

53 units

10 units

10 units

Parcel 7

Parcel 8

Tract H

Built: 0 units

Unbuilt: 73 units

Zoning cap assigned: 63 single family lots and one multi-family parcel designated for 10 units as approved and recorded. Map and table to be automatically updated with approval of plat, as shown herein, unless some condition of appeal modifies these. At that time, Fig. 2A&2B will be revisited.

3

8562730090

Parcel 9

UV-SF

90 units

Built: 0 units

Unbuilt: 90 units

The property must be subdivided such that there is no more than one unit per resulting lot.

6

8562730010

Parcel 1

UV-MF

20 units

The property is currently undergoing a lot line adjustment to segregate the developed portion of the site from the critical area and open space areas. Map to be automatically updated with approval of lot line adjustment, as shown herein.

8

8562730160

Timber Ridge

UV-O

315.32 units

Built: 314.72 units

Unbuilt: 0.6 units

Zoned O for goal and guideline purposes and as a reflection of the conversion of 300,000 GSF of Office to residential. An additional 65.32 residential units were purchased to complete the available zoning cap. Though 315.32 units are the zoning cap, as senior housing the following allocation of zoning cap and standards are carried forward per AM04-001EV:

• Independent living units shall be counted as a residential unit. Units under 701 square feet shall be granted a 2/3 unit density bonus. Units between 701-950 square feet shall be granted a 1/3 unit density bonus.

• Assisted care units shall be counted as 1/3 of a residential unit.

• The skilled nursing area shall be counted on a square footage basis as office.

Parking: Parking shall be required at the following rates:

• Independent living units, 1.3 per unit;

• Assisted living units, 1.0 per unit;

• Skilled nursing beds, 0.5 per bed; and

• Accessory nonresidential areas, 1.0 per 1,000 square feet.

9

7938700000

Spring Peak Condos

UV-MUR

25 units/6,000 GSF VC

Zoning cap assigned to:

158 – 172 Shy Bear Way, 157 – 173 Sky Ridge Walk NW & 2035 – 2063 NW Talus Dr: 25 units

184 - 188 Shy Bear Way NW & 2067 NW Talus Dr: 6,000 GSF Ret

Note: These units are also allowed 1 residential unit on the 2nd level only; residential only use of these units is not allowed.

10

8562730170

Trimet Office Campus

UV-O

516,000 GSF Off

Built: 0 GSF

Unbuilt: 516,000 GSF

11

12

8562780840

8562780830

Talus Parcel 13/Village Square

UV-VC

6,000 GSF VC

Built: 0 GSF

Unbuilt: 6,000 GSF

A cumulative total of 6,000 square feet of Village Center uses may be constructed between the two parcels.

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

Figure 3 Talus Parks Location Map and Chart

Figure 3A: Talus Parks Location Map

 

Figure 3B: Talus Parks List

Open Space (Existing)

Map No.

Plat/Division/Block No.

Parcel No.

Name/Closest Intersection

All of the Parcel?

If Portion, Sq. Ft.

1

Talus Div 05A

8562710760

Aliante Park

No

7,052

2

Talus Div 05-C

8562751250

Frisbee Park

Yes

19,490

3

Talus Div 06B

8562710760

Aliante Playground

No

4,304

4

Talus Div 06B

8562770730

Summerhill Ridge Dr

No

2,322

5

Talus Div 06B

8562770740

MountainAire Playground & Mount Baker Lookout

Yes

9,392

6

Talus Div 05-C

8562751260

Squak View Park

Yes

17,407

7

Talus Div 06B

8562770730

MountainAire Plaza

No

3,278

8

Talus Div 05B

8562720460

Hawks Ridge Playground

No

5,183

9

 

2924069154

Rose Crest Playground

No

1,035

10

Ascent at Talus Div No. 01

291300430

Ascent Open Space

No

1,128

11

Ascent at Talus Div No. 02

291310740

Ascent Playground

No

17,340

12

Talus Div A

8562730020

Bus Loop Park

No

5,488

13

Talus Div A

8562730020

Red Alder Grove Shelter

No

1,571

14

Talus Div A

7938700000

Spring Peak Plaza

No

750

15

Talus Parcel 10, 11, & 12

856279TRCT

Bridges Park

No

4,388

16

Talus Div 13

856278TR-C

Centerra Playground

No

1,249

17

Talus Div 13

856278TR-F

Centerra Plaza

No

654

18

Copperridge at Talus

1750000000

Copper Ridge Playground (North)

No

7,616

19

Copperridge at Talus

1750000000

Copper Ridge Playground (South)

No

2,064

20

Talus Div A

8562730160 & 20040526900004

Timber Ridge Park

No

22,099

21

Talus Div A

8562730160 & 20040526900004

Timber Ridge Plaza (West)

No

4,231

22

Talus Div A

20040526900004

Timber Ridge Plaza (East)

No

1,857

23

Talus Div A

8562730160

Timber Ridge Lawn

No

14,853

24

Talus Div A

8562730160

Timber Ridge Green & P-Patch

No

6,344

25

Talus Div A

8562730160

Timber Ridge Plaza (South)

No

1,734

26

Talus Parcel 10, 11, & 12

8562791050

Bridges Playground

Yes

19,319

27

Talus Div A

8562730110

The Estate at Cougar Mountain Pool

No

20,603

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

202,751

 

Open Space (Proposed)

Map No.

Plat/Division/Block No.

Parcel No.

Name/Closest Intersection

All of the Parcel?

If Portion, Sq. Ft.

A

Tract O

2924069071

Park

No

1,951

B

Tract N

2924069071

Playground

No

7,805

C

Tract A

2924069071

Overlook

No

808

D

Tract M

2924069071

Playground

No

10,680

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

21,244

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

Figure 4: Talus Trails Plan

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

Attachment 1 Talus Appendix A – Planning Goals

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).

Attachment 2 Talus Appendix B – Urban Village Design Guidelines

(Ord. 2840 § 1 (Exh. A), 2018).