Chapter 18.52
DOWNTOWN DESIGN STANDARDS

Sections:

Article I. Introduction and Applicability

18.52.010    Purpose and intent.

18.52.020    Pedestrian-oriented streets and uses.

18.52.030    Scale of downtown development.

18.52.040    Example images included in standards.

18.52.050    Recommended guiding principles – General.

18.52.060    Additional principles – Northwest Quadrant.

18.52.070    Applicability.

18.52.075    Design review process.

Article II. Site Design – Standards for All Uses

18.52.100    Pedestrian walkways.

18.52.110    Northwest Quadrant circulation plan.

18.52.120    Public spaces and plazas.

18.52.130    Furnishings.

18.52.140    Site lighting.

18.52.150    Building location/setbacks (for commercial/mixed use buildings).

18.52.160    Building setbacks (for residential/primarily residential uses).

18.52.170    Surface parking lot location.

18.52.180    Parking lot screening.

18.52.190    Location of driveways.

18.52.200    Outdoor service and storage areas.

Article III. Building Design – Standards for All Uses

18.52.210    Corner features.

18.52.220    Roof form.

18.52.230    Structured parking.

18.52.240    Blank wall and side wall screening.

18.52.250    Pedestrian bridges.

Article IV. Building Design – Standards for Commercial/Mixed Use Buildings

18.52.260    Visible building entrances.

18.52.270    Ground floor facades.

18.52.280    Ground floor transparency and visibility.

18.52.290    Weather protection.

18.52.300    Building materials.

18.52.310    Upper level stepbacks, mass, and bulk.

Article V. Building Design – Standards for Residential/Primarily Residential Uses

18.52.320    Primary residential entrances.

18.52.330    Building mass and bulk.

18.52.340    Materials.

18.52.350    Windows.

Article I. Introduction and Applicability

18.52.010 Purpose and intent.

The Kenmore downtown design standards are intended to implement the City’s comprehensive plan and vision for the creation of “...a community with an attractive, vital, pedestrian-oriented City center offering commercial, civic, cultural and park spaces, integrated with higher density housing...” and “...a community with clear design standards creating attractive, functional, and enduring buildings and places...”

The purpose of the downtown design standards is to create a pedestrian-oriented downtown by identifying appropriate site and development standards, including green infrastructure, for new development.

The Kenmore design standards are structured in the following manner. [Ord. 16-0428 § 13 (Att. I); Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.020 Pedestrian-oriented streets and uses.

The highest priority is to provide as much guidance to those elements that affect the development pattern and pedestrian orientation: building orientation and location on-site, relationship to the street, and circulation. Standards relating to these topics are more specific and relate to:

A. A sidewalk environment which is lively, attractive, comfortable, and safe;

B. Rich visual detail in the built environment which tells the user how buildings and places are used;

C. Visual predominance of buildings, walkways, and landscape, less prominent signs, and parking lots and structures which are generally concealed from view. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.030 Scale of downtown development.

Standards relating to the character of development are structured to provide greater flexibility in development and building design. They provide a palette of options to consider during the design process and address:

A. Ground floors of buildings;

B. Buildings of several stories which create continuity along the streetscape and walkways;

C. Detail in building mass and form which creates human scale with the parts of larger buildings. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.040 Example images included in standards.*

The photographs in this document are included to visually depict the type of site or building design considerations that could meet the intent of the Kenmore design standards. The images are examples only and are not intended to be interpreted as the only design approach possible.

These photographs correspond to the intent of the visioning process and visual preference survey conducted during the comprehensive plan process and independent research efforts by the planning commission conducted in May 2002. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

*Code reviser’s note: Exhibit A to Ordinance 03-0176 contains the photographs for the Kenmore downtown design standards. A copy for public review and examination is on file and available in the office of the city clerk.

18.52.050 Recommended guiding principles – General.

A. Plan for and implement an attractive, vital, pedestrian-oriented, transit friendly City center offering commercial, civic, cultural and park spaces, integrated with higher density housing.

B. Address the different characteristics of downtown by encouraging regional serving development south of SR-522 and local serving development north of SR-522.

C. Support redevelopment in accordance with the vision for the downtown through investment in public infrastructure including transportation, utility, and civic infrastructure.

D. Give priority to creating indoor and outdoor public spaces, promote community activities meeting the needs of a range of ages and interests. Outdoor spaces should include plazas, parks, and public green spaces. Encourage the efficient use of space and shared uses where appropriate.

E. Give priority consideration to strong linkages between the four downtown quadrants and the surrounding neighborhoods. Pedestrian crossings, including a bridge(s), over SR-522, linking the north and south quadrants, should be readily accessible, functional, visually attractive, safe, and inviting links to key destinations, and should provide a Kenmore identity.

F. Create a downtown circulation system that promotes mobility for all modes of travel, emphasizing a loop road circulation system.

G. Create an interconnected system of trails, sidewalks, bikeways, and open spaces in downtown.

H. Promote the revitalization and expansion of business and retail compatible with the character of the downtown districts. Encourage businesses that draw patrons during both the day and evening. Provide an adequate mix of on-street, surface and structured parking, and encourage shared parking options.

I. Provide high density, high amenity (includes public spaces and private facilities) pedestrian-oriented residential neighborhoods meeting the housing needs of a variety of income levels, and developed at densities high enough to support transit and commercial uses. Off-street parking should be encouraged.

J. Coordinate public and private investment to achieve optimal leverage of public funds.

K. Create an identity for the downtown and SR-522 by giving priority consideration to improving the appearance of the physical environment through design guidelines, sidewalks, landscaping, street trees, public art and signage.

L. The downtown should acknowledge and create a beneficial and symbiotic relationship with SR-522.

M. Integrate and manage downtown development to support sound ecological principles by responding to natural landforms, providing stormwater management, improving water quality, and retaining and adding green spaces.

N. Identify downtown view corridors of significant off-site features (i.e., Lake Washington, Cascades, and surrounding hillsides), giving priority consideration to provision of public physical and visual access from the downtown quadrants to the waterfront. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.060 Additional principles – Northwest Quadrant.

A. Locate the Civic Center facility (including City Hall, a community center and library) in the Northwest Quadrant to provide the greatest stimulus to redevelopment. If there is a truly unique opportunity in another quadrant of the downtown that would meet the balance of the Civic Center criteria, it should not be ruled out.

B. Locate a multi-modal transportation facility in the Northwest Quadrant linked with other public facilities and spaces, functioning as a key node within a larger regional system.

C. Locate the Civic Center facility at a highly visible and/or accessible location, if possible taking advantage of view corridors to Lake Washington. The facility should provide long-term expansion potential and opportunities for private use of public space. Additional potential civic uses should be considered. The facility should be prominent, distinguishable and visually attractive.

D. A large, functional, open, outdoor space should be created to function as a focal point and “public square,” providing opportunities for public and private gatherings.

E. Give priority consideration to public purchase of parcels in the Northwest Quadrant where desired private investment is least likely to occur. Public investment may include purchase, long-term lease or other owner/tenant options. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.070 Applicability.

A. Design standards shall apply as depicted in Figure 18.52.070.A.1.

B. A property owner or developer electing to develop under Chapter 18.29 KMC, Transit Oriented Development (TOD) District Overlay, shall comply with Standard 1 as described in subsection C of this section.

C. The components of the design standards shall apply as follows: (X = design component required under the specific standard)

 

Design Standard

Standard 1

Standard 2

Standard 3

Article II. Site Design – Standards for All Uses

 

 

 

18.52.100

Pedestrian walkways

X

X

X

18.52.110

Northwest Quadrant circulation plan

X1

 

 

18.52.120

Public spaces and plazas

X

 

X

18.52.130

Furnishings

X

 

X

18.52.140

Site lighting

X

X

X

18.52.150

Building location/setbacks (for commercial/mixed use buildings)

X

X

X

18.52.160

Building setbacks (for residential/primarily residential uses)

X

 

X

18.52.170

Surface parking lot location

X

X

X

18.52.180

Parking lot screening

X

X

X

18.52.190

Location of driveways

X

X

X

18.52.200

Outdoor service and storage areas

X

X

X

Article III. Building Design – Standards for All Uses

 

 

 

18.52.210

Corner features

X

X

X

18.52.220

Roof form

X

X

X

18.52.230

Structured parking

X

X

X

18.52.240

Blank wall and side wall screening

X

X2

X

18.52.250

Pedestrian bridges

X

X

 

Article IV. Building Design – Standards for Commercial/Mixed Use Buildings

 

 

 

18.52.260

Visible building entrances

X

X

X

18.52.270

Ground floor facades

X

 

X

18.52.280

Ground floor transparency and visibility

X

 

X

18.52.290

Weather protection

X

 

 

18.52.300

Building materials

X

X

X

18.52.310

Upper level stepbacks, mass, and bulk

X

X

X

Article V. Building Design – Standards for Residential/Primarily Residential Uses

 

 

 

18.52.320

Primary residential entrances

X

X

X

18.52.330

Building mass and bulk

X

X

X

18.52.340

Materials

X

X

X

18.52.350

Windows

X

X

X

1 Applicable to the portion of the downtown identified in the Northwest Quadrant Circulation Plan.

2 KMC 18.52.240(B)(1), (B)(3) and (C) only.

D. In the event of conflict between the downtown design standards and any other applicable code, the city manager shall determine the appropriate application of the conflicting codes, recognizing the need to protect public health, safety, and welfare, any specific interpretation criteria, as well as furtherance of the intent of the comprehensive plan and these downtown design standards.

E. The following categories of improvements shall comply with applicable design standards:

1. New construction;

2. Exterior remodels of existing structures;

3. Parking reconfigurations;

4. Building expansions.

F. The following categories of improvements are exempt from applicable design standards:

1. Re-roofing that does not modify the roof structure;

2. Repainting;

3. Interior remodels;

4. Mechanical equipment replacement;

5. Parking lot pavement patching, or stall repainting that does not involve reconfiguration;

6. Normal maintenance or minor repair;

7. Any activity in which the total cost or fair market value (whichever is higher) of labor and materials combined does not exceed $15,000; provided, that the improvement does not involve priority standards listed in subsection G of this section. This cost/fair market value figure shall be adjusted upward by five percent annually to address a cost of living increase; provided, that within a three-year period, if the total $15,000 amount is exceeded, future improvements shall be subject to applicable design standards.

G. The degree to which each standard applies to a redevelopment project shall be evaluated on a case-by-case basis in an effort to achieve an overall design which meets the purpose and intent of the downtown design standards. In determining the degree of applicability, the city manager shall give priority to design standards which address building placement, parking standards, window/door treatments, and first floor facades.

H. For proposed existing structure exterior remodels, or existing structure expansions, parking reconfigurations, or other activities subject to design standards that are less than new construction, the city manager shall determine the extent of compliance with the design standards as appropriate to recognize current conditions and further the intent of the downtown design standards. The required design or development standards shall be related to the improvement proposed. For example, if a parking reconfiguration is proposed, the required design standards should address pedestrian walkways between parking lots and building entrances or parking lot screening; or if a building entrance is modified, visible building entrance requirements should be applied.

[Ord. 18-0454 § 2 (Exh. 1); Ord. 15-0406 § 1 (Att. A); Ord. 14-0391 § 2 (Exh. 1); Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.075 Design review process.

A. Applications subject to design review shall be reviewed and processed following the permit procedures for the primary permit application(s) consistent with Chapter 19.25 KMC.

B. Design Departure. The city manager may grant approval to depart from strict adherence to the design regulations for new construction/development if:

1. The proposal results in superior design and fulfills the policy basis for the applicable design regulations and design guidelines; and

2. The departure will not have any substantial detrimental effect on nearby properties and the City or the neighborhood. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

Article II. Site Design – Standards for All Uses

18.52.100 Pedestrian walkways.

A. Intent.

1. Pedestrian Network. To create on-site pedestrian networks from streets and drives to building entrances, through parking lots to connect buildings to the street (see surface parking location standards), and between sites.

2. Through Block Connections. To create through block connections between blocks of development, between streets, and connecting streets to public spaces.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Locations. Clear and visible pedestrian walkways shall be provided in the following locations:

a. Through Block Connections.

(1) Northwest Quadrant. If the property abuts a proposed pedestrian route designated in the Northwest Quadrant circulation plan, see KMC 18.52.110. In areas not identified on the circulation plan, one pedestrian walkway shall be provided for an average of every 300 feet or less of street frontages in the north-south and east-west directions to create a linked pedestrian walkway system around and through the Northwest Quadrant. Distances may vary from exactly 300 feet to accommodate linking adjacent development on a case-by-case basis.

(a) Public spaces shall be linked to adjacent streets and developments.

(b) Exact locations of pedestrian walkways shall be determined at the time of development to accommodate linkages between adjacent developments.

(2) Northeast Quadrant and TOD District Overlay. In the Northeast Quadrant and for properties electing to develop under Chapter 18.29 KMC in the TOD district overlay, one pedestrian walkway shall be provided between the north and south end of the property, spaced an average of every 300 feet or less of street frontages. The walkway must connect with walkways located on other properties established in accordance with this condition. Distances may vary from exactly 300 feet to accommodate linking adjacent developments on a case-by-case basis. The comprehensive plan downtown circulation concept shall be a general guide to priority pedestrian links.

(a) Public spaces shall be linked to adjacent streets and developments.

(b) Exact locations of pedestrian walkways shall be determined at the time of development to accommodate linkages between adjacent developments.

b. Street to Building Entrances. Between a public right-of-way and building entrances where the building is set back from the street, sidewalk, or parking area.

c. Parking Lots to Building Entrances. Between parking lots and building entrances.

d. Building to Building. Between buildings where multiple structures are a part of a single development project.

e. As identified on the Northwest Quadrant circulation plan, which is located in KMC 18.52.110.

2. Minimum/Average Width.

a. For buildings up to three stories in height, pedestrian walkways shall be a minimum of four feet wide with a minimum average width of six feet. The minimum/average walkway width does not include additional areas which may be required for landscaping or site furnishings.

b. For buildings greater than three stories in height, one of the following shall be used:

(1) A minimum of eight feet wide with a minimum average width of 12 feet. The minimum/average walkway width does not include additional areas which may be required for landscaping or site furnishings.

(2) Building walls above three stories in height shall be stepped back from the first three stories by 10 feet. (See building locations/setbacks, KMC 18.52.150 and 18.52.160.)

3. Lines of Sight. Locate walkways with clear sight lines for safety. Landscaping and site furnishings in the walkway shall not obstruct visibility of the walkway or sight lines to building entrances.

4. Clearly Defined Walkways. Define all pedestrian walkways using a combination of one or more of the following techniques:

a. Special Paving. Scored concrete, stained/colored concrete, concrete pavers, paving inlays, mosaics, or other special paving material. Not all portions of the pedestrian walkway are required to be paved; however, a minimum of 60 percent of the pedestrian walkway shall provide an all-weather walking surface;

b. Architectural Features. Trellises, railing, low seat walls, weather protection, bollards, or other architectural features. Chain link fences are not allowed;

c. Landscaped Edges. A continuous, landscaped area a minimum of three feet wide flanking at least one side of the pedestrian walkway. Landscaping shall meet the City’s landscaping requirements. In the case of through block connections, this subsection (B)(4)(c) shall apply in all cases, in addition to either subsection (B)(4)(a) or (b) of this section.

5. Lighting. Pedestrian walkways shall include lighting such as pedestrian lights, bollards, and accent lighting to assist pedestrian navigation and promote a safe and comfortable walking space.

6. Pedestrian Walkways in Parking Lots. Where a walkway abuts or intersects a vehicular route (a driveway or driving aisle within a parking lot), landscaping shall be required consistent with subsection (B)(4)(c) of this section. If the walk-way abuts a driveway or driving aisle on both sides, subsection (B)(4)(c) of this section shall apply to both sides.

C. Not Allowed. Narrow breezeways between buildings without architectural embellishments or site furnishings shall not be allowed. [Ord. 16-0428 § 13 (Att. I); Ord. 15-0406 § 1 (Att. A); Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.110 Northwest Quadrant circulation plan.

Notes: This map is intended for planning purposes only and is not guaranteed to show accurate measurement. Signals at pedestrian crossings will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Source: Arai/Jackson Architects and Planners and Berger/ABAM Engineers. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.120 Public spaces and plazas.

A. Intent.

1. Comfortable and Usable Public Space. Create usable, accessible, and inviting public open space for pedestrians.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Access. Public spaces shall be visible and accessible to the public. All public spaces shall have pedestrian access from the primary public right-of-way or designated pedestrian walkway.

2. Public Space Amenities. Public spaces and plazas shall include at least one or more of each of the following elements (in subsections (B)(2)(a) through (c) of this section):

a. Special Paving. Scored concrete, stained/colored concrete, concrete pavers, paving inlays, mosaics, or other special paving material.

b. Landscaping. Trees, shrubs, trellises, flowers, or container plants.

c. Seating Area. Benches, low seating walls. Four linear feet or at least one seat per 60 square feet of plaza area or open space.

In addition to the requirements in subsections (B)(2)(a) through (c) of this section, public spaces and plazas shall also contain one or more of the following elements:

d. Public art, fountain, or sculpture;

e. Drinking fountain;

f. Gazebos or other covered/sheltered space;

g. Other elements which meet the intent of this section such as grade/elevation changes, historic markers, art elements, pools, or others.

3. Site Lighting. Use site lighting such as pedestrian lights, bollards, accent lighting, or building-mounted lighting to provide safe and comfortable public spaces. See site lighting standards, KMC 18.52.140.

4. Solar Access. Where feasible, locate public spaces and courtyards to maximize southern and western sun exposure. [Ord. 16-0428 § 13 (Att. I); Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.130 Furnishings.

A. Intent.

1. Furnishings Add Comfort and Detail. To create inviting, pedestrian-friendly public spaces by incorporating site furnishings in plazas, public spaces, building entries, and in other pedestrian areas.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Durable Furnishings. Site furnishings (benches, tables, bicycle racks, bollards, trash receptacles) and pedestrian amenities shall be made of durable, vandal resistant, and weather resistant materials which do not retain rainwater.

2. Siting. Site furnishings shall be located in all required public spaces, such as:

a. Plazas, pedestrian walkways and other pedestrian areas;

b. Where building setbacks are allowed to:

(1) Highlight building entrances (a minimum three and one-half feet recessed depth or greater than or equal to 16 square feet);

(2) Provide seating in a landscaped public area. Seating shall be provided at a ratio of four linear feet or at least one seat per 60 square feet of plaza area or open space.

3. Placement. Site furnishings shall not impede or block pedestrian access to plazas, open spaces, or building entrances.

4. Incorporate Site Furnishings. Use a combination of four or more site furnishings in required public spaces. Site furnishings include but are not limited to:

a. Trash receptacles (required as one of the four site furnishings);

b. Benches/seating;

c. Tables;

d. Bike racks;

e. Drinking fountains;

f. Pedestrian-scaled lighting (other than street lights in the public right-of-way);

g. Public art;

h. Container plants. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.140 Site lighting.

A. Intent.

1. Adequate Lighting Levels. To provide adequate lighting levels in pedestrian areas such as plazas, pedestrian walkways, parking areas, building entries, and other public areas.

2. Complement Street Lighting. To provide pedestrian-scaled, accent, and festival lighting to accompany street lighting.

3. Safety. To provide well lit, comfortable, and safe pedestrian areas.

4. Minimize Night Glow. To ensure adequate lighting is confined to the project site and minimizes night glow and impacts to adjacent properties.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Light Pedestrian Areas. Use pedestrian-scaled lighting to define plazas, courtyards, pedestrian walkways, crosswalks, building entries, and other pedestrian areas. Pedestrian-scaled lighting includes but is not limited to:

a. Pedestrian lights (maximum 14-foot height);

b. Bollard lights;

c. Accent lighting.

2. Shielding. All site lighting shall be shielded and directed away from adjacent buildings to avoid glare and “night glow.” Site lighting will be reviewed on a project-specific basis to ensure site lighting is directed onto the pedestrian area and away from adjacent uses. Site lighting review will address:

a. Foot-candle illumination;

b. Optics;

c. Shielding techniques;

d. Consideration of adjacent uses, especially adjacent residential buildings.

3. Adequate Illumination. Site lighting shall be reviewed on a project-specific basis to ensure pedestrian areas are adequately lit. Review considerations shall include:

a. Spacing;

b. Height of light fixture;

c. Shielding techniques.

4. Complementary Style. Site lighting shall complement and coordinate with other site furnishings used throughout the site development project and shall complement street lighting in the public right-of-way.

5. Light Special Areas. Use accent lighting at focal points such as building entrances, site entrances, public art, and landscape features. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.150 Building location/setbacks (for commercial/mixed use buildings).

A. Intent.

1. Retail Visibility. To ensure visibility of retail businesses, to establish active, lively uses along the sidewalk, and to encourage strolling in the downtown.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Buildings Close to Sidewalk. The majority of buildings shall be located directly abutting the sidewalk except where set back to highlight building entrances, plazas or to provide wider sidewalks, as follows:

a. Highlight Entrances. A minimum setback of four feet shall be allowed to highlight entrances or to provide wider sidewalks;

b. Landscaped Area. A maximum setback of up to 10 feet shall be allowed to provide seating in a landscaped public area;

c. Corner Lots. On corner lots, the building shall face the primary street; the primary entrance must be on one of the two streets, with the location determined on a case-by-case basis, evaluating access, volumes, adjacent uses, on-site and through-site circulation, and other fixed site features;

d. Plazas at Corners. A maximum setback of up to 10 feet on corner lots shall be allowed to provide plaza space;

e. Multiple buildings in one development, or properties subject to compliance with KMC 18.52.170(B)(2), surface parking lot location street frontage. At least 55 percent of the lot frontage shall be occupied by the primary building. The remaining buildings and associated parking may be set back further from the street. In cases where the development is on a corner lot, the building shall abut the primary street; the primary entrance must be on one of the two streets, with the location determined on a case-by-case basis, evaluating access, volumes, adjacent uses, on-site and through-site circulation, and other fixed site features;

f. Properties Fronting SR-522. Parcels fronting SR-522 shall be set back 10 feet from the right-of-way to allow for sidewalks, provided for all parcels fronting on the south side of SR-522 and zoned regional business, located east of 61st Avenue NE and west of 68th Avenue NE, the minimum street setback requirements shall be as follows:

(1) Ground floors shall maintain a minimum and maximum setback of 10 feet.

(2) For stories located below the ground floor, the minimum setback shall be zero feet, and the maximum setback shall be 10 feet.

(3) For facades above the ground floor (minimum elevation of 15 feet above street level), the minimum setback at any one point shall be no less than five feet, and the maximum setback at any one point shall be no greater than 10 feet. The setback may be averaged between a minimum of five feet and a maximum of 10 feet for purposes of modulation, but shall not be less than or greater than the minimum or maximum setbacks at any one point;

g. Recessed entrances are allowed;

h. On-Street Parking. Buildings may be set back to a planned right-of-way boundary for the purposes of adding on-street parking. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.160 Building setbacks (for residential/primarily residential uses).

A. Intent.

1. Pedestrian Orientation and Densities. To ensure pedestrian orientation and desired densities in downtown.

2. Transition and Buffer. To provide minor transition and buffer areas between streets and residences which can function as outdoor space.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Buildings Close to Sidewalk. A minimum six-foot setback, with an average setback of eight feet per street frontage, shall be required of primary structures to allow for shallow, residential front yards. The minimum setback for garages, carports, and paved parking shall be 10 feet. In the Northwest Quadrant, maximum setbacks for any structures shall be 10 feet.

2. Modulate Street Facing Facades. Use minor modulation techniques such as:

a. Recessed entries;

b. Landscaped gardens;

c. Plazas;

d. Courtyards.

3. Palette of Front Yard Transition Elements. Use two or more of the following elements to provide front yard transitions and create usable front yard space:

a. Steps;

b. Low fences;

c. Trellises;

d. Site furnishings;

e. Low hedges, trees, and landscaped borders;

f. Rain gardens or bioretention facilities;

g. Patios if a low fence or trellis is included for added privacy.

4. Palette of Entrance Elements. Provide entrance elements such as:

a. Gates;

b. Archways or arbors;

c. Walkway covers;

d. Special paving;

e. Pedestrian lighting. [Ord. 16-0428 § 13 (Att. I); Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.170 Surface parking lot location.

A. Intent.

1. Maintain Active Street Frontage. To maintain contiguous active pedestrian street frontages by avoiding parking lot siting along sidewalks and street frontages.

2. Impacts. To minimize visual impact of parking lots through screening where parking lots are unavoidable on street frontages.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Location of Parking Lots. For all new development, parking lots shall be located behind or to the side of buildings, or enclosed within or underneath the building. Parking lots shall be avoided along primary street frontages; on a corner lot, the primary entrance must be on one of the two streets, with the location determined on a case-by-case basis, evaluating access, volumes, adjacent uses, on-site and through-site circulation, and other fixed site features. The parking lot screening requirements in KMC 18.52.180 apply where a surface parking lot or portions of a surface parking lot abut a public right-of-way. Parking lots shall not be located between a public right-of-way and the building unless the following exceptions apply:

a. No other feasible alternative exists; or

b. The property has frontage on SR-522 and takes primary access from SR-522 as of May 8, 2003; and/or

c. The development consists of multiple buildings in one development on a minimum of four acres;

in which case, the provisions of subsection (B)(2) of this section apply.

2. Street Frontage. Where consistent with the exceptions of subsection (B)(1) of this section, parking lots on street frontages shall be located between buildings, with no less than 55 percent of the property street frontage devoted to the building facade. The street frontage devoted to surface parking shall also be appropriately screened per the parking lot screening standards in KMC 18.52.180.

3. Pedestrian Walkways. Where a surface parking lot is located between the public right-of-way and the primary building, a pedestrian walkway shall be provided through the parking lot to connect the building to the street per the pedestrian walkway standards in KMC 18.52.100 and the development standards of KMC 18.40.100(C). [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.180 Parking lot screening.

A. Intent.

1. Reduce Visual Prominence. To reduce visual impact of parking lots through screening techniques.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Perimeter Screening. Where surface parking lots are adjacent to a public right-of-way, the parking lot shall provide a minimum 10-foot-wide planting strip between the parking lot and right(s)-of-way. Landscape requirements in Chapter 18.35 KMC also apply.

2. Screening Techniques. Year-round perimeter screening shall provide a visually impervious screen utilizing one or more of the following screening techniques:

a. Screen Walls. Low walls, opaque hedge walls, etc., shall be a minimum of three feet in height and maximum of four feet in height. Where screen walls are used, the 10-foot-wide planting strip requirement may be reduced by two feet.

b. Screen Wall Transparency. For screen walls taller than four feet in height, all elements above four feet shall be made of semitransparent materials, i.e., lattice walls, trellises, etc. Those portions of the screen wall taller than four feet in height shall be a minimum of 85 percent transparency (i.e., see-through railing, trellis, or similar treatment).

c. Evergreen Shrubs. Shrubs shall be maintained at a maximum four feet in height from the sidewalk to maintain visibility into the site for security/safety purposes. At planting, shrubs shall be a minimum two-gallon pot size or balled and burlapped equivalent.

d. Trees. A mixture of evergreen and deciduous trees and shrubs. At planting, deciduous trees shall be a minimum three-inch caliper. Evergreen trees shall be a minimum of six-foot height to the uppermost branching point at planting.

e. Wood Fences. If a wood fence is used, the fence shall have decorative detailing at the top (i.e., trellis materials) and an eight-foot-wide planting strip. The requirements of subsection (B)(2)(b) of this section are also applicable.

f. Bioretention Landscaping. Bioretention landscaping may be used within the perimeter screen in conjunction with one or more of the options in subsections (B)(2)(a) thorough (e) of this section.

3. Supporting Ground Cover. Evergreen ground cover, other than grass, shall be used in addition to the screening techniques identified above. A maximum of 45 percent of all ground cover required shall be dedicated to grass.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Plain Fence. Unadorned wood fences or chain link fencing is not allowed. [Ord. 16-0428 § 13 (Att. I); Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.190 Location of driveways.

A. Intent.

1. Minimize Sidewalk Interruptions. To maintain continuous, uninterrupted sidewalks by minimizing, consolidating, and eliminating driveways and promoting shared access to the extent possible.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Locate Driveways. Locate vehicular driveways on side streets and alleys unless the primary street is the only means of access to the site.

2. Parking Lot Entrances. Parking lot entrances shall be clearly identified with markers such as a trellis, monument, low wall, or landscaping.

3. Continuous Sidewalks. Extend sidewalk paving across driveway to maintain sidewalk continuity.

4. Kenmore Street Standards. Driveway locations shall satisfy the requirements of the current City adopted street standards. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.200 Outdoor service and storage areas.

A. Intent.

1. Screening. To maintain design continuity by screening mechanical, service, and storage areas.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Siting of On-Site Storage Areas. All outdoor service and storage areas such as mechanical equipment, outdoor storage, trash/recycling containers, etc., shall be fully screened and shall not be visible from adjacent public streets or from views above from adjacent buildings. The Kenmore development standards and design requirements of KMC 18.30.250 also apply.

2. At-Grade Service Areas. At-grade storage areas such as outdoor storage and/or trash/recycling containers shall be screened from adjacent streets and public rights-of-way and from views above from adjacent buildings. Pedestrian-oriented trash receptacles along walkways and in public spaces are excepted from this requirement.

3. Screening Techniques. Service area screening shall be 100 percent sight-obscuring, year-round, utilizing one or more of the following screening techniques:

a. Fences and Walls. Fencing and wall materials shall be integrated and compatible with the design of the building (i.e., use the building’s materials on fence columns);

b. Adjacent to Pedestrian Walkways. Where an outdoor storage area is adjacent to a pedestrian walkway, fences installed for screening may be used only in combination with either landscaping, vines, trellis, or similar landscaping screening technique;

c. Evergreen Hedges and Shrubs. Landscaping shall meet the City’s landscaping requirements for Type I landscaping;

d. Trees. A mixture of evergreen and deciduous trees. Landscaping shall meet the City’s landscaping requirements for Type I landscaping.

e. Bioretention Landscaping. Bioretention landscaping may be used within the perimeter screen in conjunction with one or more of the options in subsections (B)(3)(a) through (d) of this section.

4. Mechanical Equipment. Locate mechanical equipment early in the design process to ensure integration with the building design. Roof-mounted mechanical equipment shall be grouped together, integrated into the building design, and thoroughly screened from view from the street level and above from adjacent buildings. Roof-mounted screening techniques include but are not limited to:

a. Roof Treatment. Roofline designed to screen visibility of mechanical equipment from an adjacent public street(s);

b. Paint. Paint mechanical equipment to match or approximate the color of the roof;

c. Setbacks. Position mechanical equipment away from building edges. [Ord. 16-0428 § 13 (Att. I); Ord. 16-0426 § 7 (Att. E); Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

Article III. Building Design – Standards for All Uses

18.52.210 Corner features.

A. Intent.

1. To ensure architectural interest and pedestrian-scaled detail in downtown.

2. To allow for comfortable pedestrian queuing space.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Locations Where Standards Apply. Corner features are required at locations specified on the Northwest Quadrant circulation map, KMC 18.52.110; outside of the Northwest Quadrant, corner features shall be provided when conditions in subsections (B)(2) and (3) of this section are present.

2. Corner Features for Buildings at Intersections Facing Two Streets.

a. Architectural Features. Building sides that face corners of public streets shall be treated architecturally to emphasize the corner location. Appropriate expressions include:

(1) Tower forms;

(2) Prominent building entries;

(3) Oversized window treatment;

(4) Special rooflines;

(5) Plazas;

(6) Other treatments which meet the intent of this standard.

b. Building Corner Setbacks. First floors of building corners facing intersections of two streets shall be set back 10 feet to accommodate pedestrian circulation. Columns are allowed in the setback area up to the size of a two-foot square footprint.

3. Corner Features for Buildings at Intersections of a Street and a Pedestrian Walkway and/or Two Pedestrian Walkways. Entrances to pedestrian walkways shall be visually emphasized by the use of two of the following elements:

a. Special Paving. Scored concrete, stained/colored concrete, concrete pavers, paving inlays, mosaics, or other special paving material which is different from the standard sidewalk material;

b. Landscaping. Trees, shrubs, trellises, flowers, or container plants;

c. Seating Area. Benches, low seating walls;

d. Site lighting;

e. City signage. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.220 Roof form.

A. Intent.

1. Distinctive Profiles. To ensure that roof forms provide distinctive profiles and visual interest.

2. Express Base and Top. To provide details which break buildings into distinct visible elements of base and top (see upper level stepbacks, mass and bulk standards in KMC 18.52.310 for details regarding building modulation and articulation).

B. Standards – Required.

1. Commercial Buildings. Commercial buildings shall use one of the following elements to create a prominent edge:

a. Extended parapets;

b. Projecting cornices;

c. Pitched or sloped roofs;

d. Decorative molding if greater than or equal to 10 inches wide.

2. Predominantly Residential Buildings. Buildings which contain predominantly residential uses shall use the following elements to break up the massiveness of an uninterrupted flat roof:

a. Dormers;

b. Pitched roofs;

c. Stepbacks;

d. Roof gardens;

e. Cornices;

f. Parapets; and

g. Intersecting roof forms.

These types of roof treatments shall be determined at the discretion of the city manager.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Flat, Unadorned Roofs. Flat roofs without architectural embellishments are not allowed on buildings in the downtown. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.230 Structured parking.

A. Intent.

1. Visually Integrated. To visually integrate parking garages with other downtown uses through active ground floor uses, and the use of architectural treatments, such as materials, treatments of openings, and human-scaled facade elements.

2. Garage Elevations. To ensure that parking garage facades facing public rights-of-way screen cars from view and resemble commercial, office, civic, and mixed use building elevations.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Retail Frontage Along Streets. Parking structures shall provide retail usages for at least 50 percent of the first floor street frontages (sites fronting 182nd excepted).

2. Treatments in Nonretail Areas. Portions of ground level facade not occupied by retail uses shall integrate one or more of the following into the ground level facade:

a. Ornamental grillwork (other than plain horizontal or vertical bars);

b. Decorative artwork (metal panels, ceramic, mosaics, etc.);

c. Display windows for events;

d. Brick, tile, or stone;

e. Pre-cast panels;

f. Wood paneling;

g. Blank wall treatments per the blank wall standards, KMC 18.52.240;

h. Other treatments which meet the intent of these standards.

3. Opening Size. The maximum size of window and facade openings shall be 64 square feet (excluding driveway/parking garage entry). The window/facade openings shall be treated further with minimum 24-inch mullions to prevent large openings in the parking garage facade.

4. Treatments in Primarily Residential Areas. Ground level facade treatments for residential parking garages shall integrate one or more of the following:

a. Ornamental grillwork (other than plain horizontal or vertical bars);

b. Decorative artwork (metal panels, ceramic, mosaics, etc.);

c. Brick, tile, or stone;

d. Pre-cast panels;

e. Wood paneling;

f. Blank wall treatments per the blank wall standards, KMC 18.52.240.

5. Facade Articulation. At least two of the following elements shall be incorporated into parking garage facades to articulate the facade and provide human-scaled architectural elements:

a. Piers or pilasters;

b. Recessed window openings;

c. Window sills and details;

d. Masonry trim;

e. Accent materials;

f. Tile, stone, or pre-cast panels;

g. Other treatments which provide facade articulation.

6. Architectural Elements in Vehicular Entrances. Vehicular entrances to structured parking shall incorporate two of the following elements into the design:

a. Arches;

b. Lintels;

c. Piers or pilasters;

d. Masonry trim;

e. Planters;

f. Ornamental lighting;

g. Tile, stone, or pre-cast panels.

7. Townhouse Units. Each unit shall have an individual garage, enclosed under the living spaces. Such garage shall be located on a different facade from the main entry of the unit.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Plain Concrete Facades. Plain, unadorned, or smooth concrete facades are not allowed.

2. Horizontal or Vertical Bars. Unadorned horizontal or vertical bars are not allowed in parking garage window openings. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.240 Blank wall and side wall screening.

A. Intent.

1. Continuity of Visual Interest. To ensure that all sides of a building in the public view have visual interest and continuity of pedestrian-oriented building scale.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Architectural Treatments for Visible Building Sides. All sides of buildings visible from a public right-of-way shall be treated with two or more of the following elements:

a. Visible rooflines (i.e., cornices, extended parapets, pitched/sloped roofs, decorative molding, etc.);

b. Windows;

c. Secondary entrances;

d. Balconies;

e. Awnings;

f. Oversized window treatments;

g. Other architectural details which meet the intent of this standard.

2. Detailed Walls Required. Ground floor walls (including retaining walls) within public view shall have architectural detail such as windows, doors, reveals, and other architectural features as described in the building design section of these standards. A wall is considered a blank wall if:

a. A ground floor wall or portion of a ground floor wall over six feet in height that has a horizontal length greater than 15 feet and does not include architectural detailing; or

b. Any portion of a ground floor wall having a surface area of 400 square feet or greater.

3. Blank Wall Screening. Where a blank wall within the public view is unavoidable due to International Building Code regulations (such as where a side building wall abuts a property line), blank walls shall be treated with two or more of the following:

a. Vegetation, including trees, shrubs, evergreen ground cover (in conjunction with other landscaping) or vines adjacent to the blank wall surface;

b. Trellis vine panels;

c. Architectural detailing such as reveals, contrasting materials, or other special detailing which meets the intent of this standard.

Due to the many potential site-specific conditions which could occur, blank/side wall treatment shall be subject to the city manager’s discretion and approval.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Murals. Murals shall not be permitted pending the completion of City standards addressing appropriate allowances, criteria, and locations. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.250 Pedestrian bridges.

A. Intent.

1. Active and Accessible. Locate pedestrian bridge(s) in active places which are accessible at all hours and promote safe passage over major roadways.

2. Unique Architectural Qualities. To develop unique and inviting pedestrian bridges as key gateway features which are integrated with buildings at bridge ends.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Locate Bridge Ends in Active Buildings and Places. Locate bridge ends in active, publicly accessible buildings or places which are accessible and secure at all hours.

2. Building and Landscape Treatments. Pedestrian bridges shall be designed as unique structures which serve as a key gateway feature to the downtown.

3. Integration with End Structures. The appearance, materials, and style of pedestrian bridges shall be architecturally integrated with the end structures or places.

4. Weather Protection. Weather protection, in the form of a roof or canopy structure, shall be provided over the entire length of pedestrian bridges. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

Article IV. Building Design – Standards for Commercial/Mixed Use Buildings

18.52.260 Visible building entrances.

A. Intent.

1. Visible and Welcoming Entrances. To make major building entrances obvious and welcoming.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Visual Prominence. The primary building entrance shall be made visibly prominent utilizing a minimum of five of the architectural treatments listed below. At least one element shall be selected from each of the categories listed below (i.e., at least one element from subsections (B)(1)(a), (b) and (c) of this section).

a. Facade Features.

(1) Recess;

(2) Canopies;

(3) Trellis;

(4) Porticos;

(5) Porches.

b. Doorway Features.

(1) Clerestory;

(2) Transom windows;

(3) Glass windows flanking door;

(4) Large entry doors;

(5) Ornamental lighting;

(6) Lit displays.

c. Detail Features.

(1) Special entry paving;

(2) Ornamental building name or address;

(3) Planters or pots of flowers;

(4) Seating.

2. Weather Protection. Provide some form of weather protection at building entrances such as a canopy, marquee, or awning. This feature may be combined with the methods used above to achieve visual building entry prominence. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.270 Ground floor facades.

A. Intent.

1. Visual Interest in Ground Level Activities. To visually and architecturally express ground level activities which promote the pedestrian environment.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Architectural Treatments and Details. Commercial building facades facing streets shall incorporate at least two elements from each of the following categories, with a minimum of five total treatments required:

a. Palette of Window Treatments.

(1) Large storefront windows above kickplates;

(2) Clerestory windows;

(3) Recessed windows;

(4) Mullions.

b. Palette of Facade Treatments.

(1) Lighting or baskets supported by ornamental brackets;

(2) Medallions;

(3) Belt courses;

(4) Plinths for columns;

(5) Piers or pilasters;

(6) Projecting sills;

(7) Tilework;

(8) Stone or concrete masonry;

(9) Pedestrian-scaled signs;

(10) Planter boxes; or

(11) Other architectural treatments which meet the intent of this standard. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.280 Ground floor transparency and visibility.

A. Intent.

1. Visual Interest in Ground Level Activities. To visually and architecturally express ground level activities which contribute to the pedestrian environment.

2. Visibility into Buildings. To provide visibility into buildings and from buildings out to the sidewalks.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Clear Glass Windows. A minimum of 50 percent of the ground floor facade of commercial buildings fronting public streets shall be comprised of windows. The facade shall be measured from the ground to the projected interior ceiling height.

2. Film. Film may be applied to windows to provide shade and for energy efficiency, provided full transparency and visibility are maintained into the building from the sidewalk.

3. Visible Light Transmittance. Windows shall have a minimum 50 percent visible light transmittance.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Reflective Glass or Film. Reflective glass and/or reflective film which diminish transparency are not allowed. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.290 Weather protection.

A. Intent.

1. Weather Protection. To provide weather protection for pedestrians throughout downtown.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Canopies, Arcades, or Awnings. Canopies, arcades, or awnings shall be provided on commercial building facades facing streets. Dimensions shall provide a:

a. Minimum canopy depth of five feet;

b. Vertical height above the sidewalk and underside of canopy between eight and 10 feet;

c. Minimum protection along 80 percent of the building facade facing a public right-of-way;

d. If an arcade is proposed, the specific dimensions and length of the arcade will be negotiated on a case-by-case basis to ensure adequate light, air, and visibility through to ground floor windows and building entries from the street.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Internal or Backlit Canopies. Internal, backlit, or uplit canopies are prohibited. Downlighting is allowed to light sidewalk for pedestrians.

2. Awnings as Signage. Awnings shall not be used as primary signage, including use of print and backlighting. If awnings are used for signage, the drop edge of the awning/canopy shall not exceed 12 inches in height. In addition, the City’s sign code requirements shall apply. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.300 Building materials.

A. Intent.

1. To develop a visual downtown identity and to ensure that downtown development forms a cohesive visual whole over time. This shall be accomplished through the use of a primarily masonry materials palette.

2. To provide a materials palette which allows for individual and creative architectural expression in individual development.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Primary Materials Palette. Commercial and mixed use buildings shall be built with materials which will form a visually cohesive identity over time. Facades of commercial and commercial levels of mixed use buildings shall be primarily of the following masonry materials:

a. Brick;

b. Stone;

c. Ceramic Tile. Alternate coursing with changes in color and/or texture is required with use of tile. Alternate coursing can be vertical, horizontal, or both;

d. Split Face Alternate Course Concrete Masonry Units. Alternate coursing with changes in color and/or texture is required with use of split face masonry units. Alternate coursing can be vertical, horizontal, or both;

e. Stucco, if limited to a maximum 50 percent of total building surface area.

2. On any facade adjoining a public sidewalk, at the first two stories above the public sidewalk level, and at exposed stories below the public sidewalk level, primary materials must cover 85 percent of the opaque surfaces on any elevation. On other facades in the public view (from adjacent public streets, pedestrian walkways, or public spaces), primary materials must cover more than 50 percent of the opaque surfaces.

Exceptions:

a. Transparent glass may cover 75 percent of the first story of any one facade. Transparent glass may cover 40 percent of the second story of any one facade.

b. Where there are two front property lines, transparent glass may cover 75 percent of a second facade if the facade is within 15 feet of the property line.

3. Residential Floors, Mixed Use Buildings. Nonmasonry materials may be used as a primary material in the residential portions of mixed use buildings subject to any applicable restrictions in this section.

4. Vinyl Siding. Vinyl siding is only permitted on floors three and above, and shall not exceed 15 percent of the total building surface area of those floors.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Plain Faced and/or Uncolored Concrete Masonry Units. Plain faced and/or uncolored concrete masonry units shall not cover an area greater than five percent of any facade.

2. Siding Materials Not Allowed. The following siding materials are not allowed on any building facade:

a. Asphalt siding;

b. Aluminum lap siding;

c. Siding grade plywood. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.310 Upper level stepbacks, mass, and bulk.

A. Intent.

1. Develop Pedestrian Scale. To ensure that multiple-storied building facades do not overwhelm the pedestrian orientation and scale of downtown.

B. Standards – Required. A minimum of two of the following techniques shall be applied to facades visible from public rights-of-way and public spaces to minimize the apparent bulk and mass of a building:

1. Step Back Buildings Over Two Stories. Buildings above two stories in height shall step back the upper stories as follows:

a. Stepbacks above two stories shall be a minimum of six feet from the first two floors;

b. A second, minimum six-foot stepback shall be made above four stories;

c. Evident Decrease in Bulk. Stepbacks need not be continuous and uniform across the entire facade as long as bulk is visually decreased.

2. Horizontal Building Modulation. Use bays, recesses, and building projections to provide variations in large facades.

a. The maximum horizontal length without building modulation shall be 100 feet.

b. Modulation Depth. The minimum modulation depth shall be six feet.

3. Modulated Roofline. Provide breaks in the roofline by alternating stepped roofs, gables, dormers, etc. (see roof form standards, KMC 18.52.220).

4. Articulation. Building articulation with at least one of the following architectural elements:

a. Change in materials or color with a change in building plane;

b. Decks and Balconies. Decks, terraces, and balconies are encouraged but not required, and may be roofed or open;

c. Bay windows;

d. Repeat distinctive window patterns at horizontal modulation intervals.

5. Other Treatments. Other architectural treatments which meet the intent of this standard.

C. Exceptions.

1. Stairs, Corner Features, and Other Architectural Features. Stairs, corners, and other vertical architectural features are not required to step back. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

Article V. Building Design – Standards for Residential/Primarily Residential Uses

18.52.320 Primary residential entrances.

(Applies to all multifamily residential development except townhouses.)

A. Intent.

1. Active and Lively Street. To face residential entrances onto streets to create and maintain a lively and active downtown.

2. Safe and Welcoming Entry. To provide safe and welcoming building entries.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Visible Entrance. The primary building entrance shall be visible from the adjacent street.

2. Weatherproof Covering. All building entries shall have a weatherproof covering.

3. Secure and Direct Access. Primary building entries shall provide secure and direct access to lobbies, stairs, and elevators. Gated entries are not allowed.

4. Entrance Dimensions. The primary residential entrance shall be a minimum four feet deep and a width at least 50 percent wider than the entry doors.

5. Visual Prominence. The primary building entrance shall be made visibly prominent utilizing a minimum of five of the architectural treatments listed below. At least one element shall be selected from each of the categories listed below (i.e., at least one element from subsections (B)(5)(a), (b) and (c) of this section).

a. Facade Features.

(1) Recess;

(2) Overhangs;

(3) Canopies;

(4) Trellis;

(5) Porticos;

(6) Porches.

b. Doorway Features.

(1) Clerestory;

(2) Transom windows;

(3) Glass windows flanking door;

(4) Large entry doors;

(5) Ornamental lighting.

c. Detail Features.

(1) Special entry paving;

(2) Ornamental building name or address;

(3) Planters or pots of flowers;

(4) Seating. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.330 Building mass and bulk.

A. Intent.

1. Reduce Building Bulk with Smaller Architectural Components. To reduce the apparent bulk of buildings by breaking them down into smaller components which are consistent with the pedestrian scale of downtown.

2. Visual Variety. To provide visual variety along streets.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Variations in Large Facades. Horizontal appearance facades longer than 25 feet in length shall be treated to reduce visual scale and bulk using two of the following:

a. Bays and recesses (bays and recesses shall be a minimum of three feet in depth and eight feet long. Wall variations shall extend from first floor to roof, excluding balconies, decks, and terraces);

b. Balconies, decks, and terraces;

c. Distinctive roof forms;

d. Window patterns;

e. Changes in materials;

f. Color differentiation;

g. Projections or overhangs;

h. Upper story stepbacks.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Flat Blank Walls Not Allowed. Flat blank walls are not allowed. See blank wall standards, KMC 18.52.240. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.340 Materials.

A. Intent.

1. Ensure Quality and Maintenance Over Time. To ensure a standard of quality and maintenance over time.

2. Materials and Details that Reduce Bulk. To encourage the use of materials appropriate to residential development and details that reduce the visual bulk of larger buildings.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Durable Materials with Texture and Pattern. Exterior materials shall be durable and maintainable over time, including:

a. Materials with textures or patterns;

b. Materials which lend themselves to quality detailing and can be well maintained over time.

2. Allowed Primary Materials.

a. Allowed primary materials include wood or masonry units (brick, stone, tile, or split face alternate course concrete);

b. Enamel panels, and precast concrete panels. If panel materials are used, each panel shall not exceed a maximum of nine square feet.

3. Vinyl Siding. Vinyl siding is only permitted on floors three and above, and shall not exceed 15 percent of the total building surface area of those floors.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Reflective Glass. Reflective glass is not allowed.

2. Siding Materials Not Allowed. The following siding materials are not allowed on any building facade:

a. Asphalt siding;

b. Aluminum lap siding;

c. Siding grade plywood. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]

18.52.350 Windows.

A. Intent.

1. Active and Lively Street. To face windows onto streets to create and maintain a lively and active downtown.

B. Standards – Required.

1. Transparent Windows. Transparent windows are required where buildings face streets.

2. Varied Window Sizes. Residential buildings shall be designed with varied window sizes and shapes, including:

a. Varied shape, and number of panes;

b. Divided or mullioned windows if appropriate to style;

c. Cantilevered bay windows if appropriate to style and may project 18 inches into required stepback areas;

d. Recessed windows;

e. Visible and substantial trim;

f. Butt glazing is allowed.

3. Visible and Substantial Trim. Windows shall be surrounded with visible and substantial trim.

C. Not Allowed.

1. Two-Light Horizontal Sliding Windows. Horizontal sliding windows with two lights are not allowed. [Ord. 11-0329 § 3 (Exh. 1).]