Chapter 18.34
DESIGN STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES1

Sections:

18.34.010    Authority, purpose, and organization.

18.34.020    Users and implementation.

18.34.030    Applicability, exemptions, relation to other codes, and effect.

18.34.040    Procedural and submittal requirements.

18.34.050    Single-family and cottage residential.

18.34.060    Multifamily residential.

18.34.070    Commercial, mixed-use and industrial design standards and guidelines.

18.34.080    Historic buildings.

18.34.090    Related residential uses.

18.34.010 Authority, purpose, and organization.

A. Authority. These design standards and guidelines are established under the authority of the Washington State Constitution, Article XI, Section 11; Chapters 35.63, 35A.63 and 36.70A RCW. These state laws grant police powers to the city of North Bend to promote and protect the public health, safety, and welfare through a variety of land use planning and regulatory mechanisms, including design standards and guidelines.

B. Purpose. The design standards are a fundamental tool to focus on the quality of growth – to establish the physical environment, and in turn, shape the consequent, cultural, social, and economic place – the community – that North Bend can become. Communities throughout the Puget Sound region, and throughout the nation, have recognized that zoning, subdivision, and critical area regulations alone, nor cumulatively, do not achieve many of the qualitative growth and quality-of-life aspects that citizens so desire. In recent years, communities have turned to design standards as having a unique and critical role in shaping physical growth and development patterns. Unlike other codes, the design standards are comprehensive in their topic coverage, including principles that address architectural style and related matters, materials and color, building mass and scale, building orientation, site circulation, access and parking, and lot bulk and dimensional variation. Citizens have expressed the desire for a vibrant small city with dynamic and connected neighborhoods, greenbelts/pedestrian options, and architecturally appealing commercial centers that capitalize on North Bend’s unique locale. Both of these trends can be seen currently in North Bend. This is also envisioned by the city’s comprehensive plan, Resolution 639, and other policy documents, that are a concerted effort on the part of North Bend citizens, business owners, public officials, and city staff.

It is this unique combination of physical and qualitative development standards and principles that can successfully shape the future of North Bend. In addition, the following items provide the basis and applicability of this chapter:

1. Provide predictability of new design for citizens and users of the design standards and guidelines;

2. Steward the natural and cultural resource heritage, including historic, visual and aesthetic qualities, that the city of North Bend and the Upper Snoqualmie Valley are richly endowed with;

3. Provide guidance to urban design decisions that will promote development of high environmental, visual, and aesthetic quality throughout the city, and avoid noncompatible, discordant, unsightly, and poor quality design;

4. Ensure that design matters are considered comprehensively, and not in isolation, on development projects;

5. Encourage innovative and exemplary urban design and neo-traditional design and development appropriate to the North Bend context;

6. Use urban design as an important mechanism to achieve worthy environmental, economic, and social opportunities present in the community;

7. Make North Bend a more pedestrian-friendly, bicycle-friendly, and transit-friendly community with associated benefits while recognizing the role of the automobile for transportation needs;

8. Stimulate desirable economic development through quality design and construction;

9. Ensure that new development is made compatible with existing neighborhoods and areas, as appropriate to the aim of good urban design throughout the city.

C. Chapter Organization. The design standards and guidelines are broken down into commercial/mixed-use/industrial, single-family, cottage, and multifamily.

The term “standards” or “guidelines” may be utilized throughout this chapter to refer to design standards and design guidelines. The effect of standards and guidelines is explained in NBMC 18.34.030(E).

Cross-references are made between text sections and other North Bend codes where there is a directly related reference. Users must be aware that the standards are intended to work collectively to achieve overall purposes. In general, new residential and nonresidential development will need to be attentive to all applicable standards, as prescribed, depending on the specific type of development project. (Ord. 1561 § 1 (Exh. A (part)), 2015: Ord. 1323 § 1 (part), 2008: Ord. 1100 § 1 (part), 2000).

18.34.020 Users and implementation.

A. Users. The standards will be used by the following parties. Users of this document are encouraged to review the city’s comprehensive plan and Resolution 639 along with the city’s design standards and guidelines.

1. Property Owners/Developers. The standards and guidelines acquaint property owners and developers with goals that the community has identified in planning and policy documents for the built and natural environment of their city.

2. Building Designers. The standards and guidelines will assist architects, landscape architects, and other designers of buildings and sites to know what is expected of their products and what can make their designs consistent with North Bend’s community design goals.

3. Project Neighbors/City Residents. Project neighbors and city residents will have the reassurance that new development will be held to a standard that is in line with their vision for the city of North Bend. Citizens will have more predictability regarding new development, including its fit to a site, to the neighborhood context, and to the community character.

4. City Staff/City Officials. In reviewing new development projects, city staff, city architects and city officials will rely on the standards and guidelines to help define design conditions that will be required for project approval.

B. Implementation. The standards will be implemented through public sector, private sector, and public sector-private sector initiatives.

1. Public Sector Development. Public works projects and capital improvements such as streets, public buildings, infrastructure improvements, and public open space which are developed and built by the city with tax dollars can provide the catalyst for improved design quality and tie diverse areas of the city together.

2. Private Sector Development. Developers will use the design standards to shape their projects to be consistent with the vision of the city reflected in the comprehensive plan, including the vision plan and Resolution 639, as well as these standards. Residential, commercial and industrial development will be built through private initiatives, but to the standards of the city.

3. Public-Private Partnerships. Development of projects which may have public and private financing or share mutual elements will also implement the desired design quality. An example could be streets, built and paid for by the private sector, within a private residential or commercial development that are deeded back to the city for maintenance but developed to design standards. These streets provide access to development sites but also benefit the larger community by improved auto, pedestrian and bicycle access to other areas of the city. Another example is the use of impact fees – payments by the private sector to fund open space which is maintained by the city. (Ord. 1561 § 1 (Exh. A (part)), 2015: Ord. 1323 § 1 (part), 2008: Ord. 1100 § 1 (part), 2000).

18.34.030 Applicability, exemptions, relation to other codes, and effect.

A. Applicability. As necessary, compliance with design standards is checked at both the conceptual land use approval stage and the building permit stage. The design standards apply to:

1. All new residential and nonresidential construction and exterior tenant improvements (TIs) that require a building permit under the International Building Code (IBC), except as noted under subsection B of this section, must follow these standards and guidelines.

2. Exterior-only nonresidential building or structure tenant improvements that require a building permit, where such improvements equal or exceed 20 percent of the King County assessed valuation of a building or structure.

3. Exterior-only multifamily residential building or structure tenant improvements that require a building permit, where such improvements equal or exceed 20 percent of the assessed valuation of a building or structure.

4. In addition to building permits, design standards apply to site plan approvals that precede issuance of building- or construction-related permits. For example, the standards apply to parking and landscaping reviews, subdivisions, short subdivisions, binding site plans, development agreements, conditional use permits and variances. The degree of application depends on the specific land use action.

5. Clearing/grading permits. Where a clearing/grading permit is required, the clearing and grading plan shall be reviewed for compliance with applicable design standards.

6. Where any single development project element triggers the design standards, the standards apply to all project improvements proposed. The purpose of this provision is to ensure that development improvements properly complement and coordinate with one another.

B. Exemptions.

1. All development that does not require a building permit under the International Building Code (IBC).

2. Developments listed as exempt from other construction permits (e.g., exempt from clearing and grading permit).

3. Interior-only tenant improvements.

4. Exterior tenant improvements that do not meet threshold guidelines noted in subsections (A)(2) and (A)(3) of this section.

5. Exterior tenant improvements that are “in-kind” maintenance and/or repair only.

6. Manufactured home design is regulated under NBMC performance standards, Table 18.10.050(1.12).

Applicants are encouraged to consult with city staff at the preapplication meeting or earlier to determine applicability and exemptions. In cases where these standards conflict with a concomitant or development agreement (existing at the time of adoption of these standards), the principles set forth in the concomitant or development agreement supersede these standards.

C. Deviation from Standards. An applicant may request a deviation from strict conformance to provisions of the design standards and guidelines set forth in NBMC 18.34.010 through 18.34.090.

In approving deviations from the standards, the community and economic development director shall prepare written findings that the proposed deviation is justified based on one of the following, and must find that the deviation is otherwise consistent with the purpose and intent of the provision from which the deviation is being sought, as well as the purpose and intent of the design standards and guidelines as a whole:

1. Site-specific limitations that prevent a building design from adhering to the design standards and guidelines;

2. The deviations better accommodate or improve the existing physical conditions of the subject property in the sole discretion of the community and economic development director; or

3. The deviations enable implementation of low impact or sustainable design techniques that may not otherwise be possible under strict conformance to the design standards and guidelines.

D. Relation to Other Codes. The design standards supplement and/or complement the city’s zoning code (this title), critical areas regulations (Chapters 14.05 through 14.12 NBMC), International Building Code (NBMC Title 15), and other land use regulations.

Where design standards conflict with other land use regulations, or where uncertainty exists regarding the interpretation of the standards, respective provisions of NBMC 18.04.020, Conflicting regulations, and NBMC 18.04.030, Interpretation, shall apply.

Residential and nonresidential developments often use covenants, conditions and restrictions (i.e., CC&Rs). CC&Rs typically address any number of design-related matters, for example, building colors, roof materials, sign guidelines, or otherwise. CC&Rs for development projects shall not be inconsistent with the design standards. As part of city review, the CC&Rs for development projects shall be reviewed by the city for consistency with the design standards. Project-related permits shall not be issued where CC&Rs would be inconsistent with design standards.

E. Effect. The design standards and design guidelines carry the full effect of the police power to regulate the public health, safety, and welfare per enabling authority outlined in NBMC 18.34.010.

Design standards are obligatory and utilize the terms “shall,” “must,” “required” and like synonyms, as well as antonyms such as “prohibited” or “not allowed.” City staff and/or affected decision makers have authority to deny development projects where design standards are not followed.

Applicants are encouraged to follow design guidelines which utilize the terms “should,” “preferred,” “recommended” and like synonyms, as well as antonyms “discouraged,” “not preferred” and the like. City staff and/or affected decision makers shall not have authority to deny development projects where design guidelines are not summarily or cumulatively followed in a development project. (Ord. 1561 § 1 (Exh. A (part)), 2015: Ord. 1323 § 1 (part), 2008: Ord. 1256 § 1 (part), 2006: Ord. 1100 § 1 (part), 2000).

18.34.040 Procedural and submittal requirements.

A. Procedures. Compliance with applicable design standards is evaluated under the major permit or approval being sought. For example, to construct a commercial building, site plan approval and subsequent building permit is required. Applicable design standards are evaluated against the site plan. If approved, design-related conditions are part of the approval. Said design conditions are then tied to subsequent construction permits.

Regarding larger single-family subdivisions, design requirements related to the subdivision are reviewed with the plat; design requirements relating to variation in building elevations, and the requirement for porches, are reviewed at the building permit stage.

The city reserves the right to utilize design consultants (e.g., architects, landscape architects, critical areas consultants, etc.) to review project submittals. Charges to retain said consultants are billed to project applicants under provisions of Chapter 20.09 NBMC.

B. Submittal Requirements. The North Bend Municipal Code identifies a set of complete application requirements for different development project types. Complete applications address written and graphic information that is required pursuant to project review in relation to the design standards. Development project types that engage the design standards include:

1. Site plans (unless exempt as identified in NBMC 18.34.030(B));

2. Subdivisions (including plats and short plats);

3. Building permit application (some development projects do not engage any of the items in subsections (B)(1) and (B)(2) of this section, and design standards are reviewed as part of a building permit application);

4. Other construction-related permits (as an example, clearing and grading plans are reviewed against applicable design standards before a clearing/grading permit is issued).

All development project submittals are responsible to include written descriptions, scaled elevation plans and site plans, architectural drawings, renderings and/or graphics, and material and color samples (as necessary). This information enables city staff to evaluate the project’s compliance with design standards.

As previously indicated, compliance with design standards may be checked at the land use approval stage and the building permit stage. (Ord. 1561 § 1 (Exh. A (part)), 2015: Ord. 1323 § 1 (part), 2008: Ord. 1256 § 1 (part), 2006: Ord. 1172 § 26, 2002; Ord. 1100 § 1 (part), 2000).

18.34.050 Single-family and cottage residential.

A. The following section of this chapter outlines the design standards and guidelines for single-family and cottage homes over two units/lots. This section should also be read along with performance standards in NBMC 18.10.050 for associated cottage and single-family design standards. This section is organized as follows:

1. Subsection A of this section, Single-Family and Cottage Residential.

2. Subsection B of this section, Architectural Style and Related Matters.

3. Subsection C of this section, Materials and Color.

4. Subsection D of this section, Building Mass and Scale.

5. Subsection E of this section, Building Orientation.

6. Subsection F of this section, Garages.

7. Subsection G of this section, Setback Variation.

8. Subsection H of this section, Lot Layout and Design.

B. Architectural Style and Related Matters. The city of North Bend promotes a variation between homes through the use of quality materials and craftsmanship, regardless of style, in its residential development. An emphasis is placed on pedestrian-oriented development and appealing neighborhoods for all to enjoy.

The following design standards provide guidance to help enhance future residential construction:

1. Building Variation. Buildings shall vary, and in so doing provide a range of compatible styles, elevations, designs, home sizes, home prices, and neighborhood diversity.

# of Units/Lots

Minimum # of Floor Plans (mirrored plans do not count as different floor plans)

16 or less

3

17 to 49

5, one of which shall be a one-story home and shall represent at least ten percent of the total number of units

50 or more

6, one of which shall be a one-story home and shall represent at least 12 percent of the total number of units

# of Units/Lots

Minimum # of Elevation Plans

16 or less

2 per floor plan = 6

17 to 49

3 per floor plan = 15

50 or more

4 per floor plan = 24

All homes as permitted in Table 18.10.030 using identical building elevation plan and detail shall be separated by at least three homes with different elevations. Identical elevations may not be across the street from one another. One-story homes shall be mixed throughout the development, and not clustered.

Where varying elevation is required, a minimum of three of the following variations must be utilized, and for developments containing 17 or more units/lots subsection (B)(1)(f) of this section shall be utilized:

a. Differing window size, design and placement;

b. Differing porch or stoop size, design and placement;

c. Differing trim details – including accent trim and garage and entry doors;

d. Differing siding material, texture and appearance;

e. Differing facade modulation – including bays, projections, and recesses;

f. Differing roof form – including gable direction, projections, and pitch.

2. Building Entries. Single-family developments of over four lots shall have their front entrance articulated with a covered entry porch, covered stoop, or other similar feature integrated with the design of a home. Stoops may not constitute more than 20 percent of the total number of units. Porches shall constitute usable areas, not less than 80 square feet and 25 square feet for stoops. Porches shall have a minimum depth of seven feet on all sides as measured at the porch floor from the wall of the house to the center of the supporting post or structure. Porches may wrap around front corners to the side of buildings, and should vary in size and type.

For cottage homes each unit shall include an attached front porch not less than 64 square feet minimum, with a minimum depth of seven feet on all sides.

3. Yard Space/Balconies. See single-family and cottage performance standards in NBMC.

4. Roof Type. Multiple gables (including stepped or opposing gables), hipped roofs, dormers, sheds, and other roof variations are required as appropriate to architectural style.

a. Eaves and gables shall provide a minimum of 18 inches of overhang.

b. Developments containing more than 17 units shall provide a minimum of three differing primary roof pitches for homes within the development (e.g., some homes with a primary pitch of 7:12, some homes with a primary pitch of 5:12). The difference in pitch shall be at least two feet for every 12 feet of run.

5. Window Types. Window types and window placement should be seen as an opportunity to provide interest and individuality amongst building facades, especially street-facing facades and those in public view. Window design and placement shall be oriented to maximize views.

To give dimension to building walls and to provide relief and shadow lines, all street-facing or street-visible windows and doors shall be trimmed a minimum of three and one-half inches in width, or be recessed from the face of the wall a minimum of two inches.

C. Materials and Color. To obtain architectural integrity of new construction, natural building materials should be utilized along with appropriate use of color to highlight and emphasize residential homes and features, and to discourage color monotony, especially in larger development projects.

1. Siding Materials.

a. Narrower (e.g., six-inch exposure) machined (beveled or otherwise) clapboard siding is encouraged. Other appropriate materials may include cedar shakes, shingles, board and batten, and brick or stone. A combination of siding materials and embellishments can provide textural variety and visual interest to facades.

b. Due to its harmful environmental impacts and synthetic appearance, vinyl siding is prohibited.

c. When used in conjunction with board and batten construction, panel siding such as T1-11 and like materials may be utilized in limited accent fashion, not in widespread application.

2. Roof Materials. Where asphalt shingles are used, they shall be of an architectural grade (multiple shingle-style layers rather than flat three-tab) for better durability, as well as greater texture and shadow lines. Tile, slate, high quality asphalt, metal, and synthetic roof products resembling natural material are acceptable. Fire treated cedar shake or shingle roofs are allowed.

3. Building Colors.

# of Units

Minimum Color Variation

2 to 16

8. 4 primary colors, with 4 trim colors. At least one trim color shall be a darker color, not white or cream.

17 to 49

12 primary colors, with 6 trim colors. At least two trim colors shall be a darker color, not white or cream.

50 units or more

15 primary colors, with 10 trim colors. At least three trim colors shall be a darker color, not white or cream.

A varied range of exterior residential building colors is required for new residential buildings. Color variation shall apply to building facade and trim. Singular trim color throughout a development is prohibited. The palette of exterior colors to be used within the development shall be provided to the community and economic development department prior to the issuance of the first building permit within the development for demonstrating conformance to these standards.

Continual or predominant use of monotone colors (e.g., similar beige or gray tones) on new dwellings is not acceptable. Darker, natural-tone colors are encouraged, to better blend with North Bend’s natural surroundings.

D. Building Mass/Scale. Purpose: to ensure that residential building mass and scale is appropriate to North Bend’s small city context and is human in scale.

1. Articulation and/or modulation of primary facades and facades in public view shall be used to break up building mass and scale. Unmodulated primary and publicly viewable (street-facing) facades should not extend more than approximately 30 feet. Modulation should be sufficient to break up wall planes. Roofline articulation shall also be utilized, and can be accomplished with multigabled roofs, stepped roofs, or otherwise.

2. Facade and roofline articulation shall be complemented with other architectural features as appropriate to architectural style, including variation in building materials; variation in fenestration; variation in building color; and elements like porches, chimneys, and finer details.

E. Building Orientation. Purpose: to ensure that buildings relate to the public street, provide pedestrian orientation, and integrate well with surrounding neighborhoods and development.

1. Fences constructed between the front of the building and the public street shall be limited to four feet in height to maintain orientation of the building to the public street.

2. The front door and/or porch shall face the street or common open space area.

F. Garages.

1. Garage Setbacks. For single-family homes, a minimum of 50 percent of the units within any subdivision or binding site plan shall set back the garage from the front wall of the home a minimum of five feet. The remaining 50 percent of the units may contain a garage flush with the front wall of the home, provided a porch of not less than 80 square feet is provided.

2. Driveway Widths. Within low density zones (LDR) driveway crossings at the sidewalk and/or public street (not including alleys) shall be no greater than 20 feet in width for front-loaded double or triple bay garages, and no greater than 16 feet for front-accessed side-loaded garages.

3. Garages within the downtown commercial (DC) zone shall be accessed off alleys when feasible.

G. Setback Variation. To break up visual monotony on a straight street, no more than two homes in a row shall be sited at the same front yard setback. In no case shall a home placed at the minimum setback line be adjacent to a home set back to three feet beyond the minimum setback line. Front yard setbacks shall vary from minimum setback as follows:

1. Twenty-five percent of the total number of homes shall vary by an additional three feet beyond the minimum.

2. Twenty-five percent of the total number of homes shall vary by an additional five feet beyond the minimum.

3. Twenty-five percent of the total number of homes shall vary by an additional eight feet beyond the minimum (excluding cottage development). Varying angles are encouraged, therefore when homes are placed on the lot in such a way that results in the sidewalls of the homes not being parallel to each other (by at least 10 degrees), or placed on a meandering street achieving the same effect, the requirement to vary by an additional eight feet may be reduced to five feet (see Diagram A).

Diagram A:

H. Lot Layout and Design. The following standards shall be applied to the layout and design of subdivisions and short subdivisions:

1. Lots shall front to a public street, a park or a common open space tract owned by the city or the applicable homeowners association, unless infeasible due to the shape of existing lot lines or the presence of topographic constraints.

2. A shared driveway/access is allowed in limited circumstances when approved by the director, and shall not be used to serve more than four residences. Where access to more than four residences is needed, a public street shall be provided, constructed to the applicable minimum planning/design street standard in Chapter 19.01 NBMC and the city of North Bend public works standards.

3. Lots with double frontages (where streets other than an alley exist on opposing property lines) are permitted only when all of the following circumstances apply:

a. When such lots are adjacent to a collector or arterial street or where necessary due to topography or other site limitations;

b. When limited to a maximum of 250 linear feet of double frontage for all applicable lots along such collector or arterial street;

c. If rear lot lines within a subdivision face a street, a minimum 15-foot landscape buffer shall be required between the rear lot line and the adjacent street right-of-way or easement. Said landscape buffer shall consist of Type 2 landscaping per the landscape regulations in Chapter 18.18 NBMC and, when provided for a subdivision, shall be placed in a tract owned and maintained by the applicable homeowners association or otherwise in collective ownership and maintenance of all homeowners within the development.

4. Subdivisions shall additionally meet the following lot size and width variation criteria:

a. Lot Width. No more than two adjacent residential lots shall have the same width. Variation shall be not less than 10 feet.

b. Lot Size. Single-family lot sizes shall vary. Not more than two adjacent lots shall be of the same size (“same size” is defined as within 500 square feet in area relative to each other) and shall vary as follows:

i. Thirty-three percent of the total number of lots shall vary from the minimum lot size by a minimum of 2,000 additional square feet.

ii. Thirty-three percent of the total number of lots shall vary from the minimum lot size by a minimum of 4,000 additional square feet. (Ord. 1628 § 1 (Exh. A), 2017: Ord. 1561 § 1 (Exh. A (part)), 2015).

18.34.060 Multifamily residential.

A. The following section of this chapter outlines the design standards and guidelines for multifamily buildings. This section should also be read along with performance standards in NBMC 18.10.050 for associated design standards. This section is organized as follows:

1. Architectural style and related matters.

2. Materials and color.

3. Building mass and scale.

4. Building orientation.

5. Site circulation, access and parking.

6. Lot bulk and dimensional variation.

B. Architectural Style. The city of North Bend promotes a variation between homes through the use of quality materials and craftsmanship, regardless of style, in its residential development. An emphasis is placed on creating compact, pedestrian-oriented development and appealing neighborhoods for all to enjoy.

The following design standards provide guidance to help preserve, maintain, and enhance future residential construction:

1. Building Variation. Buildings shall vary, and in so doing provide a range of compatible styles, elevations, designs, home sizes, home prices, and neighborhood diversity.

# of Buildings

Minimum # of Building Type

Minimum # of Elevations

2 to 3

1

2

4 or more

2

2

Where varying elevation is required, a differing roof form including gable direction, projections, and pitch is required. In addition a minimum of three of the following variations must be employed to be considered a separate elevation for a given floor plan:

a. Differing window size, design and placement;

b. Differing porch or stoop size, design and placement;

c. Differing trim details (including accent trim and garage and entry doors);

d. Differing siding material, texture and appearance;

e. Differing facade modulation (including bays, projections, and recesses).

All multifamily buildings of identical elevation may not be located adjacent to or across the street from one another, nor be over-utilized in a larger multifamily project.

2. Building Entries. Each building shall provide a primary pedestrian entrance, located on the front side of the building. Primary pedestrian entrances that serve ground floor dwelling units shall be distinguished by means of a covered porch or stoop.

Primary pedestrian entrances may either serve individual dwelling units or a number of dwelling units in common.

A walkway made of concrete, unit pavers, or brick, with a minimum width of five feet, shall directly connect primary pedestrian entrances with the nearest sidewalk.

All exterior doorways shall be trimmed with visible architectural detail, with a total minimum width of three and one-half inches.

Exterior stairs facing primary circulation routes must be designed to blend with the structure. A maximum of one flight of stairs per building may be located on the side of a building facing the street. In no case shall exterior stairs project more than five feet from the face of the building nor shall the risers of a projecting portion of the stairs be visible from the street.

3. Yard Space/Balconies. A portion of individual multifamily rear yard space should be improved, for example, with a patio or deck. Where townhouse-style designs are not utilized and individual exterior yard space is not available, upper floor balconies of usable area (e.g., five-foot width by eight-foot depth) shall be provided for respective units.

4. Roof Type.

# of Units

Minimum Eaves Width

Under 4

18"

4 or more

24"

Continuous rooflines shall be articulated with dormers, significant gables, or ridgeline offsets a minimum of two feet every 50 lineal feet.

Primary roof pitches may be a minimum of 4:12. When the minimum pitch is being used, the roofline and building elevations shall be broken with gables, with a roof width of 4:12 and greater to add architectural variety.

Building eaves shall be used to create architectural interest through shadow lines and design variety. The size of overhangs and architectural detailing shall be appropriate to the overall architectural style of the building. Eaves on roofs of 6:12 pitch or lower shall have a minimum depth of 24 inches – generous overhangs are encouraged.

To ensure that larger pieces of mechanical equipment are visually unobtrusive, rooftop mechanical equipment shall be concealed by and integrated into the roof form of the building.

Except for solar panels, to the degree practical, vent stacks, metal chimneys, and pipes shall be clustered to avoid rooftop clutter, and where practical located on the roof slope facing away from public streets. Solar panels to the extent possible shall lay flush with the roofline.

5. Window Types. Window types and window placement should be seen as an opportunity to provide interest and individuality amongst building facades, especially street-facing facades and those in public view.

A minimum of 20 percent of front facades (as measured between the top and bottom plate) shall be glazed.

All windows shall be trimmed on all sides. Total trim width shall be a minimum of three and one-half inches. Such trim should provide a color appropriate to the exterior color of the building.

C. Materials and Color. To obtain architectural integrity of new construction, natural building materials that are consistent with authentic architectural styles are encouraged. This is achieved through appropriate use of color to highlight and emphasize residential homes and features, and to discourage color monotony, especially in larger development projects.

1. Siding Materials.

a. Narrower (e.g., six-inch exposure) machined (beveled or otherwise) clapboard siding is encouraged. Clapboards may be complemented with cedar shakes, shingles, board and batten, and architectural grade brick or stone accents as appropriate. A combination of siding materials and embellishments can provide textural variety and visual interest to facades.

b. Due to its harmful environmental impacts and synthetic appearance, vinyl siding is prohibited.

c. Panel siding such as T1-11 and like materials may be utilized in limited accent fashion, not in widespread application.

2. Roof Materials. Where asphalt shingles are used, they shall be of an architectural grade (multiple shingle-style layers rather than flat three-tab) for better durability, as well as greater texture and shadow lines. Tile, slate, high quality asphalt, metal, and synthetic roof products resembling natural material are acceptable.

3. Building Colors. A complementary palette of colors and materials shall be used with individual projects and buildings. Colors and materials selected shall provide variety, while at the same time maintaining unity within a project and compatibility with the residential character of North Bend. Color variation shall apply to building facade and trim. Singular trim color throughout a development is discouraged.

D. Building Mass and Scale. To ensure that residential building mass and scale is appropriate to North Bend’s small city context and is human in scale.

Articulation and/or modulation of primary facades and facades in public view shall be used to break up building mass and scale. Unmodulated primary and publicly viewable facades should not extend more than 30 feet. Modulation should be sufficient to break up wall planes. Roofline articulation should also be utilized, and can be accomplished with multigabled roofs, stepped roofs, or otherwise.

Facade and roofline articulation should be complemented with other architectural features as appropriate to architectural style, including variation in building materials; variation in fenestration; variation in building color; and elements like porches, chimneys, and finer details.

Building location on a lot, including subtle variations in front yard and side yard setbacks, should be utilized to reduce building mass and bulk, especially on larger development projects. For example, front yard setbacks might vary by five feet (see single-family and cottage performance standards in NBMC).

All structures shall have a maximum building height of 35 feet. A mix of density and building types is encouraged, but in no case shall individual buildings contain over 10 dwelling units.

E. Building Orientation. To ensure that buildings relate to the public street, provide pedestrian orientation, and integrate well with surrounding neighborhoods and development.

Fences constructed between the front of the building and the public street shall be limited to four feet in height to maintain orientation of the building to the public street.

Primary pedestrian entrances shall face either a public street, an internal circulation route with sidewalks consistent with this chapter, or open space.

The fronts and rears of buildings shall not face each other. This requirement may be waived for individual buildings, where there is no other practical way to provide access given the parameters.

F. Site Circulation, Access and Parking. The following width limitations are required to minimize disruption of vehicular access on the sidewalk and streetscape:

1. Parking, Garages/Carports/Surface. Parking (both garages/carports and surface parking) shall be located to the side or rear of the building, away from the public street. Side yard parking, including garages/carports or surface parking areas, is limited to not more than 35 percent of lot width for multifamily buildings. Detached garages and carports for multifamily buildings shall be compatible with design of the main building.

Primary residential parking areas shall not front on public streets or internal circulation routes. Except for single units above garages, off-street parking (both surface and garages) shall be located to the side or rear of buildings where fronting public streets.

Where a driveway or alley connects to a primary circulation route, parking served by the driveway or alley shall trigger landscaping at entrance.

Surface parking areas shall be limited to a maximum of eight stalls in any one location.

Open surface parking areas at the rear of buildings shall include landscape screens to buffer parking areas from adjacent residential development.

2. Driveway Widths. When possible minimize driveways or curb cuts, so as to not disturb the movement of pedestrians, and thereby minimize streetscape impact.

Driveway crossings are to be no wider than 20 feet.

No driveways serving individual dwelling units shall be allowed from primary or internal circulation routes constructed as public streets.

Exceptions: The city may impose additional restrictions to parking area and vehicle access point locations to reduce impacts to public safety, pedestrian movement, or on-street vehicle circulation. The city may allow additional entrances or vehicle access lanes if other compelling site planning reasons outweigh the impact of an increased number of sidewalk crossings.

3. Sidewalk Access. A continuous sidewalk a minimum of five feet in width shall connect all multifamily homes directly to the public sidewalk, rather than relying on access via an internal drive lane.

Pedestrian access shall be provided in accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Pedestrian access shall be provided from the main street off of which the parcel is located. Where a project fronts two streets, access shall be provided from both streets.

Pedestrian connections shall be provided from housing areas to adjacent open space and park areas.

On-site pedestrian circulation routes shall be shown on site plans. Pedestrian pathways are to be integrated with required on-site landscaping, including parking areas.

G. Lot Bulk and Dimensional Variation. To provide design interest and prevent monotony of subdivision designs and building layout, a variety of housing size and style options shall be developed within a neighborhood and throughout the city of North Bend.

Buildings that are part of a complex of three or more buildings should use variable lot sizes, variable front yard setbacks, and side yard setbacks, as appropriate, for design interest. (Ord. 1657 § 10, 2018; Ord. 1561 § 1 (Exh. A (part)), 2015).

18.34.070 Commercial, mixed-use and industrial design standards and guidelines.

All commercial, mixed-use and industrial development shall comply with the City of North Bend Commercial/Mixed-Use/Industrial Design Standards and Guidelines dated May 2010, which are hereby adopted by reference, and any properly adopted amendments thereto. A copy of the current version of such guidelines shall be on file with the city of North Bend community and economic development department and with the city clerk. The City of North Bend Commercial/Mixed-Use/Industrial Design Standards and Guidelines shall be considered a part of this chapter as if fully set forth herein. (Ord. 1561 § 1 (Exh. A (part)), 2015: Ord. 1391 § 1, 2010; Ord. 1340 § 1, 2008: Ord. 1323 § 1 (part), 2008: Ord. 1100 § 1 (part), 2000. Formerly 18.34.050).

18.34.080 Historic buildings.

A. Historic Residential and Nonresidential Buildings. To recognize designated historic buildings as significant community assets and to promote the preservation, rehabilitation and/or restoration of the original architectural form, composition, scale, elements, and details of historic residential and nonresidential buildings.

1. Design Standards. The rehabilitation of historic buildings is encouraged. Prior alterations to historic buildings that are compatible with the historic architectural character may be preserved or restored. Rehabilitation and restoration projects should preserve the distinctive architectural character and material qualities of the building.

Staff and/or resources of the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Museum and the King County Cultural Resources Office, as well as other sources and experts, are resources that should be consulted for technical and financial assistance related to historic resources and development adjacent or near to historic buildings or districts.

Additions to historic buildings should be limited, and located as inconspicuously as possible (e.g., to the rear of buildings). Where made, additions shall be compatible with the original architectural style and features of the building.

Infill development proximate to historic buildings should be compatible with the scale, architectural qualities, and traditional uses of these resources.

The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for the Treatment of Historic Properties (1995) shall be additionally utilized for guiding the preservation, rehabilitation and restoration of historic buildings. A copy of the S.O.I. standards is available from the department of community services. (Ord. 1561 § 1 (Exh. A (part)), 2015: Ord. 1420 § 1 Exh. A (part), 2011: Ord. 1323 § 1 (part), 2008: Ord. 1165 § 7, 2002; Ord. 1100 § 1 (part), 2000. Formerly 18.34.060, 18.34.100).

18.34.090 Related residential uses.

A. Related Residential Uses. Applies to new construction and/or new use of buildings.

Where permitted, bed and breakfast establishments, boarding houses, childcare/day care facilities, adult family homes, home occupations, or other permitted business uses occurring in a single-family or multifamily dwelling shall maintain the appearance of a single-family or multifamily residence. Permitted signage for related residential uses is addressed in Chapter 18.20 NBMC.

Parking beyond that required for the principal tenants of the above-mentioned uses shall be located strictly in side yard or rear yard areas and screened by a fence or other sight-obscuring vegetation; provided, that on-street parking may partially satisfy space requirements.

B. Accessory Dwelling Units. If an ADU extends beyond the footprint of the principal SF dwelling, it must be consistent with the architectural style, materials, and color(s) of the principal residence.

Detached ADUs shall not be higher than the principal SF structure.

C. Accessory Structures. In SF and MF buildings, individual or common mechanical or other equipment and accessory structures shall be located and visually screened and operated so as not to have adverse visual impacts or create noise disturbances. (Ord. 1561 § 1 (Exh. A (part)), 2015: Ord. 1420 § 1 Exh. A (part), 2011: Ord. 1323 § 1 (part), 2008: Ord. 1256 § 1 (part), 2006: Ord. 1164 § 7, 2002; Ord. 1100 § 1 (part), 2000. Formerly 18.34.120).


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Prior legislation: Ord. 1363.