Chapter 18J.15
COUNTYWIDE DESIGN STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES Revised 12/18 Revised 6/19

Specific Item Design Standard Sections:

18J.15.010    Purpose, Applicability and Exemptions. Revised 12/18

18J.15.015    Site Design. Revised 12/18

18J.15.020    Site Clearing. Revised 6/19

18J.15.030    Tree Conservation. Revised 12/18

18J.15.040    Landscape Buffers. Revised 12/18

18J.15.050    Street Trees. Revised 12/18

18J.15.060    Infill Compatibility.

18J.15.070    Noise Attenuating Barriers and Structural Walls. Revised 12/18

18J.15.080    Off-Street Parking, Pedestrian, Bus and Bicycle Facilities.

18J.15.085    Exterior Illumination.

18J.15.090    Parking Lot Landscaping.

18J.15.100    Plant Lists.

18J.15.110    Plant Sizes, Soil Amendment, Mulching and Irrigation.

18J.15.120    Plant Installation.

18J.15.130    Plant Protection and Maintenance.

18J.15.140    Low Impact Development (LID). Revised 6/19

18J.15.150    Rural Pathways for Civic Uses.

18J.15.155    Mechanical Equipment and Outdoor Storage Screening. Revised 12/18

18J.15.160    Dry Sewer Lines. Revised 12/18

18J.15.170    Stormwater Facilities. Revised 12/18

18J.15.180    Recreational Areas. Revised 12/18

Specific Use Design Standard Sections:

18J.15.185    Residential.

18J.15.190    Outdoor Event Facilities.

18J.15.200    Mobile Home Parks. Revised 12/18

18J.15.210    Recreational Vehicle Parks. Revised 12/18

18J.15.220    Construction and Contractor Facilities. Revised 12/18

18J.15.230    Outdoor Stockpiles.

18J.15.240    Solid Waste Handling, Treatment and Storage Facilities. Revised 12/18

18J.15.250    Hazardous Waste Treatment and Storage Facility.

18J.15.260    Water Supply Facilities. Revised 12/18

18J.15.270    Telecommunication Towers and Wireless Facilities.

18J.15.280    Agritourism.

18J.15.010 Purpose, Applicability and Exemptions. Revised 12/18

A.    Purpose. This Chapter provides design objectives that are implemented with design standards and guidelines to protect the property values and property rights of property owners and promote compatibility between land uses by reducing the visual, noise, and lighting impacts of development on users of the site and abutting uses. The Chapter also serves to promote the use and protection of vegetation native and common to Western Washington, use solar principles in landscape and building design, enhance and define public and private open spaces, promote the application of water-efficient techniques in the design, installation, and maintenance of landscaping, and promote physical safety of pedestrians and motorists.

B.    Applicability. The standards contained in this Chapter shall apply Countywide. If there is a conflict between a community plan standard and a countywide standard, the community plan standard shall be followed. Each Section in this Chapter contains specific applicability information unique to the design item. Table 18J.15.010-1 below provides a brief applicability summary of the design standard items contained in this Chapter.

Table 18J.15.010-1. Countywide Design Standard Applicability and Exemptions

NOTICE: This Table provides summarized reference information.

For detailed and specific language, refer to the Title, Chapter or Section.

Applicability

Exemptions

TITLE: Title level applicability and exemption applies to all Chapters and Sections of the Title.

18J

Development Regulations – Design Standards and Guidelines

1. New construction and expansion of buildings, structures, and parking lots.

2. Use permits and expansion of uses, if the underlying project is subject to this Title.

3. Site development activities, if the underlying project is subject to this Title.

4. Site clearing, grading or filling without a proposed principal use.

5. Land Divisions.

1. Agricultural structures for farming.

2. Utility lines, equipment, and appurtenances, excluding substations and similar facilities.

3. Water dependent uses subject to Title 20 PCC.

4. Two lot single-family short plats, except that significant tree retention, PCC 18J.15.030 F.3., applies.

5. Temporary uses; see Chapter 18A.38 PCC.

6. Interior remodel work.

7. Building maintenance.

8. Portable classrooms on more than 2 acres.

9. Bus shelters, less than 300 square feet.

10. Individual single-family homes, except that special design standards apply in Graham, Gig Harbor or Browns/Dash Point, and significant tree retention of PCC 18J.15.030 F.3. applies.

11. Sites regulated through a previously adopted site plan or recorded plat.

12. Change of use to outright permitted use with no exterior remodel/outdoor storage.

13. Exempt land divisions; see PCC 18F.10.060.

CHAPTER: Chapter level applicability and exemption applies to all Sections of the Chapter.

18J.15

Countywide Design Standards

Countywide. If there is a conflict between a countywide standard and a community plan standard, the community plan standard shall apply.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

SECTIONS: Section level applicability and exemption applies only to that Section.

18J.15.015

Site Design

Commercial, industrial, and civic uses and buildings, and residential developments.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.020

Site Clearing

1. Single-family attached (townhouse), multi-family, civic, utility, commercial, industrial, land divisions, and site development permits.

2. Remodels when the improvement value of the remodel is 60 percent or greater.

1. Title 18J PCC exemptions.

2. Animal, crop or forestry production.

3. Proposals which result in the removal of less than 1,000 square feet of native vegetation.

4. Agricultural activities, except for sales and services within ARL and RF, or with an approved Hobby Farm Agreement, or Farm and Agricultural Land pursuant to Chapter 84.34 RCW.

5. Urban residential short subdivisions of 4 lots or less on 1 acre or less.

6. Public roads, paths, bicycle ways, trails, bridges, sewer lines, storm drainage facilities, related critical area mitigation, and other similar public infrastructure.

18J.15.040

Landscape Buffers

Tables 1, 2 and 3 in PCC 18J.15.040 G. establish the buffer level required for each proposed land use.

1. Title 18J PCC exemptions.

2. Existing, legally established, single and two-family dwellings and accessory structures.

3. A single-family dwelling or accessory dwelling unit with a land division decision that did not include a landscape buffer requirement.

4. Land divisions which result in 4 or fewer detached single-family dwelling unit lots.

18J.15.050

Street Trees

Both sides of all new roads in urban areas only.

1. Title 18J PCC exemptions.

2. Street tree plantings may be used to meet LID requirements in vegetative strips.

18J.15.060

Infill Compatibility

New residential developments of 5 or more dwelling units proposed adjacent to lots of less than 1 acre in size, built with similar housing type but to a lesser density.

Title 18J PCC exemptions and projects designed according to the Small Lot Design standards of Chapter 18J.17 PCC.

18J.15.070

Noise Attenuating Barriers

Any barrier being built to attenuate noise from a proposed or existing land use.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.080

Off-Street Parking, Pedestrian, Bus, and Bicycle Facilities

1. New parking facilities that accommodate 10 or more vehicles.

2. Ten percent or more expansion to an existing parking lot that accommodates 10 or more vehicles.

3. New residential developments.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.085

Exterior Illumination

1. New residential developments, civic, commercial and industrial uses; and

2. Multi-family, civic, commercial or industrial expansion greater than 60% of the building value, excluding interior improvements.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.090

Parking Lot Landscaping

1. Perimeter parking lot landscaping is required for any portion of a parking lot which is within 20 feet of a right-of-way.

2. Interior parking lot landscaping is required for all new surface parking lots with 10 or more spaces.

3. Drive-through, storage and service areas.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.100

Plant Lists

Western Washington native and/or drought tolerant plant material shall be used within all required landscape screening, buffers and parking lot landscaping.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

Exceptions:

1. Plants specifically required or prohibited by Title 18E PCC or Title 20 PCC shall supersede this Section.

2. Native plantings are required within natural buffer areas and tree conservation areas.

18J.15.110

Plant Sizes, Soil Amendment, Irrigation

Street trees, landscape buffers, noise attenuating barriers, and parking lot landscaping unless a standard has otherwise been specified in this Chapter.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.120

Plant Installation

Street trees, landscape buffers, replacement trees and parking lot landscaping.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.130

Plant Protection and Maintenance

All vegetation and associated areas required pursuant to this Chapter.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.140

Low Impact Development

Comprehensive LID site design techniques shall be utilized for development within the:

1. RSR zone classification.

2. USRO overlay.

3. Graham and Gig Harbor Open Space Corridors.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.150

Rural Pathways for Civic Uses

Certain new civic uses constructed in the rural areas.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.155

Mechanical Equipment and Outdoor Storage

1. New multi-family developments, civic, commercial and industrial uses; and

2. Multi-family, civic, commercial or industrial remodel or expansion that changes the mechanical equipment or adds outdoor storage.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.160

Dry Sewer Lines

New urban developments proposing to utilize interim on-site septic systems.

Title 18J PCC exemptions.

18J.15.170

Stormwater Facilities

Attached single-family, multi-family, civic, utility, commercial, industrial, land divisions, use permits and site development permits.

1. Title 18J PCC exemptions.

2. Animal, crop or forestry production or mineral extraction.

3. Plats for 9 or fewer dwelling units.

18J.15.180

Recreational Space/Areas

New residential developments of 31 dwelling units or more.

Title exemptions.

Exceptions:

1. Single-family and duplex lots 7,260 square feet in size or larger.

2. Single-family lots located within 2,640 feet of a public park or public school.

The following Sections apply to new development, expansion and conversion of the specific uses.

18J.15.185

Residential (attached single-family, duplex, triplex, multi-family, nursing home)

18J.15.190

Outdoor Event Facilities

18J.15.200

Mobile Home Parks

18J.15.210

Recreational Vehicle Parks

18J.15.220

Construction and Contractor Facilities

18J.15.230

Outdoor Stockpiles

18J.15.240

Solid Waste Handling, Treatment and Storage Facilities

18J.15.250

Hazardous Waste Treatment and Storage Facility

18J.15.260

Water Storage Facilities

18J.15.270

Telecommunication Towers and Wireless Facilities

18J.15.280

Agritourism

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2016-55 § 1 (part), 2016; Ord. 2013-85 § 1 (part), 2013; Ord. 2013-30s2 § 9 (part), 2013; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.015 Site Design. Revised 12/18

The purpose of this Section is to promote site design that minimizes modifications to natural topography to preserve land, water and soil relationships that are essential for sustaining plant and animal habitat. Project elements (lots, buildings, access drives, parking, walkways, and service areas) should be located in a manner that protects, enhances, or minimizes impacts to natural site features in accordance with the Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual. For instance, buildings should be designed to fit the natural slope rather than forcing the slope to fit the building design. Terraced parking lots and multi-tiered buildings are other examples of effective design solutions that minimize impacts to a site's natural features.

A.    Applicability. This Section applies to site design associated with commercial, industrial, and civic uses and buildings, and to residential developments.

B.    Exemptions. [Reserved]

C.    Design Objective. Site development for buildings, roadways and other site improvements should be designed to fit the natural topography with the minimum amount of site disturbance and grade changes possible. (See Figures 18J.15.015-1, -2, and -3)

D.    Standards.

1.    Filling and grading shall be done in accordance with Pierce County Site Development Regulations.

2.    Buildings shall be designed to fit natural slopes rather than forcing the slope to fit a particular building design.

3.    Roads shall be aligned to follow the natural contours of the site as much as possible.

4.    Finished grades shall promote a smooth transition to adjacent properties.

5.    When retaining walls or similar structures are necessary to address grade changes, terracing shall be used such that no individual wall exceeds 8 feet in height.

6.    Industrial uses within the Employment Center (EC) and Community Employment (CE) zones shall be permitted to create grades changes in excess of 8 feet except when adjacent to residentially zoned areas. (See Figure 18J.15.015-3)

7.    All retaining walls in excess of 4 feet in height shall be screened with landscaping meeting Landscape Level 1 buffer requirements as set forth in PCC 18J.15.040.

E.    Guidelines.

1.    The amount of material removed from one portion of the site should be equal to the amount of material added to another portion of the site.

2.    Clearing, grading and heavy construction activity should occur during the driest months and conclude by late fall when rainfall and associated soil compaction, erosion, and sediment yield from equipment activity increases to reduce possible impacts from sediment runoff and damage to neighboring properties.

3.    Surface roughness should be maintained on the site to reduce flow velocities and encourage sheet flow on the development by preserving native vegetation and limit soil disturbance.

4.    Where sites have been previously altered, attempt to restore natural conditions to the extent possible.

FIGURE 18J.15.015-1 – Preferred Option – All Uses

FIGURE 18J.15.015-2 – Preferred Option – All Uses

FIGURE 18J.15.015-3 – Least Preferred Option – Industrial Sites Only

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.020 Site Clearing. Revised 6/19

The primary purpose of this Section is to establish standards for site clearing and the retention of vegetation which preserve native vegetation, mature forests, and woodlands in order to minimize changes in natural hydrologic functions within designated riparian corridors and natural drainage areas. Limiting clearing and retaining existing native vegetation within these areas reduce the impacts of development on water resources and engineered storm drainage systems. These standards are also intended to maintain areas of existing native vegetation in order to preserve elements of the predeveloped aesthetic character of the community and to preserve areas which may provide habitat for fish and wildlife.

A.    Applicability.

1.    This Section applies to single-family attached (townhouse), multi-family, civic, utility, commercial, industrial, land divisions, and site development permits. This Section shall also apply to any remodel project when the improvement value of the remodel is 60 percent or greater of the building value as calculated pursuant to the adopted building code.

B.    Exemptions. The following activities shall be exempt for the provisions of this Section:

1.    Resource uses where the principal use of the property is for animal, crop or forestry production (i.e., the growing, raising, or harvesting of resources) or mineral extraction (i.e., surface mines).

2.    Sites regulated through a previously adopted site plan or recorded plat.

3.    Development proposals which result in the removal of less than 1,000 square feet of     native vegetation from a site.

4.    Land utilized for agricultural activities, except for sales and services:

a.    Within Agricultural Resource Lands (ARL) and Rural Farm (RF) zones; or

b.    Subject to an approved Hobby Farm Agreement; or

c.    Which meets the definition of Farm and Agricultural Land pursuant to RCW 84.34 and being taxed as such.

5.    Urban residential short subdivisions of 4 lots/dwelling units or fewer on project sites of 1 acre or less.

6.    Construction, reconstruction, or maintenance of public roads, paths, bicycle ways, trails, bridges, sewer lines, storm drainage facilities, related critical area mitigation activities, and other similar public infrastructure, excluding public buildings.

C.    Design Objective. Minimize site clearing to preserve and enhance the visual appearance and preserve the natural wooded character of the Pacific Northwest, promote utilization of natural systems for habitat, reduce the impacts of development on the storm drainage system and water resources.

D.    Standards – Clearing Limits.

1.    Site clearing shall be limited to the areas of approved impervious surfaces, replacement landscaping, recreation space, utilities, and a working envelope around such areas of not greater than 10 feet in depth. The clearing limitations shall apply until such time as the issuance of a building permit occurs for the parcel or lot being cleared. Where site clearing is proposed independent of a Building Permit, Use Permit, or other specific land use activity, such clearing shall be limited to a maximum of 35 percent of the total site. The 35 percent limitation shall be calculated on a cumulative basis for all site development permits affecting the site. In no case shall site clearing extend into areas identified for native vegetation retention except for the removal of noxious weeds and hazardous trees pursuant to PCC 18J.15.130.

2.    Clearing, grading, filling and vegetation removal shall be prohibited until site development permits have been issued.

3.    The maximum area of site clearing shall encompass no more than the remainder of land after the required native vegetation retention percentage set forth in Table 18J.15.020-1, tree conservation, and critical area protection have been met.

E.    Standards – Vegetation Retention. Minimum native vegetation retention standards shall apply to all projects located partially or fully within areas designated and mapped as open space corridors pursuant to PCC 19A.30.170* of the Pierce County Comprehensive Plan (Open Space) or an adopted community plan as follows, except that shoreline vegetation retention shall be regulated pursuant to Chapter 18E.30 PCC:

* Code Revisor’s Note: The reference to PCC 19A.30.170 above is incorrect. Please refer to the Pierce County Comprehensive Plan, Land Use Goal LU-113.

1.    A minimum percentage of the existing native vegetation shall be retained as set forth in Table 18J.15.020-1. The percentage shall be based on the gross acreage of the portion of the site located within an open space corridor.

Table 18J.15.020-1. Open Space Corridor Vegetation Retention Table

Zone Classification

Minimum Native Vegetation Retention (1)(2)(4)

Urban Zone Classifications

Employment Center, Community Employment, Major Urban Center

15%

Employment Services, Mixed Used District, Commercial Mixed Use District, Office-Residential Mixed Use District

15%

Community Center, Activity Center, Neighborhood Center, Urban Village, Research-Office(3)

15%

Residential/Office-Civic, High Density Residential District, Moderate Density Residential District, High Density Single Family

15%

Public Institution

15%

Moderate Density Single Family, Single Family

20%

Residential Resource

25%

Rural Zone Classifications

Rural Activity Center, Village Center

25%

Rural Industrial Center, Rural Neighborhood Center, Public Institution

30%

Tourist Commercial

40%

Gateway Community

50%

Village Residential

50%

Rural Separator, Rural 10, Rural 20, Rural 40, Rural 5, Rural Sensitive Resource, Agricultural Resource Land, Rural Farm

65%

Footnotes:

(1)    The percentage is based on gross acreage of the portion of the site located within an Open Space Corridor. If the site does not contain the minimum percentage of native vegetation listed, the percentage shall be used to establish a maximum clearing limit.

(2)    Minimum vegetation retention may be decreased to 15 percent for non-residential uses (e.g., churches, schools, etc.) that are allowed in the underlying residential zone. The calculation of the native vegetation retention area for school sites shall be based upon the total acreage of the school site minus the areas set aside for playfields in the school site plan; provided, that for the purposes of the calculation, such playfield areas shall not exceed 30 percent of the gross site area.

(3)    Within the South Hill Community Plan area, mixed use buildings located within the UV or AC zone that meet all of the provisions for increased density set forth in Table 18A.15.020-1, Footnote (1), shall be subject to a Minimum Vegetation Retention of 10 percent.

(4)    Within the Parkland-Spanaway-Midland Communities Plan area, individual lots of record within 0.5 miles of the SR-7 corridor, and any combination of two or more contiguous lots, created prior to September 3, 2002, that are each smaller than 0.75 acres and located in a commercial or industrial zone, are exempt for native vegetation retention. A combination of 0.75 acre lots exceeding 4 acres shall not be eligible to utilize this exemption.

2.    As an alternative to retaining the native vegetation percentages set forth in Table 18J.15.020-1, the applicant may choose to utilize the Site Plan Review process to provide the Department with a study prepared by a qualified professional that evaluates the effect of the proposed clearing on the site as it relates to the design objective and identifies alternative methods to mitigate these impacts. The study shall take into account the nature and extent of the proposed development, the characteristics of the applicable sub basin, the existing habitat quality, the habitat impacts of the development and its impacts on water quality. The findings and recommendations of the study shall be utilized by the Department in the evaluation of the Site Plan Review. The Department shall be authorized to reduce or waive the native vegetation retention requirements based upon the information contained in the study when it is determined that alternative methods to mitigate impacts are appropriate and feasible.

3.    Priority location for native vegetation retention shall be within critical areas and associated buffers. However, native vegetation retention may also occur within parking lot landscaping, perimeter landscaping, low impact development (LID) best management practices (BMPs), or other required landscaped or tree retention areas provided that such areas have minimum dimensions of not less than 20 feet and are otherwise in compliance with the provisions of this Title.

4.    In residential developments, native vegetation retention may be incorporated into lots that exceed 8,000 square feet in area provided that the native vegetation retention area has minimum dimensions of not less than 20 feet and is located within a protective easement. The native vegetation retention area shall be separated from the remainder of the lot area by split rail fencing.

(Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2016-33 § 1 (part), 2016; Ord. 2015-86 § 1 (part), 2015; Ord. 2015-40 § 8 (part), 2015; Ord. 2013-45s4 § 6 (part), 2015; Ord. 2014-42 § 5 (part), 2014; Ord. 2013-85 § 1 (part), 2013; Ord. 2013-30s2 § 9 (part), 2013; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.030 Tree Conservation. Revised 12/18

The purpose of this Section is to retain and/or restore the overall tree canopy in the County by using plant materials as a unifying element and tool to protect the health, safety and welfare of the public. Trees mitigate the negative effects of loss to native wildlife biodiversity and impervious surfaces and vehicular traffic such as increased temperatures, airborne particulates, carbon dioxide, noise, and stormwater runoff.

A.    Applicability. The standards of this Section apply to:

1.    New uses and divisions of land proposed on vacant or redeveloping parcels;

2.    Expansions of existing civic, utility, commercial, industrial, and multi-family uses exceeding 10 percent of the existing building footprint or associated impervious areas (parking lots, storage areas, etc.) that do not have an existing approved tree conservation plan; and

3.    Class IV Forest Practices.

B.    Exemptions. The following uses shall not be subject to the standards of this Section. The exemptions herein shall not preclude compliance with the Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual or other applicable regulations outside of this Section:

1.    Development occurring within any designated airport safety area or object-free area.

2.    Land utilized for agricultural activities, except for Agricultural Product Sales, Agricultural Supply Sales, and Agricultural Services Use Types, which meets one of the following requirements:

a.    The land is located within the Agricultural Resource Lands (ARL) or Rural Farm (RF) zones;

b.    The land is subject to an approved Hobby Farm Agreement;

c.    The land meets the definition of Farm and Agricultural Land pursuant to RCW 84.34 and is being taxed as such; or

d.    The land is existing pasture land and is utilized for agricultural purposes such as livestock production.

3.    Silvicultural activities occurring within the Forest Land (FL) zone classification and/or active forest land that is being treated as a harvestable crop.

4.    Surface mining conducted within a designated Mineral Resource Overlay.

5.    Urban short subdivisions of 4 lots or less on project sites of 1 acre or less except that the significant tree retention provisions specified in PCC 18J.15.030 F.3. shall apply unless otherwise exempted herein. The significant trees shall be shown on the site plan and can be reviewed in conjunction with the short plat.

6.    Expansion, remodeling, or maintenance of structures; provided, that the existing building footprint is not increased by more than 30 percent.

7.    Construction, reconstruction, or maintenance of public roads, paths, bicycle ways, trails, bridges, sewer lines, storm drainage facilities, related critical area mitigation activities, and other similar public infrastructure, excluding public buildings.

8.    Significant tree retention shall be waived within the first 100 feet of lot depth for mixed use buildings located within a Residential Targeted Area designated by the Pierce County Council pursuant to RCW 84.14 when the streetscape standards of PCC 18J.30.110 B. are met.

9.    Cell tower lease area of up to 1,000 square feet.

C.    Tree Conservation Plan. A tree conservation plan, meeting standards as specified in PCC 18J.10.055, is required for any project that is subject to the standards of this Chapter, unless PPW staff determines that one or more of the following applies:

1.    Trees, as required by Table 18J.15.030-2, exist in a current protected area such as, but not limited to, a steep slope or wetland/buffer.

2.    Existing trees are not significant and are not proposed to be retained to satisfy tree unit requirements.

3.    The project does not require a landscape plan, and no more than 20 tree units are required for the project. In such case, photos may be submitted in lieu of a tree conservation plan and the applicant must clearly identify the species, diameter, and location of trees on the project site plan.

D.    Credits. All trees on-site that meet the standards of this Section and are required, provided, or are retained for residential street trees, perimeter buffering or otherwise, may be counted toward the minimum tree unit requirements.

E.    Design Objective. To promote tree conservation by establishing minimum tree density requirements, expressed as tree units per acre, for new or expanding uses proposed on vacant and redeveloping parcels. It is intended that the tree density requirements will be met primarily through the conservation of existing trees. However, in order to provide for continued flexibility in the design of new development, in those situations where an applicant's design would preclude the retention of the required number of trees, the use of replacement or supplemental tree planting is authorized. It is also recognized that some sites may not contain a sufficient number of existing trees to meet the tree density standards. In those situations, additional trees are to be planted as necessary to achieve the minimum tree density requirements.

F.    Standards – General.

1.    Construction Buffer. No construction shall occur within the anticipated mature critical root zone of a tree planted or retained to meet tree unit density requirements. (See also PCC 18J.15.130, Plant Protection and Maintenance, for additional standards and PCC 18J.15.100, Plant Lists, for tree species and canopy sizes.)

2.    Residential Lot Location. To minimize development related conflicts and foster long-term success of tree conservation in residential spaces, the following standards shall apply to tree conservation on residential lots:

a.    Lots must be at least 8,000 square feet in size to include trees that count toward tree unit density requirements.

b.    Replacement coniferous and broadleaf evergreen trees shall not be less than 4 feet in height at time of planting. Deciduous trees shall be fully branched, have a minimum caliper of 1 1/2 inches and a minimum height of 8 feet at time of planting. Seedlings are not permitted.

c.    All retained trees located on lots shall be identified with a permanent tree tag at breast height.

3.    Significant Trees. At a minimum, 30 percent of significant trees on site shall be retained, preferably reflective of the diversity of species and age within the stand, up to the minimum tree density requirements. All retained significant trees shall be shown to be windfirm. Where a sampling method is proposed for treed project sites, standards shall follow accepted industry methods as determined by a Professional Forester or licensed Landscape Architect.

Table 18J.15.030-1. Significant Trees

Tree Species

Size

Garry (Oregon White) Oak (1)

8" d.b.h. or greater

Pacific Yew

5" d.b.h. or greater

Pacific Madrone

10" d.b.h. or greater

Ponderosa Pine, Grand Fir, Big Leaf Maple, Western Hemlock, Western Red Cedar, Shore Pine, Western White Pine

15" d.b.h. or greater

Douglas Fir, Sitka Spruce

24" d.b.h. or greater

Legacy Tree (any species)

40" d.b.h. or greater

Footnote:

(1)    See also habitat protection standards for Oregon White Oak trees/stands in 18E.40.020 D. and 18E.40.040 C.

G.    Standards – Tree Unit Density.

1.    General. The following minimum tree unit densities apply to new development activities; calculated using net developable acreage of the project site:

Table 18J.15.030-2. General Minimum Tree Unit Density (1)

Employment Centers

5 tree units/acre

Urban Centers and Districts, Rural Centers

20 tree units/acre

Urban Residential (2)

30 tree units/acre

Rural Residential (3)

40 tree units/acre

Resource Lands and Other Zones

Not Applicable

Footnotes:

(1)    If the calculation results in a fractional quantity, it shall be rounded to the nearest whole number (greater than or equal to .5 is rounded up, less than .5 is rounded down).

(2)    Non-residential uses, other than schools, permitted within Urban Residential zones shall be subject to a required tree unit density of 20 tree units/acre.

(3)    Non-residential uses, other than schools, permitted within Rural Residential zones shall be subject to a required tree unit density of 20 tree units/acre.

2.    Property and Use Expansion.

a.    For expansion on legally established civic, utility, commercial, industrial, and multi-family properties which do not conform to the tree density requirements, the following tree conservation requirements shall apply:

(1)    A minimum of 1 tree unit shall be provided for each 500 square feet of building or use area expansion; and

(2)    A minimum of 3 tree units shall replace each tree unit removed, up to a maximum of 25 tree units per acre.

b.    For properties with an approved Tree Retention Plan, the applicant shall provide:

(1)    Information to explain how the removal of tree conservation trees cannot be avoided;

(2)    Replacement trees for each tree unit lost, based upon tree size at the time of removal; and

(3)    A revised plan demonstrating that no net loss of tree units will occur.

3.    Schools. Schools shall be subject to a required tree unit density of 10 tree units per acre in all zone classifications.

4.    Rural Residential Land Division. Rural land divisions which result in the creation of residential lots each having a minimum lot size of 5 acres or 1/128th of a Section or larger; or residential lots of less than 5 acres where the density of the land division is 0.2 dwelling units per acre or less, shall have the following special standards:

a.    For project sites containing forest, at least 50 percent of forested area shall be retained. If the retained forest area does not achieve 50 percent forest site coverage within the division additional tree plantings shall be provided to achieve such coverage. Forested areas shall meet a minimum tree unit density of 40 tree units per acre. Additional tree planting shall be provided as necessary to achieve this tree density.

b.    In order to preserve agricultural opportunities, where a project site is historically non-forested or pasture, and has been for over 20 years as documented by aerial or ortho photography, tree unit density requirements shall not be required.

H.    Standards – Tree Unit Credits. Tree unit credits for the retention and planting of trees shall be awarded as follows:

Table 18J.15.030-3. Tree Unit Credits

Tree Category

Tree Unit Credit

Existing Tree 1" to 6" d.b.h.

1.0 tree unit per tree retained

Existing Tree > 6" </= 12" d.b.h.

1.5 tree units per tree retained

Existing Tree > 12" </= 18" d.b.h.

2.0 tree units per tree retained

Existing Tree > 18" </= 24" d.b.h.

2.5 tree units per tree retained

Existing Tree > 24" d.b.h.

3.0 tree units per tree retained

Significant Tree < 24" d.b.h.

2.5 tree units per tree retained

Significant Tree >/=24" d.b.h.

3.0 tree units per tree retained

Legacy Tree

10 tree units per tree retained

Replacement Tree – 2-1 Seedling (1)

.25 tree units per tree planted

Replacement Tree – Coniferous ≥ 4' in height, Deciduous ≥1 ½ " caliper

.75 tree units per tree planted

Footnote:

(1)    Seedlings shall not be credited toward tree unit density requirements if placed on lots. (See PCC 18J.15.030 F.2., Standards – Residential Lot Location)

1.    Retained Trees. Trees to be retained on site must meet the following minimum standards to be credited toward the tree density requirements of this Section. Trees identified as having significant habitat value (i.e., Legacy Trees, snags or nesting trees) and those located within a critical area or its buffer may be credited toward the tree density requirements, regardless of the health or state of the tree. An evaluation of individual tree health shall not be required for such trees except for those trees within 1 1/2 tree lengths of proposed structures, improvements and roads:

a.    Post-development life expectancy of greater than 10 years;

b.    Relatively sound and solid trunk with no extensive decay or hollow and no significant trunk damage;

c.    No major insect or pathological problem;

d.    No significant crown damage;

e.    Full branching and general proportionality in height and breadth for the tree age; and

f.    Individual trees and groupings of trees proposed for retention must be wind-firm in their post development state.

2.    Replacement Trees. Each tree proposed for planting must meet the following minimum standards to be credited toward satisfying the tree density requirements of this Section:

a.    Developments shall locate a minimum of 25 percent of the required trees in protected tracts, such as tree conservation tracts, recreation tracts, stormwater tracts, and critical area tracts;

b.    Trees shall be free from injury, pests, diseases and nutritional disorders and must be fully branched and have a healthy root system;

c.    Trees utilized for planting shall be a minimum 2-1 seedling size, unless a larger size is specified;

d.    Trees planted shall include a mix of coniferous and deciduous trees, with a minimum of 30 percent coniferous, unless the area is deemed to have been Oregon white oak habitat, in which case the standards in Title 18E PCC, Development Regulations – Critical Areas, shall apply;

e.    Replacement trees proposed to be planted within open space, greenbelts, native buffer areas and landscape areas such as street trees must be compatible with the intended growing location;

f.    Individual species of replacement trees planted shall not exceed 25 percent of the total number of all replacement trees;

g.    Irrigation shall be provided until the tree is established; and

h.    Trees may be planted on a solitary basis or within clusters to form stands.

I.    Guidelines.

1.    When lots or building sites are located next to protective tracts (such as park, stormwater, or critical area tracts), the preferred location of the trees is the area adjacent to these tracts.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2017-12s § 2 (part), 2017; Ord. 2016-33 §§ 1 (part), 2 (part), 2016; Ord. 2016-14s § 6 (part), 2016; Ord. 2015-86 § 1 (part), 2015; Ord. 2015-40 § 8 (part), 2015; Ord. 2013-85 § 1 (part), 2013; Ord. 2013-30s2 § 9 (part), 2013; Ord. 2012-42s § 2 (part), 2012; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.040 Landscape Buffers. Revised 12/18

The purpose of this Section is to use landscaping and buffering concepts to promote compatibility between land uses by reducing the visual, noise, and lighting impacts of development on users of the site and abutting uses. The Section also provides standards that protect property values and property rights, protect critical areas from the impacts of development, promote the use of solar principles in landscape and building design, enhance and define public and private open spaces, promote the preservation of existing vegetation and use of vegetation common to Western Washington, and promote the physical safety of pedestrians and motorists.

A.    Applicability. The Minimum Landscape Level Tables set forth in PCC 18J.15.040 G. establish the applicable buffer level for each proposed land use according to compatibility with the existing adjacent land use.

1.    Expansions. This Section shall only apply to the developable lot area associated with the expansion of a permitted use or nonconforming use. The remainder of the property shall be governed by regulations in force at the time of the original approval.

B.    Exemptions. The standards of this Section do not apply to:

1.    Existing, legally established, single- and two-family dwellings and accessory structures.

2.    A single-family dwelling or accessory dwelling unit built on a legal lot of record with a previous land division decision that did not include a landscape buffer requirement.

3.    Land divisions which result in 4 or fewer detached single-family dwelling unit lots.

C.    Credits.

1.    Use of Existing Vegetation or Topography in Lieu of Landscape Levels. An applicant may be allowed to deviate from the standard requirement where existing vegetation or topographic features, e.g., location at the bottom of a slope, can provide the same or better level of screening as required per the landscape level or where supplemental plantings associated with existing vegetation or topography can provide the same level of screening as required per the landscape levels. Integration of stormwater LID BMPs and facilities into the landscape strip is encouraged and preferred where site conditions warrant. Vegetation planted within vegetated LID BMPs and facilities may help meet landscaping, screening, or buffer requirements, but shall not reduce the quantity of plant material required.

a.    The applicant is responsible for submitting to PPW an alternative vegetation plan, supporting photographs, and a brief explanation as to how the alternative plan satisfies the intent of the landscape level required. Supplemental plant material may be required to be installed within or adjacent to a natural feature to fully comply with the intent of the landscape level.

D.    Design Objective. Establish and retain perimeter landscape buffering that provides a physical, visual, and noise buffer to transition between land uses of varying intensity and compatibility.

E.    Standards.

1.    General.

a.    Tables 18J.15-040-1, 18J.15.040-2, 18J.15.040-3: Perimeter Landscape Buffering. Each lot line will have a landscape level based on the abutting land use, as applicable. If the calculation of the number of trees or shrubs results in a fraction of 0.5 or greater, the applicant shall round up to the next whole number. If the calculation of the number of trees or shrubs results in a fraction of less than 0.5, the applicant can round down to the previous whole number.

b.    8" dbh Trees. For required perimeter landscape buffers, all trees exceeding 8 inch diameter at breast height (d.b.h.) at time of development shall be retained and incorporated into the buffer. If determined by a professional forester that retention of a tree will create a hazard or that the tree is not viable, then the tree may be removed.

(Note: Additional requirements may apply when Oregon White Oak trees are present. See Chapter 18E.40 PCC)

c.    Native and Drought Tolerant Western Washington Plants. Landscape buffers required pursuant to this Section shall be planted with plants as specified in PCC 18J.15.100, Plant Lists.

d.    Buffer Interruption. Landscape buffers may be interrupted at points of vehicular or pedestrian access to connect the site with rights-of-way and adjacent property. Where necessary, vegetation may be removed for utilities but shall be replanted where feasible.

F.    Exceptions to Tables 18J.15.040-1, 18J.15.040-2, and 18J.15.040-3.

1.    Rural Centers. For lots in Rural Centers along a Highway or a Rural State Route, L2 landscaping shall be required.

2.    Vacant land. For lots in Urban Employment Centers, Urban Centers, Urban Districts or Rural Centers that abut vacant lands in residential zones, L1 Landscaping Canopy Vegetation shall be installed along the interior lot line of all parcels. In all other cases, no landscape buffer is required when abutting vacant land.

3.    Contiguous Jointly Developed Lots. If contiguous lots are developed jointly, the requirement for perimeter buffering between the jointly developed lots shall not be required.

4.    Mixed Use Buildings. Where two or more use types or categories are located in a single building, the perimeter landscape level required will be based on the use requiring the highest level of perimeter buffering.

5.    Single-Family or Two-Family Dwellings on Lots of Record in Centers and Districts. An L2 Landscape Level shall be the maximum required for uses abutting single-family or two-family dwellings located in MUC, CC, AC, NC, MUD, OMUD, ROC, RAC and RNC zones.

6.    Nonconforming Uses. Where a proposed permitted use abuts a legally established nonconforming use in the EC zone classification, an L2 landscape buffer shall be required. Where a proposed permitted use abuts a nonconforming use in any other zone classification, no buffering shall be required of the permitted use.

7.    Large Lot Location Exception. Project sites that exceed 1 acre in size may locate the required perimeter buffering along the boundary of the proposed developed area of the site, instead of at the perimeter of the entire property.

8.    Private Roads. Where a private road easement, tract or right-of-way of at least 50 feet abuts an interior lot line, the development abutting that private road shall not be required to install the landscape level that would be required if the two lots abutted each other without the separation of a private road. Where a private road is classified as a collector, secondary, or major arterial; the street tree requirement shall still apply.

9.    Screening of Storage Yards. Where an outdoor storage area is located within 20 feet of a public or private road right-of-way, an L3 Landscape Level or a 6-foot solid board fence or solid wall shall be installed between the yard and the right-of-way line, provided all applicable sight distance requirements of Title 17B are met.

10.    Residential Targeted Areas. Perimeter buffer requirements set forth in Tables 18J.15.040-1, 18J.15.040-2, and 18J.15.040-3 shall only apply to mixed use buildings located within a Residential Targeted Area designated by the Pierce County Council pursuant to RCW 84.14 when such development abuts a Residential Zone Classification. Where such mixed use buildings include ground level residential units, a stoop or terrace of at least 75 square feet in area, with an additional 50 square feet in planting, shall be provided. All other landscaping requirements set forth in Pierce County Code, such as parking lot landscaping, street tree and streetscape, and tree retention, shall continue to apply.

11.    Homeland Security. When a project or project site is subject to United States Department of Homeland Security regulations, PPW may adjust plant type, size and density to accommodate required security measures. Landscape buffering and screening, and/or other measures to mitigate incompatibility and aesthetic impacts, shall be provided to the maximum extent feasible.

G.    Tables.

1.    Interpretation of Tables. Tables 18J.15.040-1 through -3 set forth the required perimeter landscaping buffer based upon proposed use. The tables are arranged in a matrix format. To determine what level of perimeter landscape buffering is required to be installed for a proposed project, follow the procedures below:

a.    Read down the left-hand column for the use type or use category in which the proposed use would most closely fit. If there are note references associated with the use types/categories, refer to the note descriptions immediately below the table;

b.    Read across the top of the table to the column containing the use type or use category abutting the property along a certain lot line. If there are note references associated with the use types/categories, refer to the note descriptions immediately below the table;

c.    Read down the appropriate existing use column to its intersection with the proposed use row to determine the required landscape level. If there are note references associated with the landscape levels, refer to the note descriptions immediately below the table for the appropriate landscape level, e.g., L2; "n/a" means not applicable; and

d.    Refer back to the text of the Section for details on the landscape levels and other standards. If a use is not listed as proposed or existing on the table, no perimeter landscape buffering as defined in this Section shall be required of that use.

Table 18J.15.040-1: Perimeter Landscape Buffering:

Minimum Landscape Levels 

Existing Uses

 

 

 

Proposed Uses

Detached Single-Family/Two-Family Use Type

Attached Single-Family/ Multi-Family Use Type

Mobile Home Parks Use Type

Senior Housing/Nursing Homes Use Type

Fraternity and Sorority House/Group Home Use Types

Civic/Utility Use Category

Single-Family/Two-Family Developments

L2 or F1

n/a

L1

L1

L1 (1)

Multi-Family Use Type

L3

L1

L2

L1

L2 (1)

Mobile Home Parks Use Type

L2

L2

n/a

n/a

L2 (1)

Senior Housing/ Nursing Home Use Types

L2

L1

L1

L2

L1 (1)

Fraternity Sorority House/Group Home Use Types

L2

n/a

n/a

L2

L1 (1)

Civic/Utility Use Category

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

Office/Business Use Category

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

L1 (1)

Resource Use Category

(4)

(4)

(4)

(4)

(4)

(4)

Commercial Use Category

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

L1 (1)

Industrial Use Category

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

L1 (1)

Table 18J.15.040-1: Perimeter Landscape Buffering:

Minimum Landscape Levels (continued)

Existing Uses

 

Proposed Uses

Office/ Business Use Category

Resource Use Category

Commercial Use Category

Industrial Use Category

Arterials

Rural SR and Highways

Single-Family/Two-Family Developments

L2 or F1

L2 or F1 (2)

L2 or F1

L3 or F1

L3 (5)

L4

Multi-Family Use Type

L2

L2 (2)

L2

L3

L2

L4

Mobile Home Parks Use Type

L2 or F1

L2 or F1 (2)

L2 or F1

L3

L2

L4

Senior Housing/ Nursing Home Use Types

L2

L2 (2)

L2

L3

L2

L4

Fraternity/Sorority House Use Type

L2 or F1

L2 or F1 (2)

L2 or F1

L3

L2

L4

Civic/Utility Use Category

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

(3)

Office/Business Use Category

n/a

n/a

n/a

L2

L4

Resource Use Category

(4)

(4)

(4)

(4)

(4)

(4)

Commercial Use Category

n/a

n/a

n/a

L2

L4

Industrial Use Category

L2

n/a

L2

L3

L4

Footnotes:

(1)    This landscape level applies only to the following Civic and Utility Use Types: Administrative Governmental Facilities and Services, Community and Cultural Services, Health Services, Day-Care Center, Education, Postal Services/Transportation (Levels 2 and 3 only), Utility or Public Maintenance Facilities, Public Safety Services, Public Park Facilities (Levels 2 and 3 only), Religious Assembly, Communication or Cellular Facilities, Electrical Facilities, Electrical Generation Facilities, Natural Gas Facilities, Water Supply Facilities, Sewage Collection Facilities and Sewage Treatment Facilities.

(2)    This landscape level applies only to the following Resource Use Types: Agricultural Supply or Product Sales, Agricultural Services, Animal Production, Boarding and Slaughtering, Fish Processing, Hatcheries and Aquaculture, Forestry (Level 2 only), Surface Mines and Crop Production (Level 2 only).

(3)    Refer to Table 18J.15.040-2 for landscape buffering requirements for proposed Civic and Utility Use Types.

(4)    Refer to Table 18J.15.040-3 for landscape buffering requirements for proposed Resource Use Types.

(5)    Not applicable on arterials outside of Community Plan Areas.

Table 18J.15.040-2: Perimeter Landscape Buffering:

Minimum Landscape Levels for Proposed Civic and Utility Uses

Existing Uses

Proposed Uses

Detached Single-Family/Two-Family Use Types (4)

Attached Single-Family/Multi-Family Use Types (4)

Mobile Home Park Use Type

Senior Housing/Nursing Homes Use Types

Fraternity and Sorority House/ Group Home Use Types

Administrative Governmental Facilities and Services/Community and Cultural Services/ Health Services Use Types

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

Day-Care Center Use Type

L3 or F1

L3 or F1

L3 or F1

L3 or F1

L3 or F1

Education Use Type

L2

L2

L2

L2

L1

Postal Services/ Transportation (Levels 2 and 3 only)/Utility or Public Maintenance Facilities Use Types

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

Recreation, Non-Profit/ Religious Assembly Use Type

L2 (1)

L2 (1)

L2 (1)

L2 (1)

L2 (1)

Communication or Cellular Facilities/ Electrical Facilities/ Electrical Generation Facilities/Natural Gas Facilities/Sewage Collection Facilities/ Water Supply Facilities Use Types (6)

L3 (3)

L3 (3)

L3 (3)

L3 (3)

L3 (3)

Stormwater Facilities Use Types (above ground)

L2

L2

L2

L2

L2

Sewage Treatment Facilities Use Types

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

Organic Waste Processing Facilities/Waste Disposal Facilities/ Waste Transfer Facilities Use Types

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

Table 18J.15.040-2: Perimeter Landscape Buffering:

Minimum Landscape Levels for Proposed Civic and Utility Uses (continued)

Existing Uses

Proposed Uses

Civic/Utility Use Category

Office/ Business Use Category

Resource Use Category

Commercial Use Category

Industrial Use Category

Arterials

Rural SR and Highways

Administrative Govern-mental Facilities and Services/Community and Cultural Services/ Health Services Use Types

L1 (2)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

L2

L4

Day-Care Center Use Type

L3 or F1

L3

n/a

L3

L3

L2

L4

Education Use Type

L3 or F1

L1

L1

L1

L3

L2

L4

Postal Services/ Transportation (Levels 2 and 3 only)/Utility or Public Maintenance Facilities Use Types

L1 (2)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

L3

L4

Recreation, Non-Profit/ Religious Assembly Use Types

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

L2

L4

Communication or Cellular Facilities/ Electrical Facilities/ Electrical Generation Facilities/Natural Gas Facilities/Sewage Collection Facilities/ Water Supply Facilities Use Types (6)

L3 (3)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

L3

L4

Stormwater Facilities Use Types (above ground)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

L3

L4

Sewage Treatment Facilities Use Types

L3 (2)

L3

n/a

L3

n/a

L3

L4

Organic Waste Processing Facilities/ Waste Disposal Facilities/Waste Transfer Facilities Use Types

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

(5)

L3 (5)

L4 (5)

Footnotes:

(1)    Landscape level is required only along that portion of an interior lot line where parking spaces or aisles are located less than 15 feet from the interior property line.

(2)    Landscape level is required only if the abutting interior use is of an Education, Recreation, Non-profit, Religious Assembly or Community and Cultural Services Use Type.

(3)    Only the Vegetative Screen or Berm requirements of the L3 Landscape Level are required.

(4)    Buffering requirements for this use type shall include areas of subdivisions set aside for active and passive recreation.

(5)    Refer to Solid/Hazardous Waste Handling Facility standards of PCC 18J.15.240.

(6)    See PCC 18J.15.260 for additional exterior screening standards for water supply facilities.

Table 18J.15.040-3: Perimeter Landscape Buffering:

Minimum Landscape Levels for Proposed Resource Uses

Existing Uses

 

 

 

Proposed Uses

Detached Single-Family/Two-Family Use Types (3)

Attached Single- Family/ Multi-Family Use Types (3)

Mobile Home Park Use Type

Senior Housing/Nursing Homes Use Types

Fraternity and Sorority House/Group Home Use Types

Agricultural Product Sales Use Type

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

Agricultural Supply Sales Use Type

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

Agricultural Services Use Type

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

Animal Production, Boarding and Slaughtering (Level 1)/ Fish Processing, Hatcheries and Aquaculuture Use Types

L2

L2

L2

L2

L2

Animal Production, Boarding and Slaughtering (Level 2)/ Forestry (Level 2 only)/ Surface Mines Use Types

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

Crop Production Use Type (Level 2 only)

L3

L3

L3

L3

L3

Table 18J.15.040-3: Perimeter Landscape Buffering:

Minimum Landscape Levels for Proposed Resource Uses (continued)

Existing Uses

 

Proposed Uses

Civic/Utility Use Category

Office/Business Use Category

Resource Use Category

Commercial Use Category

Industrial Use Category

Arterials

Rural SR and Highways

Agricultural Product Sales Use Type

L2 (1)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

L2

L2

Agricultural Supply Sales Use Type

L2 (1)

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

L3

L4

Agricultural Services Use Type

L2 (1)

L2

n/a

L2

n/a

L3

L4

Animal Production, Boarding and Slaughtering (Level 1)/ Fish Processing, Hatcheries and Aquaculture Use Types

L2 (1)

L2

n/a

L2

n/a

L2

L2

Animal Production, Boarding and Slaughtering (Level 2)/ Forestry (Level 2 only)/ Surface Mines Use Types

L2 (1)

L3

L3 (2)

L3

n/a

L3

L4

Crop Production Use Type (Level 2 only)

L2 (1)

L2

L3 (2)

L2

n/a

L3

L4

Footnotes:

(1)    This landscape level is required only if the abutting interior use is of an Education, Recreation, Non-profit, Religious Assembly or Community and Cultural Services Use Type.

(2)    This landscape level is required only along that portion of an interior lot line where enclosures or buildings are located less than 35 feet from the interior property line.

(3)    Buffering requirements for this use type shall include areas of subdivisions set aside for active and passive recreation.

H.    Standards – Landscape Levels. The following standards are minimum requirements and may be exceeded by the applicant. The landscape levels are listed in hierarchical order, and correspond to the levels indicated on Tables 18J.15.040-1, 18J.15.040-2, and 18J.15.040-3. The F1 Fence Level is intended to be used as an alternative in specialized cases as indicated in Tables 18J.15.040-1, 18J.15.040-2 and 18J.15.040-3.

1.    Low Screen/Berm (Landscape Level 1 – L1). This landscaping is intended to provide a minimal buffer between somewhat compatible uses to soften the impact of uses that have a low profile but dominating presence, or where visibility is more important than a total visual screen. Examples of use: buffering parking lots from the street in pedestrian-oriented areas, buffering between non-residential uses such as offices and civic and utility uses and between different types of semi-compatible residential development.

a.    The L1 standard consists of Canopy Vegetation-L1 plus a Vegetative Screen-L1 or Berm-L1.

b.    Canopy Vegetation-L1. Trees at a rate of 1 per 40 lineal feet of lot line shall be interspersed throughout the landscape strip in clusters or uniform rows. Spacing shall be the minimum required by the selected species pursuant to the landscape plan, but in no case shall spacing be greater than 40 feet for individual trees or 100 feet between clusters. Minimum mature heights shall be 20 feet.

c.    Vegetative Screen-L1. Continuous vegetative screen a minimum of 3 feet high and a maximum of 4 feet high at maturity, planted at a rate of 1 shrub per 4 feet of lot line, minus any driveway widths. The screen may consist of either clusters or a solid row of material. Plant spacing shall be such that shrubs create a continuous screen of vegetation at maturity. Installation of vegetative groundcover is encouraged within the planting area but not required.

d.    Berm-L1. The earthen berm a minimum of 3 feet high and a maximum of 4 feet high, measured from street curb or the crown of the adjacent paved way for road frontages or existing grade for interior lot lines. The berm shall be planted with vegetative ground cover sufficient to achieve a 50 percent coverage rate at maturity.

e.    Screen Width-L1. Vegetation shall be located adjacent to the lot line and shall have a minimum planting bed width of 5 feet for shrubs and groundcover; 8 feet for trees with no tree located more than 15 feet from the right-of-way line.

2.    Filtered Screen (Landscape Level 2 – L2). This landscaping is intended to provide a visual separator between different types of non-residential uses and intensities and different types of residential uses and densities. Examples of use: interior lot line buffering between residential and existing office, civic, or commercial uses, between office and industrial development, and between mobile home parks and multi-family housing.

a.    The L2 standard shall consist of:

(1)    trees, at a rate of 1 per 40 lineal feet of lot line, interspersed throughout the landscape strip in clusters or uniform rows; and

(2)    shrubs, at a rate of 1 per 7 lineal feet of lot line, interspersed throughout the landscape strip in clusters or uniform rows.

b.    Spacing. Trees at the ratio and spacing of trees may be up to 1 tree per 40 lineal feet if a registered landscape architect or certified nursery professional can provide documentation that a proposed tree would have a mature spread greater than 30 feet; and shrubs at no greater than 8 feet on center, with no greater than 15 feet on center between clusters.

c.    Minimum Mature Heights. Trees: 20 feet; and Shrubs: 3 feet. Installation of vegetative ground cover is encouraged but not required within the planting area.

d.    Screen Width. All required L2 vegetation shall be located adjacent to the lot line and shall have a minimum planting bed width of 8 feet, with no required vegetation located greater than 30 feet from the lot line.

3.    Full Screen/Berm (Landscape Level 3 – L3). This level is intended to provide a physical and visual separator between incompatible uses or intensities/densities but where a complete noise barrier is not necessary. Examples of use: interior lot line buffering between single-family development and commercial, office, industrial, or multi-family uses, between multi-family development and non-residential uses or arterial roadways, between public schools and commercial and industrial uses, etc.

a.    Full Screen/Berm, Landscape Level 3, shall include Canopy Vegetation-L3 and either a Vegetative Screen-L3 or a Berm-L3.

b.    Canopy Vegetation-L3. Trees at a rate of 1 per 25 lineal feet of lot line shall be interspersed throughout the landscape strip in groupings or uniform rows. Minimum mature height shall be 20 feet.

c.    Vegetative Screen-L3. The Vegetation Screen shall consist of: (1) evergreen shrubs at a rate of 1 per 5 lineal feet of landscape strip; or (2) closely spaced evergreen trees, at a rate of 1 per 8 lineal feet of landscape strip, or a combination of the two in separate sections. The screen may consist of either overlapping clusters or a solid row of material. If overlapping clusters are used, the overlap shall be at least one-half plant width. Spacing shall be as follows: (1) evergreen trees for the landscape screen at no greater than 8 feet on center, with no more than 10 feet on center between clusters; (2) shrubs for the landscape screen shall be no greater than 5 feet on center, with no greater than 7 feet on center between clusters; or (3) planting spacing shall be such that shrubs create a solid continuous screen of vegetation within three years to fully screen adjacent land uses. Vegetative screening materials shall have a minimum mature height of 6 feet.

d.    Berm-L3. The earthen berm shall be a minimum of 4 feet high, measured from street curb or the crown of the adjacent paved way for road frontages or existing grade for interior lot lines. Vegetative groundcover shall cover a minimum of 50 percent of the landscape strip area at maturity. Berms less than 6 feet in height shall be planted with evergreen shrubs at a rate of 1 per 4 lineal feet of landscape strip, to a mature height equal to or greater than a 6-foot high berm. The screen may consist of either overlapping groupings or a solid row of material. If overlapping groupings are used, the overlap shall be at least one-half plant width. Shrub spacing shall be no greater than 4 feet on center, with no greater than 6 feet on center between groupings.

e.    Screen Width. All required L3 vegetation shall be located adjacent to the lot line and shall have a minimum planting bed width of 20 feet, with no required vegetation located greater than 30 feet from the lot line.

f.    Installation of vegetative groundcover is encouraged but not required within the L3 planting area.

4.    Rural State Route and Highway Buffer (Landscape Level 4 – L4). This level is intended to provide a physical and visual filter and separator uses and the passing motorist along rural state routes, rural state highways, and the Key Peninsula Highway in order to maintain the aesthetic character of the surrounding area and to provide a noise and air quality buffer.

a.    L4 shall include Canopy Vegetation-L4; either a Vegetative Screen-L4 or Berm-L4; and vegetative ground cover.

b.    All existing vegetation shall be retained to provide a complete visual screen between the site and abutting highway. Where existing vegetation does not provide a complete visual screen, the buffer shall be supplemented such that a complete visual screen is achieved within 10 years.

c.    Canopy Vegetation-L4. Trees at a rate of 1 per 25 lineal feet of lot line shall be interspersed throughout the landscape strip in natural clusters or groups. The maximum distance between canopy tree clusters shall be 40 feet. Minimum mature height shall be 20 feet.

d.    Vegetation Screen-L4. Shall consist of: (1) evergreen or deciduous shrubs at a rate of 1 per 5 lineal feet of landscape strip, with the shrub mix not including more than 25 percent deciduous shrubs; (2) evergreen and deciduous trees at a rate of 1 per 8 lineal feet of landscape strip, or (3) a combination of the trees and shrubs in separate clusters. The screen shall consist of overlapping clusters. The overlap between clusters shall be at least one-half mature plant width. Spacing shall be as follows: (1) trees for the buffer at no greater than 8 feet on center, with no more than 10 feet on center between clusters; (2) shrubs for the screen shall be no greater than 5 feet on center, with no greater than 7 feet on center between clusters; or (3) planting spacing shall be such that shrubs create a solid continuous screen of vegetation within three years to fully screen adjacent land uses. Plants shall have a minimum mature height of 6 feet.

e.    Berm-L4. An earthen berm a minimum of 4 feet high, measured from the crown of the adjacent paved way for road frontages or existing grade for interior lot lines. Vegetative ground cover shall cover a minimum of 75 percent of the landscape strip area at maturity. Berms less than 6 feet in height shall be planted with evergreen shrubs at a rate of 1 per 4 lineal feet of landscape strip, to a mature height equal to or greater than a 6-foot high berm. The screen shall consist of overlapping groupings with a naturalistic appearance. The overlap between groupings shall be at least one-half mature plant width. Shrub spacing shall be no greater than 4 feet on center, with no greater than 6 feet on center between groupings.

f.    Ground Cover. Vegetative ground cover, evergreen, deciduous or a mix, shall be installed to achieve a coverage rate of a minimum of 50 percent of the required buffer area;

g.    Buffer Width and Location. The buffer shall be located adjacent to the parcel boundary which abuts the rural state route, highway or arterial and shall extend the full length of the parcels frontage along the highway except for points of pedestrian and vehicular access as set forth in PCC 18J.15.040 H.4.c. above. All required L4 vegetation shall be located within the buffer area. The buffer shall have a minimum planting bed width of 50 feet. Where insufficient existing vegetation is present within the buffer to meet the requirements of PCC 18J.15.040 H.4.d. and e. above, the property owner may elect to increase the buffer width to 100 feet in lieu of providing additional plantings provided, however, that said buffer area must have understory vegetation and a tree cover established and managed to achieve a density of 80 square feet of basal area per acre.

5.    Sight-Obscuring Fence/Wall (Fence Level – F1). The F1 standard provides a tall and complete visual separation. This standard is applied in special circumstances where complete screening is necessary to protect abutting uses where landscape screens are impractical in that: there is inadequate space for a full landscape screen; noise protection afforded by walls and fences is greater than what is provided by a vegetative screen; or when a lower intensity use locates adjacent to an existing higher intensity use.

a.    Fences and walls shall be 6 feet high or a maximum height of 8 feet for security fencing necessary for a Utility Use, Industrial Use, or an Agricultural Use and 100 percent sight obscuring.

b.    Sight-obscuring fences and walls can be constructed of wood, metal, bricks, masonry, or other permanent material. A combination of fence and wall is permitted.

c.    The fence/wall shall be installed along the lot line, except that space can be provided to accommodate proposed landscaping.

d.    When using the F1 standard along road rights-of-way, the fence/wall shall comply with sight distance requirements of Title 17B PCC.

I.    Guidelines.

1.    Where possible, perimeter buffers should include the retention of existing mature, native trees and vegetation to protect the aesthetic qualities of the community, protect aquifers and aquifer recharge areas, provide wildlife habitat, and to prevent detrimental runoff to adjoining properties, streams, and other critical areas more closely mimic the natural hydrologic cycle.

2.    The use of sodded or seeded lawn should be avoided in industrial and commercial projects except where necessary for recreation or outdoor gathering places.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-12s § 2 (part), 2017; Ord. 2013-85 § 1 (part), 2013; Ord. 2013-30s2 § 9 (part), 2013; Ord. 2012-42s § 2 (part), 2012; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.050 Street Trees. Revised 12/18

The purpose of planting street trees is to enhance the environment by using plant material as a unifying element and to protect the health, safety and welfare of the public by using street trees to mitigate the negative effects of impervious surfaces and vehicular traffic including increased temperatures, airborne particulates, carbon dioxide, noise, and stormwater runoff. Street trees also provide shade and visual interest for pedestrians.

A.    Applicability. Street trees shall be installed along both sides of all new urban roads and access ways in urban areas only. Flexibility may be allowed when requirements for low impact development (LID) best management practices (BMPs) preclude street trees on both sides of a new road or access way.

B.    Design Objective. Provide buffers along street corridors to increase privacy and minimize noise impacts.

C.    Standards.

1.    Street trees located within public or private rights-of-way shall be installed consistent with the requirements of PCC 17B.10.060.

2.    Street trees shall be planted along each side of streets at a rate of 1 per 30 lineal feet of roadway, exclusive of intersections. Clustering is permitted to allow for driveways. Spacing shall be the minimum required by the selected species pursuant to the street tree plan, but in no case shall spacing be greater than 30 feet for individual trees or 100 feet between clusters.

3.    Minimum mature height shall be 20 feet.

4.    Refer to PCC 18J.15.100, Plant Lists, for a list of appropriate street tree species.

D.    Guidelines.

1.    Any tree planted within 5 feet of public or private road pavement edge, curbing, or sidewalk, or within required parking areas should include a root control barrier. Root control barriers should consist of galvanized metal or plastic sheets extending a minimum of 2 feet below the finished grade of the surrounding surface.

2.    The preferred location of street trees is within the public road right-of-way, within the buffer.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.060 Infill Compatibility.

Infill compatibility standards are intended to ensure neighborhood compatibility, maintain harmony and character of existing residential areas, and ensure residential infill development occurs in an orderly and desirable manner.

A.    Applicability. New residential developments of 5 or more dwelling units proposed adjacent to lots of less than 1 acre in size, at least 100 percent larger than proposed lot sizes, and of the same or lesser intense residential use type shall meet infill compatibility standards. (For example: If the proposed lot is 5,000 square feet in size and the adjacent lot is 10,000 square feet or larger (but less than 1 acre) and of the same or less intense housing type, infill compatibility applies.)

B.    Exemptions.

1.    Projects designed according to the Small Lot Design standards of Chapter 18J.17 PCC.

C.    Design Objective. Infill compatibility measures are necessary to help mitigate potential impacts of infill densities throughout the County.

D.    Standards.

1.    The rear yard setback for new homes which abut the lower density development shall be a minimum of 30 feet. Detached structures accessory to the home may be built within the rear yard, pursuant to zone setbacks, as long as the accessory structure does not exceed 12 feet in height;

2.    The rear lot line shall be fenced with a 6-foot sight obscuring fence or sight obscuring vegetated screening alternative such as evergreen shrubs or trees, see Landscape Level 3 in PCC 18J.15.040 H. for full screen plant spacing standards; and

3.    A note regarding the required setback and fence shall be included on the final platting document.

(Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.070 Noise Attenuating Barriers and Structural Walls. Revised 12/18

The purpose of this Section is to provide standards for the design, placement, and construction of noise attenuating barriers between incompatible land uses. A "noise attenuating barrier" means any buffer strip, wall or berm constructed for the purpose of reducing noise from a noise-generating activity.

A.    Applicability. These standards apply to any barrier being built to attenuate noise from a proposed or existing land use, as required by the Hearing Examiner, Director, Responsible Official or voluntarily constructed on any parcel of land.

B.    General Standards.

1.    An Acoustical Expert must certify that the building plans comply with the noise regulations in Chapter 8.76 PCC and the standards and guidelines of this Section prior to the issuance of a Building Permit.

2.    No barrier may be located within the right-of-way without express permission from the County Engineer pursuant to PCC 12.28.010.

3.    Maintenance of the barrier shall be the responsibility of the property owner, applicant, or successor.

4.    Barriers shall not limit access for maintenance equipment, traffic service vehicles, emergency vehicles, pedestrians and bicycles.

5.    A noise barrier shall not have anything affixed to it; such as a light fixture or sign, and shall not protrude in such a way as to interfere with pedestrian or vehicle traffic.

6.    When a Noise Attenuating Barrier, Structural Wall or retaining wall greater than 6 feet in height, is visible from a public arterial roadway it shall be screened from public view utilizing a vegetative screen. This landscaping ensures that a noise barrier and related buffer is visually attractive and consistent with the character of the community.

a.    Vegetation Screen Standards.

(1)    The Vegetation Screen shall consist of: a mix of evergreen and deciduous shrubs and trees across the buffer strips and any berm associated with a noise attenuating barrier;

(2)    Landscaping shall be installed on each side of any wall or berm, as follows:

(a)    Evergreen and deciduous shrubs, in a mix of at least 60 percent evergreen, at a rate of 1 per 5 lineal feet of landscape strip;

(b)    Closely spaced evergreen trees, at a rate of 1 per 10 lineal feet of landscape strip; and

(c)    Closely spaced deciduous trees, at a rate of 1 per 20 lineal feet of landscape strip. The screen may consist of either overlapping clusters or a solid row of material. If overlapping clusters are used, the overlap shall be at least one-half plant width;

(3)    Vegetative screening materials shall have a mix of mature heights ranging from 4 to 6 feet for shrubs to 10 to 12 feet for the trees;

(4)    In the event only a buffer strip is used for noise attenuation, landscaping shall be installed at the same rate as for two sides of a berm or wall; and

(5)    Installation of vegetative groundcover that is native and drought tolerant is encouraged but not required within the planting area.

(6)    Native and drought-tolerant vegetation shall be considered.

C.    Design Options. The proponent may choose one of the following options for a noise attenuating barrier, provided the required mitigation of noise is achieved to meet the noise standards in Chapter 8.76 PCC, as certified by the acoustical expert, and the conditions of the permit.

1.    Buffer Strip. A vegetated buffer strip may be used to attenuate noise, if determined to be effective given the noise impacts, given the topography and other characteristics of the site.

a.    Standards.

(1)    If a buffer is used, the width of the buffer must be 40 feet wide or a width specified by the Acoustical Expert as necessary to mitigate the noise.

2.    Berm. A vegetated berm may be used to attenuate noise, if determined to be effective given the noise impacts, topography and other characteristics of the site. A berm is defined as an earthen strip barrier with permanent vegetative cover, which is free from broken concrete, asphalt, large rocks or other debris and placed as a continuous ridge of earth.

a.    Standards.

(1)    The height of the berm shall be at least 6 feet or the height specified by the Acoustical Expert as necessary to mitigate the noise. The berm shall be measured from street curb or the crown of the adjacent paved way for road frontages or existing grade for interior lot lines;

(2)    The berm shall be placed on a strip of land (buffer strip) at least 30 feet in width; and

(3)    Berm slopes shall be no steeper than 2:1. The end of the berm shall be designed with a lead-in slope of 10:1 and curved toward the right-of-way line.

3.    Wall. A solid, opaque wall with noise attenuating qualities may be constructed as a noise attenuating barrier if determined to be effective given the noise impacts, topography and other characteristics of the site.

a.    Standards.

(1)    The height of the wall shall be at least 6 feet or the height specified by the Acoustical Expert as necessary to mitigate the noise, provided the wall shall be no higher than 9 feet;

(2)    The wall shall be placed on a strip of land (buffer strip) at least 20 feet in width;

(3)    The wall shall be constructed of stone, masonry or concrete with a stone, corrugated or exposed aggregate finish with horizontal and vertical modulation to reduce the appearance of a barrier and look more like a design element that fits the character of the adjacent developments; and

(4)    The wall shall be set back from the adjoining property line or right-of-way by at least 10 feet.

4.    Combination of Berm and Wall. A wall may be combined with a berm to achieve the required noise reduction. The separate standard for the berm and wall shall be met, except that the buffer strip shall be at least 20 feet in width and the wall no taller than 6 feet.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.080 Off-Street Parking, Pedestrian, Bus and Bicycle Facilities.

A.    Applicability. The standards of this Section shall apply to the following:

1.    New parking facilities that accommodate 10 or more vehicles.

2.    Ten percent or more expansion to an existing parking lot that accommodates 10 or more vehicles.

3.    New residential developments.

B.    Exemptions. [Reserved]

C.    Design Objective. To provide aesthetically pleasing parking facilities that accommodate motorized and nonmotorized modes of transportation and facilitate safe connections for vehicles and pedestrians between commercial areas and neighborhoods while minimizing impervious surfaces by sharing parking facilities where possible.

D.    Standards – Surface.

1.    All new vehicle parking facilities located within the Urban and Rural Center zone classifications shall be paved.

2.    In accordance with the Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual, permeable materials must be considered and is preferred for new and redevelopment projects. Permeable materials, however, may not be appropriate for certain land uses which produce hazardous wastes or for use as emergency vehicle access.

3.    The site shall be designed in conformance with currently adopted Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual.

E.    Standard – Location and Orientation. New parking lots for commercial and office uses shall have no more than 50 percent of required parking stalls between the road and building. For redevelopment projects already improved with building/parking layouts, this standard shall be met to the greatest extent possible.

F.    Guidelines – Location and Orientation.

1.    Where feasible, share and interconnect parking areas between uses with different peak demand times.

2.    Avoid orienting parking facilities that serve residential developments toward the street.

3.    Site entrances should incorporate a special design treatment in order to enhance the overall visual image of the site. Treatment may include decorative pavement, landscaping, lighting and entry signs.

4.    Garage doors and open vehicle entries should be recessed at least 6 feet from the front building façade.

G.    Standards – Stall Design.

1.    Parking facilities shall be designed to conform to the following minimum standards:

Minimum Parking Stall Dimensions

Width

Length

Standard Parking Stall

9 feet

18 feet

Compact Parking Stall

8 feet

16 feet

Residential Garage Driveway

10 feet

24 feet

2.    Up to 40 percent of the required parking stalls, excluding those stalls designed to meet accessibility laws, for a non-residential development may be compact parking stalls. Compact stalls shall be clearly identified by painting the word "COMPACT" in capital letters a minimum of 8 inches high at the base of the parking space and centered between the striping.

3.    Parking stalls shall be delineated and maintained for the life of the project with weather resistant striping.

H.    Standards – Carpool Stalls.

1.    Carpool stalls shall be clearly identified by painting the word "CARPOOL" in capital letters a minimum of 8 inch high at the base of the parking space and centered between the striping.

2.    Carpool stalls shall be located close to the main employee entrance and shall be identified on the site plan.

I.    Standards – Loading Areas.

1.    Loading areas shall be located so that trucks using the spaces do not encroach upon or interfere with areas reserved for off-street parking and do not project into any public right-of-way or easement.

2.    Loading areas shall be adjacent to the building that they serve. If the loading space abuts an alley, the loading space(s) shall be off-alley. For redevelopment projects already improved with building/parking layouts, this standard shall be met to the greatest extent possible.

3.    If the loading space is incorporated within a building, the location requirements of this subsection shall not apply.

4.    Required loading areas shall be shown on the parking plan and be permanent in nature.

J.    Standards – Vehicle Circulation.

1.    Driveways and aisles providing access to parking facilities shall have the following minimum dimensions set forth below:

Minimum Width for Motorized Vehicle Access

Drive aisle for 61-90 degree parking.

24 feet

Drive aisle for 60 degrees or less angle parking.

20 feet

Aisle or driveway for fire apparatus access.

24 feet

One-Way drive aisle (without fire apparatus access).

14 feet

2.    One-way drive aisles shall include permanent directional signs and arrows.

3.    Vehicular circulation patterns shall be clearly marked.

4.    Parking lots shall be designed to provide opportunity for logical and convenient vehicle and pedestrian connections to adjacent commercial or vacant commercially zoned land when topographic, critical area or other constraints do not make such connections infeasible.

5.    Principal vehicular accesses into a Commercial Center shall be through an entry driveway designed and constructed with a distinct sense of arrival. In addition to signage at this location, the distinct sense of arrival shall be achieved through the use of at least two of the following:

a.    Decorative paving materials;

b.    Decorative lighting;

c.    Fountain; or

d.    Art sculpture.

K.    Guidelines – Vehicle Circulation.

1.    Drive lane width should narrow at crosswalks with the sidewalk flared out beyond the parking lane.

2.    Roadway access driveways should be limited to encourage efficient internal site circulation and take advantage of opportunities for shared driveways where practicable

3.    Monotonous, long parking driveways and expansive surface parking areas should be avoided.

4.    Encroachment of driveways into building setbacks should be minimized.

5.    Common access driveways are encouraged.

L.    Standards – Employee Parking. Parking stalls physically separated from customer and guest parking that are located behind the building near an employee entrance and which are clearly designated exclusively for employee parking may be designed with compact dimensions. These compact employee parking stalls shall not count against the compact stall size allowance for the project site.

M.    Standards – Parking Garages.

1.    Parking garage facades which are visible from the street shall conform to one or a combination of the following options:

a.    A landscaped screen. Screening may be trees and shrubs, or climbing plantings on a trellis.

b.    Store fronts. The parking garage may be faced with store fronts or display windows.

c.    Simulated storefront. The openings of the parking garage may be designed to reflect or simulate the window pattern and material choice of the primary structure on the site. The door and window fenestration requirements should be used as a guide.

N.    Standards – Pedestrian Circulation.

1.    Commercial and civic development shall provide pedestrian facilities to each abutting commercial use or commercially zoned parcel and a minimum of one pedestrian connection shall be made to each adjacent street. For developments with parking lots in excess of 250 spaces, additional connections to abutting streets may be required. Sidewalks may be considered part of the pedestrian facility system if they provide convenient movement between structures.

2.    Commercial, civic and industrial projects shall provide sidewalks as specified in Table 17B.20.005-1, "Minimum Requirements for Commercial Projects."

3.    Residential developments shall provide sidewalks as specified in Table 17B.20.005-2, "Minimum Improvements for Residential Projects," for detached single-family and two-family uses and Table 17B.20.005-1, "Minimum Requirements for Commercial Projects," for attached single-family and multi-family uses.

4.    Pedestrian facilities shall provide the shortest, most convenient walking route possible.

5.    Where a parking lot separates a building entrance from a sidewalk in the right-of-way, a pedestrian walkway shall be provided connecting the street to the building entrance.

6.    Hard surface pedestrian facilities shall be clearly marked with the use of pavers, stamped concrete, or by being raised a minimum of 6 inches above the adjacent surface and shall be of durable, non-slip surfaces. Painted striping alone is not an acceptable form of walkway delineation. Facilities intended to provide handicap accessibility shall be smooth. Permeable materials or other pervious materials are encouraged for hard surface pedestrian facilities. See the Pierce County Stormwater and Site Development Manual for permeable pavement design specifications.

7.    Pedestrian facilities shall be provided to access parks used to meet the recreational space requirement for residential development.

8.    When a project site is located along a proposed trail route, a linear section of land shall be dedicated and developed for the trail.

9.    Pedestrian facilities shall be designed according to the following standards:

Minimum Width for Pedestrian Facilities

Walkways adjacent to buildings.

6 feet

Walkways that connect a building entrance to the street/sidewalk (does not apply to single family homes).

6 feet

Walkways within parking lots.

4 feet

Multiple use trail facility.

10 feet

Private recreation and/or open space walkways.

4 feet

Travel routes to schools, community facilities, libraries, or parks.

4 feet

Sidewalks along public or private roads shall be designed in accordance with PCC Title 17B.

O.    Standards – Outdoor Pedestrian Amenities.

1.    Bench or similar outdoor seating shall be provided for commercial and civic projects at the following rate.

Number of Parking Spaces

Number of 4-foot Benches

10 to 19

One

20 to 99

Two

100 to 149

Three

150 and more

One per 50 stalls

2.    Outdoor seating shall be located:

a.    Near transit stops, bicycle parking, or building entrances;

b.    Outside of the public right-of-way, unless placement within the right-of-way is approved by the Washington State Department of Transportation or the Pierce County Planning and Public Works Department, depending on the jurisdiction of the road;

c.    Adjacent to pedestrian walkways and sidewalks; and

d.    Such that it is accessible by all.

3.    Outdoor pedestrian amenities shall be of commercial grade designed for heavy public use and shall be constructed of materials that complement the character and design of the building, facility, or site upon which it is located.

4.    All new civic, commercial and industrial developments shall provide outdoor trash and recycling receptacles for use by patrons and/or employees.

5.    In rural zones, when exterior pedestrian amenities are required by this Title, they shall reflect the historic and rustic character of the rural area.

P.    Standards – Bus Facilities.

1.    Transit and school bus stops shall be provided when the need is identified by local transit agency and/or school district.

2.    When transit facilities are required, the developer shall either provide the facilities to the transit agency's specifications or pay to the transit agency the costs of providing and installing such facilities.

3.    The need for shelter, benches, concrete pad, signage, lighting, and trash receptacles and other developer-supplied improvements shall be coordinated with the transit agency or school district. The following design standards shall be applicable unless a different standard is provided by the transit authority or school district:

a.    Adequate area of at least 80 square feet shall be provided for waiting passengers;

b.    Pedestrian walkways shall be provided between transit stops and building entries;

c.    Shelters shall have a pitched roof;

d.    Shopping cart storage adjacent to the transit stop shall be provided for commercial centers with more than 40,000 square feet of retail space; and

e.    Transit stops shall be illuminated.

4.    Transit shelters and related facilities may be required on each side of the street to provide for transit passengers traveling in both directions along the transit corridor.

Q.    Standards – Bicycle Facilities.

1.    Bicycle parking shall be provided at the quantities specified by PCC 18A.35.040 E.6.

2.    Bicycle parking shall not block pedestrian use of a walkway.

3.    All required bicycle parking shall be located on-site and in close proximity to the activity or use for which the parking is provided.

4.    Bicycle parking areas shall be clearly identifiable.

R.    Guidelines – Bicycle Facilities.

1.    Encourage the development of marked, paved bike lanes along State highways, per Washington Department of Transportation non-motorized standards.

2.    Trails or bicycle paths should be identified on-site and connect with the regional or sub-regional trail system.

(Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2017-12s § 2 (part), 2017; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.085 Exterior Illumination.

A.    Applicability. The provisions of the Section apply to:

1.    New residential developments, civic, commercial and industrial uses; and

2.    Multi-family, civic, commercial or industrial expansion greater than 60 percent of the building value, excluding any interior improvements to an existing structure. The 60 percent calculation is cumulative for the project site, and over time, calculated based on the "Building Valuation Data" table compiled by the International Code Council and published in the Building Safety Journal, as used by the Building Official. Only the area associated with expansion will be subject to the standards.

B.    Exemptions. [Reserved]

C.    Design Objective. Provide safe and visible public areas exterior lighting that accents and complements the space and/or building architectural details.

D.    Standards – Parking and Pedestrian Area Illumination.

1.    Light sources (light bulb) shall be hidden from public view except for streetlights and holiday decorator lights.

2.    Illumination level of 1 footcandle shall be provided in all pedestrian areas, including building entries, along walkways, parking areas, and other public areas.

3.    Except for intermittent security lighting on motion detectors, all lights more than 7 feet above the ground shall be downward directional lighting. The fixture's housing must be totally opaque. Clear or refractive lenses shall not extend below the housing.

4.    Illumination shall not cast beyond the premises it is intended to illuminate.

5.    Illumination of landscaped areas shall be prohibited unless lighting is part of the landscape area immediately around the building or the area is intended for recreational use.

6.    Large areas shall be illuminated with multiple low-intensity light sources rather than single high-intensity light sources.

7.    Pole lights shall be no taller than 20 feet above a 36 inch base in parking lots and traffic areas and no taller than 12 feet in pedestrian areas.

E.    Standards – Exterior Building Illumination.

1.    Exterior building illumination, if proposed, shall be of an indirect source.

2.    All lights, other than street lights, shall be shielded from the sky and adjacent properties and structures, either through cut-off or downward directional lighting, or optics within the fixture.

3.    Translucent panels or other features illuminated from behind are prohibited.

4.    All building mounted floodlights shall be shielded from above in such a manner that the bottom edge of the shield shall be at or below the light source.

5.    Light fixtures used to illuminate the building that are not affixed to the building shall be screened or hidden from view with plant materials.

6.    The design and placement of exterior lighting shall be integrated with the architectural design of the building.

7.    Illumination used to highlight building elements shall be of an indirect source and not affect neighboring residences.

F.    Guidelines – Exterior Illumination.

1.    Avoid colored lighting on buildings except during holiday periods.

2.    Avoid lighting large areas with a single source.

3.    Fixture designs for commercial and civic uses of an industrial or utility appearance should be avoided.

4.    Lighting shall be limited to illumination of surfaces intended for pedestrians, vehicles or key architectural features.

5.    Recessed spot lighting may supplement indirect lighting where more direct lighting is desired.

6.    Lighting should be lamped to prevent spillage onto neighboring parcels (light trespass), energy waste and glare.

7.    All non-essential lighting should be turned off after business hours. Sensor activated lights are encouraged for security purposes.

(Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012)

18J.15.090 Parking Lot Landscaping.

The intent of parking lot landscaping is to provide visual and noise relief to adjacent uses from parking lots by enhancing public and private open spaces, and to facilitate aquifer recharge. The standards promote physical safety of pedestrians and motorists with proper location and placement of vegetation and provide for internal parking lot landscaping to buffer such uses as drive-through facilities and service areas. Parking lots should not visually dominate any development setting.

A.    Applicability.

1.    Perimeter parking lot landscaping is required for any portion of a parking lot which is within 20 feet of a public or private road right-of-way.

2.    Interior parking lot landscaping is required for all new surface parking lots with 10 or more spaces; and for the addition of 10 spaces or more to an existing parking lot.

3.    Standards for drive-through facilities, storage and service areas are applicable when such facilities are proposed for the project.

B.    Credits.

1.    Where a portion of a critical area's required buffer area is within the parking lot area, the required interior landscaping for that parking lot shall be credited with up to 50 percent of the areas set aside for critical area buffers. The total of all credits cannot reduce the total interior landscaping required by more than 35 percent.

2.    Where a lot line is within a critical area with a required buffer area, perimeter parking lot landscaping shall not be required.

a.    Supplemental plant material may be required to be installed within or adjacent to the natural landscape area, critical area, or critical area buffer to fully comply with the intent of the landscape level.

C.    Design Objective. Provide visual and noise relief for adjacent uses from adjacent parking lots, unify development, enhance and define public and private open spaces, promote the use and protection of vegetation native and common to Western Washington, facilitate aquifer recharge, and promote physical safety of pedestrians and motorists through proper location and placement of vegetation.

D.    Standards.

1.    General.

a.    Planting areas shall be fully protected by curbs, wheel stops, or other appropriate means to prevent injury to plants from pedestrian or vehicular traffic, except that minor curb cuts are allowed for sheet flow into planting areas used as stormwater facilities.

b.    A maximum of 10 parking stalls in a row shall be allowed between landscape planting islands.

c.    Landscape areas containing trees shall be a minimum of 64 square feet in size with no dimension less than 6 feet. Trees must be set back at least 24 inches from the curb edge to prevent damage from parking cars.

d.    Landscape areas containing only shrubs and groundcover shall have a minimum width of 4 feet. Shrub, hedge and groundcover plants shall not have mature heights that exceed 36 inches to provide for ease of vehicular sight distance and pedestrian safety.

e.    Parking lots shall be located no closer to the interior lot line than the minimum width of required perimeter landscape buffer.

f.    If the calculation of the number of trees or shrubs results in a fraction of less than 0.5, the applicant can round down to the previous whole number.

g.    Native and Drought Tolerant Western Washington Plants. Refer to PCC 18J.15.100, Plant Lists, for required landscape plant selection standards. For bioretention areas within planting areas, refer to the plant list in the Pierce County Stormwater and Site Development Manual.

2.    Perimeter Parking Lot Landscaping.

a.    Any portion of the parking area within 20 feet of a public road right-of-way shall provide L2 landscape buffering along the right-of-way line.

b.    The perimeter street landscaping for the parking lot shall not count toward the total interior landscaping required for the parking lot.

3.    Interior Parking Lot Landscaping.

a.    Areas devoted to truck loading and turn around do not require interior parking lot landscaping.

b.    One of the following options shall be met for interior parking lot landscaping:

(1)    Landscaped area shall be provided within the parking lot at the rate of 25 square feet of landscaped area per stall or alternatively, 10 percent of the total parking area ("parking area" includes the parking stalls, aisles, entry ways), shall be landscaped, whichever is greater. At least 1 tree must be planted for every 200 square feet of landscaped area; or

(2)    One tree shall be installed for every five parking spaces provided.

c.    When a parking lot is divided into distinct areas, the applicant may utilize different options in distinct areas of the lot.

4.    Drive-Through Facilities.

a.    Drive-through window lanes and facilities shall be oriented away from residential zones;

b.    Drive-through windows and stacking lanes shall be visually screened from streets with an evergreen screen and/or architectural element or combination thereof with a minimum height of 4 feet;

c.    Stacking lanes shall be physically separated from parking lots, sidewalks, and pedestrian areas by an evergreen screen and/or architectural element, or combination thereof with a minimum height of 4 feet;

d.    Screening elements shall reflect the design of the primary building and shall provide a physical separation that cannot be traversed in a method other than the circulation route intended for the drive-through traffic; and

e.    Drive-through speakers shall not be audible off site.

5.    Storage and Service Areas.

a.    Service and delivery bays shall not be oriented to the street frontage.

b.    Outdoor storage facilities, garbage and recycling stations, and when permissible, utility meters and electrical conduit, shall be screened with the use of one of following:

(1)    A structural enclosure compatible with the primary structure.

(a)    Structural enclosures shall be designed to be architecturally consistent to the primary structure with primary structures that conform to these design standards. Roof forms, building materials, and color shall be comparable to the primary structure; and

(b)    Structural enclosures that are not accessory to a primary structure shall be designed in accordance with these design standards.

(2)    A 6-foot sight obscuring fence; or

(3)    An L3 Vegetative Screen.

c.    Service areas shall be setback from property lines 15 feet or the required building setback, whichever is greater, when abutting a conforming residential use. The service areas shall be setback a minimum of 5 feet from property lines of abutting non-residential uses.

E.    Guidelines.

1.    Tree species should be selected based on their parking lot compatibility, that is, high branching, do not release sticky substances, deep rather than shallow rooting, etc.

2.    During the summer, interior parking lot landscaping areas should provide tree shade for 35 percent of the total parking lot area.

3.    Parking lot planting areas should be constructed to retain, infiltrate, and cleanse stormwater generated from the parking lot area as either bioretention areas or bioswales, except where soil types will not allow for such designs.

4.    Landscape areas should be distributed evenly throughout the parking area; however, clustering of landscaping is permitted to accommodate preservation of existing vegetation or specific design objectives including, but not limited to, solar access, water conservation, passive recreation, transit facilities, or architectural design.

5.    Planting of lawn in areas less than 10 feet in width is discouraged due to associated water waste.

6.    Vegetative and inert ground cover or lawn should cover all required landscape areas.

7.    When replacement or expansion of existing utility systems is required, such expansion or replacement should, when feasible, be underground.

(Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.100 Plant Lists.

The intent of a plant material list is to foster the use of plants native to Western Washington and drought tolerant plants common to this area. This plant material maximizes use of rainwater, reduces general maintenance needs, and reflects our natural surroundings. The use of drought-tolerant plants in landscape designs can reduce the amount of water devoted to outdoor watering at a time when population demand for water is increasing faster than the water supply.

A.    Applicability. Western Washington native and/or drought tolerant plant material, i.e., groundcover, understory shrubs, and trees, shall be used within all required landscape screening, buffers and parking lot landscaping, etc., referenced in this Chapter. This Section also provides suitable replacement trees for tree conservation pursuant to PCC 18J.15.030.

1.    Exceptions.

a.    Plant species specifically required or prohibited by other Pierce County development regulation, e.g., Title 18E – Critical Areas, Pierce County Shoreline Use Regulations, or individual community plan Chapters in Title 18J PCC shall supersede this Section.

b.    Only suitable native plants shall be permitted where lands are set aside only for native plantings, such as natural buffer areas, screening buffers, and tree conservation areas.

B.    Design Objective. Reduce general maintenance needs, maximize rainwater use and create designs that reflect our natural surroundings by using plants native to Western Washington and drought tolerant plants common to the area.

C.    Standards.

1.    Planting plans associated with new development applications shall reflect the recommended plant lists and/or the plant resources provided in this Section.

2.    Use plants native to Western Washington and drought tolerant plants common to the area, in that order of preference.

3.    Where existing vegetation is to be retained in required landscape areas, all noxious weeds and English ivy shall be removed. Refer to the Washington State Noxious Weed website at http://www.nwcb.wa.gov for the current weed list.

4.    No species included on a State or County invasive, nuisance, or species of concern list can be used to meet landscaping standards.

5.    Native varieties of listed plant species are preferred over horticultural varieties.

D.    Native Plant Resources. The following resources may be used to identify appropriate native plants:

1.    The WSU Cooperative Extension Native Plant Identification Database and plant association lists, found at http://gardening.wsu.edu/nwnative;

2.    Native plant choices identified by a landscape architect or certified professional horticulturalist, subject to approval by the Planning and Public Works Department;

3.    United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) plant database for plants that occur in Pierce County; or

4.    The plants recommended on the Tables 18J.15.100-1 through -5 below.

Table 18J.15.100-1. Recommended Native Tree Species

Native trees suitable for use as Tree Conservation replacement trees and may be suitable for use as street trees, canopy trees for park areas, and parking lots.

Species

Scientific Name

Canopy Size (1)

Street Tree?

Characteristics

Grand fir

Abies grandis

Large

No

Coniferous tree achieving heights of up to 150 feet. Tolerant of a variety of soil conditions, similar needs as Douglas fir.

Vine maple

Acer circinatum

Small

No

Deciduous tree typically reaching heights of 5-35 feet. Treelike in open sun, crooked sprawling and vinelike in shade. Good fall color. Tolerant of a wide variety of soil conditions. Prefers moist soils, but can tolerate drier conditions once established.

Big leaf maple

Acer macrophyllum

Large

No

Deciduous tree. Form varies widely based upon competition and soil conditions. Typically 20 to 30 feet high when grow in open conditions but can reach heights of 80 feet or more in the forest. Good fall color. Tolerant of a wide variety of soil conditions. Similar environmental needs as Douglas fir.

Serviceberry

Amelanchier alnifolia

Small

No

Deciduous tree seldom larger than 20 feet in height. Tolerant of a wide variety of soil conditions. Fruit very valuable to wildlife.

Pacific madrone

Arbutus menziesii

Medium

No

Broadleaf evergreen tree typically reaching heights of 20 to 60 feet. Prefers dry sites. Can be difficult to grow. Red peeling bark.

Western dogwood

Cornus nutallii

Small

Yes

Deciduous tree up to 30 feet in height. Prefers well-drained sites and partial shade. Could work well as a supplemental planting under a canopy of larger trees.

Black hawthorn

Crataegus douglasii

Small

No

Deciduous tree up to 30 feet in height. Scarlet fruit. Prefers highly fertile soil and grows best in moist, open areas.

Oregon Ash

Fraxinus latifolia

Medium

No

Deciduous tree up to 80 feet in height. Prefers moist or wet sites with rich soils. Works well for streamside and wetland plantings.

Incense cedar

Libocedrus decurrens

Large

Yes

Coniferous tree achieving height of 150 feet. Drought and wind resistant. Slow growth.

Pacific Crabapple

Malus fusca (Pyrus fusca)

Small

Yes

Deciduous tree achieving a height up to 40 feet. Suited to moist to marshy soils. Fruit is valuable to wildlife.

Sitka Spruce

Picea sitchensis

Large

No

Coniferous tree 100-210 feet in height. Fast growing and tolerates moist forested lowland areas. Suitable to lowland and coastal areas.

Shore Pine

Pinus contorta

Medium

No

Coniferous tree reaching 15-50 feet in height in coastal areas and up to 100 feet inland. Grows in marshy to well-drained soils, best in coastal or low-lying areas.

Western White Pine

Pinus monticola

Medium

No

Coniferous tree growing 80 to 130 feet on average, but in some cases much taller. Grows rapidly even in nutrient-poor, gravelly soils and is very windfirm due to its tendency to form a few deep roots.

Black Cottonwood

Populus balsamifera v. tricocarpa

Medium

No

Deciduous tree grows 100-200 feet tall and 3-6 feet in diameter. Grows fast, moist soil. Full sun. Tolerates seasonal flooding. Breaks easily, has copious seeds.

Bitter Cherry

Prunus emarginata v. mollis

Small

Yes

Deciduous tree reaching heights of 20 – 50 feet. Produces small white to pinkish flowers and fruit is valuable to wildlife. Intolerant of full shade and thrives in dry to moist soils.

Douglas fir

Pseudotsuga menziesii

Large

No

Fast growing, long lived coniferous tree growing to height of 150 feet or more. Prefers drier sites, but tolerates a wide variety of soil conditions.

Oregon white oak

Quercus garryana

Large

No

Deciduous tree typically not more than 50 feet in height. Provides food and cover for a variety of wildlife. Slow growing, prefers well-drained soil.

Pacific Willow

Salix lucida spp. lasiandra

Medium

No

Deciduous tree reaches 40-60 feet tall. Prefers wet soils and full sun. Tolerates seasonal flooding, often grown with Western Red Cedar.

Pacific yew

Taxus brevifolia

Medium

No

Coniferous tree reaching height of 60 feet. Very shade tolerant. Most successful under canopy of larger trees.

Western red cedar

Thuja plicata

Large

No

Coniferous tree growing to height of 150 feet or more. Best under moist, shaded conditions, but tolerates a wide variety of soil conditions once established.

Western hemlock

Tsuga heterophylla

Large

No

Coniferous tree growing to height of 150 feet or more. Best under moist, shaded conditions, but tolerates a wide variety of soil conditions once established.

Footnote:

(1) Tree canopy size is approximately: Large=1,000; Medium=700; and Small=300, square feet.

Table 18J.15.100-2. Recommended Non-Native Tree Species

Non-native trees suitable for use as street trees, canopy trees for park areas, and parking lots.

Species

Scientific Name

Canopy Size (1)

Street Tree?

Characteristics

Japanese Maple

Acer palmatum

Small

Yes

Common deciduous landscape tree. Slow growing, typically grow to no larger than 20 feet in height. Well suited for small lot use.

Red Maple

Acer rubrum

Medium

Yes

Common deciduous landscape tree. Varieties 'Armstrong' and 'Red Sunset' are recommended for street tree use. Fast growing, typically to 40 feet with brilliant fall control.

European hornbeam

Carpinus betulus

Medium

Yes

Deciduous tree growing to 40 feet. Variety 'Fastigata' recommended for street tree use.

Katsura Tree

Carcidiphyllum japonicum

Medium

Yes

Deciduous tree, slow growing to 40 feet. Good fall color. Well suited for small lot use.

English hawthorn

Crataegus phaenopyrum

Small

Yes

Small deciduous tree, typically no larger than 25 feet. Well suited for small lot use, but can be prone to disease.

Washington hawthorn

Crataegus phaenopyrum

Small

Yes

Small deciduous tree, typically no larger than 25 feet. Well suited for small lot use with good fall color.

Green ash

Fraxinus pennsylvanica

Medium

Yes

Fast growing deciduous tree with height of 40 feet. For street tree use, seedless varieties such as 'Marshall' are preferred.

Honey locust

Gleditsia triacanthos

Medium

Yes

Fast growing deciduous tree with height of 40 feet. Varieties 'Shademaster', 'Skyline', and 'Moraine' are preferred varieties.

American sweet gum

Liquidambar styraciflua

Medium

Yes

Common landscape tree very tolerant of urban conditions. Achieves heights of 60 feet with good fall color.

Tulip tree

Liriodendron tulipifera

Large

No

Large deciduous tree achieving height of up to 60 feet. Very tolerant of urban conditions.

Sourwood

Oxydendron arboreum

Medium

Yes

Medium deciduous tree with good fall color. Achieves height of 35 feet.

Flowering plum

Prunus blireiana

Prunus cerasifera

Small

Yes

Small deciduous tree with colorful dark foliage. Typically reaches height of 20 to 25 feet. Well suited to urban conditions and small lot use.

Japanese flowering cherry

Prunus serulata

Small

Yes

Small deciduous tree with colorful dark foliage. Typically reaches height of 20 to 25 feet. Well suited to urban conditions and small lot use. 'Amanagowa' and 'Kwanzan' varieties are a well suited street tree.

Flowering cherry

Prunus subhirtella

Small

Yes

Small deciduous tree with colorful dark foliage. Typically reaches height of 20 to 25 feet. Well suited to urban conditions and small lot use. Variety 'Rosea' and 'Whitcombii' well suited for street tree use.

Yoshino flowering cherry

Prunus yedoensis

Medium

Yes

Medium sized deciduous tree achieving height of 40 feet. Fast growing.

Flowering callery pear

Pyrus calleryana

Medium

Yes

Widely used in commercial landscaping. Deciduous tree 25 to 40 feet in height. Well suited to urban conditions. Varieties for street tree use include 'Aristocrat', 'Bradford', 'Capital', 'Chanticleer', 'Redspire' and 'Whitehouse'.

Table 18J.15.100-2. Recommended Non-Native Tree Species

Non-native trees suitable for use as street trees, canopy trees for park areas, and parking lots.

Species Scientific Name

Canopy Size (1)

Street Tree?

Characteristics

Pin oak

Quercus palustris

Large

No

Deciduous tree achieving heights of 50 to 80 feet. Better suited to park or large lot use due to size.

Little Leaf Linden

Tilia cordata

Small

Yes

Small deciduous tree reaching height of 30 feet. Tolerant of urban conditions.

Footnote:

(1)    Tree canopy size is approximately: Large=1,000; Medium=700; and Small=300, square feet.

Table 18J.15.100-3. Recommended Shrubs Species

Suitable for use in landscape areas; not all plants listed will be appropriate for areas that require only native plants.

Serviceberry

Amelanchier alnifolia

Labrador tea

Ledum groenlandicum

Ramanas rose

Rosa rugosa

Strawberry tree

Arbutus unedo

Russian arborvitae

Microbiota decussate

Rosemary

Rosmarinus officinalis

Winter blooming camellia

Camellia sasanqua

Oregon wax myrtle

Myrica californica

Senecio

Senecio greyii

Wild lilac

Caenothus species

Persian parrotia

Parrotia persica

Common lilac

Syringa vulgaris

Rock rose

Cistus species

Wild mock orange

Philadelphus lewisii

Tamarisk

Tamarix species

Smoke tree

Cotinus coggygria

Ninebark

Phisocarpus species

Evergreen huckleberry

Vaccineum ovatum

Hardy ice plant

Delosperma nubigenum

Portugal laurel

Prunus lusitanica

Yew

Taxus species

Broom

Genista species

Firethorn

Pyracantha species

Thyme

Thymus species

Pacific rhododendron

Rhododendron macrohphyllum

Red huckleberry

Vaccineum parviflorum

Juniper

Juniperus species

Sumac

Rhus glabra or typhina

Chaste tree

Vitex agnus-castus

Kerria

Kerria japonica

Nootka rose

Rosa nootka

Yucca

Yucca species

Crape myrtle

Lagerstroemia indica

Table 18J.15.100-4. Recommended Groundcover Species

Suitable for use in landscape areas; not all plants listed will be appropriate for areas that require only native plants.

Manzanita, Kinnikinnick

Arctostaphylos species

Bunchberry

Cornus canadensis

Salal

Gaultheria shallon

Wild ginger

Asarum caudatum

Coastal strawberry

Fragraria chiloensis

Oregon grape

Mahonia species

Barberry

Berberis species

Wild strawberry

Fragraria virginiana

Western trillium

Trillium ovatum

Cotoneaster

Contoneaster species

Table 18J.15.100-5. Recommended Vine Species

Suitable for use in landscape areas; not all plants listed will be appropriate for areas that require only native plants.

Evergreen clematis

Clematis armandii

Honeysuckle

Lonicera species

Wisteria

Wisteria species

(Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2017-12s § 2 (part), 2017; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.110 Plant Sizes, Soil Amendment, Mulching and Irrigation.

The purpose of this Section is to address water conservation measures by using appropriate sized plantings in landscapes and smart irrigation design for sustainable landscapes with techniques that conserve, recycle, and reuse the resources that are invested.

A.    Applicability. The following plant sizes and irrigation methods apply to street trees, landscape buffers, noise attenuating barriers, and parking lot landscaping unless a standard has otherwise been specified in this Chapter.

B.    Design Objective. Plant vegetation that, with minimal irrigation, will survive and provide aesthetic relief from developed portions of the project site. Provide irrigation, as needed, for vegetation to ensure survivability and vibrant health for the life of the project.

C.    Standards.

1.    Refer to PCC 18J.15.100, Plant Lists, for required plant selection standards.

2.    Plant Sizes.

a.    Trees, evergreen. Tree material at time of planting shall be of a sufficient size to meet the minimum height and screening requirements of the landscape level within 10 years of installation.

b.    Trees, deciduous. Tree material at time of planting shall be of a sufficient size to meet the minimum height and screening requirements of the landscape level within 10 years of installation.

c.    Shrubs and Hedges. Shrub and hedge material at time of planting shall be of a sufficient size to meet the minimum height and screening requirements of the landscape level within 5 years of installation.

d.    Groundcover, vegetative. Groundcover, other than lawn or turf grass, shall be planted to achieve minimum planting area coverage of 50 percent of required coverage within two years of installation and shall achieve 100 percent of required coverage within five years of installation. English ivy is not permitted.

e.    Groundcover, inert. Wood chips, bark, decorative rock, or other appropriate inert organic material may be used.

f.    Lawn, sod and seed. If utilized in the landscape, newly seeded lawns or installed sod shall include drought-resistant and hardy varieties which, when properly installed and maintained, are capable of surviving under conditions of restricted water use.

g.    Berms. Mounds of earth used for berming shall not exceed a slope of 2 horizontal feet to 1 vertical foot (2:1).

3.    Soil Amendment.

a.    Landscape areas shall be deep tilled to a depth of at least 12 inches to facilitate deep water penetration and soil oxygenation. Use of soil amendments is encouraged to improve water drainage, moisture penetration, soil oxygenation, and/or water holding capacity. Soil amendments are organic matter such as composted yard waste, sewer biosolids, and forestry by-products, but do not include topsoil or any mix with soil as an element. Sphagnum moss is not allowed because it provides only short-term value and is a non-renewable resource.

b.    For all newly landscaped areas, including single-family residences, organic matter (3 to 4 cubic yards of organic matter per 1,000 square feet of landscape area) shall be incorporated to a depth of at least 4 inches.

c.    For newly landscaped areas where topsoil is limited or nonexistent, or where soil drainage is impeded due to subsurface hardpan, 6 to 24 inches of sandy loam topsoil shall be spread in all planting and turf areas, in addition to the incorporation of organic matter into the top horizon of the imported soil.

d.    Soil analysis of new or renovated turf areas shall include a determination of soil texture, including percentage of organic matter; an approximated soil infiltration rate; and a measure of pH value.

4.    Mulching.

a.    Mulch shall be applied regularly to, and maintained in all, planting areas to assist soils in retaining moisture, reducing weed growth and minimizing erosion.

b.    Mulches shall be applied to the following depths: 3 inches over bare soil, and 2 inches where plant materials will cover.

c.    Acceptable mulches include organic materials such as wood chips and shredded bark and inert organic materials such as decomposed lava rock, cobble, and gravel.

d.    Non-porous materials, such as plastic sheeting, are not allowed in any area of the landscape because of down-slope erosion and potential soil contamination from herbicide washing.

5.    Irrigation.

a.    All landscaped areas must have installed a permanent underground irrigation system with an automatic controller plus an overriding rain switch, or an alternative irrigation method which provides sufficient water to ensure that the plants will establish and remain healthy.

b.    Irrigation shall be permanent unless the plant materials selected are determined to be drought tolerant, in which case irrigation shall be required until the plants are fully established and there shall be an identified method to easily provide water to the plants in the case of a prolonged drought.

(Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.120 Plant Installation.

The purpose of this Section is to ensure compliance of applicable plant related design standards through installation concurrent with development of a project site.

A.    Applicability. The following standards apply to the installation of required vegetation for: street trees, landscape buffers, replacement trees and parking lot landscaping.

B.    Design Objective. Install required plants concurrent with development.

C.    Standards.

1.    All applicable landscaping is to be installed prior to the operation of the commercial businesses and prior to the occupancy of dwelling units in residential projects.

2.    The Department shall be contacted to perform an Accessory Element Inspection of installed landscaping, irrigation and retained vegetation.

3.    Except for short plat, large lot, and preliminary plat applications, all required landscaping shall be installed prior to issuance of occupancy permits unless performance bonds or other appropriate security (including letters of credit) are approved by the County. Acceptance of performance bonds or other security in place of installation shall be at the discretion of the County based on the scale of the project, phasing, etc.

4.    Landscaping required per this Chapter for short plats, large lots, and preliminary plats, shall be installed or bonded, or otherwise financially guaranteed, prior to final approval.

5.    Refer to PCC 18J.15.100, Plant Lists, for required plant selection standards.

D.    Guidelines.

1.    Timing of Installation. Planting is encouraged to take place in the spring or fall planting season following Final Development Plan approval or Building Permit approval if no final development approval is required, but in no case shall planting be postponed beyond 180 days of final development plan approval or Building Permit approval if no final development approval is required, unless the Department approves an alternative timeline associated with a phased project.

(Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.130 Plant Protection and Maintenance.

Proper protection and maintenance is necessary to ensure that vegetation required by this Chapter is healthy and continues to meet the objectives for the life of the project.

A.    Applicability. The following maintenance requirements shall apply to all vegetation and associated areas required pursuant to this Chapter. Failure to maintain vegetation as required in this Section shall constitute a violation of this Chapter and any associated land use or subdivision approvals.

B.    Design Objective. Protect and maintain planted and retained vegetation, replace diseased and/or dangerous trees as appropriate.

C.    Standards.

1.    Tree Protection Before and During Development. All trees proposed for retention and supplemental plantings shall be protected before and during site development and construction through adherence to the following standards:

a.    A tree protection area shall be designed to protect each tree or tree stand during site development and construction.

(1)    The tree protection areas shall conform to the approved tree conservation plan; and

(2)    All tree protection and erosion control measures shall be in place and/or installed prior to grading, clearing or other vegetation removal.

b.    Tree protection areas may vary widely in shape, but must extend a minimum of 5 feet beyond the existing tree canopy area along the outer edge of the tree stand, unless otherwise approved by the Department.

c.    Tree protection areas shall be identified and clearly labeled on all applicable site development, plats, and construction drawings, submitted to the Department.

d.    Temporary construction fencing at least 30 inches tall shall be erected along the outer edge and completely surrounding the tree protection area prior to any site clearing grading. The fencing shall be posted with signage clearly identifying the tree protection area. The fencing shall remain in place through site development and construction.

e.    No clearing, grading, filling, or other development activities shall occur within the tree protection area, except where approved in advance by the Planning and Public Works Department and noted in the tree conservation plan.

f.    No vehicles, construction materials, fuel, or other materials shall be placed in tree protection areas. Movement of any vehicles within tree protection areas shall be prohibited.

g.    No nails, rope, cable, signs, or fencing shall be attached to any tree proposed for retention, unless tree tagging has been authorized.

h.    If the grade level around a tree is to be raised, a dry rock wall or rock well shall be constructed around the tree. The diameter of this wall or well must be at least equal to the diameter of the tree plus an additional 5 feet.

i.    The Department may approve the use of alternate tree protection techniques if an equal or greater level of protection will be provided.

2.    Plant Maintenance.

a.    All required landscaping shall be maintained for the life of the project.

b.    Plants are to be maintained in a vigorous and healthy condition, free from diseases, pests, and weeds.

c.    All landscape areas shall be kept free of trash.

d.    Plants lost due to lifecycle or disease shall be replaced within 180 days, during the spring or fall growing season. Replacement plants shall meet current plant size and irrigation standards.

e.    Plant maintenance standards apply for the life of the project and to all future property owners.

3.    Tree Pruning. Pruning is the practice of removing dead or living components of a tree for the purposes of maintaining or improving form, improving tree health, or addressing safety concerns. Pruning can produce strong, healthy, attractive plants when done properly as recommended or by a professional tree service. Poor pruning practices however, adversely affects plant health.

a.    Pruning of Significant and Legacy trees shall be done by a professional tree service only.

b.    All plant materials shall be pruned and trimmed as necessary to maintain a healthy growing condition or to prevent primary limb failure.

c.    Pruning of trees shall be limited to thinning, windowing, or skirting, unless otherwise restricted by critical area regulations.

(1)    Thinning. Removal of foliage evenly through the tree crown maintaining tree form and health. Not more than one quarter of the total leaf area is removed.

(2)    Windowing. The practice of creating a "window" within the tree crown. The overall crown remains intact. When windowing one side of a tree, it may be necessary to prune the opposite side of the tree to maintain balance.

(3)    Skirting. The practice of opening up views by removing the lower limbs of a tree. As a rule, do not limb up more than one-third of the tree's visible height.

4.    Removal of Danger, Hazard and Diseased Trees.

a.    Trees required to be retained pursuant to an approved conservation plan, landscape plan, or other similar plan or requirement shall not be removed unless it is demonstrated to the satisfaction of the Planning and Public Works Department that a hazard exists to public health or safety, the safety of public or private property, or the health of surrounding trees (e.g., there is a significant chance of toppling in high winds). The following requirements shall apply to the removal of a danger, hazard, or diseased tree in such areas:

(1)    The landowner shall submit a report and replanting plan prepared by a registered landscape architect, professional forester, or other expert approved by the Department to document the hazard, the specific actions that must occur to abate the threat, and the schedule for replanting.

(2)    Trees shall not be removed until after consultation and confirmation by the Department that removal is necessary, unless hazard tree(s) are determined to pose an imminent threat or danger to public health or safety, or to public or private property, or serious environmental degradation. In that event, trees may be removed or danger abated by the landowner prior to receiving written approval from the Department; provided that within 30 days following such action, the landowner shall submit the necessary report and replanting schedule demonstrating compliance with the requirements of this Section.

(3)    Trees shall be replaced at the tree unit ratios and planting standards specified in PCC 18J.15.040 and restoration plans shall be approved by the Department prior to replanting.

(4)    Restoration plans shall consider retention of snags for wildlife habitat.

(5)    Trees shall be replaced within 60 days unless determined by the Department to be more appropriate to replant within the following spring or fall planting season. In no case shall replanting take place more than 180 days from original tree removal.

b.    Developer responsibility for maintenance of trees, including removal or replacement of diseased, dead, or dying trees, shall be as follows:

(1)    Within residential subdivisions (including short plats) the developer shall be responsible for maintaining trees on individual lots until such time as the individual lots are sold at which point the individual lot owner shall assume responsibility. Developer responsibility for maintaining trees within common tracts shall remain in effect until such time as the common tract is transferred to the control of a homeowner's association or, where no homeowner's association exists, until such time as all individual lots within the subdivision are sold, at which point the homeowner's association or individual lot owners shall assume responsibility.

(2)    Within all other developments, developer responsibility for maintaining trees shall remain in effect until such time as the property sale occurs. Upon the property sale, the new owner shall assume the responsibility for maintenance.

(Ord. 2017-12s § 2 (part), 2017; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.140 Low Impact Development (LID). Revised 6/19

Low Impact Development (LID) techniques emphasize the use of on-site natural features integrated with engineered small scale hydrologic controls to promote groundwater recharge and protect the function and value of surface waters, aquifers, and fish and wildlife habitat from degradation by preserving the native vegetation and wooded character of watersheds while continuing to provide stormwater control necessary to protect downstream property owners.

A.    Applicability. LID techniques as described in the Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual, Volume VI, shall be utilized for development within the:

1.    Rural Sensitive Resource (RSR) zone.

2.    Urban Sensitive Resource Overlay (USRO).

3.    Open space corridors of the Graham and Gig Harbor Community Plan areas.

4.    Natural Shoreline Environment Designation. New land divisions and subsequent development.

5.    Conservancy Shoreline Environment Designation. New land divisions and subsequent development when the project exceeds base density.

B.    Design Objective. Provide stormwater control to protect downstream property owners and promote groundwater recharge and protect the function and value of surface waters, aquifers, and fish and wildlife habitat from degradation by preserving and restoring the native vegetation and wooded character of the site.

1.    Standards.

a.    Projects shall be designed to meet the full comprehensive LID standards of the Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual, Volume VI.

(Ord. 2016-33 § 2 (part), 2016; Ord. 2016-14s § 6 (part), 2016; Ord. 2013-45s4 § 6 (part), 2015; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.150 Rural Pathways for Civic Uses.

A.    Applicability.

1.    Any new civic use, except day-care centers and bus shelters (Level 1, Transportation Use Type), constructed in the rural area shall be required to construct pathways in accordance with subsection C. of this Section, along the roadway abutting the primary entrance to the site.

2.    Any new civic use, except day-care centers and bus shelters (Level 1, Transportation Use Type), constructed within 0.25 miles of a residential development shall be required to construct a pathway from the civic use to the residential development in accordance with subsection C. of this Section. For the purposes of this requirement, the following criteria apply:

a.    A residential development shall consist of a recorded subdivision of 50 or more lots that are less than 0.5 acres in size.

b.    The 0.25 miles shall be measured along existing roadways from the exterior lot line of the proposed civic use site to a point of connection with the residential development.

c.    The pathway shall connect to the residential development at one location, either the entrance to the development or an alternative location identified by mutual agreement with the homeowner's association or developer. If the residential development is abutting the site, an access easement may be pursued between the properties as an alternative to constructing the pathway in the right-of-way.

B.    Design Objective. Facilitate safe pedestrian access to civic uses from parked cars and nearby residential neighborhoods.

C.    Standards.

1.    Existing road shoulders may substitute for pathways provided the shoulder is of standard width and grade as specified in PCC 17B.10.060 A., referencing the "Manual on Design Guidelines and Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction in Pierce County," as published by the Pierce County Engineer.

2.    New pathways must be constructed a minimum of 6 feet in width within existing Pierce County right-of-way on one side of the road. The pathway may be separated from the existing roadway. The County standard for construction is specified in PCC 17B.10.060 A. of the "Manual on Design Guidelines and Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction in Pierce County" as published by the Pierce County Engineer. Pathways may be adjusted to accommodate ingress, egress, parking, bus turn-in lanes, and facility design.

3.    The requirement to construct a rural pathway pursuant to this Section shall not, in itself, trigger a requirement to construct curb, gutter, and sidewalk improvements.

4.    In the event the County Engineer determines right-of-way is not large enough or suitable for such pathway because of road conditions or safety consideration, the pathway requirement may be waived. Suitability shall at a minimum consider critical areas, topography, ditches, and location of utilities.

5.    Relocation of power lines, drainage pipes/culverts, and/or utilities, if needed, shall be required when the total cost of relocating them is less than 5 percent of the pathway's project total cost or $10,000, whichever is greater.

(Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.155 Mechanical Equipment and Outdoor Storage Screening. Revised 12/18

A.    Applicability. The provisions of this Section apply to mechanical equipment and outdoor storage associated with:

1.    New multi-family, civic, commercial and industrial uses; and

2.    Modification and expansion of multi-family, civic, commercial and industrial uses when the mechanical equipment or outdoor storage is being modified or expanded.

B.    Exemptions. [Reserved]

C.    Design Objective. Protect the aesthetic quality of developments and surrounding properties by screening service areas for mechanical equipment and outdoor storage.

D.    Mechanical and Utility Equipment Screening Standards.

1.    Utilities necessary to provide power to or to heat and cool buildings shall be integrated into the architectural and site design of the project.

2.    Rooftop mechanical equipment shall be screened by either a parapet, rooftop vegetation, or a stepped or sloped roof form that is a part of the architecture of the building and is at least as high as the equipment being screened. Other mechanical equipment screening methods may be utilized for buildings which exceed two stories in height when it is determined by the Department that the screening is effective, durable, and complimentary to the design of the building.

3.    Screening for noise impacts shall be required for all mechanical equipment.

4.    See PCC 18J.15.090 D.5. for screening standards applicable to mechanical equipment and/or service areas that are located within a parking lot.

5.    When replacement or expansion of existing utility systems is required, such expansion or replacement shall, when feasible, be underground.

E.    Outdoor Storage Area Screening Standards. See also PCC 18J.15.230 for Outdoor Stockpile standards.

1.    Outdoor storage shall be screened from adjacent sites with the use of structural enclosures compatible with the primary structure and landscaping.

2.    Outdoor storage areas shall be located behind the front wall of the primary building on site and shall be no closer than 10 feet to a required building or landscape buffer with no setback less than 10 feet from any property line.

3.    Landscape shall be Type I with fence or structural enclosure.

4.    Material shall not exceed the height of fences or screening enclosures.

5.    Materials or colors for fences or walls shall be compatible with building architecture.

6.    Where appropriate, landscaping meeting the Landscape Level 1 buffer requirement shall also be installed to provide additional screening.

7.    When landscaping is used to achieve buffer requirements, native and drought-tolerant vegetation should be used.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2012-42s § 2 (part), 2012; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012)

18J.15.160 Dry Sewer Lines. Revised 12/18

A.    Applicability. New urban developments proposing to utilize interim on-site septic systems shall be required to install dry sewer facilities.

1.    When dry sewer lines are installed, a residential development up to the maximum density may be allowed, provided that lots in excess of the density permitted with on-site septic shall not be built upon until the sewer line is extended and connected to all the lots. This process is referred to as shadow platting.

B.    Exemptions.

1.    Dry sewer facilities are not required if all the following apply:

a.    The applicable sewer service provider agrees to the dry sewer facility exemption;

b.    The depth and location of a future sewer line that would serve the project cannot be provided by the applicable sewer service provider;

c.    All lots within a project shall be connected to the sanitary sewer system at the time a sewer line is installed adjacent to the proposed development; and

d.    The plat includes a no objection to sewer clause.

C.    Design Objective. Provide adequate public facilities and services concurrent with development. Ensure that the creation of lots, the location of easements, road dedications, structures, wells, and septic drainfields are consistent to permit future infill at urban densities.

D.    Standards.

1.    Dry sewer lines shall be installed in conformance with the standards established by the Pierce County Public Works Department*, or other applicable permitting jurisdiction.

* Code Revisor’s Note: The name of the Department was changed to Planning and Public Works in Ordinance No. 2017-12s.

(Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-12s § 2 (part), 2017; Ord. 2015-25s § 2 (part), 2015; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.170 Stormwater Facilities. Revised 12/18

A.    Applicability. The following standards apply to development proposals for attached single-family, multi-family, civic, utility, commercial, industrial, land divisions, use permits and site development permits. The standards set forth in this Section are supplementary to the requirements of the Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual.

B.    Exemptions.

1.    Resource uses where the principal use of the property is for animal, crop or forestry production or mineral extraction (e.g., surface mines) shall not be subject to these standards.

2.    Residential developments designed to accommodate 9 or fewer dwelling units shall not be subject to these standards.

C.    Design Objective. Minimize visual impacts of stormwater facilities with landscaping, contouring, and other techniques, including vegetated LID BMPs.

D.    Standards.

1.    General.

a.    Stormwater facilities which are proposed to be dedicated to the public may be subject to additional requirements related to maintenance, security, and other considerations as set forth within the Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual.

2.    Storm drainage facilities shall be designed to comply with one of the following design standards, in order of preference:

a.    Design storm features as a site amenity. Stormwater facilities are deemed site amenities when:

(1)    Fencing is not required;

(2)    Side slopes do not exceed 4 to 1;

(3)    Ponds are lined with a mix of low-maintenance native plant materials;

(4)    Uses such as recreation, walking or sitting, picnicking are allowed; and

(5)    The pond is designed in a curvilinear, non-rectangular shape.

b.    Place storm drainage detention into underground vaults, and underground retention systems; or

c.    If a. or b. is not feasible, storm drainage features shall include a complete visual screen on the outside of any fencing facing the public right-of-way, adjacent development or other public areas with evergreen shrubs at a rate of 1 per 5 lineal feet and evergreen trees at a rate of 1 per 8 lineal feet, with a minimum planting width of 10 feet. Minimum mature height for trees shall be 16 feet. Screening of stormwater ponds shall not be required when the pond is surrounded by a 6-foot tall solid board fence. Screening of public ponds should be outside of the public Tract, on private property.

E.    Guidelines.

1.    Urban Facility Design.

a.    Design the pond in an aesthetically pleasing manner along with other landscape features;

b.    Capture treated storm water and other non potable water for use in irrigation;

c.    Utilize pervious paving surfaces such as porous pavement and pavers for roads, driveways, parking lots, or other types of drivable or walkable surfaces.

2.    Rural Facility Design.

a.    Design and vegetate wetponds and detention ponds to simulate natural wetland features in conjunction with required landscape areas;

b.    Direct rooftop runoff to infiltration areas, full dispersion systems, or to cisterns for non-potable reuse, or utilize vegetated roof systems to evaporate and transpire stormwater;

c.    Design storm drainage facilities at schools, churches and similar uses to accommodate recreational elements such as sport fields, walking and picnic areas, with the understanding that at times throughout the year, these areas may be wet or totally unusable;

d.    Minimize changes to natural topography. Limit grading and clearing disturbance to road, utility, building pad, and landscape areas to the minimum area needed to maneuver equipment during construction; and

e.    Maintain surface roughness on the site to reduce flow velocities and encourage sheet flow on the development by preserving native vegetation, forest litter and micro surface topography.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.180 Recreational Areas. Revised 12/18

This Section preserves land for active and passive recreational uses to provide convenient opportunities for physical activity, community gathering, aesthetic relief from development, wildlife habitat, preservation of vegetation and aquifer recharge.

A.    Applicability. Recreational space shall be dedicated within all new residential developments of 31 dwelling units or more.

1.    Exceptions. The following shall not be subject to the recreational areas standards of this Section:

a.    Single- and two-family residential lots 7,260 square feet or larger.

b.    Single-family lots located within 2,640 feet (1/2 mile) of walking distance to a public park or public school site containing recreational amenities freely open to the public outside of school hours. This only applies if there is a safe pedestrian crossing from the development to the park or school site.

c.    Mixed use buildings within a Residential Targeted Area designated by the Pierce County Council pursuant to Chapter 84.14 RCW and located within 2,640 feet (1/2 mile) of walking distance to a public park, public school site, public or private university containing recreational amenities which are open to the public when the following requirements are met:

(1)    One or more features such as a fitness center, vegetated roof, or community multi-purpose space having a combined area of at least 1,500 square feet are incorporated into the mixed use building;

(2)    Safe pedestrian access from the mixed use building to the identified off-site recreational amenities exist; and

(3)    The developer provides documentation acceptable to the Department that the facilities are available and accessible to the public.

B.    Credits. Table 18J.15.180-1 specifies credit opportunities for certain project amenities.

Table 18J.15.180-1. Recreational Area Credits

Credit Incentive

Requirements

Trails

•    Shall be credited on a square footage basis towards any required active recreation area dedication.

•    Dedication, construction, and standards shall comply with the County's adopted Parks, Recreation, and Open Space (PROS) Plan.

•    Trails should be constructed of permeable pavement where feasible.1

Indoor Facilities*

Covered and rooftop recreational facilities.*

Community Gardens*

Include irrigation systems and collars to define garden edges and cover at least 1,000 sq. ft. in area.*

Storm Facilities**

•    Private stormwater retention/detention facilities may be credited on a 50 percent basis.***

•    Facilities are dedicated or reserved as a part of a Recreation Tract and include passive recreation opportunities.

•    The side slope shall not exceed 25 percent, with a maximum water depth no more than 18 inches, requiring no fencing.

•    Complies with all applicable requirements of the Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual.

*    At the discretion of the Director and/or Hearing Examiner, LID stormwater facilities that are open to the public, such as a vegetated roof, count towards recreational area credits.

**    Shall not be credited toward satisfying the first 5,000 square feet of recreation space or any of the required active recreation space. When a stormwater facility consisting of multiple holding areas is used, only that portion accessible for passive recreation shall be credited.

***    (i.e., each square foot of stormwater facility would be credited as .5 square feet for on-site recreation purposes).

1Code Revisor's Note: The table format adopted in Ordinance No. 2016-55 was retained when incorporating amendments from Ordinance No. 2017-28s.

C.    Design Objective. Recreation space shall be located on site in usable areas that are appropriate in terms of size, shape, and topography for the intended use to provide recreational area and facilities for the use and enjoyment of the residents.

D.    Standards.

1.    Area Requirements. Depending on the number of dwelling units, the requirements for recreation areas may vary. See Table 18J.15.180-2 below:

Table 18J.15.180-2. Required On-Site Recreation Areas

Number of Dwelling Units

Recreation Area Requirements*

1-30

N/A

31+

Minimum 500 sq. ft. per dwelling unit.

•    5,000 contiguous sq. ft. useable for recreation activities.

•    Minimum of 25 percent of the area shall be for active recreation.

•    Remainder shall be for passive recreation.

*    At the Director's discretion, square footage requirements for outdoor recreation areas may be substituted with internal recreation areas at a rate of 1:1 square feet.

2.    Location and Size.

a.    For developments of 31 dwelling units or more, the minimum required dedication of land within a residential development shall be 5,000 contiguous square feet useable for recreation activities;

b.    Recreation spaces, with the exception of trails and bike paths, shall not be located adjacent to any street designated as an arterial. However, all active recreation spaces shall be open, accessible, and visible from adjacent dwellings, internal circulation drives and streets;

c.    All lots and dwellings within the development shall have access to recreation space via an all-weather pedestrian walkway or sidewalk;

d.    For subdivisions, the required on-site areas shall be dedicated as a tract of land separate from the lots and shall be in a common tract owned by all property owners of a subdivision;

e.    For non-subdivision development, the required on-site areas shall be set aside in an easement, except for condominium and apartment projects; and

f.    For developments of 31 dwelling units or more, no designated active recreation space shall have a dimension of less than 50 feet except for trail segments unless the applicant can demonstrate to the satisfaction of the Director and/or Hearing Examiner that the lesser dimension will not inhibit the use of the recreation space for its designated purpose. (See Figure 18J.15.180-1)

FIGURE 18J.15.180-1 –
Illustration of Recreation Area Locations

3.    Improvements.

a.    Active recreational spaces shall:

(1)    Include amenities that serve people of all ages, such as playgrounds, athletic fields, sports court, tot lots, impervious trails and gazebos;

(2)    Include infrastructure such as irrigation, drainage, and power to maintain the operational characteristics of the space;

(3)    Not have a cross slope exceeding 3 percent; and

(4)    Not contain critical areas and shall not cause harm to adjacent critical areas.

b.    Play equipment shall be of commercial grade construction and shall follow the Consumer Product and Safety Commission (CPSC) guidelines for equipment safety. Asphalt, concrete and sand shall not be used underneath play equipment. Rubber, synthetic matting, or loose materials such as commercial grade shredded hardwood mulch are preferred provided they comply with CPSC guidelines.

c.    Additional permitted amenities and features beyond those provided by the developer may be added to a recreation facility by the property owner or homeowner's association.

d.    Passive recreation spaces shall include low maintenance plants and areas for walking and sitting, such as pervious trails, rain gardens, benches, and picnic tables.

e.    Permeable pavement is the preferred option for trails and other hard surfaces.

4.    Installation. Active recreation space amenities, improvements and landscaping shall be installed concurrent with, or before, site development work for roads, parking, and utilities unless a land use decision specifies a different option.

5.    Maintenance. It shall be the responsibility of the homeowner's association or property owner to manage and maintain all recreation space.

E.    Guidelines.

1.    Recreation areas shall be designed to accommodate a wide range of activities, ages, and abilities.

2.    Passive recreation space(s) shall connect critical areas when possible and any necessary fences should not impede wildlife movement.

3.    Trails shall be located and designed to:

a.    Increase connectivity.

b.    Enhance user safety.

c.    Provide access to destinations and unique environmental features.

d.    Be aesthetically pleasing.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2016-55 § 1 (part), 2016; Ord. 2012-42s § 2 (part), 2012; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2009-98s § 2 (part), 2010)

18J.15.185 Residential.

A.    Applicability. This Section applies to new construction and remodels that exceed 60 percent building value as calculated by the International Building Code (IBC):

1.    Attached single family;

2.    Duplex in zones with a maximum density of 6 dwelling units per acre or less;

3.    Multi-family;

4.    Nursing home and assisted living facilities; and

5.    Senior housing or group home constructed as any of the above.

B.    Exemptions.

1.    Nursing homes and assisted living facilities in non-residential zone classifications; and

2.    Multi-family units when located in a commercial mixed use building that are not located on the ground floor.

C.    Design Objective. These standards are intended to ensure residential structures are integrated with the existing and adjacent neighborhoods by reducing the scale of structures and by incorporating architectural design features to increase compatibility with adjacent structures and uses.

D.    Standards – Duplex.

1.    Duplexes built on corner lots shall be designed to appear as a single-family unit from either street with only one front door visible from any one street.

2.    Garages and carports shall be deemphasized by recessing the garage or carport a minimum of 5 feet into the duplex structure or by locating the carport or garage behind the duplex structure.

E.    Guidelines – Duplex.

1.    Duplex structures located on corner lots should contain significant architectural features on both street fronts such as wrap-around porches, window and door trim, and building articulation.

F.    Standards – Attached Single-Family, Multi-Family, Nursing Home.

1.    Attached single-family, multi-family, and nursing home structures located adjacent to a parcel developed with an existing single-family residence shall be limited to a maximum of 25 feet in height for a distance of 50 feet from the property boundary of the single-family residential parcel. Thereafter, height may be increased by 1 additional foot for each additional 2 feet of distance from the property boundary (e.g., height may be increased to 30 feet at a distance of 60 feet and 35 feet at a distance of 70 feet).

2.    Building façades visible from public rights-of-way and/or other public spaces shall be:

a.    Articulated with porches, balconies, bays, changes in color, eaves or parapets, or changes in siding materials.

(1)    Building articulation shall not exceed intervals of 30 feet.

(2)    Balconies shall be at least 6 feet deep by 8 feet wide.

(3)    Bay windows must extend at least 1 inch horizontally from the façade of the building.

b.    Wall planes shall not exceed 80 feet in length. Buildings that exceed 80 feet in width along the street front shall be divided by a modulation that is at least 20 percent of the elevation width. Such modulation must be at least 4 feet or deeper and extend through all floors (see Figure 18J.15.185-1).

FIGURE 18J.15.185-1

FIGURE 18J.15.185-2

Example: Buildings exceeding 80 feet in width along the street front can be divided by a 30-foot wide modulation of the exterior wall so that the maximum length of a particular facade is 80 feet or less. Such modulation must be at least 20 feet or deeper and extend through all floors.

3.    Roofline variation shall be provided to break up the appearance of lengthy or monotonous roof forms. This may be accomplished by stepping back the building on upper floors, or use of dormers, gables, chimneys, or balconies. Where single runs of ridge, cornice, or fascia exceed 50 feet, the following standards shall be met:

a.    The maximum roof length without variation shall be 50 feet;

b.    The minimum horizontal or vertical offset shall be 4 feet;

c.    The minimum variation length shall be 8 feet; and

d.    Use of one of the following techniques:

(1)    Vertical off-set in ridge line;

(2)    Horizontal off-set in ridge line;

(3)    Variations of roof pitch;

(4)    Gables; or

(5)    False façades.

4.    Mansard, butterfly, dome and flat roofs are prohibited in the Graham Community Plan Area.

5.    Weather protection shall be provided over the main building entry – for both common entries in apartment or condominium buildings and primary entries for ground floor units.

FIGURE 18J.15.185-3

6.    Create a sense of privacy through the following:

a.    Locate windows so residents from one unit to the next cannot look directly into another unit;

b.    Orient and locate units to maximize privacy; and

c.    Use landscaping and architectural features like trellises to block views of adjacent units.

7.    A minimum of 320 square feet of landscaping per ground floor unit shall be provided within 20 feet of the building with no dimension less than 8 feet. See Figure 18J.15.185-4. See also PCC 18J.15.040 and 18J.15.050 for additional planting requirements.

FIGURE 18J.15.185-4

G.    Guidelines.

1.    Carefully consider the placement of doors and windows into the shared space between dwelling units to maximize the sense of privacy.

2.    Harmony and continuity of colors and materials should be considered and should complement the neighborhood.

3.    The overall color scheme and materials used should create the appearance of reducing building prominence and complementing the natural environment.

4.    Emphasize the entrance of a building and make it more distinct by using pavement materials and landscaping to direct pedestrians to the entrance. Use of pervious surfaces in building entrances is encouraged.

5.    Avoid locating parking spaces directly in front of the building entrance or in such a way as to interfere with visibility and access.

6.    Vertical articulation. To moderate the vertical scale of tall buildings (over three stories in height), the design should include techniques to clearly define the building's top, middle and bottom. The following vertical articulation techniques are suggested:

a.    Top. Sloped roofs, strong eave lines, cornice treatments, horizontal trellises or sunshades, etc.

b.    Middle. Windows, balconies, material changes, railings and similar treatments that unify the building design.

c.    Bottom. Pedestrian scale building details and highlighted building entries.

7.    Additional design elements that may reduce architectural scale and add visual interest:

a.    Upper story setbacks (at least 6 inches in horizontal width) can reduce the perceived bulk of a structure from the street, particularly for mixed-use buildings near the street corners built up towards the sidewalk edge.

b.    Changes in color, particularly when used in conjunction with modulation techniques, often adds visual interest to a building and reduces its overall scale.

8.    Minor architectural details should be highlighted with minor accent color that complements base and major trim color. Minor accent color is normally applied to window sash, doors, and small architectural elements.

9.    Consider the use of natural materials such as wood or stone as accents on the primary façade of the structure.

10.    Muted natural colors are preferred to help structures in prominent locations blend with the surrounding landscape.

11.    Avoid bright color, reflective roofing material.

(Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012)

18J.15.190 Outdoor Event Facilities.

A.    Applicability. These standards apply to outdoor event facilities permitted through PCC 18A.33.220 C.

B.    Design Objective. Provide design standards to ensure outdoor event facilities are located and developed in a manner that protects the health, safety, general welfare and convenience of the citizens of Pierce County.

C.    Standards.

1.    Hours of Operation. Hours of operation shall be limited from sunrise to sunset (outdoor events only), except where specifically addressed in a use permit decision.

2.    Lighting. Exterior lighting shall be directed and shielded in a manner which minimizes its visibility at the site's boundaries. Exterior lighting shall not be used in such a manner that it produces glare on public streets and neighboring residential properties. Any temporary lighting associated with a specific event shall comply with these standards and shall be removed within 24 hours of the end of the event.

3.    Noise. Noise originating from the site shall be buffered to the maximum extent possible and be minimized to serve the needs of the facility while limiting impacts to adjacent parcels.

a.    A noise study shall be provided recommending wattage/decibel maximums for any sound equipment proposed to be utilized outdoors.

b.    A noise attenuating barrier described in PCC 18J.15.070 may be required to attenuate noise from an outdoor event at the discretion of the Hearing Examiner or Director.

4.    Buffers and Screening. Adequate buffering addressing noise, lighting, parking areas, and other identified impacts is required at varying levels depending upon adjacent uses, adjacent zoning, and type of impact. Interior and exterior buffers are required depending upon proposed on-site and off-site impacts. These standards are in addition to the landscaping standards of PCC 18J.15.040.

a.    Interior.

(1)    Any outdoor storage areas, maintenance or mechanical equipment or other equipment deemed by the Planning Director or Hearing Examiner to need screening must be screened from view by a sight obscuring enclosure such as fencing, landscaping, or a combination thereof.

(2)    Loading areas should be located to the side or rear of buildings, or use areas to minimize views of this activity and shall be screened from adjacent properties and streets.

b.    Exterior. A site obscuring fence, wall or landscape buffer shall be provided around the perimeter of either the entire parcel or proposed use area, where appropriate, proposed to accommodate outdoor events located adjacent to an existing residential use, public or private right-of-way, access easement, or any parcel within an Urban Residential or Rural Residential zone classification. (See PCC 18A.10.080 and 18A.10.090 for a complete list of zone classifications.)

(1)    Any landscaping proposed to be utilized for screening shall be a minimum of 30 feet in width and shall provide a complete visual screen within three years.

(2)    One access, not wider than 30 feet, will be allowed to cut through the designated visual screening buffer area, unless documentation for the need for multiple accesses is submitted to the Planning and Public Works Department. Access points shall be the minimum number and width necessary to serve the site.

(3)    No clearing of existing vegetation or trees within 30 feet of the parcel boundary for the life of the approved project, except for those trees defined by Chapter 18.25 PCC as Dangerous, Diseased or Hazard trees, noxious weeds on the State of Washington Noxious Weed List (WAC 16-750), or invasive species as identified and approved from removal by Pierce County.

(4)    If existing vegetation is not adequate to accomplish the required buffer, supplemental plantings shall be utilized. Irrigation must be provided meeting the standards set forth in PCC 18J.15.110.

5.    Setbacks. All outdoor events shall maintain a minimum 50 foot setback from parcel boundaries adjacent to an existing residential use, public or private right-of-way, access easement, or any parcel within an Urban Residential or Rural Residential zone classification. (See PCC 18A.10.080 and 18A.10.090 for a complete list of zone classifications.) The minimum setback for outdoor event activities may be reduced to 35 feet when noise attenuating measures described in PCC 18J.15.070 are implemented, except where the zone classification requires a larger building setback, in which case all events shall maintain that setback designated for building setback, whichever is greater.

6.    Occupancy. The facility shall establish a maximum occupancy to provide for safe access to and use of the facility. Parking requirements shall be based upon maximum occupancy to ensure that parking impacts to neighboring parcels are not created. If the facility cannot provide adequate parking, sanitary facilities, emergency access, and overall public safety, maximum occupancy shall be reduced. Maximum occupancy may not be exceeded in any case for any event without the approval of the Temporary Use Permit, Chapter 18A.38 PCC.

7.    Parking Areas. Parking shall be per Chapter 18A.35 PCC. If Chapter 18A.35 PCC does not include a level that encompasses the types of events proposed to be held on the project site, the applicant shall provide a parking study detailing the types of events the facility may be utilized for and recommending adequate minimum and maximum parking areas for the specific facility.

8.    Outdoor Receptions. Outdoor receptions or parties shall be prohibited in Rural 5 zone classifications. No amplified noise shall be permitted at outdoor events in the Rural 5 zone classification except during an outdoor wedding ceremony for the wedding march music, recited vows, etc.

9.    Access. Facilities generating traffic at a level which requires a traffic study are required to be accessed via a public roadway, state highway, or other roadway or access, such as a private road, serving only the project site.

(Ord. 2017-12s § 2 (part), 2017; Ord. 2016-33 § 1 (part), 2016; Ord. 2015-86 § 1 (part), 2015; Ord. 2015-40 § 8 (part), 2015; Ord. 2013-85 § 1 (part), 2013; Ord. 2013-30s2 § 9 (part), 2013; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.200 Mobile Home Parks. Revised 12/18

A.    Applicability. This Section applies to all new and expanding mobile home parks.

B.    Design Objective. Provide design standards that ensure mobile home parks are located, developed and occupied in a manner that will protect the health, safety, general welfare and convenience of the occupants and the citizens of Pierce County.

C.    Standards – General. The following criteria shall govern the design of a mobile home park:

1.    A mobile home park shall contain not less than two spaces and shall be consistent with the density provisions of the underlying zone, except when located within the HRD and MUD zones. Mobile home parks proposed within the HRD and MUD zones shall have a minimum density of six dwelling units per acre.

2.    Only one mobile, manufactured home, or motor home/travel trailer shall occupy any given space in the park.

3.    No building, structure, or land within the boundaries of a mobile home park shall be used for any purpose other than the following:

a.    Mobile or manufactured homes or motor home/travel trailer used as a single-family residence only.

b.    A patio, carport, or garage as an accessory use for a mobile/manufactured home.

c.    Recreation buildings and structures including facilities such as a swimming pool for the exclusive use of park residents and their guests.

d.    One residence for the use of the owner, a manager, or caretaker responsible for maintaining or operating the property. This residence may be either a mobile/manufactured home or a site-built structure.

e.    Public or private utilities where related exclusively to serving the mobile home park.

4.    Setbacks. No mobile/manufactured home, building, or other structure shall be located closer to a park boundary property line than is specified by the zone district in which the park is located.

5.    Two off-street parking stalls shall be provided for each mobile/manufactured home space with a minimum 10 feet access to a park street. All required off-street parking spaces shall be not less than 8 by 20 feet and shall be paved, preferably with permeable materials, or have a crushed rock surface and maintained in a dust free surface. On-street or curb-side parking shall not be counted as part or all of the required parking for a mobile home park where moving traffic lanes are used for this purpose.

6.    All interior park roads shall be privately owned and shall be paved with asphalt, or concrete, or permeable pavement as allowed by the Pierce County Stormwater and Site Development Manual, to a width to safely accommodate the movement of a mobile home and emergency vehicles. Dead-end streets shall be provided with a 70-foot minimum diameter roadway surface turnaround exclusive of parking lanes.

7.    Storage areas comprising not more than 10 percent of the total mobile home park area for recreational vehicles, boats, and trailers may be provided. Such areas shall be enclosed by a sight-obscuring fence or hedgerow.

8.    There shall be landscaping and ground cover within open areas of the mobile home park not otherwise used for park purposes. Such open areas and landscaping shall be continually and properly maintained.

9.    When deemed necessary to maintain compatibility of the park with adjacent land uses, buffering or screening may be required by the County approving authority.

10.    Mobile homes may be maintained with or without mobility gear but in either event shall be secured to the ground in a manner approved by the Building Official. Each mobile home shall be skirted with weather resistant, non-combustible material compatible with the exterior finish of the mobile home.

D.    Standards – Phased Development. Proposed mobile home parks of 10 or more acres in size developed after the effective date of this Section may be developed in phases. Notwithstanding a change of zone or reclassification of the site which would ordinarily preclude further development, a mobile home park which has completed the initial phase of development may be continued and developed into all additional phases indicated on the approved site plan provided that this exception shall only be applicable to phases which can be substantially completed within five years of the adoption of the change of zone.

E.    Standards – Park Administration.

1.    It shall be the responsibility of the park owner and manager to assure that the provisions of this Title are observed and maintained within the mobile home park. Violations of this Title shall subject both the owner and the manager of the facility to any penalties provided for violation of this Title.

2.    No camper shall be utilized except as temporary living quarters; however, the parking of an unoccupied recreational vehicle in duly-designated storage areas shall be permitted.

3.    All refuse shall be stored in insect-proof, animal-proof, water-tight containers which shall be provided in sufficient number and capacity to accommodate all refuse. Any storage area for refuse containers shall be enclosed by sight-obscuring fence or screening and shall be situated on a concrete pad and shown on the site plan. Refuse shall be collected and disposed of on a regular basis.

4.    Construction of accessory structures and alterations and additions to the mobile home park shall be subject to review by the Building Division, and necessary permits and inspections shall be obtained as required for such construction.

5.    All electrical connections to each mobile home shall comply with the Electrical Code and shall be inspected.

6.    Portable fire extinguishers rated for classes A, B, and C shall be kept in service buildings and at other locations conveniently and readily accessible for use by all residents and shall be maintained in good operating condition.

7.    The park shall be maintained free of any brush, leaves, and weeds which might communicate fires between mobile/manufactured homes and other improvements. No combustible materials shall be stored in, around, or under any mobile/ manufactured home.

8.    Individual mail boxes shall be provided for each space in the park.

9.    The owner, or a designated agent, shall be available and responsible for the direct management of the mobile home park.

10.    The parking of an unoccupied recreational vehicle in duly-designated storage areas shall be permitted.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.210 Recreational Vehicle Parks. Revised 12/18

A.    Applicability. The Section applies to all new and expanding recreation vehicle parks.

B.    Design Objective. Provide design standards that ensure recreational vehicle parks are located, developed and occupied in a manner that will protect the health, safety, general welfare and convenience of the occupants and the citizens of Pierce County.

C.    Standards – General. The minimum design standards for recreational vehicle parks shall be as follows:

1.    Capacity. The number of recreational vehicles permitted in a park shall not exceed a capacity of 20 units per gross acre. This capacity may be further limited as a condition of approval of the park to ensure compatibility with the surrounding areas.

2.    Recreational Vehicle Site Size. Each individual recreational vehicle site shall be not less than 1,000 square feet in size.

3.    Parking. At least one parking space shall be provided at each recreational vehicle site. At least one additional parking space for each 20 recreational vehicle sites shall be provided for visitor parking in the park.

4.    Internal Park Roads. All internal park roads shall be privately owned and maintained. All park roads shall be constructed to the Pierce County Private Road and Emergency Vehicle Access Standards as amended.

5.    Access. Parks shall be located with direct access to an arterial roadway or state highway and with appropriate frontage thereon to permit appropriate design of entrances and exits.

6.    Open Space/Recreational Facilities. A minimum of 20 percent of the site shall be set aside and maintained as open space for the recreational use of park occupants. Such space and location shall be accessible and usable by all residents of the park for passive or active recreation. Parking spaces, driveways, access streets, and storage areas are not considered to be usable open space. The percentage requirement may be reduced if substantial and appropriate LID or recreational facilities (such as recreational buildings, swimming pools or tennis courts) are provided.

7.    Vehicle Setbacks. No recreational vehicle site shall be closer than 35 feet from any exterior park property line abutting upon a major arterial, shoreline, or residential zone, or 30 feet from any other exterior park property line. A minimum separation of 10 feet shall be maintained between all vehicles. Permanent structures within a park shall meet the setbacks applicable to the zone in which the structure is located.

8.    Landscaping/Screening. A 20-foot-wide L3 landscaping buffer shall be provided around the perimeter of the parcel pursuant to PCC 18J.15.040 H.3.

9.    Utilities. Electricity and water service shall be provided to each recreational vehicle site. All utility lines in the park shall be underground and shall be approved by the agency or jurisdiction permitting the service;

10.    Storm Drainage. Storm drainage control facilities shall be provided as required by the Pierce County Stormwater Management and Site Development Manual;

11.    Public Facilities. Recreational vehicle parks shall provide the following public facilities in such quantity, size and location as required by the agency issuing the permit:

a.    A water distribution system connected to a public or private water utility;

b.    A water station for filling recreational vehicle water storage tanks;

c.    Restroom facilities containing showers and toilets connected to a public sanitary sewer or approved on-site septic system, the minimum number of which shall be one commode and one shower for each 20 recreational vehicle sites;

d.    A sanitary waste station for emptying sewage holding tanks of recreational vehicles;

e.    Refuse containers for solid waste in adequate quantity. Park garbage shall be picked up daily by park personnel, who shall also maintain the park free of any uncontrolled garbage.

12.    No external appurtenances, such as carports, cabanas or patios, may be attached to any recreational vehicle while it is in a park.

D.    Standards – Occupancy. The following general standards shall apply to all recreational vehicle parks unless more restrictive requirements have been established by the Hearing Examiner through an approved discretionary land use permit:

1.    No recreational vehicle shall be occupied overnight unless the vehicle is parked inside an approved recreational vehicle park or a motor home/travel trailer in an approved mobile home park. An exception to this rule may be granted for temporary uses as defined in Chapter 18A.38 PCC, subject to strict compliance with the requirements of said Section.

2.    No recreational vehicle shall be occupied for commercial purposes anywhere in unincorporated Pierce County. An exception to this rule may be granted for temporary uses as defined in Chapter 18A.38 PCC, subject to strict compliance with the requirements of said Section.

3.    No recreational vehicle shall be used as a permanent place of abode, or dwelling, for more than 120 calendar days unless it is a motor home/travel trailer located in an approved mobile home park. Any action toward removal of wheels of a recreational vehicle, except for temporary purposes for repair; or placement of the unit on a foundation, is prohibited.

4.    No space within a recreational vehicle park shall be rented for any purpose other than those expressly allowed by this Section.

E.    Standards – Health Department Approval Required. Prior to occupancy of a recreational vehicle park, the owner shall obtain any and all necessary permits from the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department and comply with all rules, regulations and requirements of said department. All permits must be kept current at all times, subject to the park being closed. The rules, regulations and requirements of the health department shall be construed as being supplemental to the provisions of this Section.

F.    Standards – Site Plan Required. A site plan shall be submitted with all applications for a recreational vehicle park. This site plan shall be subject to review, modification, approval or denial by the agency issuing the permit. An approved site plan shall constitute an integral part of the permit for the recreational vehicle park and shall be binding upon the owner of the property, its successors and assigns. All development within the recreational vehicle park shall be consistent with the approved site plan.

G.    Standards – Phasing. All required site improvements and other conditions of the permit and approved site plan shall be met prior to occupancy of any site by a recreational vehicle; provided that completion may be accomplished by phases if such phases are identified on the site plan and approved in the permit.

H.    Standards – Park Administration.

1.    The owner of a recreational vehicle park shall be responsible for the development and maintenance of the park in strict conformity with the approved site plan and permit, and all applicable laws and ordinances.

2.    Each park shall have an on-site manager available 24 hours per day, 7 days per week.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2013-85 § 1 (part), 2013; Ord. 2013-30s2 § 9 (part), 2013; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.220 Construction and Contractor Facilities. Revised 12/18

A.    Applicability. This Section shall apply to all new Construction and Contractor Facilities, and to the expansion area of expanding facilities.

B.    Design Objective. Provide design criteria for contractor yards and construction services facilities in accordance with adopted policies and in a manner that will protect the health, safety, and general welfare the citizens of Pierce County.

C.    Standards.

1.    Hours of Operation. Hours of operation shall be limited to 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. except where specifically addressed in a use permit decision or where specifications for a governmental Public Works project requires work outside of these hours. When a contractor obtains a contract requiring after-hours operations, the contractor shall post a sign on the property identifying the contract and the dates and time periods involved to serve as notice to the surrounding property owners.

2.    Emissions.

a.    Dust, dirt or other particulate matter shall not be emitted in quantities as to adversely affect adjacent residential property or degrade water quality of adjacent lakes or streams. Reasonable precautions shall be taken to prevent particulate matter from becoming airborne.

b.    No use shall emit odorous gasses or other odorous matter or generate ground vibration which is perceptible without instruments at or beyond the site lot lines except for vehicles entering and exiting the site.

c.    Noise originating from the site shall comply with the standards set forth in Chapter 8.76 PCC, as now existing or hereafter amended.

3.    Lighting. Exterior lighting shall be directed and shielded in a manner which minimizes its visibility at the site's boundaries. Exterior lighting shall not be used in such a manner that it produces glare on public streets and neighboring residential property. Arc-welding, acetylene torch cutting or similar processes shall be performed so as not to be seen from any point beyond the property line of the use creating the glare.

4.    Impervious Surfaces. Impervious surface coverage shall be determined by the underlying zone classification.

5.    Setbacks.

a.    All buildings and other structures shall be set back a minimum of 30 feet from exterior lot lines when the use or activity occurs on property that is adjacent to property improved with a residential use, public and private road right-of-way, or a MSF or HRD zone classification, except where increased setbacks are required pursuant to PCC 18A.15.040 B.3.

b.    Outdoor storage and stockpiling of construction materials and equipment shall maintain a minimum setback of 50 feet from exterior lot lines.

6.    Interior Fencing and Screening.

a.    Outdoor storage areas must be secured by a surrounding fence or other enclosure. Within an urban growth area, the fence or enclosure shall be sight obscuring and shall meet the standards set forth in PCC 18J.15.040 H.5.

b.    Loading areas should be located to the side or rear of buildings to minimize views of this activity and shall be screened from adjacent properties and streets.

7.    Exterior Screening.

a.    A visual screening buffer shall be required along the site's exterior boundaries when the use or activity occurs on property that is adjacent to property improved with a residential use, public and private road rights-of-way, or a MSF or HRD zone classification.

b.    The required visual screening buffer(s) shall not be less than 30 feet in width and shall provide a site-obscuring screen within three years. If existing flora does not provide the required sight-obscuring screen, supplemental plantings and/or sight-obscuring fencing shall be required. When supplemental plantings are proposed, irrigation must be provided meeting the standards set forth in PCC 18J.15.110. One access way, not wider than 30 feet, will be allowed to cut through the designated visual screening buffer area. No other cutting of trees will be allowed within the designated visual buffer area for the life of the approved project, except as provided for dangerous or diseased trees.

c.    When using native and drought-tolerant vegetation, some or all irrigation requirements may be waived.

D.    Standards – Rural 10 Locations. For property zoned Rural 10, construction and contractor facilities are not allowed on any land that is within 1,000 feet of any State Route 16 interchange. For purposes of this Section, an interchange shall be defined as the point at which the centerline of the highway intersects the centerline of any street or road crossing under or over the highway.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.230 Outdoor Stockpiles.

A.    Applicability. This Section shall apply to businesses including, but not limited to, contractors, landscaping suppliers, garden nurseries, recycling processors, and scrap metal processors who stockpile materials including, but not limited to, yard waste, wood debris, landscape materials, construction materials, demolition waste, manure, or scrap metal exceeding 10 cubic yards.

B.    Exemptions:

1.    Temporary stockpiles that are created during the course of normal construction where materials are stockpiled on a site for less than six months;

2.    Surface mines operating under a valid special use permit or Department of Natural Resources Reclamation Permit; or

3.    Commercial/retail centers (Commercial Centers Use Type) having site areas of 15 acres or larger in size.

C.    Design Objective. Provide design criteria for businesses including, but not limited to, contractors, landscaping suppliers, garden nurseries, recycling processors, and scrap metal processors in accordance with adopted policies and in a manner that will protect the health, safety, general welfare the citizens of Pierce County.

D.    Standards.

1.    Setbacks.

a.    Outdoor stockpiles shall maintain a minimum setback of 30 feet from exterior lot lines. When the exterior lot line is abutting an urban residential zone classification, the setback shall be increased to 100 feet.

2.    Maximum Height. The maximum height of a stockpile shall not exceed that which is established for structures in the applicable zone classification or 30 feet, whichever is less. The following exceptions apply:

a.    A stockpile may be allowed to increase 1 foot in height for every foot the required setback is increased, not to exceed 40 feet.

b.    In the EC zone classification there shall be no height restriction on parcels exceeding 5 acres in size, provided all setback standards are met.

3.    Interior Fencing and Screening.

a.    Outdoor stockpile areas must be secured by a surrounding fence or other enclosure. Within an urban growth area, the fence or enclosure shall be sight obscuring and shall meet the standards set forth in PCC 18J.15.040 H.5.

b.    Loading areas should be located to the side or rear of existing buildings to minimize views of this activity and shall be screened, in accordance with fencing standards contained in PCC 18J.15.040 H.5., from adjacent properties and streets.

4.    Exterior Screening.

a.    Visual screening consisting of evergreen plant material that will provide a solid screen of at least 16 feet in height shall be required along the site's exterior boundaries when the use or activity occurs on property that is adjacent to property improved with a residential use, public and private road rights-of-way, or urban residential zone classification.

b.    Within the required setback, the required visual screening buffer(s) width shall not be less than 30 feet in width and shall provide a site-obscuring screen within three years. If existing vegetation does not provide the required sight-obscuring screen, supplemental plantings or sight-obscuring fencing shall be required. When supplemental plantings are proposed, irrigation must be provided meeting the standards set forth in PCC 18J.15.110. One access way, not wider than 30 feet, will be allowed to cut through the designated visual screening buffer area. No other cutting of trees will be allowed within the designated visual buffer area for the life of the approved project, except as provided for dangerous or diseased trees.

(Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.240 Solid Waste Handling, Treatment and Storage Facilities. Revised 12/18

A.    Applicability. This Section applies to solid waste facilities whether or not a Solid Waste Permit is required by State regulations or the Health Department, unless otherwise stated. Individual facilities requiring a Conditional Use Permit may be subject to increased standards. Solid waste facilities that require a Solid Waste Permit shall indicate on a site plan that the facility meets the State and the Health Department's locational siting standards for that particular facility. Variances to the Health Department's Solid Waste Permit which impact these development standards or conditions required through the Conditional Use Permit must receive the Department's review and possible rehearing.

B.    Design Objectives.

1.    Provide mitigation measures to reduce noise, odor, dust, litter, and lighting impacts on users of the site and abutting uses and to coordinate these measures with the permit requirements of other local and state agencies;

2.    Promote compatibility between land uses and unify development with aesthetic screening;

3.    Provide mitigation measures for security, vector, and fire control;

4.    Provide for potential corrective measures for groundwater protection; and

5.    Promote the use of water conservation in the design, planting and maintenance of landscaping.

C.    Standards.

1.    Organic Waste Processing Facilities. This includes any solid waste facility specializing in the controlled decomposition of organic solid waste and which requires a Solid Waste Permit under Chapter 70.95 RCW.

a.    Soil Treatment Facility or Composting Facility. These standards apply to any soil treatment facility or any composting facility designed to handle more than 40 cubic yards and which composts a feedstock material other than municipal solid waste.

(1)    Landscaping and Buffering. This use type requires a landscape screen.

b.    Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Composting Facility. This includes any MSW composting facility which requires a Solid Waste Permit including a facility located within an enclosed structure.

(1)    Landscaping and Buffering. This use type requires a landscape screen, buffer area, and fencing.

2.    Waste Disposal Facilities. This Section applies to all waste disposal facilities requiring a Solid Waste Permit under Chapter 70.95 RCW.

a.    Waste-to-Energy Facility. These development standards apply to all energy recovery and incinerator facilities, including those which burn less than 12 tons of solid waste per day, except for facilities burning woodwaste or gases recovered at a landfill.

(1)    Landscaping and Buffering. This use type requires a landscape screen and fencing.

b.    Landfill. These development standards apply to all landfills including all surface impoundments or other solid waste facilities to be closed as permanent disposal landfill sites and only to those inert and demolition landfills to contain 2,000 cubic yards or more of fill.

(1)    Landscaping and Buffering. This use type requires a landscape screen, buffer area, and fencing.

3.    Waste Transfer Facilities. These development standards apply to all transfer facilities receiving solid waste from off site.

a.    Drop Box Transfer Station. This Section applies to all drop-box transfer stations requiring a Solid Waste Permit under Chapter 70.95 RCW.

(1)    Landscaping and Buffering. This use type requires a landscape screen and fencing.

b.    Transfer station, waste separation recovery facility, or moderate-risk waste facility. This Section applies to all interim transfer facilities which require a Solid Waste Permit under Chapter 70.95 RCW.

(1)    Landscaping and Buffering. This use type requires a landscape screen, buffer area, and fencing.

c.    Tire Piles. This Section applies to all tire piles whether or not they are required to have a Solid Waste Permit under Chapter 70.95 RCW.

(1)    Landscaping and Buffering. This use type requires a landscape screen and fencing.

(2)    Size and Height. No tire pile shall be visible from off-site when viewed 50 feet from the property line containing the pile. Tire piles shall not exceed 15,000 tires; shall not be more than one-half acre in size; shall not be in excess of 40 feet in any horizontal dimension; and shall be limited to 10 feet in height. A tire pile of less than 2,500 tires shall have 30 foot fire lanes between piles. Tire piles of more than 2,500 tires shall have a dirt berm not less than 5 feet in height around each stack of tires and shall have a 40 foot fire lane between piles to include 10 feet at the base of each berm plus 20 feet between berms.

D.    Standards – Landscaping and Buffering.

1.    Use of Existing Vegetation to Satisfy Requirements. The applicant is responsible for submitting to the Department an alternative conceptual landscape plan, supporting photographs, and a brief explanation as to how the alternative plan satisfies the intent of the landscaping required in this Section for each type of facility. Supplemental plant material may be required to be installed within the natural landscape area, critical area, or critical area buffer to fully comply with the intent of this Section.

2.    Landscape Screen. A soil treatment or composting facility shall have a perimeter landscaping area which is not less than 20 feet in width. Landscape screening shall be designed and maintained so as not to impair vehicle visibility at corner intersections or adjacent to points of ingress or egress. Landscape planting screens shall be planted according to an approved site plan, utilizing LID techniques when the site warrants it, with due consideration to seasonal planting conditions, use of drought-tolerant vegetation, irrigated as necessary, and permanently maintained. All plant material which does not live shall be replaced within the next planting season. Landscaping areas shall incorporate:

a.    A perimeter, sight-obscuring earth berm when adjacent to existing residential or commercial uses or residential or commercial zones. The earth berm shall be at least 3 feet high with a slope not more than 40 percent (1:2.5) on the side away from the active area and shall be terraced and/or planted with ground cover to minimize erosion.

b.    At least one row of deciduous and evergreen trees, staggered and spaced not more than 15 feet apart.

c.    At least one row of evergreen shrubs spaced not more than 5 feet apart which will grow to form a continuous hedge at least 5 feet in height when adjacent to existing residential or commercial uses or residential and commercial zones.

d.    A mixture of lawn, low-growing shrubs, or hardy evergreen ground cover over the balance of the area.

3.    Buffer Areas.

a.    A municipal solid waste composting facility shall have a buffer area around the active area so that the active area is no closer than 50 feet to the facility property line when adjacent to existing residential or commercial uses or residential or commercial zones.

b.    With the exception of woodwaste or inert and demolition landfill, a landfill shall have a buffer area around the active area so that the active area is no closer than 100 feet to the facility property line when adjacent to land zoned for commercial or industrial uses and no closer than 250 feet to existing residential uses or residential zones.

c.    A transfer station, waste separation recovery facility, or a moderate-risk waste facility shall have a buffer zone around the active area so that the active area is no closer than 50 feet to the facility property line when adjacent to existing residential or commercial uses or residential or commercial zones.

4.    Fencing. To impede entry by the public and animals, a solid waste facility shall have perimeter fencing 6 feet to 8 feet in height with a lockable gate, provided that no sight-obscuring fence constituting a traffic hazard is erected within any required setback flanking a street. Every fence shall be maintained in a condition of good repair and shall not be allowed to become or remain in a condition of disrepair including, but not limited to, noticeable leaning, sagging, missing sections, or broken supports.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.250 Hazardous Waste Treatment and Storage Facility.

A.    Applicability. This Section shall apply to all types of hazardous waste treatment and storage facilities and are in addition to the standard bulk and performance requirements of each zone. A hazardous waste facility is subject to State siting and design criteria and permitting processes adopted pursuant to the requirements of Chapter 70.105 RCW and to any other siting criteria applying to commercial and industrial uses adopted by the Health Department or the County.

B.    Standards.

1.    Site Plan. A site plan must be filed with the Planning and Public Works Department along with a copy of the application for a State facility permit issued pursuant to Chapter 70.105 RCW and any other required County permits. In addition to the County site plan requirements, the site plan shall show all State requirements for siting, performance, buffering, security, and design. The site plan shall become a binding site plan when approved by the Examiner or the Director (whichever is appropriate depending upon the land use permitting process) and when all land use and State permits have been approved. However, in no case shall a site plan receive final approval until agreements with County Law Enforcement, the Fire District, County Fire Marshal, and Emergency Management Department have been signed in accordance with Chapter 173-303 WAC. Any major changes as defined by Chapter 173-303 WAC which affect State requirements or County development standards require amendments to the original site plan and must be reviewed and approved through the same permit process as the original was approved. Site plans must be finalized and approved prior to the issuance of any Building Permit.

2.    Security Fencing and Signage. All security fencing and signs required for the State's final facility permit must meet County sign code and fencing standards. Perimeter fencing shall be 6 feet to 8 feet in height with a lockable gate, provided that no sight-obscuring fence constituting a traffic hazard is erected within any required setback flanking a street. Every fence shall be maintained in a condition of good repair and shall not be allowed to become or remain in a condition of disrepair including, but not limited to, noticeable leaning, sagging, missing sections, or broken supports.

3.    Onsite Facility. An onsite facility shall only be allowed as an accessory use clearly incidental and secondary to a permitted principal commercial or industrial use and subject to the permitting procedures of the principal use. The proposed addition of an onsite facility to an existing use that is permitted through a Conditional Use Permit requires an amendment to the original permit. Any onsite facility requiring a Conditional Use Permit may be subject to additional conditions by the Examiner in relation to specific concerns about the site's location and proximity to environmentally sensitive areas, residential development, or other constraints.

4.    Offsite Facility.

a.    An offsite facility limited to treating or storing hazardous wastes generated within Pierce County shall be allowed through a Conditional Use Permit in the EC and RAC zones. Permit applications and site plans must address and demonstrate that the proposed facility meets the policies of the County's Hazardous Waste Plan.

b.    An offsite facility treating or storing hazardous waste generated outside Pierce County shall only be allowed through a Conditional Use Permit in the EC and RAC zones and not unless and until a State Hazardous Waste Plan is adopted. Permit applications and site plans must address and demonstrate how the proposed facility meets the regional needs as assessed in the State's Hazardous Waste Plan.

c.    An offsite facility located in the EC or RAC zones when adjacent to residential or agricultural zones shall meet the same minimum setback distances and landscaping requirements for industrial uses as listed in PCC 18A.15.040 B.3. and 18J.15.040 unless State buffering and setback permitting requirements are more restrictive. In addition, the facility must provide a continuous setback of 300 feet measured from the property line unless it can be shown that a sight-obscuring screen formed by natural growing evergreen trees or shrubs will be maintained. If the natural configuration of the land is such that it serves to completely screen the facility from view from the adjacent residential zones, the setback may be reduced, but in no case shall the setback be less than 100 feet. In such cases, it shall be the responsibility of the applicant to prove compliance with the intent of this exception.

d.    An offsite facility located in an EC or RAC zone when adjacent to commercial or industrial zones shall provide a setback measured from the property line equal to the setback required for the same yard in the abutting zone directly opposite, unless State buffering and setback permitting requirements are more restrictive.

(Ord. 2017-12s § 2 (part), 2017; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.260 Water Supply Facilities. Revised 12/18

A.    Applicability. The following provisions shall apply to all new water supply facilities.

B.    Design Objective. Provide screening and setback requirements for water supply facilities to provide for security of such facilities while ensuring compatibility with surrounding uses.

C.    Standards.

1.    Minimum Lot Size and Setbacks.

a.    Water Storage Facilities. The following setbacks and lot size requirements shall apply to water storage facilities:

(1)    Water storage facilities which are 60 feet or less in height shall be set back a minimum of 30 feet from all property boundaries. This setback shall be in lieu of the setback requirements pursuant to the underlying zone classification.

(2)    Water storage facilities in excess of 60 feet in height and within or adjacent to a residential zone classification shall be subject to one of the following standards, as determined by the applicant:

(a)    Option 1. Setback Based Upon Height: The water storage facility shall be set back 30 feet from all property boundaries and a minimum of 1 foot for every 2 feet that the height of the facility exceeds 60 feet; or

(b)    Option 2. Minimum Lot Area Requirement: The water storage facility shall be placed on a minimum lot area based on the following calculation:

(Tank Diameter in feet + Tank Height in feet)2 =

Minimum Lot Size in square feet

For Example: Proposed water tower is 75 feet in diameter and 90 feet in height: (75 ft + 90 ft)2 = 27,225 ft2

Setbacks on such sites shall be a minimum of 30 feet from adjacent residential zone classifications.

b.    All other water supply facilities shall be set back according to the prescribed setback of the zone classification.

2.    Design. These standards shall be used in lieu of any other landscaping standards required in Title 18J PCC, Design Standards and Guidelines.

a.    Landscaping. One of the following landscaping options shall be implemented for all water supply facilities:

(1)    A full screen buffer, Landscape Level 3 – L3, per PCC 18J.15.040 H.3., shall be provided along the perimeter of any proposed water storage facility or along the property boundary.

(2)    Landscaping shall be provided throughout the site. All areas not occupied by buildings, on-site facilities and work areas, or required access shall be landscaped and maintained with groundcover, shrubs, and trees. Shrubs and groundcover shall be a maximum of 2 feet in height at maturity or maintained as such. Trees shall be disbursed throughout the site at a minimum of 20 tree units per acre (based on total acreage) and may be deciduous or coniferous, native and drought-tolerant vegetation is preferred. Perimeter and buffer trees shall apply to this total requirement. Retention of existing vegetation may be incorporated to meet these requirements in part or in whole.

(3)    For sites utilizing either option (1) or (2) above, when any planting is proposed between May and October, irrigation per PCC 18J.15.110 C.5. is required. Plantings shall be maintained for the duration of the use, and shall be replaced if disease, death or removal of required landscaping takes place.

b.    Fencing. When security fencing is proposed, it shall be constructed of natural materials or shall be coated with a dark, neutral color. Any fencing not meeting this standard shall be located behind a Level 1 – L1 Landscape Buffer, per PCC 18J.15.040 H.1.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.270 Telecommunication Towers and Wireless Facilities.

A.    Applicability. All telecommunication towers and wireless facilities shall be subject to the standards of this Section.

B.    Design Objectives. Provide standards to protect the public health, safety, and welfare and minimize visual impact while furthering the development of enhanced telecommunications services in unincorporated Pierce County. These standards were designed to comply with the Telecommunications Act of 1996. The provisions of this regulation are not intended to and shall not be interpreted to prohibit or to have the effect of prohibiting telecommunications or personal wireless services.

C.    Decision Criteria. In addition to the standards set forth in subsection E. of this section, the Director and/or the Examiner shall address the following criteria when conditioning a permit for a proposed facility in order to satisfy the following:

1.    Significant visual impacts of a facility shall be minimized through careful design, siting, landscape screening, and innovative techniques. This may involve increasing, if feasible, or reducing setback standards to achieve the maximum visual buffer.

2.    Efforts to mitigate impacts and protect the public health and safety shall be exercised to the extent permitted by the Telecommunications Act of 1996.

3.    Potential impacts to adjacent properties shall be avoided through sound engineering practices and the proper siting of antenna support structures.

4.    The facility is proposed in a location where the existing topography, vegetation, buildings, or other structures provide the greatest amount of screening.

5.    Consideration has been given so that the placement of a telecommunication tower has a minimal impact on adjacent properties and their view of Mt. Rainier, Puget Sound, Olympic Mountains or other vistas which increase the assessed value as determined by the Pierce County Assessor-Treasurer.

6.    When feasible, the facility is significantly screened by placing it in existing trees to the extent that it does not result in significant signal degradation.

7.    A tower shall not be permitted unless the applicant demonstrates that there are no existing towers or support structures available which can accommodate the applicant's proposed antenna. Fees, costs, or contractual provisions that are necessary to accommodate collocation may not be used as justification to construct a tower within the required separation.

D.    Exemptions. The following are exempt from the provisions of this regulation and shall be permitted in all zones:

1.    Antennas and related equipment no more than 580 square inches or 4 feet in height.

2.    Wireless radio utilized for temporary emergency communications in the event of a disaster.

3.    Licensed amateur (ham) radio stations.

4.    Satellite dish antennas less than 7 feet in diameter, including direct to home satellite services, when used as an accessory use of the property.

5.    Routine maintenance or repair of a personal wireless service facility and related equipment (excluding structural work or changes in height or dimensions of antenna, tower, or buildings).

6.    A COW or other temporary personal wireless telecommunications facility for a maximum of 30 days during an emergency declared by the County, State or Federal government or at the discretion of the Director in a non-emergency situation.

E.    Standards – General.

1.    Location Criteria/Tower Separation. In an effort to promote collocation, telecommunication towers shall maintain a one-half mile separation.

a.    If reduced separation is requested, the applicant shall demonstrate why it is necessary from a technical standpoint to have a tower within one-half mile of another tower whether it is owned or utilized by the applicant or another provider. The distance shall be measured from tower to tower regardless of property lines and roadways.

b.    If a technical dispute arises about the required separation, the Hearing Examiner or the Director may require a third party technical study, as described in subsection H. of this section, to resolve the dispute.

c.    If it is demonstrated that a tower must be located within one-half mile of another tower for technical reasons, the tower is subject to the priority of location criteria in subsection F. of this section.

2.    Antenna Location Criteria. An antenna and any mechanical equipment on or above a structure shall be subject to the following:

a.    The antenna shall be mounted on a wall of an existing building in a configuration as flush to the wall as technically possible and shall not project above the wall on which it is mounted unless the projection is warranted for technical reasons. In no event shall an antenna project more than 16 feet above the peak of the roof.

b.    The antenna shall be constructed, painted, or fully screened to match as closely as possible the color and texture of the building and wall on which it is mounted.

c.    The antenna may be attached to an existing conforming mechanical equipment enclosure which projects above the roof of the building, but may not project any higher than the enclosure or 16 feet above the peak of the roof, whichever is greater.

d.    If an accessory equipment shelter is proposed, it must blend with the building or structure's architectural character and color. Such facilities will be considered architecturally and visually compatible if they are camouflaged to disguise the facility.

3.    Setbacks. The required setback for a wireless telecommunication tower shall be based on the setback for the underlying zone, and shall be increased by 1 foot for every foot that the height of the tower exceeds 60 feet, except as follows:

a.    The setback in the EC, MUC, and FL zones classifications shall be based on the setback of the underlying zone only.

b.    That portion of a tower or antenna necessary to accommodate collocation for a current or future provider shall not be used in calculating the required setback.

c.    Towers in rural areas shall maintain a setback from city limits and urban growth areas equal to the height of the tower.

4.    Tower and Antenna Height. Telecommunication towers and wireless facilities are exempt from the height requirements of the underlying zone. Height limitations are based upon the Use Category level of facility.

a.    The applicant shall provide documentation to the Department that demonstrates that the tower and antenna are the minimum height required to function satisfactorily. No tower or antenna that is taller than this minimum height shall be approved.

b.    Towers that accommodate collocation are permitted to increase the height of the tower to an elevation which will accommodate all necessary antennas. This provision shall not be interpreted to authorize a tower that exceeds the height established by the Use Category level.

5.    Color. Towers shall have a color generally matching the surroundings or background that minimizes their visibility, unless a different color is required by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

6.    Lights, Signals, and Signs. No signals, lights, or signs shall be permitted on towers unless required by the FAA.

7.    Historic Classification. A wireless facility or tower shall not be permitted on property designated as a landmark or as a part of an historic district, unless such antenna has been approved by the Landmarks Commission.

8.    Equipment Structures. Ground-level equipment, buildings, and the tower base shall be screened from public view pursuant to this Section. The standards for the equipment buildings are as follows:

a.    The maximum floor area is 400 square feet and the maximum height is 12 feet for each provider. The equipment building may be located no more than 250 feet from the tower or antenna and shall comply with the setback regulations for the underlying zone.

b.    Ground-level buildings shall be screened from view by landscape plantings, fencing, or other appropriate means as specified herein or in PCC 18J.15.040 of the Development Regulations. Required landscape plantings shall be installed around the perimeter of the required security fence.

c.    Equipment structures mounted on a roof shall have a finish similar to the exterior building walls. Equipment for roof-mounted antenna may also be located within the building on which the antenna is mounted.

d.    In instances where equipment structures are located in residential zones or adjacent to existing residential land uses, and if the equipment structure houses motorized or electronic equipment, airborne sound transmission shall not exceed the noise levels prescribed by the Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department.

e.    An alternative to the landscaping and screening requirement may be approved by the Director or Examiner in review of an Administrative Use Permit or Conditional Use Permit. Alternatives include, but are not limited to, exemplary architectural design of the equipment structure.

9.    Fencing. For new telecommunication towers and equipment shelters, a wall, slatted chain link fencing, or wooden fence not less than 6 feet in height from the finished grade shall be provided. Access to the tower shall be through a locked gate. This standard shall not apply to towers and equipment shelters mounted onto or located inside an existing building.

10.    Required Parking. At least one off-street parking stall shall be required for maintenance workers.

11.    Federal Requirements. All towers must meet or exceed current standards and regulations of the FAA, the FCC, and any other agency of the Federal government with the authority to regulate towers and antennas.

F.    Standards – Priority of Locations. An applicant siting a facility subject to priority location criteria shall review the criteria contained in the table below. Only when the applicant is unable to meet a criteria shall the next group of criteria be considered. The hierarchy of criteria is divided by three separate permitting processes: permitted outright (P), permitted by Administrative Use Permit (A), and permitted by a Conditional Use Permit (C). If the applicant is unable to meet a criteria within an identified permit group below, an increased level of review is required. The order of criteria for locating facilities shall be as follows:

Permitted

Outright

(P)

Antennas and towers on public property which has been identified by the appropriate jurisdiction as a desirable location for wireless facilities.

Antennas or dishes that are located a minimum of 100 feet from an existing residential dwelling unit.

Antennas or dishes on property that is improved with uses that are classified in the commercial or industrial use category.

Towers in Urban Districts and Centers when they are at least 200 feet from a MSF zoned property.

Administrative

Use

Permit

(A)

Antennas and towers utilizing a camouflaged or a concealed design to eliminate aesthetic impacts.

Towers that are screened from abutting property lines by vegetation including, but not limited to, existing Douglas Fir trees.

Towers in Urban Centers and Districts and Rural Centers that do not exceed the height limitation of the underlying zone.

Antennas and towers on non-residential sites including, but not limited to, parks, libraries, or churches.

Antennas on multi-family residential sites.

Monopole towers not exceeding 150 feet in height and meeting the criteria for a camouflaged or concealed design in PCC 18J.15.270 G.

Any tower that is proposed on a site that contains multiple tower(s) such as cellular tower farms.

Conditional Use

Permit

(C)

Any facility that is unable to meet the Priority of Locations criteria outlined in this subsection.

G.    Camouflaged or a Concealed Design. Telecommunication towers and wireless facilities determined by the County to meet one or more of the following criteria are allowed under PCC 18A.33.230 A., Level 2:

1.    The tower is disguised as a natural or built object typically appearing in the vicinity (a "stealth" tower), hidden from view, or integrated with an existing structure that is not a telecommunication tower. Monopine towers are encouraged where there are existing trees on or adjacent to the relevant parcel or lease area. Utility power poles may be modified or replaced at an increased height. Other acceptable designs include, but are not limited to, wireless facilities disguised as or integrated with playfield or stadium lights, other utility structures, or flagpoles.

2.    The tower is placed within an existing or proposed structure.

3.    The tower is placed upon a site in such a way that the topography and/or existing vegetation together with the proposed landscaping, design, and colors of the facility significantly screen the facility from view or cause it to blend in with surrounding natural features. Among other design options, a new tower shall be considered to have a concealed design under this subsection if it is placed with trees and vegetation, such as Douglas Fir trees, so as to be significantly screened from view.

H.    Standards – Third Party Technical Review. The Hearing Examiner or Director may, at his or her discretion, require a technical review by a third party expert. The selection of the third party expert shall be by mutual agreement by the provider and the County or at the discretion of the Examiner. The costs of the technical review shall be borne by the provider. A third party technical review may include, but is not limited to, a review of:

1.    The technical accuracy and completeness of submissions;

2.    The technical applicability of analysis techniques and methodologies;

3.    The validity of conclusions reached by the applicant; and/or

4.    Other specific technical issues as identified by the Hearing Examiner.

I.    Standards – Abandonment. The telecommunications service provider for a specific facility shall provide the Department with a copy of the notice to the FCC of intent to cease operations and shall remove the obsolete tower, antennas and associated structures within one year from the date of said notice.

J.    Standards – Location of Wireless Facilities in Public Rights-of-Way. Wireless facilities are allowed within a right-of-way or easement, public or private. Whichever entity controls the right-of-way or easement controls what is built provided it meets the requirements established for the use in the zone in which it is located. Antennas are allowed to attach to an existing structure or utility pole so long as the antenna and any accompanying structural modification does not add on more than 16 feet to the existing structure.

(Ord. 2014-67 § 2, 2014; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010)

18J.15.280 Agritourism.

A.    Applicability. The following provisions shall apply to all new agritourism uses. The Agritourism Use Type refers to uses which involve the sale of locally grown agricultural products and involves agriculturally based operations or activities that bring visitors to a farm or ranch. Agritourism includes a wide variety of activities, including navigating a corn maze, picking fruit and vegetables, feeding animals, riding horses, tasting honey, learning about wine and cheese making, or shopping in farm gift shops and farm stands for local goods.

B.    Design Objective. Provide minimum design standards for agritourism uses to ensure compatibility with surrounding uses.

C.    Standards.

1.    New buildings and structures associated with agritourism shall be designed with a rural theme to complement and/or enhance the rural environment.

2.    Impervious surface limits, signage and parking standards shall be the same as the underlying zoning designation.

3.    Safe vehicular access and customer parking shall be provided on site such that vehicles are not required to back onto public roads.

4.    Any exterior lighting installed shall be appropriately shielded and shall be directed downward.

5.    All activities generating noise detectible off-site shall observe Title 8 PCC, Chapter 8.76, Noise Pollution Control.

6.    Sale of ancillary products is permitted; however, such products shall not exceed 25 percent of the products offered for sale on site.

D.    Guidelines.

1.    Use of existing buildings is encouraged. Any new buildings, parking, or supportive uses should be located within or near the general area already developed.

(Ord. 2013-85 § 1 (part), 2013; Ord. 2013-30s2 § 9 (part), 2013)