Chapter 18J.40
GIG HARBOR COMMUNITY PLAN AREA DESIGN STANDARDS AND GUIDELINES Revised 12/18

Sections:

18J.40.010    Goals.

18J.40.020    Applicability.

18J.40.030    Exemptions.

18J.40.050    Urban Area Design Standards and Guidelines. Revised 12/18

18J.40.060    Rural Area Design Standards and Guidelines. Revised 12/18

18J.40.010 Goals.

The design goals of the Gig Harbor Peninsula Community Plan are to:

A.    Strive for development that is visually attractive, compatible with the historical marine identity of the community, harmonious with the small town atmosphere and residential character of the area and respectful of the natural environment;

B.    Utilize existing site characteristics such as clusters of trees, vegetative screening and topography to separate potentially conflicting land uses and soften the appearance of new development;

C.    Assure that new development and redevelopment in the Gig Harbor UGA be designed in a manner that is consistent with the City's design goals and objectives;

D.    Preserve the rural atmosphere and protect the native vegetation and open space characteristics in the area outside Gig Harbor's UGA;

E.    Implement low impact development design standards in areas designated as sensitive resource lands.

(Ord. 2002-113s § 4 (part), 2002)

18J.40.020 Applicability.

A.    This Chapter shall apply to new development activity that is required to obtain building or development permits or approvals, unless otherwise exempted by PCC 18J.10.040 or 18J.40.030.

B.    This Chapter contains design objectives, standards and guidelines for the following aspects of development: site preparation, building, landscaping or planting, and lighting.

C.    Table 18J.40.020-1 identifies the regulated permit types and under what circumstances design review is required:

GIG HARBOR COMMUNITY PLAN AREA

Table 18J.40.020-1. Type of Review Required for Regulated Activities

Review Type

Regulated Activities

1. New Civic, Multi-Family, Commercial or Industrial (1) (3)

2. Civic, Multi-Family, Commercial or Industrial Expansion < 60% of the building value (2)

3. Civic, Multi-Family, Commercial or Industrial Expansion > 60% of the building value (2)

4. Residential Duplex and Attached Single-Family

5. Residential Urban Detached Single-family

6. Land Divisions Short Plat, Formal Plat, Binding Site Plan and Mobile Home Park

7. Use Permit

8 Site Development Permit

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

Urban Area Design Standards

18J.40.050 A.

Building Design

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

18J.40.050 A.7.

Yes

18J.40.050 B.

Color and Material Design

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

18J.40.050 C.

Landscaping Design

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

18J.40.050 D.

Outdoor Lighting and Fence Design

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Rural Area Design Standards

18J.40.060 A.

Site Design

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

18J.40.060 B.

Building Design

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

18J.40.060 C.

Color and Material Design

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

18J.40.060 D.

Landscaping and Planting Design

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Footnotes:

(1)    Includes binding site plan and commercial building permit.

(2)    Commercial and industrial expansion excludes any interior improvements to an existing structure or remodeling of structures, that does not alter the prominent facade or that portion of a building visible from the public road right-of-way. The 60 percent calculation is cumulative over time and is calculated based on the "Building Valuation Data" table compiled by the International Code Council and published in the Building Safety Journal, as used by the Building Official.

(3)    A new structure on a site where there are existing commercial or industrial buildings will be subject to the same standards as a greater than 60 percent value expansion described above.

(Ord. 2014-42 § 5 (part), 2014; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 7 (part), 2010; Ord. 2005-84s § 3 (part), 2005; Ord. 2004-52s § 5 (part), 2004; Ord. 2002-113s § 4 (part), 2002)

18J.40.030 Exemptions.

The following special exemption applies to this Chapter:

A.    Industrial buildings which are not visible within 800 feet of a public right-of-way located outside of an employment center or which are not visible within 800 feet of SR-16, Purdy Drive, Burnham Drive, or Canterwood Blvd. are exempt from select design standards. The Industrial Building Exemption acronym (IBE) is shown at the end of any standard that qualifies for the exemption.

(Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2005-84s § 3 (part), 2005; Ord. 2004-52s § 5 (part), 2004; Ord. 2003-40s2 § 3 (part), 2003; Ord. 2002-113s § 4 (part), 2002)

18J.40.050 Urban Area Design Standards and Guidelines. Revised 12/18

The following design objectives, standards and guidelines are separated into categories based on the design review type. If a development proposal is designed in a manner that satisfies all design standards for each applicable review type, Design Review is considered complete. As an alternative to the Design Review process, an applicant can design a project in a style that meets the design objective pursuant to the design guidelines through the Site Plan Review process. As a third alternative, an applicant can propose an original design through the Site Plan Review process that provides a better design, in a manner consistent with the City of Gig Harbor's UGA design manual, which takes advantage of unique site characteristics or utilizes an innovative design concept, etc., provided the applicable design objectives of this Section are met. See Table 18J.40.020-1 to determine which specific design review standards are applicable to an individual project.

A.    Building Design.

1.    Design Objective – Architectural Character and Details. Avoid facing dissimilar structures along streets that divide zone classifications. Avoid dominant garages on residential development. Windows should serve as a pleasing focal point in a building's design or emphasize a shift in a wall or roof plane. Windows should relate to, align with, or complement exterior design features of the building. Generally, building techniques such as concrete tilt-up construction that create structures with an industrial appearance should be avoided.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Structures facing a street and abutting a dissimilar zone classification shall be subject to design standards for both zones. The more restrictive design requirements shall apply. Buildings that are behind street facing buildings are not subject to this standard.

(2)    All buildings facing a street that abuts a residential zone shall be limited to residential type doors, windows, trim and massing. Large storefront windows, kick plates below windows, flat roofs, parapets, sign bands, etc. do not appropriately reflect residential architecture.

(3)    Generally, windows and doors shall constitute at least 25-30 percent of prominent façade wall planes. In situations where this is not practical, the masonry façade option (PCC 18J.40.050 C.2.a.(8)) may be considered. (IBE)

(4)    To the extent possible, multiple windows on a single wall plane shall be spaced and aligned with other windows and doors on the same wall plane. Single or grouped windows on a wall plane shall relate to other architectural features such as roof forms, doors, or façade projections.

(5)    Mirrored glass is prohibited.

(6)    Emphasize individuality of multi-family units with variation of massing or details – e.g., a combination of trim, rooflines, porch designs, reverse designs, and color variation, particularly on street-oriented units.

(7)    All multi-family building façades prominently visible to public rights-of-way shall meet the following facade requirements.

(a)    Prominent facades shall not be blank walls.

(b)    Prominent facades shall reflect the same design and detailing which typify the building's front including roof design, window proportion, facade variation, and building materials.

(c)    Prominent facades on required street facing units may not be concealed behind high walls or privacy fences. Lower fences and walls not exceeding 3 feet in height are acceptable.

(8)    Visual continuity can be achieved between dissimilar buildings by emphasizing common elements of site design (e.g., landscaping, screening, furnishings, light standards, and decorative paving materials). Similar colors of structures can also provide visual continuity to the streetscape.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Avoid facing dissimilar structures along streets.

(2)    Conform to window and door solid/void ratio requirements. (IBE)

(3)    Maintain balance in the placement of windows.

(4)    Mirrored glass is prohibited.

(5)    Vary design on multi-family units or groups of multi-family units.

(6)    Provide consistent architectural interest to all prominent facades for multi-family developments.

(7)    Link dissimilar buildings with common site amenities.

2.    Design Objective – Building Mass. One of the most prominent characteristics of a building's design is its scale and massing. The scale of a building determines its size in relation to surrounding buildings; the massing of a building gives it interest and character. Modern building trends emphasize large-scale designs with no thought toward massing. This imbalance between size and visual character has resulted in visually obtrusive development that is out of character with surrounding structures of a smaller scale. Large retail boxes epitomize this trend and are incompatible with the design objectives in Gig Harbor's UGA. Prominent facades on multi-family and non-residential development, which face the road(s) providing primary access to the building site, shall comply with the following standards:

a.    Standards.

(1)    Building height shall be no taller than the average building height on all parcels in opposing zones (including code allowed height on vacant parcels) that are located within 200 feet of subject site and are contiguous to the transition zone boundary. Structures may step up to a greater height (not to exceed maximum height limits) if the taller portions are stepped back at least 1.25 feet for every increased foot of height. In this context, structures shall be measured from the average finished grade along the side of the building facing the opposing zone to the highest point on the roof.

(2)    Building footprints shall be no larger than the average footprint size on all buildings in opposing zones located within 200 feet of the subject site and that are on parcels that are contiguous to the transition zone boundary (accessory structures, e.g., sheds and garages may be excluded from this calculation).

(3)    Facades shall have no wall plane wider than 2.5 times the height of the wall plane. If a new wall plane is required to achieve compliance with this requirement, it must be offset by at least 6 feet. (IBE)

(4)    Wall and roof surfaces shall be broken down into smaller planes using substantial shifts in building footprints, which result in substantial shifts in rooflines as follows:

(a)    Horizontal shift. No portion of a prominent facade may exceed 80 feet in length without a shift in the building footprint measuring 1/10 of the facade length. This shift may be broken down into smaller shifts of at least 6 feet each. Horizontal shifts, when required, shall be reflected by a shift or alteration in the roof design. To assure that footprint shifts are evenly distributed across the building facade, shifted wall planes shall have a width proportion of between 1-to-1 and 3-to-1 the width of adjacent wall planes on the same facade.

(b)    Vertical shift. No single run of ridge, cornice, or fascia (excluding eave overhang) shall exceed 80 feet without a 5-foot transition in height. Cupolas and similar minor projections above the roof lines do not meet the vertical shift requirement.

(5)    Exterior walls and roof forms shall be a true reflection of interior space. False projections of wall or roof forms are not allowed, except that parapets and gables may rise above the true roof line if they include side returns or roof planes that: (1) extend back at least one and one-half times the width of the parapet or gable, or (2) extend back to a point that is not visible from any public vantage point.

(6)    To avoid a truncated appearance, all structures shall have a visual "cap". This may be achieved with either a pitched roof or a flat roof if designed according to one of the following options:

(a)    Lower pitched roofs with extended eaves. A lower pitch roof with a minimum 4/12 pitch is allowed provided eaves extend at least 2 feet beyond exterior building walls.

(b)    Steep pitch hip, saltbox or gable roof form conforming to the following roof pitch requirements: Minimum pitch (6/12) – Maximum pitch (12/12). Exceptions: Steeples, bell towers and other ancillary structures.

(c)    False pitch roof with appearance of true hip, gable or saltbox. Single story and multiple story buildings may have a flat roof with a false pitch if: (a) the roof appears to be a true hip or gable from all public vantage points, and (b) there are extending wings on each corner of the building which allow for a true hip or gable to extend out from the false hip or gable (this will avoid a mansard roof appearance). Roofs shall conform to the minimum roof pitch standards stipulated in (6)(a) above.

(d)    Flat roof with projecting cornice (multi-story structures only). Cornice dimensions must be 1 foot high for every 16 feet of building height and must protrude forward at least 1/3 the cornice height dimensions. The protrusion may include the entire cornice or the cornice may be a graduated protrusion with full protrusion at the top. Cornices must be at or near the top of the wall or parapet. Pediments may extend above the cornice.

(7)    A-frame, modified A-frame, curvilinear, domed, and mansard type roofs and other unusual or atypical roof forms are prohibited. Multiple gables over a single-mass structure forming a "saw-tooth" design (IBE) are also prohibited.

(8)    Larger structures built next to smaller structures along Purdy Drive shall include projections in the façade which reflect and approximate the smaller structures massing and height. Heights of existing structures shall be measured from the facade to the highest point of the roof.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Limit building height to the average height of buildings in opposing zones.

(2)    Limit building footprint to the average size of building footprints in the opposing zones.

(3)    Avoid long low wall planes. (IBE)

(4)    Provide substantial shifts in walls and roof surfaces. (IBE)

(5)    Avoid a false-front look on building exterior.

(6)    Provide visual terminus to tops of buildings.

(7)    Avoid unusual or atypical roof forms on all structures.

(8)    Buildings along Purdy Drive should reflect the mass, scale, and height of adjacent structures.

3.    Design Objective – Primary Building. Visual interest shall be achieved through a hierarchical approach to design. For example, strategically located structures, architectural elements or site amenities designed as focal points create a visual "draw" and suggest a point of activity. These serve also as a reference point for all subordinate structures. This concept is particularly applicable to large parcels with multiple structures. To this end, a primary building shall be designed to serve as a focal point to a development and suggest a point of activity. On parcels with more than one structure it is the primary or anchor tenant building. Multiple "carbon-copy" buildings provide no visual hub and shall be avoided. Primary structures standards shall apply to all non-residential sites with more than one building or with one or more multiple tenant buildings.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Primary structures are those which serve as a visual draw to a site. Primary structures shall be designed as follows: (IBE)

(a)    Primary structures shall be the focal point of development and must be prominently visible to the public right-of-way giving access to the project, unless significant vegetation warrants a less visible structure, or unless visibility is otherwise prohibited (e.g., enhancement corridors).

(b)    To provide a more stately appearance, primary structures shall have at least two floors (minimum eight feet apart). The second floor level shall be at least one-third the area of the lower floor area. Alternatively, primary structures may be single-floor buildings with roofs having a minimum pitch of 8/12, and which contain dormer windows on every roof plane having a ridge length of 40 feet or more. One dormer window with a glazing area of at least 15 square feet shall be required for every 40 feet of ridge length (or portion thereof). Dormer windows shall be functional, providing natural light into the finished and heated area of the building.

(c)    Primary structures may include an area not to exceed 10 percent of the buildings foot print area that rises above the maximum height limit. The height increase must be in building volume rather than an extension of a parapet. This height increase may not exceed 8 feet.

(d)    Primary structures shall include a prominent entrance, which faces or is clearly visible from the street. The entrance shall be defined by a projecting or recessed portico or a clearly defined doorway designed as a focal point in the facade design.

(2)    Primary structures shall include, either as a prominent portico or courtyard, all or portions of a common area as required in PCC 18J.40.050 B.5., which shall be visible to the public and usable to customers or clients. It shall be integrated into the building design by means of either a roof-like structure (e.g., sheathed roof or open pergola style) or perimeter wall extending from the building. Walls and roof structures shall include materials and design details that typify the primary structure. (IBE)

(3)    Secondary structures (all structures other than primary structures) may be much simpler in design than primary structures, but they must include design elements that visually link them to the primary structure site. Secondary structures must include siding, trim, roofing materials and colors common to the primary structure of a site. Specific combinations of materials and colors may be varied from building to building; provided, that any material or color used on secondary structures has, in some application, been used on the primary structure. For example, if the primary structure is a red brick building with gray clapboard in the gables, then the secondary structure may be a gray clapboard building with red brick accents. (IBE)

(4)    All building facades prominently visible to public waterways, rights-of-way or streets providing primary access to the site or from any customer or client parking or pedestrian area shall meet the following facade requirements.

(a)    Prominent facades shall not be blank walls.

(b)    Prominent facades shall reflect the same design and detailing which typify the building's front including roof design, window proportion, facade variation, and building materials.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Design primary structure as a focal point. (IBE)

(2)    Integrate outdoor leisure space into primary structure design. (IBE)

(3)    Integrate primary structure design elements into secondary structures. (IBE)

(4)    Provide consistent architectural interest to all prominent facades.

4.    Design Objective – Building Placement. Enhance the visual quality of non-residential development by placing buildings in a manner that promotes pedestrian circulation, preserves native vegetation and diminishes the view of parking lots and service areas from the street.

a.    Standards.

(1)    At least 50 percent of the primary structure's front facade shall be placed on the front setback line. The remaining portion of the building may be stepped back to accommodate common areas or parking. However, no more than 50 percent of required parking may be located in front of a building. (IBE)

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Locate commercial structures on front setback line. (IBE)

5.    Design Objective – Pedestrian Oriented Features. Provide designed outdoor common space that encourages outdoor activities and leisure in outdoor spaces associated with commercial development. Required common areas must be provided on-site, but may be enlarged and extended into road right-of-ways to connect with the sidewalk, subject to approval of the County Engineer.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Commercial development greater than 2,000 square feet in floor area shall include common areas equal to 10 percent of the gross floor area of the building to which they apply, excluding garages, warehouses, and similar unheated support structures.

(2)    Common areas must include trash receptacles and casual seating or tables. Common areas must be one of (or a combination of) the following:

(a)    Balcony, terrace or covered colonnade – providing a minimum walking width of 8 feet and which also incorporates seating areas.

(b)    Plaza – with colored or textured pavement surface, e.g., brick, stone, exposed aggregate concrete or colored and textured concrete. To provide pattern and enhance the texture of the pavement, concrete surfaces shall be scored or otherwise divided into smaller sections.

(c)    Pocket park – developed between or in front of buildings which include landscaped areas of grass, trees, shrubbery and flowers, combined with limited paths and pavement areas for casual tables or seats.

(d)    Shoreline viewing platform – consistent with both the Shoreline Master Program requirements and these design standards. Viewing platforms intended for public access shall be identified with signage located at the edge of the public right-of-way.

(e)    Off-site common areas – For structures with less than 5000 square feet of floor area, any of the above common areas which are within 250 feet of the subject site and are at least as large as the required common area for the subject site meet common area requirements and do not have to be repeated. This does not imply that the off-site common area must be accessible for the subject site's use. It merely develops an appropriate density for outdoor common areas in a given district. Off-site common areas do not qualify for on-site parking credits.

(3)    Where scenic views occur on a site, common areas should be located within the view corridor. Use care in the selection of landscape plantings so as to preserve views.

(4)    Common areas (or outdoor stairs leading to common areas) shall be easily accessible to customers from the public right-of-way by either primary or secondary walkways.

(5)    Pedestrian seating is encouraged in locations that allow enjoyment of sun and protection from wind and rain. Locate seating so users can observe the activities of the street or enjoy a scenic view.

(6)    Common areas invite pedestrian activity. Therefore, it is expected that impacts from automobile traffic will be lessened. Additionally, a well-designed common area provides the same visual amenity as pervious coverage landscaping. Provision of common areas may therefore be counted toward parking and impervious coverage requirements as follows:

(a)    Required on-site parking may be reduced by one parking stall for every 200 square feet of required common area.

(b)    Required common areas may be counted as pervious when calculating impervious coverage allowances. (Drainage system design must incorporate all impervious surfaces.)

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Provide common area of a size proportionate to development.

(2)    Choose common area best suited to development.

(3)    Locate common area in view corridor.

(4)    Provide direct access to common areas with pedestrian walkways.

(5)    Provide outdoor seating where people want to sit.

6.    Design Objective – Building Lighting. Lighting may be used to accent a building but shall not be used to denote a corporate or commercial image except on allowed signage. Lighting may be directed to a building but should generally not emanate from a building. See PCC 18J.40.050 D.1. for outdoor lighting standards and PCC 18J.15.085 for countywide illumination standards.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Translucent panels and awnings illuminated from behind are prohibited. This shall not exclude soft light commonly and incidentally emitted from windows.

(2)    Except for decorator lights which use clear 60-watt maximum incandescent bulbs (e.g., candelabra bulbs), light sources shall be concealed behind soffits, within recessed containers, behind shrubbery, etc. Sources of high-intensity light, whether behind a translucent lens or not, shall not be visible to the public.

(3)    Outdoor building lighting is limited to one 60-watt bulb (or equivalent foot candles) on any 10 feet of façade length, except that more intense lighting is allowed at building entrances. (IBE)

(4)    Colored lighting is limited to temporary holiday lighting only.

(5)    Designs that are strictly utilitarian in appearance are prohibited on all fixtures visible to the public, e.g., mercury vapor lights, cobra lights, etc. (IBE)

7.    Design Objective – Detached Single-Family Residence. Enhance the visual quality of neighborhoods by de-emphasizing the scale of homes and garages and promote incentives to locate garages behind houses.

a.    Standards.

(1)    De-emphasize garages by giving visual emphasis to design elements which reflect human activity and enclosure. Choose one of the following options.

(a)    Locate garages behind the house. A garage may be located in the defined side and rear yards provided it conforms to the following criteria:

(i)    The garage is placed at least 6 feet behind the house (a 6-foot wide breezeway, measured side to side, may connect the garage to the house).

(ii)    The garage is at least three feet from the side and rear property lines or three feet from an alley access easement.

(iii)    The size of the garage does not exceed 24 x 24 feet.

(iv)    The height of the garage is limited to 12 feet above the highest point of natural grade along the front (vehicular entrance) wall of the garage.

(b)    Recess vehicular entrances. At least 70 percent of the front walls of the house that enclose the living area shall project at least 6 feet forward of the garage doors.

(c)    Emphasize windows and porches. Provide windows above garage doors in gables, dormers, or other wall planes that are within 2 feet of the garage door wall planes, along with front porches which emphasize front entries. At least one window is required for every two garage bays. Each window shall have at least 10 square feet of glazing area.

(d)    Increase window area. Garage doors may be flush with the front walls of the house if the front walls include window glazing area that is at least 50 percent of the total garage door area. Garages may project forward of the front walls of the house if the front walls include window glazing area that is at least 70 percent of the total garage door area. (Garage door windows may not be included in the glazing area calculations.)

(e)    Place garage entry on side of house. In this context, garage doors may not face the street unless it is a side street on a corner lot. If the garage projects forward of the house, the garage doors must be located on the side of the garage most distant from the entry to the house.

(f)    Garage door placement. Place garage doors in locations that are not visible from the street providing access to the site.

(2)    Front porches can be used to emphasize the front entry. When there is no front porch or when a front porch is not an obvious or prominent feature of the house design, the front door must be oriented so that it directly faces the street.

(3)    No wall plane, excluding gable areas, may exceed a height of 22 feet above any point of finished grade. Additional wall plane area may be allowed (subject to maximum building height limits) only if it is stepped back at least eight feet from the lower wall plane, or if it is in a dormer that is stepped back from the lower wall plane. Step-backs from decks, balconies or other spaces not fully enclosed do not meet this step-back requirement. This requirement applies only to prominent facades.

(4)    Single family homes shall comply with building lighting and outdoor lighting standards of this Chapter.

(5)    Single family homes shall comply with all fencing standards of this Chapter.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    De-emphasize garages.

(2)    Emphasize front entry.

(3)    Avoid visually looming wall planes.

(4)    Conform with all building lighting and outdoor lighting standards.

(5)    Conform with all fencing standards.

B.    Color and Material Design.

1.    Design Objective – Color. Color is an important and dominant aspect of building design. When selecting colors, consider carefully the different materials and levels of detail that color can emphasize. The field or base color is one of the most dominating features of the building; trim colors are used on the building's secondary features, while accent colors can emphasize the finer, more characteristic elements of the building's design. Typically, no more than three colors should be used on one building, but additional colors may be considered if they are a close shade of one of the other three colors.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Field or base colors (the main color of the exterior walls) are limited to the subtle earthtone colors. White, soft sands, grays, sage greens, pale yellows and deep rich clay colors are appropriate field colors.

(2)    Trim colors (fascia, cornice, window and door trim, kick panels, etc.) may contrast to complement the field color but shall not be bright or bold. A lighter or darker shade of the field color is always an appropriate trim color, as is white. Bright or primary colors are not permitted.

(3)    Accent colors can generally be brighter than field or trim colors. Accent colors should be used with restraint. Appropriate areas for accent colors are those details that might otherwise go unnoticed such as moldings or molding indentations, medallions, and shadow lines of window and doorframes. Doors are also an appropriate location for accent colors.

(4)    Stone and brick have naturally durable colors and finishes that would be lost or damaged if painted. Painting or staining of stone and brick is prohibited.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Keep field colors subdued.

(2)    Avoid bold or bright trim colors.

(3)    Limit bright colors to finer architectural details.

(4)    Avoid painting factory colors of stone and brick.

2.    Design Objective – Exterior Building Materials. Traditional building materials such as brick, stone or wood reflect human handicraft and provide texture to building exteriors. Materials for new construction and remodeling should convey similar visual qualities. Building design should be executed in a straightforward manner. Tack-on devices may not be used to mitigate poor design or to promote a particular theme. If a particular style or theme is desired, it should be reflected in the building's form and general detailing.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Siding materials are limited to horizontal lap siding (of any lap design) made of wood or cement-like materials; shingles made of cedar or cement-like materials; board and batten (or panels with similarly spaced battens); brick, stone (real or cultured), nonscored, split-faced block (CMU). Stucco, tile, terra-cotta, concrete, spandrel glass, sheet siding (e.g., T1-11), corrugated metal panels and smooth-faced or scored concrete block may be used as accent materials on nonresidential projects, not to exceed 20 percent of any given facade. Standing seam metal siding with separately attached battens (with proportions similar to board and batten siding) may be used in gables only, or on up to 20 percent of any given façade. (IBE)

(2)    Avoid architectural gimmickry including, but not limited to, the following:

(a)    Tenant-specific Motifs – Fanciful or unusual detailing used to promote a particular theme or to identify a specific tenant shall be avoided. Signage shall be used for this purpose.

(b)    Neon Outlining – Architectural features shall not be outlined in neon or tube-type lights. This includes exposed and concealed lights.

(c)    Backlit Awnings – Awnings may not be backlit or otherwise illuminated from behind unless the awning fabric is completely opaque so that it blacks out all light.

(d)    Non-functional Awnings – Awnings shall be limited to traditional locations over windows, walkways, and entrances or over other architectural features where weather protection is needed. Awnings must be applied to walls or posts and may not be applied to existing projections over walkways or windows.

(e)    Faux Windows – All windows must be true windows that let in light to occupied space or to large attic areas that provide at least limited standing room.

(f)    False-Fronts – Building facades must be designed to reflect the mass and bulk of the structure behind the facade. Design details that create a false appearance of building mass, or that otherwise make a building appear to be something that it is not, are not permitted. This restriction is not intended to prohibit the use of decorative pediments that project above the roof line in the historic district.

(g)    Architectural Anomalies – Application of materials or details that are not integrated into the overall building design, or that do not reflect the materials or details characteristic of the overall building design, are prohibited.

(3)    Multiple awning designs are not permitted on a single building.

(4)    Awnings, canopies and marquees may not obscure architectural details of the façade and may not be the prominent design element of the building. They must appear as a secondary and complementary element of the building design. Awnings may not extend more than 12 inches beyond the outer edges of windows or groups of windows, and they may not come any closer than 12 inches to building corners or 36 inches to eaves or cornices.

(5)    Visual continuity can be achieved between dissimilar buildings by emphasizing common elements of site design (e.g., landscaping, screening, furnishings, light standards, decorative paving materials). Similar colors of structures can also provide visually continuity to the streetscapes.

(6)    Cedar shingles, architectural grade asphalt shingles, tile, slate, and standing-seam metal roofs are allowed. Other roofing materials are prohibited except on roofs having slopes less than 1/12.

(7)    Limit roofing colors to darker earth tone and forest colors. Forest greens, charcoal or medium grays, and dark clay colors are allowed. Do not use clay colors that look red or purplish in sunlight.

(8)    Brick, split-faced block (nonscored) or ground-faced block, if used in a manner that provides added relief, shadow lines, and dimensional interest to a facade, may serve as an alternate method of compliance to other specified design requirements, as follows:

(a)    Alternative to solid/void ratio requirements (see PCC 18J.40.050 B.1.a.(3). (NOTE: This option may not be used on facades facing and within 50 feet of the street or street right-of-way providing primary access to a site.) All prominent facades shall be 80 percent sided with the masonry materials stated above, which shall also include:

(i)    Masonry pilasters regularly spaced every 15 to 25 feet apart (depending on the scale of the building); and

(ii)    Recessed "panels" in the masonry work that provide a "frame and panel" design in the masonry work between all pilasters and that comprise approximately 70 percent of the width and height of the space between pilasters.

(b)    Alternative to wall and roof substantial shift requirements (see PCC 18J.40.050 B.2.a.(4). All prominent facades shall be 80 percent sided with the previously stated masonry materials, which shall also include:

(i)    Masonry pilasters regularly spaced every 15 to 20 feet apart (depending on the scale of the building);

(ii)    Windows comprising of 25 to 30 percent of the wall plane or recessed "panels" in the masonry work that provide a "frame and panel" design in the masonry work between all pilasters, with the recessed panel comprising approximately 70 percent of the width and height of the space between pilasters (NOTE: The option to use recessed panels in lieu of windows may not be used on facades facing and within 50 feet of the street or street right-of-way providing primary access to a site.);

(iii)    Projecting lintels and windowsills made of brick, cut stone or similar masonry material and placed above and below each main-floor window;

(iv)    A projecting wainscot at the base of the building made of brick, cut stone or similar masonry material per the previously stated masonry materials;

(v)    A projecting string course of brick above the windows or recessed panels; and

(vi)    A corbelled projection in the masonry work at or near the top of the building spanning the full width of the facade, completed by a cornice made of masonry or some other material that meets standard cornice requirements.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Use siding materials that convey the same visual qualities as wood, brick, stone, stacked masonry or (in limited application) other unspecified materials. (IBE)

(2)    Avoid architectural gimmicks.

(3)    Maintain consistency in awning design.

(4)    Avoid awnings which obscure or dominate the building design.

(5)    Link dissimilar buildings with common site amenities.

(6)    Use roofing materials which provide texture and shadow lines.

(7)    Avoid bright-colored or reflective roofing materials.

(8)    Consider masonry façade option.

C.    Landscaping Design.

1.    Design Objective – Enhancement Corridors. State Route 16, Canterwood Blvd., and Burnham Drive are designated as enhancement corridors (except for those properties designated as "visual interchange mode" as shown on the City of Gig Harbor's visually Sensitive Areas Map). Development within 300 feet of the SR-16 right-of-way and within 100 feet of the Canterwood Blvd. and Burnham Drive right-of-way must either be 100 percent screened or conform to all of the following design criteria if required screening cannot be achieved within 3 years. The purpose of these enhancement corridors is to maintain the scenic beauty, which characterizes highway travel across the peninsula, to maintain a more distinct City "edge", and to provide visual separation between zone classifications.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Significant vegetation within 30 feet of the property line abutting the street or utility rights-of-way within the enhancement corridor shall be retained.

(2)    Parking lots and structures in any area of the defined enhancement corridor must be fully screened from SR-16, except they may be viewed through a semi-transparent screen of on-site trees as follows.

(a)    Significant vegetation within 30 feet of the property line abutting the street or utility rights-of-way within the enhancement corridor shall be retained.

(b)    Semi-transparent screens must provide at least 70 percent year-around foliage coverage distributed evenly across the view along SR-16 and the Tacoma-Cushman utility corridor. Coverage may be reduced to 50 percent along the Canterwood Blvd. and Burnham Drive Corridor. Semi-transparent screens may consist of new vegetation only if healthy existing vegetation is not adequate to meet coverage requirements.

(c)    A semi-transparent screen must be more than a rigid line of trees along the property's edge. While rows of trees existing along property edges shall be retained, additional trees are required so that a staggered, natural growth pattern is retained or achieved.

(3)    Parcels abutting defined enhancement corridor rights-of-way must maintain a 30-foot setback within which no structure or parking lots shall be allowed. Existing significant vegetation within the setback shall be retained.

(4)    Service and delivery bays, including warehouse buildings and mini-storage units, may not be visible from enhancement corridors.

(5)    Parking lots designed for more than 16 cars and which are visible from SR-16 shall either be completely screened or meet the following landscape standards:

(a)    Provide continuous tree canopy throughout parking lot. Parking lots must include a continuous tree canopy between parking rows. At maturity, the tree canopy shall shade 35 percent of the parking stall area at high sun in the summer. This shading requirement may be modified as needed for projects that incorporate bioretention areas in the parking lot.

(b)    Provide color and texture to distant parking stalls. On-site parking spaces that are more than 200 feet from the building they apply to and which are visible from SR-16 must be surfaced with colored and textured paving or permeable pavement.

(6)    Buildings visible from or partially visible from enhancement corridors shall meet all design criteria for prominent facades. Semi-transparent screens are not sufficient to negate this requirement.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Retain significant vegetation in enhancement corridors.

(2)    Provide full screening or partial screening with glimpse through areas.

(3)    Maintain 30 foot setbacks from road rights-of-way in enhancement corridors.

(4)    Orient service and delivery areas away from enhancement corridors.

(5)    Screen or enhance parking lots visible from the SR-16 enhancement Corridor.

(6)    Screen or enhance building design.

2.    Design Objective – Landscaping Design. Formal landscaping provides a pleasing transition between the natural setting and the built environment and between adjacent built environments. Landscaping shall not be considered adequate compensation for poor site or building design; it shall be used to enhance new development (regardless of how attractive the buildings on a site may be) and to soften the visual impacts of such urban necessities as parking lots and mechanical equipment. Views through or framed by natural vegetation may be achieved while retaining the existing vegetation which characterizes the Gig Harbor setting. The following planting design standards are intended to supplement the Landscape Standards, Tree Conservation, Landscape Buffers, and Infill Compatibility standards of Chapter 18J.15 PCC.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Plantings must be of a type that will thrive amid existing vegetation without killing or overtaking it. Avoid mixing incompatible plants, which require different planting environments or microclimates. Avoid haphazard mixture of textures, colors, and plant types. Native and drought-tolerant vegetation should be used when appropriate.

(2)    Planting areas with nursery stock or transplanted vegetation shall include a mechanical irrigation system designed for full coverage of the planting area. Exceptions may be granted for drought tolerant plants, which require little or no supplemental irrigation. See PCC 18J.15.100 for Plant Lists.

(3)    Views and vistas from public rights-of-way shall be considered when determining placement of vegetation. While it is not the intent to avoid all trees in the foreground of a view, consideration should be given to the expected height of trees and how they might be located to "frame" the view.

(4)    Trimming of trees shall be done in a manner that preserves the tree's natural symmetry. Topping is prohibited unless recommended by a certified arborist for health/safety reasons. Limbing-up may be appropriate if sufficient crown is retained to preserve the tree's health. Tree trimming and pruning should be done in a manner that preserves tree health and vigor. See also PCC 18J.15.130, Plant Protection and Maintenance.

(5)    Buffering between parcels of different zone categories (e.g., low density residential vs. medium density residential vs. commercial, etc.) shall include a dense vegetative buffer of 40 feet or more unless other zone transitional boundaries are met. See PCC 18J.40.050 B.1.a.(1) and (2); 18J.40.050 B.2.a.(1) and (2); and 18J.40.050 B.8.a.(1)

(6)    A minimum of 15 percent native vegetative shall be retained for screening in a Community Employment (CE) zone. The depth of native vegetation screening buffers shall be a minimum of 35 feet wide in a CE zone. No structure in a CE zone shall be located closer than 25 feet to the required screening buffer that is adjacent to a residential zone or residential use.

(7)    Screening requirements must provide a dense screen when adjacent to a residential area. Where existing vegetation does not provide adequate screening, additional native plantings may be required. The vegetative screen may only be broken at points of vehicular or pedestrian access.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Choose plantings that are compatible with existing vegetation.

(2)    Provide a mechanical irrigation system.

(3)    Locate vegetation to preserve significant views.

(4)    Retain the natural symmetry of trees.

(5)    Encourage use vines or shrubs along blank walls.

(6)    Substantially separate and buffer opposing zones with a minimum 40-foot dense vegetative buffer.

(7)    Provide significant buffer and setbacks for all uses in CE zones.

(8)    Provide dense vegetative screens adjacent to residential areas.

(9)    Blank walls may include a narrow planting area with shrubs or vines giving coverage to the wall.

(10)    Choose plants that are native and drought tolerant.

D.    Outdoor Lighting and Fence Design.

1.    Design Objective – Outdoor Lighting. Outdoor lighting is intended to improve visibility and safety within outdoor spaces. Lighting shall be designed to enhance the setting therefore the intensity and source of the light shall correspond to the visual character of the surroundings. See also PCC 18J.15.085 for countywide illumination standards.

a.    Standards.

(1)    All light sources shall be hidden or conform to light standards specified herein. Light sources (e.g., light bulbs or lenses) shall not be visible except on approved decorator lights. Sources of high intensity light, whether behind a lens or not, shall not be visible to the public.

(2)    The following lighting types are approved – "shoe box" style pole lamps, ornamental pole lamps and bollard lights.

(3)    Designs that are strictly utilitarian in appearance shall be avoided on all fixtures visible to the public, e.g., mercury vapor lights, cobra lights, etc.

2.    Design Objective – Fencing. Fences are useful for defining space, providing security, and visually enhancing outdoor settings. The degree that these qualities are considered depends on the intended purpose of the fence and where it will be located. The design of the fence may not be important if the fence is strictly for security reasons (e.g., a mini-storage yard), but if the fence is visible to the public right-of-way, design takes on added significance.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Fences shall be constructed of wood, wrought iron, brick, stone, or cinder block. Smooth-faced cinder block must have a veneer finish on the side visible to the public's view. In commercial areas or recreation centers in residential areas, coated chain link attached to wood posts and rails is permitted. Other materials which have the general appearance and visual quality of approved fence materials may be approved by the Planning Director; however, the use of plywood or composition sheeting as a fence material is not permitted. (IBE)

(2)    In areas not visible from any road rights-of-way, waterway, or designated public space, standard chain link fencing including steel posts and rails is permitted.

(3)    Fences are limited to a height of 3 feet along front yards (4 feet for open rail fences) and 6 feet in rear yards. (IBE)

(4)    Chain link fencing shall not be permitted forward of the front setback line along Purdy Drive.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Choose fence materials carefully. (IBE)

(2)    Limit chain link to non-visible areas.

(3)    Limit height of fences. (IBE)

(4)    Avoid chain link fencing along Purdy Drive.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-89s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2013-85 § 1 (part), 2013; Ord. 2013-30s2 § 9 (part), 2013; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 7 (part), 2010; Ord. 2005-84s § 3 (part), 2005; Ord. 2004-58s § 7 (part), 2004; Ord. 2003-40s2 § 3 (part), 2003; Ord. 2002-113s § 4 (part), 2002)

18J.40.060 Rural Area Design Standards and Guidelines. Revised 12/18

A.    Site Design.

1.    Design Objective – Building Placement. In the rural area, buildings are generally required to locate in the interior of lots to provide adequate land for open space and tree retention around the perimeter property lines. When the land adjacent to exterior lot lines is kept free from development a variety of design objectives including: screening between incompatible land uses, pedestrian connections between developments, preservation of native vegetation, stormwater mitigation, and wildlife movement can be achieved.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Screening is required adjacent to all exterior property lines, except for points of vehicular or pedestrian access, for new development in the rural area. Trails, utilities, small accessory structures such as a gazebo or picnic table, and fencing that does not impede wildlife movement may be permitted within required screening areas when the integrity of the screening can be maintained. The following screening standards shall be required, adjacent to the exterior of a development, for all new divisions of land, commercial, civic uses and utility buildings in the following rural zones:

(a)    Rural Ten – 35 feet.

(b)    Rural 5 – 35 feet.

(c)    Rural Sensitive Resource – 50 feet.

(2)    In Rural Neighborhood Centers, that portion of a commercial or civic building that faces the street shall be located within 25 feet of the street. When outdoor gathering places or low impact development (LID) best management practices (BMPs) are provided, the building is not required to be within 25 feet of the street as long as the building is located immediately adjacent to the outdoor gathering place.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Existing native vegetation should be utilized for screening whenever possible. Supplemental landscaping may be necessary to provide an adequate screen. Vegetated low impact development (LID) facilities using native and drought tolerant vegetation, such as bioretention, may be used to meet landscaping requirements when supplemental plantings are used. Drought tolerant vegetation is encouraged to avoid irrigation.

(2)    Landscaped areas may be suitable for required screening when a site is devoid or deficient in the quality and quantity of screening that is necessary to meet the objectives of this design element.

(3)    Buildings should be designed to fit the natural slope rather than forcing the slope to fit the building design. Multi-tiered buildings are an example of an effective design solution that minimizes impacts to a site's natural features.

B.    Building Design.

1.    Design Objective – Architectural Character and details. A rural or rustic design theme is required for new development and exterior remodels of all buildings in rural neighborhood centers. This design can be achieved by introducing details such as knee bracing, wood siding, use of trim and siding, covered porches and window treatments. In other rural zones, building techniques such as concrete tilt-up construction that create structures with an industrial appearance should be avoided.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Utilize wood, shake, stone, brick, cedar shingle, timber or other traditional building materials.

(2)    Window patterns shall be characterized by vertical proportions with horizontally oriented rectangular forms prohibited.

(3)    The use of reflective or mirrored windows is prohibited.

(4)    Tenant specific motifs shall be prohibited. As an alternative, signs may be used to identify a specific tenant.

(5)    Standardized corporate or franchised style in the design of new buildings shall be prohibited.

(6)    Accessory structures shall be designed of the same building materials, roof forms, and color as primary structures that conform to these design standards.

(7)    Accessory structures shall be designed to be architecturally comparable with the primary structure when the primary structure conforms to these design standards. Roof forms, building materials, and color shall be comparable to the primary structure.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Avoid unusual roof forms (domed, mansard, curvilinear, etc.) on all structures.

(2)    Multi-paned windows, or the appearance of multi-pained windows, such as one over one, two over two, or four over four patterns is encouraged.

(3)    The area of first story windows on street front elevations should be at least twice the area of second story windows along the same side of the building.

(4)    Retention and conservation of historic structures is encouraged.

(5)    Utilize building materials that simulate traditional building materials.

2.    Design Objective – Building Mass. The apparent scale of new commercial and civic developments should be reduced throughout the rural area. Within Rural Neighborhood Centers, design new buildings at a scale that is compatible with the size and character of the historical buildings in these centers.

a.    Standards.

(1)    The use of long blank walls is prohibited. The maximum allowable length of an uninterrupted building elevation is 50 feet. Visual interruptions to the planes of exterior walls shall be achieved through a combination of the following methods:

(a)    Modulating building facades at depth of least 4 feet and a width of at least 8 feet.

(b)    Prominent facades shall have no wall plane wider then 2.5 times the height of the wall plane.

(c)    Provide a covered porch at the building entrances.

(2)    Roof lines shall be interrupted every 50 feet with gable, hip, or dormer roof forms or a vertical shift of at least 5 feet.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Avoid long, low wall planes

(2)    Provide visual shifts in walls and roof surfaces.

3.    Design Objective – Pedestrian Oriented Features. Design buildings and developments that are intended for use by the general public with pedestrian oriented features such as pedestrian walkways and outdoor gathering places.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Commercial businesses that sell general merchandise or food and civic uses that are oriented toward pedestrian traffic such as a neighborhood post office shall provide an outdoor gathering place such as a courtyard, plaza or covered area with seating.

(2)    Outdoor gathering places shall be accessible to the pedestrian.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Locate outdoor gathering places to maximize sun exposure (typically a south or west exposure), and in locations where soils have good infiltration.

C.    Color and Material Design.

1.    Design Objective – Color. Utilize natural colors that are prevalent in the rural area of the Gig Harbor Peninsula and are representative of a rural, forestry, agricultural or maritime theme. Avoid bold or bright primary colors

a.    Standards.

(1)    Facade colors shall not be used to identify specific tenants as typified by national corporate fast food restaurants and gasoline stations.

(2)    Earth tone colors shall be used for masonry building materials.

(3)    Typically, no more than three colors should be used on one building, however, additional trim colors may be considered if they are a close shade of one of the other three colors.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    The use of natural wood is encouraged over paint.

(2)    Major architectural trim or details should complement the main building's base color. Color is normally applied to major architectural trim and details such as window trim, corner siding trim, doors and door frames, knee bracing, and columns.

(3)    Minor architectural details should be highlighted with minor accent color that complements base and major trim color. Minor accent color is normally applied to window sash, doors, storefront frames and small architectural elements.

(4)    Murals may be used on building facades and are encouraged to reflect the history or natural landscape of the Gig Harbor Peninsula.

(5)    Tinting may be used as an accessory element to a permitted window treatment.

(7)    The base color of the main building or a complementary major accent color should be used for metal roofs.

(8)    The use of bold or primary colors for the main body of buildings should be avoided.

2.    Design Objective – Exterior Building Materials. Utilize natural materials such as stone, wood, heavy timbers, rough cut lumber or brick as exterior building materials.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Wood, shake, stone, brick, cedar shingle, or timber materials shall be used for facade treatment.

(2)    Raised seam metal, shake, shingle, unglazed tile or composition roofing shall be used for roof materials. Roof materials that are uncharacteristic of the area such as Spanish red clay, Oriental tile, or stucco are prohibited.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Encourage the use of native stone or brick as an accent.

(2)    Building materials used for site features such as fences, and screen walls should complement a primary on-site structure that conforms to these design standards.

(3)    Utilize exterior building materials that simulate natural building materials.

D.    Landscaping and Planting Design.

1.    Design Objective – Native Vegetation Screening and Perimeter Buffers. The retention of native vegetation and significant trees is necessary to preserve and enhance the visual appearance of the Gig Harbor Peninsula throughout the rural area. Retaining native vegetation on a development site also supports various environmental systems and provides a better transition between permitted land uses. The retention or replanting of native vegetation is required for all projects in the rural area. The following standards are intended to supplement the Tree Conservation and Landscape Standards in PCC 18J.15.030 and 18J.15.040.

a.    Standards.

(1)    Native vegetative screening shall be retained between rural development and Highway 16. The depth of screening buffers shall be determined by evaluating the quality and quantity of natural vegetation that is available on the site together with intensity of the proposed use. In no case shall the screen buffer be less than 50 feet wide. Supplemental plantings shall be provided when existing native plantings do not provide a complete visual screen.

(2)    The depth of native vegetation screening buffers shall be a minimum of 35 feet wide in a Rural 10 (R-10) and Rural 5 (R5) zone.

(3)    The depth of native vegetation screening buffers shall be a minimum of 50 feet wide in a Rural Sensitive Resource (RSR) zone.

(4)    The native vegetation screening requirements in this Section must provide a dense screen. Where existing vegetation does not provide adequate screening, additional native plantings may be required. The vegetative screen may only be broken at points of vehicular or pedestrian access.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    Setback areas should be retained in native vegetation where feasible and supplemented by planted native species where native vegetation is sparse or nonexistent.

(2)    Native vegetation shall be utilized to provide a transition between land uses. Screening varies with the use and density or intensity of the proposed development and shall range from 25 to 70 feet in width on the property that has been proposed for development. The increase in screen width is based on the increase in impacts or incompatibility between uses.

(3)    Preserve as much native vegetation on the site as possible to protect the aesthetic qualities of the Peninsula, to protect aquifers and aquifer recharge areas, provide wildlife habitat, and to prevent detrimental runoff to adjoining properties, streams, and other critical areas more closely mimic the natural hydrologic cycle.

(4)    Native vegetation shall be retained in areas located contiguous to critical areas, open space tracts or other buffer areas creating the potential for corridors.

(5)    Tree retention in clusters is a higher priority than tree retention in lineal strips.

2.    Design Objective – Planting Design. Landscaping design shall incorporate native plant species into their proposal. Drought tolerant plantings are allowable substitutes for native species, provided the majority of plants species used for any landscaping design are native to the Puget Sound basin. The following planting design standards are intended to supplement the Landscape Standards, PCC 18J.15.030 and 18J.15.040.

a.    Standards.

(1)    At least 50 percent of all trees, shrubs, or ground covers shall be native plant species.

(2)    The use of berms or fencing shall not be permitted for perimeter screening requirements in the R10, RSR zones.

(3)    Planting design standards are judged, as the plantings will exist five years after the development is completed.

b.    Guidelines.

(1)    The use of sodded or seeded lawn should be avoided in civic, utility, commercial and industrial projects in the rural area except where necessary for recreation or outdoor gathering places.

(2)    Project designs should emphasize the preservation and enhancement of existing native vegetation as a higher priority than supplemental landscaping.

(Ord. 2018-68s § 6 (part), 2018; Ord. 2017-28s § 8 (part), 2017; Ord. 2016-33 § 1 (part), 2016; Ord. 2015-86 § 1 (part), 2015; Ord. 2015-40 § 8 (part), 2015; Ord. 2012-2s § 8 (part), 2012; Ord. 2010-70s § 15 (part), 2010; Ord. 2009-98s § 7 (part), 2010; Ord. 2004-58s § 7 (part), 2004; Ord. 2004-52s § 5 (part), 2004; Ord. 2003-40s2 § 3 (part), 2003; Ord. 2002-113s § 4 (part), 2002)