Chapter 18.260
PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS

Sections:

18.260.010    Purpose.

18.260.020    Review authority.

18.260.030    Uses permitted.

18.260.040    Size of planned residential development.

18.260.050    Modification of development standards.

18.260.060    PRD development standards.

18.260.070    Planned residential development site design criteria.

18.260.080    Residential types in residential low (RL) zoning district.

18.260.090    Open space requirements.

18.260.100    Amenities required.

18.260.110    Residential density incentives.

18.260.120    Street standard alternatives.

18.260.130    Submittal requirements.

18.260.140    Findings.

18.260.150    Final approval.

18.260.160    Appeal.

18.260.170    Extension of time.

18.260.010 Purpose.

The purpose of this chapter is to encourage creative and superior site design in residential zones which also promotes the preservation of open space in such development by permitting greater flexibility in zoning requirements than is permitted by other chapters of this title, while ensuring compliance with the goals and policies of the Poulsbo comprehensive plan. Furthermore, it is the purpose of this chapter:

A.    To implement the city’s comprehensive plan and the state of Washington’s Growth Management Act, Chapter 36.70A RCW.

B.    To allow flexibility in lot size and design for residential development, in order to enable development to attempt to achieve the zoned density.

C.    To allow flexibility in residential design in order to result in creative site planning and superior residential and subdivision developments than generally found in conventional developments and subdivision regulations.

D.    To preserve protected critical areas and their buffers as defined in the Poulsbo critical areas ordinance.

E.    To provide open space, recreational opportunities and other benefit features for enjoyment of future occupants.

F.    To encourage preservation of cultural, scenic or natural features.

G.    To encourage a diversity of housing units and types within and between neighborhoods.

H.    To provide for maximizing efficiency of street layout, utility networks, and other public improvements.

I.    To preserve and retain areas of trees or groupings of trees. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.010)

18.260.020 Review authority.

All planned residential development permits shall be processed as Type III applications according to the provisions of Title 19. The review authority shall have the authority to approve, approve with conditions, disapprove, or revoke planned residential developments, subject to the provisions of this chapter. All changes and/or expansions to existing planned residential developments prior to the effective date of the ordinance codified in this title shall conform to all regulations pertaining to planned residential developments. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.020)

18.260.030 Uses permitted.

Any use consistent with the comprehensive plan and uses permitted in the underlying zoning designation will be permitted in planned residential developments in accordance with the approved development plan. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.030)

18.260.040 Size of planned residential development.

Except as set forth below, a tract of land to be developed as a planned residential development shall have a minimum of five acres. However, a smaller site size may be allowed if the review authority makes specific findings to support the conclusion that a planned residential development is in the public interest because one or more of the following conditions apply:

A.    The site contains critical areas and their protected buffers, as defined and set forth by the city’s critical areas ordinance.

B.    A physical and/or topographic feature of importance identified through a site analysis (such as but not limited to rock croppings, significant stands of trees, and areas of cultural resources) exists on the site or in the neighborhood, which can be conserved and still leave the applicant adequate land for use by the planned residential development.

C.    The property or its neighborhood has a historical character of importance to the community that will be protected by use of a planned residential development.

D.    The property is adjacent to or across the street from property which has been developed or redeveloped under a planned residential development, and a planned residential development will contribute to or supplement the existing amenities, open space and values of the neighboring planned residential development.

E.    The planned residential development design contains unique or innovative design concepts that could not be achieved without a planned residential development.

F.    The proposed planned residential development is located in the RM or RH zoning district, or is adjacent to RM, RH, C or LI zoning district(s) on at least two sides of the subject site. Further, adequate perimeter landscaping, buffering or other compatibility provisions must be able to be provided through project design.

G.    The proposed planned residential development provides an infill opportunity in the vicinity in which it is located.

H.    A cottage housing development as stand-alone when at least twelve cottages are proposed or as part of a larger development proposal. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.040)

18.260.050 Modification of development standards.

The city’s standard development regulations may be modified for a PRD as set forth in Table 18.260.050 below; all other development standards shall be as set forth in the underlying zoning district requirements.

Table 18.260.050 Lot Requirements for PRD

Development Standard

RL zoning district

(including any method of subdivision for single-family detached)

RM/RH zoning district + attached units in RL district

No subdivision proposed—commonly held ownership (condominium) for all R zones

Density

Per underlying zoning district and as allowed as bonus units in Section 18.260.110.

Minimum Lot Area

3,750 square feet

3,000 square feet for detached single-family cottages.

No minimum lot area for attached units.

3,000 square feet for detached units.

5 acres or as a component of a PRD w/subdivision

Minimum Lot Width

30'

20'

n/a

Minimum Lot Depth

70'

None

n/a

Maximum Building Lot Coverage

50%

60%

n/a

Front Yard Setback*

10'

10'

n/a

Rear Yard Setback*

5'

5'

n/a

Side Yard Setback*

5'

5'

n/a

Street Corner Yard Setback* (corner lots at intersections(s) of public streets/rights of way)

10'

or greater if necessary for sight distance as determined by the city engineer

10'

or greater if necessary for sight distance as determined by the city engineer

n/a

Perimeter Setback

n/a

n/a

20' and as may be required by Section 18.260.070

Setback between Structures*

n/a

n/a

10'

Maximum Overall Building Lot Coverage

n/a

n/a

60%

*    Additional building setback may be required per adopted International Building Code.

(Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.050)

18.260.060 PRD development standards.

A.    Lot Sizes. When a PRD subdivision has an average lot size of four thousand square feet or less, a variety of lot sizes are desired to provide for market variety, clustering and creativity. The PRD design shall include at least three different lot size ranges distributed throughout the PRD. The applicant must demonstrate to the review authority how this requirement has been met through the required written narrative.

B.    Alleys. If a unit abuts an alley, the garage shall take access from the alley whenever possible. When parking is accessed from the rear of the lot, garages must be separated at least twenty-five feet from garage face to garage face in order to provide safe vehicle backout room.

C.    Privacy. Dwellings on lots without direct frontage on a public street should be situated to respect the privacy of abutting homes and to create usable private yard space for the dwelling(s). The review authority shall have the ability/discretion during the review process to establish alternate setbacks in order to accomplish this objective.

D.    Project Design. Site design for the entire project (including open space areas, recreational amenities, any attached units and/or condominium areas, and building architectural renderings) shall be submitted in support of the proposed PRD. The renderings shall include possible footprint locations and housing elevations or generally identified architectural style. Open space areas and preliminary location of active recreational amenities, trails, conceptual landscaping and other amenities shall also be identified.

E.    Individual Identity. Home individuality shall be achieved through the following methods:

1.    When lots front on a public street, the house shall have windows and doors that face the street. Houses shall have a distinct entry feature such as a porch or weather-covered entryway.

2.    When lots front on a public street, garage doors must not be the dominant feature of the building facade. At least two of the following design elements shall be provided on home designs that have the garage door projecting forward from the first level living space:

a.    Windows in gables or dormers above the garage doors.

b.    Covered porches that emphasize the front entry.

c.    Trellis in front of garage.

d.    Additional front yard landscaping.

e.    Variety of architectural elements incorporated into the front building facade design, such as knee braces, varied column types, window boxes, corbels, and raised panel garage doors with windows.

The same building plans cannot be utilized on consecutive lots. “Flip-flopping” of plans does not satisfy this requirement and is not permitted on immediately adjacent lots.

3.    Varied architectural design features (such as roof line articulation, color and materials) and home placements shall be utilized to avoid appearance of a long row of identical homes.

4.    At building permit application submittal, the planning director will review submitted building permits for compliance with this section, as well as substantial compliance with the conceptual architectural renderings required in subsection D of this section, Project Design.

5.    The planning director has the ability to modify any of the standards within this subsection, if the subject site topography precludes the compliance with any of the stated standards.

F.    Landscaping. Landscaping in a minimum ten-foot-wide strip shall be provided on site and visible along all public street frontage classified as a neighborhood collector. The landscaping can be provided through a landscape easement on lots. If the landscaping is provided in an open space tract and maintained by a homeowners’ association, it may contribute to the project’s open space requirement. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.060)

18.260.070 Planned residential development site design criteria.

A.    When a PRD is proposed adjacent to an existing single-family residential zone which has been developed utilizing traditional city subdivision development standards and lot sizes (seven thousand five hundred square feet or larger), the PRD shall be designed and developed so as to be consistent with the single-family residential environment at its adjacent perimeter. The review authority may require the PRD to make provisions such as matching lot sizes, lot widths or house height and scale (or other provisions as deemed appropriate) for those lots that are located adjacent to the existing subdivision. Further, any proposed attached units shall be clustered and located away from the established single-family subdivision.

B.    When a PRD is proposed adjacent to a single-family residential zone (developed or un/underdeveloped), the perimeter of the PRD shall be subject to screening provisions (this is in addition to subsection A of this section as applicable). The review authority may require the PRD to make such provisions as providing a six-foot sight-obscuring fence or a minimum twenty-five-foot vegetated buffer (designated as an open space tract), or other provisions as deemed appropriate to provide adequate screening.

C.    Undeveloped parcels that are cleared within five years prior to the filing of a PRD application, and where no substantial stands of existing trees or natural features exist, shall not qualify for a PRD unless the proposed design warrants consideration under the PRD provisions, or significant landscaping is proposed to mitigate the loss of natural vegetation. This determination will be made by the planning director during the pre-application process. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.070)

18.260.080 Residential types in residential low (RL) zoning district.

Attached dwellings, not to exceed fourplexes, may be allowed in the RL zone through a PRD if the proposal meets the following criteria:

A.    The overall site density does not exceed the zoning district maximum or the allowable density bonus.

B.    The attached units must be clustered and located within the interior of the project, along street frontages, or other areas which are appropriate and compatible with adjacent residential zones.

C.    The attached units must be single-family in appearance.

D.    Architectural renderings of the attached units must be submitted with the application. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.080)

18.260.090 Open space requirements.

Common open space and other appropriate beneficial features are required for all planned residential developments.

A.    Open space is intended to benefit the occupants of the planned residential development and shall be improved with recreational amenities.

B.    The open space design shall be appropriate to the size, natural features and topography of the subject site. The design shall include open space that is accessible for all residents through pedestrian connections. Further, the open space area(s) shall be visible to at least half of the home sites. This may require multiple open space areas.

C.    Open space is required based on the average lot size in the proposed development. The greater the deviation from the RL standard lot size, the greater the open space requirement. This relationship is intended to mitigate the effects of smaller lot sizes including reduced recreation space on private lots, reduced setbacks between structures and overall intensity of the development. The required open space is a percentage of the gross project area.

D.    The amount of open space required is set forth in Table 18.260.090.A. The amount of open space required is based upon a range of proposed average lot sizes. The determination of average lot size shall be the sum of all individual lot square footage, divided by the total number of proposed lots.

Table 18.260.090.A—Amount of Open Space Required for PRD Subdivisions 

Proposed Average Lot Size

Required Amount of Open Space (of gross project area)

4,499 or smaller

20%

4,500—5,499

15%

5,500—6,499

10%

6,500—7,499

5%

E.    For PRDs where no individual lots are proposed (i.e., commonly held ownership/condominium), the amount of open space required is tied to the proposed intensity of the PRD, so that as a project increases the number of units, the open space amount also increases in order to compensate for the loss of private yards and privacy, as well as providing for light, air, space, and recreational amenities throughout the PRD design. The amount of open space required shall be based upon the number of units as prescribed below:

Table 18.260.090.B—Amount of Open Space Required for Commonly Held Ownership (Condominium) Development 

Number of Units

Required Amount of Open Space (of gross project area)

1—40 units

5%

41—80 units

10%

81—110 units

15%

111 or greater units

20%

F.    For projects with a combination of individual lots and units on commonly held ownership, total amount of open space required is cumulative. The amount of open space required shall be calculated using Tables 18.260.090.A and 18.260.090.B percentage requirements for each respective area (i.e., area(s) of common ownership tract percentage and remainder of site percentage). Each area’s acreage requirement shall then be combined for the project’s total open space requirement.

G.    Critical area protection areas and required buffers as defined and required by the city’s adopted critical areas ordinance can contribute to the above-required open space amount.

1.    If less than twenty-five percent of the subject site contains protected critical areas and required buffers, then the critical area and protected buffer area may contribute up to forty percent of the project’s required open space amount, credited on a square-foot-by-square-foot basis.

2.    If twenty-five percent to forty percent of the subject site contains protected critical areas and required buffers, then the critical area and protected buffer area may contribute up to fifty percent of the project’s required open space amount, credited on a square-foot-by-square-foot basis.

3.    If forty-one percent or greater of the subject site contains protected critical areas and required buffers, then the critical area and protected buffer area may contribute up to sixty percent of the project’s required open space amount, credited on a square-foot-by-square-foot basis.

H.    Stormwater management facilities may contribute to a project’s required open space amount under the following circumstances:

1.    For projects that utilize low impact development (LID) techniques for their stormwater management, the planning director may consider on a case-by-case basis, with demonstration that the LID technique will beneficially contribute to a project’s open space and/or landscaping and can be maintained and operated as passive open space, allowing an area of the LID technique to contribute towards the project’s passive open space requirement.

2.    For projects that utilize stormwater vaults, the top of the vault may be proposed to also serve as an active recreational amenity (i.e., sport court), if grade and landscaping provide for a usable area. The area proposed to serve as the active amenity can therefore contribute toward the open space requirement.

I.    Open space areas not proposed to be improved with recreational amenities or purposes shall remain as natural vegetation or landscaped with groundcover, shrubs and trees consistent with the type and location of open space. Removal of natural vegetation in preserved and approved open space shall only be permitted for public safety reasons and upon review and approval of the planning director and city arborist. Enhancement of critical area buffer vegetation shall be as allowed and prescribed in Chapter 16.20, Critical Areas. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.090)

18.260.100 Amenities required.

A.    Both passive and active recreational amenities (owned and maintained by the homeowners) are required to be provided for all PRDs, and shall be located within the required open space areas.

B.    Table 18.260.100 shall provide guidance on the type of passive and active amenities in proposed PRDs. At a minimum, the following shall be provided:

1.    PRDs with less than fifty-one units shall provide at least two Group 1 amenities.

2.    PRDs with fifty-one to eighty units shall provide one Group 1 amenity and one Group 2 amenity.

3.    PRDs with eighty-one to one hundred ten units shall provide two Group 1 amenities and two Group 2 amenities.

4.    PRDs with one hundred eleven units or more shall provide three Group 1 amenities and two Group 2 amenities.

Table 18.260.100—Types of Passive and Active Recreational Amenities 

Passive

Active

Group 1 Amenities

Group 1 Amenities

Picnic areas with improved seating area and at least 2 picnic tables, in conjunction with an open play area

Multipurpose sport court or other type of sport court (pickleball, shuffleboard, etc.)

Passive seating areas connected by walking path in a length proportionate to the size of the project

Basketball court (minimum 1/2 court)

Walking path in a length proportionate to the size of the project

Tennis court (minimum 1 standard size)

Arboretum/gardens with interpretive trail

Playground (minimum 0.25 acre) with large toy

Any other comparable passive recreation use as approved by the review authority

Any other comparable active recreation use as approved by the review authority

Group 2 Amenities

Group 2 Amenities

Pond/fountain/waterfall with seating for no less than 10 persons

Outdoor exercise circuit with a trail in a length proportionate to the size of the project

Community gardens with improved soils, fencing and sheds

Clubhouse including gathering space for intended residents and kitchen facilities

Gazebo connected to gardens or walking paths in a length proportionate to the size of the project

Large picnic area with covered shelter and multifamily barbecue

Nature interpretative areas/viewing areas with trail and educational signage

Swimming pool and spa

Any other comparable passive recreation use as approved by the review authority

Any other comparable active recreation use as approved by the review authority

C.    The location of the recreational amenities shall be distributed throughout the PRD for use by all residents unless clustering related amenities will result in recreational opportunities which contribute to the project’s overall recreational plan and provisions (i.e., a playfield located adjacent to a clubhouse, or walking paths and gazebo in conjunction with viewing areas).

D.    All PRD amenity design shall take into consideration and provide, when feasible, pedestrian linkages and connectivity between adjacent properties consistent with the city’s Urban Paths of Poulsbo map. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.100)

18.260.110 Residential density incentives.

The applicant may request an increase in the density permitted by the underlying zoning district in exchange for public benefits through land dedications and facility improvements to help achieve comprehensive plan goals of creation of quality neighborhoods, affordable housing, public facility acquisition and improvement, low impact development techniques, environmentally responsible design, and pedestrian and walkability improvements.

A.    The density incentive is expressed as additional bonus dwelling units earned per amount of public benefit provided. When a range is specified, the additional bonus dwelling units will be determined by the planning director during project review, based upon the criteria established in Table 18.260.110 for those public benefits.

B.    Bonus dwelling units may be earned through any combination from Table 18.260.110; however, bonus units cannot exceed twenty-five percent increase above maximum density allowed in the underlying zoning district.

C.    When bonus dwelling units are proposed, a PRD cannot also include accessory dwelling units within the proposed project.

Table 18.260.110—Public Benefit Incentives/Residential Density Bonus 

Benefit

Density Incentive

Affordable Housing

As set forth in Section 18.70.070(B)

Public Facilities*

(public buildings/facilities, trails, parks, and street right-of-way)

 

Dedications:

Dedication of land: for public buildings and facilities (such as schools, utilities); public park (consistent with city’s park capital facility plan); public trails (consistent with Urban Paths of Poulsbo plan and map); or street right-of-way (in addition to required by project). Off-site dedications may be considered when acquired by the applicant and dedicated to the city.

 

5—12% increase above maximum density allowed in underlying zoning district. Range is dependent upon priority and amount of usable acres dedicated.

Improvements:

Improvement to city or other agency standards of public buildings and facilities; public parks; public trails and street right-of-way.

 

5—12% increase above maximum density allowed in underlying zoning district. Range is dependent upon priority, amount and cost of facility improvement.

Inclusion of a number of visible Low Impact Development (LID) measures in project design and stormwater facility construction.

5% increase above maximum density allowed in underlying zoning district.

Project Design

 

a. Preservation of substantial vegetation above the required open space amounts. No increase in permitted density shall be permitted for sites that have been cleared of evergreen trees and native understory within 5 years prior to the date of application. (Density increases granted which were based upon preservation of existing trees shall be forfeited if such trees are removed between time of preliminary and final approval, and issuance of building permits.)

a. 7% increase above maximum density allowed in underlying zoning district.

b. Retention or creation of a perimeter buffer minimum of 50' in width, composed of existing trees and vegetation, additional plantings, and/or installation of fencing or landscaping.

b. 1 bonus unit per 250 lineal feet of perimeter buffer retained, enhanced or created.

c. Enhancement of existing native vegetation, proposed through a landscape plan, and approved by the planning director and city arborist.

c. 5% increase above maximum density allowed in underlying zoning district.

Residential Home Design

 

a. Inclusion in home design of at least three multi-generational or fully accessible elements, including but not limited to having one entrance without a step(s); master bedroom on main floor; 33" doors into bathroom; or other home design elements that can be demonstrated to easily convert into being accessible under the provisions of ADA.

a. 5% increase above maximum density allowed in the underlying zoning district when multi-generational elements (as listed in this section) are incorporated into home design; 10% increase above maximum density allowed when home design is fully functional under ADA provisions. Minimum 7% of the pre-density bonus units must be provided to utilize the density.

b. Home design in which the dwelling units are constructed with LEED certification or other equivalent standard.

b. 10% increase above maximum density allowed in underlying zoning district when minimum 7% of the pre-density bonus units are designed with LEED certification or other equivalent standard.

Pedestrian Connections and Walkability*

 

a. Construction of an identified pedestrian/bicycle deficiency** (per city of Poulsbo capital improvement plan). Improvements may consist of paved shoulder, sidewalk or detached path or walkway depending on adjoining conditions.

a. 5—10% increase above maximum density allowed in underlying zoning district. Range dependent on priority, length and cost of improvement.

b. Covered transit shelter** with associated landscaping and other pedestrian amenities.

b. 1—2 bonus units dependent on cost, area, quantity and type of landscaping and other amenities provided.

*    Dedication of land and construction of improvements under this section is voluntary by the developer and is undertaken for the purpose of achieving a density incentive. For that reason, developers who elect to dedicate land or construct improvements under this section shall not be entitled to credit against park or transportation impact fees for the value of such land or improvements.

**    In addition to what may be required as part of project review and approval.

(Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.110)

18.260.120 Street standard alternatives.

The city’s street standards, as set forth in the city’s adopted Developer’s Guide, Section 2, may be modified as provided below:

A.    On-street parking as required in local access streets table may be clustered at a ratio of one-half parking space per unit. The clustered parking spaces shall be located in parking bays adjacent to a public street or within commonly owned areas. The parking bays shall be sized to appropriate parking stall sizes. The parking bays shall be owned and maintained by the project’s homeowners’ association.

B.    Private roads may serve up to nine single-family lots. Private roads must be a minimum of sixteen feet wide for two-way traffic and ten feet wide for one-way traffic (or as otherwise required by the fire department). Additional roadway width may be required if determined necessary for safe vehicle movement, to accommodate grading or other considerations as determined by the city engineer.

1.    Private roads shall be placed in a commonly owned tract. The tract will be owned and maintained by the project’s homeowners’ association. Covenants, conditions and restrictions (CCRs) and sales contracts for lots abutting private roads must indicate that the private roads are owned and maintained by the project’s homeowners’ association.

2.    Private roads must gain access from public streets constructed to city standards.

3.    If fire department access is to be met by a private road, the proposed private road must meet fire department design standards.

4.    A sidewalk on one side of the private road built to city construction standards is required.

5.    Private roads shall be paved full-width for their entire length. Asphalt and subgrade thickness must meet city construction standards.

6.    A ten-foot utility easement may be required on the outside of the private road.

7.    Stormwater collection shall meet city standards. However, the city engineer may allow modifications such as an inverted crown or a thickened asphalt edge rather than curb; provided, that stormwater treatment will be adequate and safety will not be compromised. A geotechnical analysis of the proposed private road may be required at the discretion of the review engineer.

8.    No on-street parking is allowed on private roads unless provided in eight-foot-wide bulb-outs or in parking bays sized to appropriate parking stall sizes. CCRs and sales contracts for lots abutting private streets must indicate no on-street parking is allowed if provisions for parking are not made.

C.    Alleys are only permitted as secondary access in planned residential developments. Alleys will be considered private roads and must meet the requirements in subsection B of this section with the following exceptions: alleys may provide secondary access for up to fifteen units, and a sidewalk on one side will not be required.

D.    Sidewalks separated from public streets or private roads may be required by the city engineer upon review of the project lot widths and proposed driveway locations.

E.    These specific modifications to the city’s Developer’s Guide may be utilized in PRD site design, and do not require prior city council approval in order for the application to proceed to the review authority. The PRD application remains subject to the Type III review process. However, any other modifications to the street standards that may be proposed are subject to the process set forth in the city’s Developer’s Guide, Section 2. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.120)

18.260.130 Submittal requirements.

All applications shall be accompanied with complete site plans and subdivision plans if creating lots, drawn to one inch to forty feet scale and produced in such a way as to clearly indicate compliance with all applicable requirements, and shall include the following. At least one sheet shall show the proposed project in its entirety (drawn at its appropriate scale).

A.    A vicinity map showing the location of the property and surrounding properties. A copy of assessor’s quarter section map may be used to identify the site.

B.    Dimensions and orientation of the parcel.

C.    Location of existing natural features and structures, including as appropriate: (1) significant stands of trees and trees to be retained (species must be identified; dominant species for stands); (2) topography including identification of geologic hazard areas; (3) any known cultural assets; (4) streams, wetlands and other critical areas or environmental features; (5) aerial photography, if available, of subject site; (6) site and soils analysis for suitability of appropriate low impact development stormwater management facilities; and (7) identification of any adjacent off-site natural features which may have an impact on the subject site, as well as any existing or proposed open space, trail linkages or road connections.

D.    Location of proposed lots, building footprints, and open space numbered as open space tracts.

E.    Location of walls and fences, indication of their height and construction materials.

F.    Elevation of the site at two-foot contour intervals for grades zero to ten percent and at five-foot contour intervals for grades more than ten percent.

G.    Streets adjacent to, surrounding or intended to serve the property; curb cuts and internal pedestrian and vehicular traffic circulation routes.

H.    Existing and proposed exterior lighting.

I.    Landscape plan depicting the location and configuration of overall site landscaping, including protected critical areas.

J.    Location and layout of off-street parking, on-street parking, and site circulation.

K.    Preliminary utility plan depicting the location of utility and drainage facilities and related tracts or easements.

L.    Site design for the entire project, including open space areas, pedestrian walkways and connections, recreational amenity details, outdoor features, building footprints and preliminary building elevations and/or general proposed architectural style.

M.    Architectural elevations/renderings for any proposed attached unit structures.

N.    Environmental checklist or, if required, environmental impact statement.

O.    Preliminary draft of restrictive covenants.

P.    Other architectural or engineering data which may be necessary to determine compliance with applicable regulations including any appropriate site design guidelines.

Q.    Other information may be required as identified at the pre-application conference and/or application form.

R.    A written statement explaining how the proposed PRD meets the purpose and findings of this chapter. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.130)

18.260.140 Findings.

In approving a planned residential development, the review authority must make the following findings:

A.    The proposal, through its design and submitted supporting documents, has clearly demonstrated it meets the stated purposes of this chapter.

B.    The proposal complies with all of the applicable provisions of this title, except those provisions from which deviation has been allowed under this chapter.

C.    The proposal provides overall site design features through its conceptual architectural renderings for the entire project, and has included open space areas, pedestrian walkways and connections, recreational amenities, and outdoor features.

D.    The proposal would not impair the integrity and character of the zoning district in which it is to be located.

E.    The site is physically suited for the type and intensity of land use being proposed.

F.    The proposal would be compatible with existing and future land uses within the general area in which the proposal is to be located by providing screening or buffering between parcels and providing consistency between any existing single-family subdivisions and the proposal.

G.    The proposal would preserve natural features and critical areas and would preserve and incorporate existing significant stands of trees within the project design as much as possible.

H.    There are adequate provisions for water, sanitary sewer, and public utilities (electric, gas, phone) and services to ensure that the proposal would not be detrimental to public health and safety.

I.    There will be adequate provisions for public access to serve the subject proposal, as well as providing for neighborhood connectivity as appropriate and as required by the city.

J.    The proposal is consistent with the comprehensive plan and the city’s adopted development standards.

K.    There will not be significant unmitigated harmful effects upon environmental quality and natural resources.

L.    The proposed location, size and design of the proposal would not be detrimental to the public interests, health, safety or welfare of the city. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.140)

18.260.150 Final approval.

A.    Within seven years following the approval of the planned residential development, the applicant shall file with the city engineer a final plat or, if no subdivision is occurring, a final site development plan for review by the review authority. If the review authority finds that the final plat or final site development plan is consistent with the PRD as approved, and that all conditions of the development approval have been satisfied, the review authority shall approve the final plat or final site development plan. The review authority may approve the final plat or final site development plan in phases.

B.    If the review authority finds evidence of a significant deviation from the original approved PRD, the review authority shall advise the applicant to submit an application for amendment of the preliminary plan. An amendment shall be considered in the same manner as an original application.

C.    Upon request by the applicant and for demonstrated appropriate reasons, the review authority may approve, at its discretion, adequate financial guarantees of compliance with the final plat or final development plan. Such guarantee may be a performance bond or other form of security in an amount sufficient to assure compliance, and may provide that such security be reduced as stages of construction are completed. Alternatively, or in addition to the security, conditions may be imposed requiring other adequate assurances that the structures and improvements will be completed, subject to the review and approval as to form by the city attorney; or that the city may, in the event of the applicant’s failure to comply, take steps necessary to assure compliance, including performing the construction or maintenance itself, and levying a lien for all costs thereof against the property.

D.    A final draft of covenants, conditions and restrictions (CCRs) shall include provisions that the project’s homeowners’ association will own, maintain and enforce all open space tracts, perimeter buffers, fences, recreational amenities, private roads, parking bays, and all other applicable project condition(s) regarding ownership, maintenance and enforcement of all commonly owned elements. Further, the face of the final plat or final development plan shall include statement(s) that the project’s homeowners’ association will own, maintain and enforce all open space tracts, perimeter buffers, fences, recreational amenities, private roads, parking bays, and all other commonly owned elements. The city will not join the homeowners’ association as enforcers of the project’s CCRs.

E.    A final draft of the project’s CCRs and face of the final plat or final development plan shall include the following statement:

Open space areas not proposed to be improved with recreational amenities or purposes shall remain as natural vegetation or appropriately landscaped. Removal of preserved and approved open space in natural vegetation shall only be permitted for public safety reasons and upon review and approval of the Planning Director and City Arborist. Enhancement of critical area buffer vegetation shall be as allowed and prescribed in PMC 16.20, Critical Areas.

(Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.150)

18.260.160 Appeal.

The applicant or any interested person may appeal the decision of the review authority as set forth in Title 19, Project Permit Application Procedures. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013: Ord. 2007-25 § 1 (part), 2007. Formerly 18.80.160)

18.260.170 Extension of time.

A.    During City Review of PRD Application.

1.    A technically complete application shall be deemed null and void if the applicant fails to submit additional information within one hundred eighty days of the planning director or hearing examiner’s written request; further, a technically complete application shall be deemed null and void if the application has been on hold a combined total of one hundred eighty days. If the additional information has not been submitted and accepted by the city, the application will be closed and a new application will be required to be submitted.

2.    A technically complete application which has been on hold for a total of one hundred eighty days may request one one-hundred-eighty-day extension. The extension shall be granted if all of the following are met:

a.    The applicant requests such an extension in writing no less than thirty days prior to the expiration of the initial one-hundred-eighty-day time period. Verbal requests will not be accepted.

b.    The director or hearing examiner finds that unusual circumstances beyond the applicant’s control or other good cause have prevented them from providing the additional information within the initial one-hundred-eighty-day time period.

c.    The applicant demonstrates the likelihood that the requested information will be provided to the city within the additional one-hundred-eighty-day time period.

d.    The planning director shall not grant more than one extension.

If at the end of the one-hundred-eighty-day extension, the additional information has not been submitted and accepted by the city, the application will be closed and a new application will be required to be submitted.

B.    After City Permit Approval. Upon written request by the property owner filed no less than thirty days prior to the date of permit expiration, the planning director may grant an extension of time up to but not exceeding one year. Any extensions of time shall be based upon finding:

1.    The PRD permit is compliant with all applicable development codes at the time of the extension request.

2.    There has been no material change of circumstances applicable to the property since project permit approval.

3.    The applicant must provide good cause for the delay, and demonstrate likelihood that the permit will be commenced within the additional year.

4.    The planning director shall not grant more than one extension. (Ord. 2013-04 § 2 (Exh. A (part)), 2013)