Chapter 4
TRANSPORTATION

Chapter 4

4A    GENERAL STANDARDS

4A.010    General

4B    STREETS

4B.010    General

4B.020    Design Standards

4B.030    Functional Classification

4B.035    Commercial Collectors

4B.040    Naming

4B.050    Signing and Striping

4B.060    Right-of-Way

4B.070    Private Streets

4B.080    Streetside (Frontage) Improvements

4B.085    StreetSide (Frontage) Improvements West Bay Drive

4B.090    Streetside (Frontage) Improvements Boulevard Road (Standard Drawing 4-2G8)

4B.095    Streetside (Frontage) Improvements East Downtown

4B.110    Half Street

4B.120    Medians

4B.130    Intersections

4B.140    Driveways

4B.150    Sight Obstructions at Intersections

4B.160    Surfacing Requirements

4B.170    Temporary Street Patching

4B.175    Pavement Restoration

4B.180    Trench Backfill

4B.190    Surveying and Staking

4B.195    Utility Coordination

4B.200    Testing

4B.210    Traffic Calming Devices

4C    SIDEWALKS AND CURBS

4C.020    Design Standards

4C.030    Sidewalks

4C.040    Curb or Curb and Gutter

4C.050    Curb Ramps

4C.060    Staking

4C.070    Parking Bulb-outs

4C.071    Pedestrian Bulb-outs

4D    BIKEWAYS

4D.020    Design Standards

4D.030    Staking and Testing

4E    TRAILS OR SHARED-USE PATHS

4E.010    Design Standards

4E.020    Pathway Illumination

4F    ILLUMINATION

4F.010    General

4F.020    Design Standards

4F.030    Technical Requirements for Streetlight Construction

4F.040    Staking

4F.050    Testing

4G    SIGNALS

4G.010    General

4G.020    Design Standards

4G.030    Induction Loops

4G.040    Staking

4G.050    Testing

4G.060    Checkout Procedures

4H    MISCELLANEOUS STREETSIDE FEATURES

4H.010    General

4H.020    Design Standards

4H.030    Surveying and Staking

4H.040    Testing

4H.050    Survey Monuments

4H.060    Bus Stops and Amenities

4H.070    Mailboxes

4H.080    Guardrails

4H.090    Retaining Walls

4H.100    Street Trees

4H.110    Parking Lots

4H.120    Parking Meters

4I    ACCESS POINTS AND INTERSECTION CRITERIA

4I.010    General

4I.020    Applicability

4I.030    Methods of Measurements

4I.040    Spacing of Access Points, Same Side of Street

4I.050    Alignment of Offset of Cross-Street Access Points

4I.060    Corner Clearance from Intersections

4I.070    Number of Access Points

4I.080    Access Location Based on Street Class

4I.090    Combined or Shared Access

4I.100    Direction of Driveways (One-Way or Two-Way)

4I.110    Adjustment for Street Gradient

4I.120    Drive-Through Windows

4I.130    Monitoring and Enforcement

4I.140    Design of Access Points and Driveways

Appendix 1:        List of Standard Drawings

Appendix 2:        Index of Tables

Appendix 3:        Monument Preservation Documentation Letter

Appendix 4:        Downtown Boundaries

Appendix 5:        Transportation Related Special Provisions

Appendix 6:        Pervious Concrete Sidewalk Construction Standards

4A GENERAL STANDARDS

4A.010 General

The intent of this chapter is to encourage the uniform development of an integrated and accessible public street system that will support present and future multi-modal transportation.

Through the implementation of these standards, streets are built as transportation facilities as well as public spaces, contributing positively to the character of an area. These standards help create an efficient multi-modal transportation system with minimal environmental impact to the community.

These standards balance the safety and mobility of motor vehicles, bicyclists, pedestrians and transit riders. The features in the standards are intended to: maintain safe motor vehicle speeds through narrow street widths and street edge features for friction; provide safe pedestrian crossings through narrow lane widths, crossing islands, and curb bulb-outs; provide inviting space for pedestrians on wide sidewalks with buffers from motor vehicle traffic; provide adequate width, signs and markings for safe on-street bicycle travel, and; create inviting public space through landscaping and other street edge treatments.

This chapter provides minimum development standards supplementing the applicable standards as set forth.

Deviations as defined in Chapter 1 shall be considered by the City Engineer as outlined in Chapter 1, Section 1.050. A request for deviation increasing the 10' travel lane width for Arterial and Major Collector streets shall be based upon the following criteria:

•    High frequency transit route as defined by 15 minute transit service frequency on any given day.

•    High frequency truck traffic where trucks compose 5 percent or more of the total daily traffic.

•    The roadway alignment includes a unique curve of 200 foot radius or less.

•    The geometry of the roadway includes a skewed intersection.

4B STREETS

4B.010 General

Design and construction of City streets shall meet the standards in this and other relevant sections of this Chapter. Table 1 lists all Arterials and Major Collectors, and the number of lanes required for each street section listed. Table 2 summarizes the Street Design Standards and Table 3 summarizes other Street Characteristics to be considered and/or addressed.

4B.020 Design Standards

The design of streets and roads will depend upon their type and usage. The design elements of city streets will conform to City standards as set forth herein, to safely and uniformly accommodate maximum anticipated loading conditions.

The layout of streets will provide for the continuation of existing streets in adjoining subdivisions or of their proper projection when adjoining property is not subdivided.

A.    Alignment. Alignment of major arterials, minor arterials, and collectors will conform as nearly as possible with that shown in the Comprehensive Plan.

B.    Grade. Street grade should conform closely to the natural contour of the land. In some cases a different grade may be required by the City Engineer. The minimum allowable grade will be 0.5 percent. The maximum allowable grade will be 8 to 15 percent, depending upon the street classification.

C.    Width. The pavement and right-of-way width depend upon the street classification. Table 2, Street Design Standards, shows the minimum widths allowed.

Street widths will be measured as shown on Standard Drawings for each street classification.

D.    The General Notes for Street Construction listed on Drawing 3-1 shall be included on any plans dealing with street, sidewalk and/or pathway design as applicable.

E.    Low Impact Development. As part of meeting the 2016 DDECM’s LID-related requirements, bioretention swales may be allowed under certain conditions outlined in the 2016 DDECM. Standard street sections for those street classifications allowing bioretention swales are indicated in the Standard Drawings that have a drawing number ending in “-LID”. Swale details, including planting requirements, can be found in Chapter 5 of the EDDS

4B.030 Functional Classification

City streets are divided into Arterial, Major Collector, Neighborhood Collector, and Local Access street classifications. The City Council has the authority to classify or reclassify all streets, in accordance with regional transportation needs and the functional use each serves. Definitions for each of these street classifications can be found in section 2.020 of these Standards.

4B.035 Commercial Collectors

The Commercial Collector Street standard in Table 2 apply to (1) all streets in the Downtown area (see Appendix 4), as well as commercially-zoned areas of the City that are not Arterials. Commercial Collector Streets shall be constructed or reconstructed to the Commercial Collector street standard, as detailed in Table 2 and Standard Drawings 4-2D, 4-2E, 4-2E-LID1, 4-2E-LID2 and 4-2G10. Commercial Collector streets shall include bike lanes as they apply to Major Collectors and Neighborhood Collectors (refer to Section 4D, Bikeways, for guidance.

Table 1: Street Classification and Number of Lanes 

Region Section

Street Name

From

To

Class

Required Lanes (1)

Street Classification (2)

DT

4th Avenue

Olympic Way

Water Street

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

DT

4th Avenue

Water Street

Chestnut Street

Arterial

2

Existing Arterial

NS

4th Avenue

Chestnut Street

Pacific Avenue

Arterial

3

Existing Arterial

NS

4th Avenue

Pacific Avenue

Phoenix Street

Arterial

5

Existing Arterial

DT

14th Avenue

Capitol Way

I-5

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

DT

Adams Street

State Avenue

8th Street

Arterial

2

Existing Arterial

WS

Black Lake Boulevard

US 101

21st Avenue

Arterial

5

Existing Arterial

WS

Black Lake Boulevard

21st Avenue

South City Limits

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

WS

Black Lake Boulevard

Cooper Point Road

US 101

Arterial

5

Widening of Existing Arterial

WS

Black Lake Boulevard

4th Avenue

Cooper Point Road

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

DT

Boston Harbor Road

North City Limits

Ames Road

Arterial

2

Existing Major Arterial

SS

Capitol Boulevard

Capital Way

Carlyon Avenue

Arterial

4

Existing Arterial

DT

Capitol Way

Corky Avenue

Capitol Boulevard

Arterial

4

Existing Arterial

WS

Cooper Point Road

Conger Avenue

Evergreen Park Drive

Arterial

5

Existing Arterial

WS

Cooper Point Road

Evergreen Park Drive

US 101

Arterial

5

Widening of Existing Arterial

WS

Cooper Point Road

28th Street

Conger Avenue

Arterial

2/3

Widening of Existing Arterial

WS

Division Street

14th Avenue

Garfield Avenue

Arterial

2/3

Existing Arterial

WS

Division Street

Garfield Avenue

4th Avenue

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

NS

East Bay Drive

Ames Road

San Francisco Avenue

Arterial

2/3

Existing Arterial

NS

East Bay Drive

San Francisco Avenue

State Avenue

Arterial

3

Existing Arterial

WS

Harrison Avenue

Cushing Street

Olympic Way

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

WS

Harrison Avenue

Cooper Point Road

Cushing Street

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

WS

Harrison Avenue

West City Limits

Cooper Point Road

Arterial

4/5

Widening of Existing Arterial

DT

Henderson Boulevard

Plum Street

I-5

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

SS

Henderson Boulevard

I-5

North Street

Arterial

2/3

Existing Arterial

DT

Jefferson Street

8th Avenue

Maple Park Avenue

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

NE

Martin Way

Phoenix Street

Devoe Street

Arterial

5

Existing Arterial /Future Turn Lane

NE

Martin Way

Devoe Street

Lilly Road

Arterial

4

Addition RW for Median Island

NE

Martin Way

Lilly Road

College Street

Arterial

5

 

WS

Mud Bay Road

West UGB

West City Limits

Arterial

4/5

Widening of Existing Arterial

WS

Olympic Way

4th Avenue Bridge

Harrison Avenue

Arterial

4

Existing Arterial

NE

Pacific Avenue

State Avenue

I-5 Overpass

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

SS

Pacific Avenue

I-5

East City Limits

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

SS

Pacific Avenue

East City Limits

East UGB

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

DT

Plum Street

State Avenue

Henderson Boulevard

Arterial

4/5

(1) Existing Arterial

NE

Sleater-Kinney Road

I-5

Martin Way

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

DT

State Avenue

Wilson Street

Water Street

Arterial

2

Existing Arterial, Potential HOV

DT

Union Avenue

Capitol Way

Plum Street

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

DT

Union Avenue

Plum Street

Eastside Street

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

DT

Water Street

State Avenue

4th Avenue

Arterial

3

Existing Arterial

WS

Yauger Way Extension

SR 101/Black Lake Boulevard

Capital Mall Drive

Arterial

2/3

Future Arterial

SS

Yelm Highway

Henderson Boulevard

Rich Road

Arterial

4/5

Existing Arterial

WS

4th Avenue

Kenyon Street

Olympic Way

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

DT

5th Avenue

4th Avenue/Olympic Way

Water Street

Major Collector

4

Existing Major Collector

NS

5th Avenue

Water Street

Eastside Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

7th Avenue

Kaiser Road

McPhee Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

DT

8th Avenue

Capitol Way

Eastside Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

9th Avenue

Black Lake Boulevard

Decatur Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

DT

11th Avenue

Capitol Way

Jefferson Street

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector w/ Center Median

NE

12th Avenue

Wilson Street

Fenske Drive

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

12th Avenue

South Bay Road

City Limits

Major Collector

2/3

Additional RW for New Major Collector

NE

12th Avenue

PSP Hospital

Sleater-Kinney Road

Major Collector

2/3

Additional RW for New Major Collector

WS

14th Avenue

Kaiser Road

Division Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

SS

14th Avenue

Elizabeth Street

East City Limits

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector/Future Left-Turn Needs

SS

18th Avenue

Wilson Street

Elizabeth Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

20th Avenue

Road Sixty-Five

Crestline Boulevard

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

20th Avenue

Kaiser Road

Road Sixty-Five

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

WS

21st Avenue

Black Lake Boulevard

R.W. Johnson Boulevard

Major Collector

2/3

(2) Existing Major Collector

SS

22nd Avenue

Eastside Street

Boulevard Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

26th Avenue

South Bay Road

Pleasant Glade Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

26th Avenue

Gull Harbor Road

South Bay Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

SS

27th Avenue

Wiggins Road

Hoffman Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

28th Avenue

Division Street

West UGB

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Ames Road

East Bay Drive

North City Limits

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

NE

Bethel Street

26th Avenue

San Francisco Avenue

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

WS

Birch/Bing Street

Harrison Avenue

4th Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

NE, SS

Boulevard Road

Pacific Avenue

Yelm Highway

Major Collector

2/3

Major Collector Medians (See Table 5)

SS

Cain Road

22nd Avenue

Log Cabin Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Capital Mall Drive

McPhee Road

Black Lake Boulevard

Major Collector

4

Existing Major Collector

SS

Carlyon Avenue

Capitol Boulevard

Henderson Boulevard

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Carriage Loop

Carriage Street

Carriage Drive

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Carriage Street

Cooper Point Road

Carriage Drive

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Caton Way

Cooper Point Road

Decatur Street (at south end of trail)

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Central Street

Bigelow Avenue

11th Avenue

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

WS

Conger Avenue

Harrison Avenue

Cooper Point Road

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

WS

Conger Avenue

Cooper Point Road

Division Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Cooper Point Road

North UGB

28th Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Crestline Boulevard

Elliot Avenue

Raft Avenue

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

DT

D Avenue

Capitol Way

Franklin Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Decatur Street

Harrison Avenue

9th Avenue

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

WS

Decatur Street

9th Avenue

1700 Block

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

WS

Decatur Street Connection

Decatur Street

Caton Way

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

WS

Deschutes Parkway

5th Avenue

South City Limits

Major Collector

2/3

Major Collector

WS

Division Street

28th Avenue

14th Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

SS

Eastside Street

State Avenue

22nd Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

SS

Elizabeth Street

18th Avenue

14th Avenue

Major Collector

3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Ensign Road

Martin Way

Lilly Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Ensign Road

Pacific Avenue

Martin Way

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

SS

Eskridge Boulevard

O’Farrell Avenue

Cain Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Evergreen Park Drive

Cooper Point Road

Lakeridge Drive

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

NS

Fir Street

Legion Way

Pine Street

Major Collector

2

Future Major Collector

SS

Fones Road

1400 Block Fones Road

18th Avenue

Major Collector

3

Widening of Existing Major Collector

SS

Fones Road

Pacific Avenue

1400 Block Fones Road

Major Collector

4/5

Widening of Existing Major Collector

NE

Friendly Grove Road

North UGB

26th Avenue

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

NE

Friendly Grove Road

26th Avenue

Miller Avenue

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

NE

Gull Harbor Road

North UGB

North City Limits

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

SS

Henderson Boulevard

North Street

Yelm Highway

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

SS

Herman Road

Wiggins Road

East City Limits

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector Boulevard

SS

Hoffman Road

18th Avenue

Morse-Merrymann Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

SS

Hoffman Road

Morse-Merryman Road

Log Cabin Road Connection

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

SS

Hoffman Road Realignment

Fones Road/Hoffman Road

Fones Road/Elizabeth Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

WS

Kaiser Road

16th Lane SW

Black Lake Boulevard

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

WS

Kaiser Road

Evergreen College Parkway

Cooper Point Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Kaiser Road

North UGB

16th Lane SW

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Kenyon Street

Harrison Avenue

4th Avenue

Major Collector

4

Existing Major Collector

WS

Lakeridge Drive

Deschutes Parkway

Evergreen Park Drive

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

DT

Legion Way

Water Street

Plum Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NS

Legion Way

Plum Street

Fir Street

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

NE

Lilly Road

North UGB

15th Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Lilly Road

15th Avenue

Martin Way

Major Collector

4

Existing Major Collector

NE

Lilly Road

Martin Way

I-5 Overpass

Major Collector

4/5

Existing Major Collector

SS

Lilly Road

I-5

Pacific Avenue

Major Collector

4/5

Existing Major Collector

SS

Log Cabin Road

Cain Road

Boulevard Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

SS

Log Cabin Road Connections

Boulevard Road

Wiggins Road / Herman Road

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector Boulevard

DT

Maple Park

Capitol Way

Jefferson Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector/Median

WS

McPhee Road

Harrison Avenue

7th Avenue / Capital Mall

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

DT

Marine Drive

Market Street

Olympia Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

DT

Market Street

Capitol Way

Marine Drive

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Miller Avenue

Bethel Street

Friendly Grove Road

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

SS

Morse-Merryman Road

Boulevard Road

Wiggins Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Mottman Road

R.W. Johnson Boulevard

Crosby Boulevard

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector/Future Left-Turn Needs

SS

North Street

West City Limits

Cain Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector/Future Left-Turn Needs

SS

O’Farrell Avenue

Capitol Boulevard

Eskridge Boulevard

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

NS

Olympia Avenue

Jefferson Street

East Bay Drive

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Pattison Street

Martin Way

Pacific Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

NS

Phoenix Street

South Bay Road

Pacific Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Pine Avenue

Puget Street

Wilson Street

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

NE

Providence Lane

12th Avenue

Ensign Road

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

NE

Puget Street

San Francisco Avenue

State Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Raft Avenue

Crestline Boulevard

Schneider Hill Road

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

WS

Road Sixty-Five

20th Avenue

14th Avenue

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

WS

Road Sixty-Five Connector

28th Avenue

Road Sixty-Five

Major Collector

2/3

Future Major Collector

WS

Rogers Street

Bowman Avenue

4th Avenue

Neighborhood Collector

2

Existing Neighborhood Collector

WS

R.W. Johnson Boulevard

Mottman Road

21st Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

San Francisco Avenue

East Bay Drive

Bethel Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Schneider Hill Road

West Bay Drive

Raft Avenue

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

DT

Simmons Street

5th Avenue

4th Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Sleater-Kinney Road

North UGB

6th Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector/Future Left-Turn Needs

NS

Sleater-Kinney Road

6th Avenue

Martin Way

Major Collector

4/5

Existing Major Collector

NE

South Bay Road

Steele Street

North UGB

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

NE

State Avenue

Pacific Avenue

Steele Street

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

DT

Thurston Avenue

Capitol Way

Jefferson Street

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

West Bay Drive

Harrison Avenue

Schneider Hill Road

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector Modified

SS

Wheeler Street

Eastside Street

Boulevard Road

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

SS

Wiggins Road

27th Avenue

Yelm Highway

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

NE

Wilson Street

12th Avenue

Pine Avenue

Major Collector

2

Existing Major Collector

SS

Wilson Street

18th Avenue

22nd Avenue

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

WS

Yauger Way

Harrison Avenue

Forestbrooke Way

Major Collector

2/3

Existing Major Collector

(1)    If 2/3 or 4/5 lanes are indicated, left-turn channelization may be required for vehicle capacity or safety needs.

(2)    For the location of each street, see the Transportation 2030 Maps in Appendix B of the Transportation section of the Comprehensive Plan.

 

Table 2: Street Design Standards 

Design Standards

Functional Classification

 

Arterial Blvd

Arterial

Major Industrial Collector

Commercial Collector Blvd

Commercial Collector

Major Collector Blvd

Major Collector

Neighbor-hood Collector Blvd

Neighborhood Collector

Local Access

Alleys

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Com.

Res

Minimum Structural Design

See Standard Drawing 4-6A

ADT

14,000-40,000

14,000-40,000

3,000-14,000

3,000-14,000

3,000-14,000

3,000-14,000

3,000-14,000

500-3,000

500-3,000

0-500

N/A

N/A

Sidewalks

8' both sides (1)(10)

8' both sides (1)(10)

6' both sides (1)

10' Both sides (10)

10' Both sides (10)

6' both sides

6' both sides

5' both sides

5' both sides

5' both sides

None

None

Planting Strips (4)

10' between curb & walk both sides

-----

14' center median

10' between curb & walk both sides

6' between curb & walk both sides

2-lane = 10' median

-----

4-lane = 14' median

4-ft in sidewalk adjacent to curb

8' between curb & walk both sides

-----

14' center median

8' between curb & walk both sides

8' between curb & walk both sides (2)

-----

10' median

8' between curb & walk both sides (2)

8' between curb & walk both sides (2)

None

None

Street Tree Spacing (5)

40' on center

40' on center

40' on center

40' on center (9)(10)

40' on center (9)(10)

40' on center

40' on center

40' on center

40' on center

40' on center

None

None

Parking Lanes

None (12)

None

None

8' both sides

8' both sides

None

None

None

7' one side

7' one side (6)

None

None

Curbs

Curb both sides

Curb both sides

Curb both sides

Curb both sides

Curb both sides

Curb both sides

Curb both sides

Curb both sides

Curb both sides

Curb both sides

None

None

Lane Widths

All Arterials and Major Collectors will use 10-foot travel lanes, 5-foot bike lanes and 11-foot center turn lanes. On high frequency bus routes and truck routes, upon evaluation, the City Engineer may require different lane width dimensions to address safety concerns. Street widths will be measured as shown on Standard Drawings for each street classification.

2 lane - 1'-6'

1 lane-10'

1 lane-9'

1 lane-12'

12

Two-36" ribs

Street widths will be measured as shown on Standard Drawings for each street classification.

 

R-O-W

2 lanes - 88'

3 lanes - 88'

4 lanes - 104'

5 lanes - 104'

2 lanes - 68

’3 lanes - 79'

4 lanes - 88'

5 lanes - 99'

2 lanes - 56'

3 lanes - 67'

4 lanes - 76'

5 lanes - 87'

2 lanes - 80'

3 lanes - 84'

4 lanes - 104' (3)

2 lanes - 68'

3 lanes - 79'

4 lanes - 88' (3)

2 lanes - 80'

3 lanes - 80'

3 lanes - 96' (3)

2 lanes - 60'

3 lanes - 71'

4 lanes - 80' (3)

2 lanes - 74'

2 lanes w/ swale - 70'

2 lanes - 55' - 65' w/ class II and III

2 lanes w/ swale - 51' - 61' w/ class II and III

1 lane - 48'

1 lane w/ swale - 44'

12

12 No dead ends

Intersect-ion Radii

35' turning radius (7)

35' turning radius (7)

35' turning radius (7)

35' turning radius (7)

35' turning radius (7)

35' turning radius (7)

35' turning radius (7)

25' curb radius (7a)

25' curb radius (7a)

30' curb radius (7a)

N/A

N/A

Cul-de-sac Radii

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

47' w/ 22' land-scaped island

N/A

N/A

Pedestrian Bulb-outs

Curb bulb-outs required on all Arterials, Major Collectors, Neighborhood Collectors, Commercial Collectors, and streets in the Downtown, where on-street parking exists. Downtown is defined in Chapter 2, and shown in Appendix 4 of this Chapter.

 

 

 

Grades

0.5-8%

0.5-8%

0.5-8%

0.5-10%

0.5-10%

0.5-10%

0.5-10%

0.5-12%

0.5-12%

0.5-15%

0.5-15%

0.5-15%

Maximum Design Speeds

35 mph

35 mph

30 mph

25 mph

25 mph

30 mph

30 mph

25 mph

25 mph

20 mph

10 mph

10 mph

Site Access

See Access Points and Intersection Criteria Guidelines

20' from inter-section

20' from inter-section

20' from inter-section

N/A

N/A

Street Lighting

Highmast ornament

Highmast ornament

Highmast ornament

Highmast ornament

Highmast ornament

Highmast ornament

Highmast ornament

Highmast ornament

Highmast ornament

Ped Scale

N/A

N/A

Access Width

See Access Points and Inter-section Criteria Guide-lines

10' at PL

15' at PL

Curb

10' at PL

15' at PL

Curb

 

10' at PL

15' at PL

Curb

N/A

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

Bicycle Facilities

Arterials, Major Collectors and selected Neighborhood Collectors will have Class II bicycle facilities, with the exception of those listed in 4D.020.E. Commercial Collectors shall include bike lanes as they apply to Major Collectors and Neighborhood Collectors (refer to section 4D. Bikeways for guidance).

N/A

Class II - only for those listed in 4D.020.E

N/A

N/A

N/A

Table Notes:

(1)    Sidewalk width will be 10 feet in the Central Business District or where the extensions of existing frontage improvements are being extended and the sidewalk width is 10'.

(2)    Swale will only be used as an alternative design based on environmental standards. When swale required, swale width = 12' between curb and sidewalk, 6' tree easement opposite side of swale.

(3)    The need for left-turn channelization will be evaluated at intersections and access points.

(4)    Unless otherwise agreed upon by the City of Olympia, maintenance of street trees, turf or other landscaping within the planting strips is the responsibility of the adjacent landowner.

(5)    Street trees required. Exact spacing and species to be determined by Urban Forester. Spacing is approximate - exact spacing will depend on locations of streetlights, fire hydrants, driveways, sign clearance triangles, etc.

(6)    Block faces that are greater than 350 feet require parking bulb-outs at both street ends to define parking with a 100 foot No Parking Zone center block.

(7)    Turning radius dimensions represent the vehicle turning path. The smallest curb radius should be used while maintaining the specified turning radius. Lane width and the presence of a bike lane and parking lane affect a vehicle’s turning path and allow a smaller radius to be used. All curb radii shall be designed to accommodate a bus, garbage and fire truck turning path. On streets with more than one lane in that direction of travel, large vehicles may encroach into no more than one-half of the adjacent travel lane to complete the turn. On Arterials and Major Collectors, encroachment into oncoming travel lanes is unacceptable. The minimum curb radius is 15 feet.

(7a)    At the intersection of two classes of streets, the radius for the higher class of street is used. Where larger truck types are anticipated, further engineering design will be required to determine an adequate radius.

(8)    Parking may be required on a case-by-case analysis of neighborhood parking needs.

(9)    Street trees in sidewalk section of Commercial Collector will require street tree frames and grates per Standard Drawing 4-49.

(10)    Awnings shall conform to OMC 12.24.020 “Awnings.”

(11)    In the Chambers Basin R-4CB zone, all streets shall conform to the local ’full-dispersion’ street standard, per Standard Drawing 4-2JX2.

(12)    Exceptions to this include where on-street parking exists on an Arterial Street, where such on-street parking can remain.

 

Table 3: Street Characteristics 

Street Characteristics

Arterial Street

Major Collector

Neighborhood Collector

Local Access Street

Types of Traffic Served

Regional and City-wide

Sub-regional, feed Arterial traffic

Subarea and local traffic, feed Major Collector traffic

Local traffic, feed Neighborhood/Major Collector or Arterial Traffic

Traffic Volumes

14,000 - 40,000 Average Daily Traffic

3,000 - 14,000 Average Daily Traffic

500 - 3,000 Average Daily Traffic

0 - 500 Average Daily Traffic

Percent Local Traffic

0 - 15% of origins and destinations are within a one mile radius of the street

0 - 30% of origins and destinations are within a one mile radius of the street

70% - 100% of origins and destinations are within a one mile radius of the street

80% - 100% of origins and destinations within a one mile radius of the street

Average Travel Length

10 to maximum miles

2 to 15 miles

1 to 2 miles

Minimum to 2 miles

Street Spacing (1)

1 - 2 miles

1/2 - 3/4 mile

1000' - 1500'

350' - 500'

Intersection Spacing (2)

500' - 750'

350' - 500'

250' - 350'

250' - 350'

Design Speed

30 - 35 mph

25 - 35 mph

25 mph

20 - 25 mph

On-Street Parking

No - except where parking exists and where exempt. Existing parking may be removed for other Transportation needs. Where parking exists, intersection bulb-outs are required.

No - except where parking exists and where exempt. Existing parking may be removed for other Transportation needs. Where parking exists, intersection bulb-outs are required.

Yes - with bulb-outs at intersections.

Yes - one side with parking bulb-outs to define parking areas.

Driveway Access

No

No - except for existing developments

Yes

Yes

Bike Lanes (Class II)

Yes -See 4D.020.E for exceptions.

Yes - See 4D.020.E for exceptions.

Some - See 4D.020.E for exceptions

No

Planting Strips (between sidewalk and curb)

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Sidewalks

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

Traffic Calming

No

As needed

Yes - if problem is anticipated or determined through an engineering study.

Yes - if problem is anticipated or determined through an engineering study.

Transit Shelters

Every 1/2 mile

Every 1/2 mile

None

None

Transit Pullouts

Every 1/2 mile

Every 1/2 mile

None

None

Table 3 Notes:

(1)    Street spacing means the frequency of street types within the street network.

(2)    Intersection spacing means how often a cross street occurs on a particular class of street.

4B.040 Naming

Streets and roads will be named according to specific criteria. The City is divided into four quadrants by Capitol Way (east or west) and 4th Avenue/ Martin Way (north or south). “Avenues” run east-west and are numbered with the exception of certain long-standing historical names. “Streets” run north-south and are named. “Drives” are irregular or diagonal streets over two grid blocks in length not conforming to the grid pattern. “Places” will be a north-south street parallel to but between streets. “Ways” will be an east-west street parallel to but between avenues. “Courts” will be a cul-de-sac that cannot be extended. Courts are to be named or numbered and carry name or the number of the preceding street or avenue. “Loops” will be small loop-type streets to carry the name of the street from which they originate. “Lanes” will be private streets.

An address number will be assigned to all new buildings at the time the building permit is issued. It is then the owner’s responsibility to see that the house numbers are placed clearly and visibly at the main entrance to the property or at the principal place of ingress.

The developer must check with the Public Works Department regarding the naming of streets. This should be done at the time the preliminary plat is submitted and again upon approval of the final plat. The Public Works Department will ensure that the name assigned to a new street is consistent with policies of the City.

4B.050 Signing and Striping

Street signs are defined as any regulatory, warning, or guide signs. The developer is responsible for providing all street signs. Street signs will comply with the latest edition of the U.S. Department of Transportation Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD).

Pavement markings and street signs, including posts and hardware, shall be designed, furnished, installed, and paid for by the developer under the City’s direction. The design and installation of all street signs, pavement markings, and associated hardware, will conform to the Washington State Department of Transportation’s Standard Specifications for Road, Bridge and Municipal Construction, in effect at the time of approval for construction, as modified herein, to establish and maintain uniformity.

Plastic pavement markings (preformed tape or sprayed application) shall be used for all transverse, long line, and symbol markings unless otherwise approved by the City Engineer.

Street name signs will display street names, district designation, and grid numbers.

Mast arm street name signs will be pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-37. Post-mounted signs will be pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-45.

4B.060 Right-of-Way

Right-of-way is determined by the functional classification of a street. See Table 1. See Drawing Details 4-2A through 4-2L for specific widths. See Table 2 Street Design Standards for radius requirements at cul-de-sac “bulb.” Right-of-way at “bulb” will be increased accordingly.

Right-of-way requirements may be increased if additional lanes, pockets, transit lanes, bus loading zones, operational speed, bike lanes, utilities, schools, or other factors are required as determined by the Director or Public Works.

Right-of-way will be conveyed to the City on a recorded plat or by a right-of-way dedication or separate instrument.

4B.070 Private Streets

Acceptance as Public Streets. Acceptance of private streets as public streets will be considered only if the streets meet all applicable public street standards, including right-of-way widths.

4B.080 Streetside (Frontage) Improvements

A.    All commercial and residential (including multi-family) development, plats, and short plats will install street improvements at the time of construction as required by the Department of Community Planning and Development. Such improvements may include curb and gutter; sidewalk; transit stops, pads, and shelters; street and stormwater; street lighting system; traffic signal modification, relocation, or installation; street trees; utility relocation or installation; undergrounding of franchised utilities; landscaping and irrigation; and street widening, all pursuant to these Standards. Plans will be prepared and signed by a licensed civil engineer registered in the State of Washington.

B.    At a minimum, all streetside improvements will be made across the full frontage of the property being developed from centerline to right-of-way line.

Full structural street cross section will be constructed throughout the entire length, including the transition taper. No cross-section taper will be allowed.

C.    For Exceptions, see Section 2.040; for Deferrals, see Section 2.070.

D.    When streetside improvements are required:

1.    Half-street pavement reconstruction will be required when the existing pavement rating is at or below 40, based on the City of Olympia Pavement Management System; crown slope is greater than 3 percent; is light bituminous pavement; and/or was built with no base structure. Section pavement coring and/or subsurface investigation will be required to determine base condition.

2.    Half-street asphalt overlay (2-inch minimum) will be required when the existing pavement rating is at or below 60 based on the City of Olympia Pavement Management System. Pre-leveling may be required to create a uniform 2 percent crown slope.

4B.085 Streetside (Frontage) Improvements West Bay Drive

Frontage improvements specific to West Bay Drive will conform to the descriptions contained in Table 4.

 

Table 4: West Bay Drive Streetside Improvements 

West Bay Drive Street Section

Westside of Right-of-Way

Eastside of Right-of-Way

From

To

 

 

Roundabouts

Southern Park Border

Maintain existing sidewalk location and re-stripe centerline east to provide bicycle lanes north and southbound. (Standard Drawing 4-2G1.)

Maintain existing sidewalk location and re-stripe centerline east to provide bicycle lanes north and southbound. (Standard Drawing 4-2G1.) Existing on-street parking will be removed.

Southern Park Boundary

Garfield Nature Trail

Maintain existing sidewalk location and re-stripe centerline east to provide bicycle lanes north and southbound. (Standard Drawing 4-2G2.)

Maintain existing sidewalk on the east side of ROW. Re-stripe centerline east to provide bicycle lanes north and southbound. Provide on-street pocket parking/planter. (Standard Drawing 4-2G2.)

Garfield Nature Trail

Brawne Avenue

Maintain existing sidewalk location and re-stripe centerline east to provide bicycle lanes north and southbound. (Standard Drawing 4-2G3.)

Maintain existing sidewalk on the eastside of ROW. Re-stripe centerline east to provide bicycle lanes north and southbound. Bicycle lanes will remain next to the vehicle travel lanes. Sidewalks can be either at street level or below grade. (Standard Drawing 4-2G3.)

Brawne Avenue

Park Property North Border

Variable retaining wall, sidewalk and planter strip. (Standard Drawing 4-2G4.)

The railroad right-of-way will be used for combined trail-sidewalk facility wherever practical and safe. Park trail and sidewalk will be combined in a 10-foot multi-use facility. (Standard Drawing 4-2G4.)

Park Property North Border

Schneider Hill Base

Variable retaining wall, sidewalk and planter strip. (Standard Drawing 4-2G5.)

Bicycle lanes will remain next to the vehicle travel lanes. Sidewalk will be below street grade. If land use remains industrial, trail will be incorporated into the sidewalk. (Standard Drawing 4-2G5.)

Schneider Hill Base

Schneider Hill Top

Standard Drawing 4-2G6

Standard Drawing 4-2G6.

Schneider Hill Base

West Bay Marina

Drainage swale without curbing. (Standard Drawing 4-2G7.)

Pocket parking intermixed within planter strip. (Standard Drawing 4-2G7.)

4B.090 Streetside (Frontage) Improvements for Boulevard Road (Standard Drawing 4-2G8)

Table 5 lists the required streetside improvements in various sections of Boulevard Road, working north from Yelm Highway. Refer to Standard Drawing 4-2G8 for more information.

Table 5: Boulevard Road Street Frontage Improvements 

From

To

Lanes

Yelm Highway

45th Avenue

2

45th Avenue

Boulevard Heights Loop

3

Boulevard Heights Loop

Boulevard Park Court

2

42nd Avenue

41st Way (North Leg)

2

Cedar Park Loop (South Leg)

Cedar Park Loop (North Leg)

3

Cedar Park Loop (North of North Leg)

Log Cabin Road

2

Log Cabin Road

Morse Merryman Road (North Leg)

2

31st Avenue (South Leg)

31st Avenue (North Leg)

2

30th Avenue (South Leg)

31st Avenue (North Leg)

3

31st Avenue (North of North Leg)

28th Avenue (South of South Leg)

2

28th Avenue (South Leg)

28th Avenue (North Leg)

3

Fox Avenue (North Leg)

Swecker Avenue (South of South Leg)

2

Swecker Avenue (South Leg)

Not applicable

3

Briar Lea Loop (South Leg)

Not applicable

3

24th Avenue (South Leg)

24th Avenue (North Leg)

3

18th Avenue

16th Avenue

2

Lincoln Avenue (South Leg)

Not applicable

2

15th Avenue (South Leg)

Not applicable

2

Wheeler Avenue (North Leg)

Not applicable

2

9th Avenue (North Leg)

Not applicable

2

7th Avenue (South Leg)

Not applicable

2

The City Engineer will determine locations for median breaks and exclusive left-turn needs.

4B.095 Streetside (Frontage) Improvements East Downtown

 

Table 6: East Downtown Streetside Improvements 

Street Section

Improvements

Cherry Street from 4th Avenue to State Avenue

Widen sidewalks to 12 feet

Restripe street to a 16-foot one-way lane

Maintain parking on both sides

Raised mid-block crossing

Bulb-outs on corners of 4th Avenue and State Avenue where on street parking exists

Stamped colored concrete at crosswalks

Underground utilities

Chestnut Street from 4th Avenue to State Avenue

Widen sidewalks to 12 feet

Restripe street to a 16-foot one-way lane

Maintain parking on both sides

Raised mid-block crossing

Bulb-outs on corners of 4th Avenue and State Avenue where on-street parking exists

Stamped colored concrete at crosswalks

Underground utilities

4th Avenue from Jefferson Street to Plum Street

Remove vehicle travel lane, Jefferson to Chestnut (leaving two eastbound lanes), use space for wider parking lanes and bike lane

Widen parking lanes to 9 feet

Add bike lane on south side of street from Jefferson to Chestnut

Rebuild sidewalk, Jefferson to Cherry, retain existing width

Add bulb-outs at all corners where on-street parking exists, and extend length of bulb-outs along block faces up to established parking stall

Assumes no undergrounding of utilities nor resurfacing, only patching

State Avenue from Plum Street to Jefferson Street

While maintaining south curb line and parking lane, restripe street for two 11-foot travel lanes and a bike lane on the north side

Bike lane would extend from Plum to Cherry (no widening required)

Relocate 10-foot sidewalk on north side to north edge of right-of-way, provide varying sized planter strip adjacent to relocated parking lane and new bike lane

On south side near corner of Plum, widen planter to shadow parking

Add bulb-outs on south side at Cherry and at Chestnut where on-street parking exists

Widening for bike lane from Cherry to Franklin, with widening

Legion Way from Cherry Street to Plum Street

Remove travel lane east bound, preserving right turn at Plum

Use space for wider sidewalks and bulb-outs at corners and mid-block

Widen sidewalks by approximately 5 feet on north and south sides of street

Add bulb-outs at corners where on-street parking exists

Add mid-block bulb-outs approximately 60 feet long to accommodate larger street trees

Remove 1-2 parking stalls for each of 4 mid-block bulb-outs

Install large canopy street trees at corners and mid-block

Legion Way from Cherry Street to Washington Street

Standard street trees in grates

Bulb-outs on corners where on-street parking exists

Maintain sidewalk width

Plum Street and State Street intersection

Textured colored concrete in the crosswalks

Downtown gateway or entrance signage

4B.110 Half Street

A half street is an otherwise acceptable roadway section modified to conform to limited right-of-way on the boundary of property subject to development. See definition in Chapter 2.

A half street may be permitted, subject to approval by the Public Works Department when:

1.    There is reasonable assurance of obtaining the prescribed additional right-of-way from the adjoining property suitable for completion of a full-section roadway; and

2.    Such alignment is consistent with or will establish a reasonable circulation pattern; and

3.    The right-of-way width of the half street will equal at least 30 feet, or 50 percent of the required right-of-way, whichever is greater; and

4.    The traveled way will be surfaced the same as the designated street classification to a width not less than 20 feet; and

5.    The half street will be graded consistent with the centerline of the ultimate roadway section; and

6.    Property line edge of street will be finished with permanent concrete curb, or curb and gutter to ensure proper drainage, bank stability, and traffic safety.

7.    The full street cross-section will be constructed when left-turn channelization, additional vehicle lanes, or medians are required. See Table 2 for design criteria.

4B.120 Medians

A median will be in addition to, not part of, the specified roadway width except on a road classed as a boulevard. Medians will be designed so as not to limit turning radius or sight distance at intersections. Landscaping and irrigation will be installed when directed by the Public Works Director.

For additional guidance on design standards for medians, refer to Section 4I, Access Points and Intersection Criteria.

4B.130 Intersections

A.    Traffic control will be as specified in the current edition of the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) or as modified by the City Engineer as a result of appropriate traffic engineering studies.

B.    Street intersections will be laid out so as to intersect as nearly as possible at right angles. Sharp-angled intersections will be avoided. For reasons of traffic safety, a “T” intersection (three-legged) is preferable to a crossroad (four-legged) intersection for local access streets. For safe design, the following types of intersection features should be avoided:

1.    Intersection with more than four intersecting streets.

2.    “Y”-type intersections where streets meet at acute angles.

3.    Intersections adjacent to bridges and other sight obstructions.

4.    In no case will the angle of intersection be less than 60 degrees or greater than 120 degrees. The preferred angle of an intersection is 90 degrees.

C.    Spacing between adjacent intersecting streets, whether crossing or “T” should be as follows in Table 7.

Table 7: Centerline Offsets 

When highest classification involved is:

Centerline offset should be:

 

Desirable

Minimum

Arterial

500-750 feet

350 feet

Major Collector

350-500 feet

200 feet

Neighborhood Collector

250-350 feet

150 feet

Local Access

250-350 feet

150 feet

“Desirable” conditions shall be applied when sufficient space or street frontage is available.

When different class streets intersect, the higher standard will apply on curb radii. Deviations to this may be allowed by the City Engineer per Section 1.050.

D.    On sloping approaches at an intersection, landings will be provided with grade not to exceed a 1-foot difference in elevation for a distance of 30 feet approaching any arterial or 20 feet approaching a collector or local access street, measured from the nearest right-of-way line (extended) of intersecting street.

4B.140 Driveways

A.    General

This section addresses that portion of the driveway located within the street right of way, also referred to as the driveway approach or entrance. That portion of the driveway located on private property is regulated by Title 18 OMC.

1.    Design and construction requirements and details for driveway approaches are located in Table 2 above, section 4I Access Points and Intersection Criteria, and the Standard Drawings appendix of this chapter.

2.    All abandoned driveway approaches on the same frontage will be removed and the curb, gutter and sidewalk, or shoulder and ditch section will be properly restored.

3.    All driveways approaches will be constructed of impervious Portland Cement Concrete with welded wire fabric reinforcement and will be subject to the same testing and inspection requirements as curb, gutter, and impervious sidewalk construction.

4.    Joint-use driveways serving two adjacent parcels may be built on their common boundary upon formal written agreement by both property owners and approval of the City. The agreement will be a recorded easement for both parcels of land specifying joint usage.

5.    Grade breaks, including the tie to the street will be constructed as smooth vertical curves. The maximum change in driveway grade will be 8 percent within any 10 feet of distance on a crest and 12 percent within any 10 feet of distance in a sag vertical cure.

6.    No commercial driveway approach will be approved where backing onto the sidewalk or street will occur.

B.    Arterial and Collector Streets

1.    See section 4I, Access Points and Intersection Criteria, for arterial street driveway and access control design criteria.

2.    Within the limitations set forth above, access to arterial and collector streets within the City will be limited to one driveway for each tract of property separately owned. Properties contiguous to each other and owned by the same person are considered to be one tract.

3.    Driveways giving direct access onto arterial and collector streets may be denied if alternate access is available.

4B.150 Sight Obstructions at Intersections

Sight distance standards are important at intersections and driveways so that drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians can see each other, to minimize potential conflicts when approaching and entering these locations. One method to minimize potential conflicts is to require and maintain Clear Sight Triangles.

A.    Clear Sight Triangle. The Clear Sight Triangle at each corner of every intersection is a volume of space inside which no permanent obstructions, except those listed in subsection D below, are allowed. The height of this volume of space is between 2.5 feet and 10 feet above the ground surface. The length, or sides, of this triangle will vary by type of intersection, as discussed below, but in no case shall be less than 20 feet on a frontage side, as shown in Standard Drawing 4-1A. Clear Sight Triangle requirements also apply to both sides of commercial driveway approaches.

The area within the Clear Sight Triangle shall be free from all obstructions, except those identified in subsection D below, to maintain a clear view on the intersection approaches. So, for example, if not otherwise prohibited a fence may be constructed along the property boundary at an intersection, but must be less than 2.5 feet tall, so as not to extend into the Clear Sight Triangle at that intersection.

B.    Stop or Yield Controlled Intersection. The Intersection Sight Distance criteria given in Table 8 is for Stop or Yield Controlled Intersections, and is based on Table 9-6 of A Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets published by AASHTO (2011). This table applies to intersection and driveways with an ADT greater than 20. For driveways with an ADT of 20 or less, the Stopping Sight Distance on page 3-4 of this AASHTO publication can be used. An example is shown in Standard Drawing 4-1C.

Table 8: Stop or Yield Intersection Sight Distance* 

Operating Speed

Intersection Sight Distance

Stopping Sight Distance

2 Lanes

4+ Lanes

20 mph

225 feet

240 feet

115 feet

25mph

280 feet

295 feet

155 feet

30mph

335 feet

355 feet

200 feet

35 mph

390 feet

415 feet

250 feet

Other factors, such as vertical and horizontal curves and roadway grades, also need to be taken into account. Such factors can require necessary modification to the intersection sight distance given in this table.

C.    Uncontrolled Intersection. At uncontrolled intersections, the Clear Sight Triangle may be increased in size from the minimum dimensions described in subsection A above, based on the dimensions indicated in Table 9.

Table 9: Uncontrolled Intersection Sight Distance* 

 

Sight Distance

Speed Limit

(A) Major Street

(B) Minor Street

20 mph

90 feet

90 feet

25 mph

115 feet

115 feet

30 mph

140 feet

140 feet

35 mph

165 feet

165 feet

D.    Exclusions. Sight obstructions that may be allowed in the Clear Sight Triangle include utility poles, regulatory signs, trees trimmed from the base to a height of 10 feet above the street, places where the contour of the ground is such that there can be no cross visibility at the intersection, buildings constructed in conformance with the provisions of appropriate zoning regulations and preexisting buildings. In addition, the requirements of OMC section 18.40.060.B shall also apply. In the case of conflicts between the OMC and the EDDS regarding Clear Sight Triangles, the more restrictive requirement shall apply.

4B.160 Surfacing Requirements

The following are the surfacing requirements for each application listed.

A.    Asphalt Pavements. The minimum pavement sections listed in Standard Drawing 4-6A are in lieu of pavement design and are based on subgrade California Bearing Ratio (CBR) value of 3. Alternate structures will be accepted based on soil tests to determine the actual CBR value and completion of Worksheet 4-6B in Chapter 4 drawings. Soil tests and a completed worksheet for each street classification shall accompany plans submitted if other than the structures shown below and pavement sections in Detail 4-6A is used.

One soil sample per each 250 LF of centerline with three minimum per project representative of the roadway subgrade shall be taken to determine a statistical representation of the existing soil conditions.

The soils report, signed and stamped by a professional engineer licensed by the State of Washington, shall be based on actual soils tests performed by an engineering firm specializing in soils analysis and submitted with the plans. All depths indicated are a minimum compacted depth.

Existing pavement restoration for utility or street widening projects requiring restoration of existing pavement, additional information, and design will be required to ensure pavement meets restoration requirements shown in Table 10: Pavement Restoration Requirements. The information required may include: (1) pavement cores representative of typical pavement sections; and (2) statement of existing pavement condition and discussion of how it will “match up” to the new pavement section.

For asphalt concrete paving requirements for streets, see Section 4B.175.

B.    Sidewalks

Surfacing:

4-inch pervious concrete

Base:

4-inch ballast and underdrain system per Standard Drawing 4-9C

Alternate:

 

Surfacing:

4-inch commercial concrete

Base:

2-inch crushed surfacing top course or well-graded sand

Asphalt sidewalks will not be permitted, unless approved through the deviation process outlined in section 1.050.

C.    Driveway Approach

Surfacing:

9-inch commercial concrete

Base:

2-inch crushed surfacing top course or well-graded sand

D.    Class I Bikeway

Surfacing:

4-inch commercial concrete

Base:

2-inch crushed surfacing top course

 

 

Alternate:

 

 

 

Surfacing:

2 1/2 inch Commercial Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA)

Base:

4-inch ballast

 

 

Alternate:

 

 

 

Surfacing:

4-inch pervious concrete

Base:

4-inch ballast and underdrain system per Standard Drawing 4-9C

Pervious concrete materials shall only be used in locations where topography and soil conditions are appropriate.

4B.170 Temporary Street Patching

Temporary restoration of trenches will be accomplished by using one of the following:

A.    Commercial HMA,

B.    Cold asphalt patching material consisting of PG 58-22 liquid asphalt and aggregate meeting AASHTO T-30 gradation, or

C.    Steel plates. Asphalt ramps shall be established for steel plate edges facing traffic.

Commercial HMA or cold patch asphalt for temporary restoration may be placed directly into the trench, bladed and rolled to provide a smooth-riding surface. The minimum thickness of the compacted material must be 2 inches or the thickness of the existing asphalt, whichever is greater.

Prior to beginning street trenching work, the contractor will ensure that temporary patching material is stockpiled at the project site, both for completing and maintaining the temporary patching.

All temporary patches will be maintained by the contractor and will be made permanent within three (3) working days. Patches that are not properly maintained will be identified by the City Construction Inspector and repaired by the City at the property owner, permit holder, or private utility’s expense.

4B.175 Pavement Restoration

A.    Introduction. Trench cuts and other invasive pavement cuts such as “windowing” for pipe depth verification and service line connections in roadways greatly degrade the condition of the pavement, as well as reduce the design life. The most significant damage can be seen in newer pavements. A restored pavement cut in a newly paved street lowers the Pavement Management System (PMS) rating 30 points (on a scale of 0 to 100). It is the goal of pavement restoration to have a pavement in better or as good as pre-pavement cut condition. This can be achieved through prevention of pavement cuts through utility coordination, and high-quality pavement restoration.

B.    Lane width restoration requirements. For longitudinal utility trench cuts in pavements over five years old, a minimum 2-inch overlay or full-depth pavement reconstruction is required for the following widths:

1.    One-lane overlay or reconstruction: when trench cut or patch is within one travel lane.

2.    Two-lane overlay or reconstruction: when trench cut or patch is within two travel lanes.

3.    Additional overlay or reconstruction: when the remaining pavement area to the edge of existing pavement on either side is less than one travel lane or pavement is less than five years old. No longitudinal joints will be allowed in the wheel path.

C.    Pavement restoration requirements. Table 10: Pavement Restoration Requirements describes pavement restoration requirements for various size projects and various existing pavement conditions.

D.    Transverse utility crossings. Transverse utility crossings must be bored or completed by another trenchless method. Bore pits must be restored pursuant to Section 4B.175(C).

E.    Pavement cuts in new pavements. Pavement cuts, including “windowing” for pipe depth and/or location verification, are not permitted in pavements that have been constructed or rehabilitated within five years. Rehabilitation includes all asphalt overlays. If there is no other option but to cut into new pavement, the pavement must be restored pursuant to Table 10: Pavement Restoration Requirements.

F.    Exemption from pavement restoration requirements and financial penalties. Utilities can appeal in writing directly to the Public Works Director for exemption from pavement restoration requirements and financial penalties associated with cutting into new pavements.

Utilities may be exempt from pavement financial penalties if there is no other viable alternative and under the following conditions:

1.    If the City failed to give six months’ notice of an upcoming roadway rehabilitation project either because of:

a.    a change in property ownership, or

b.    a change in the City’s Capital Facilities Plan, or

c.    streets and roads associated with the Street Repair Least-Cost Program.

2.    An emergency project requiring immediate attention for the preservation of life or property.

 

Table 10: Pavement Restoration Requirements 

Existing Pavement Condition

Project Type

New Pavements Less Than 5 Years Old

Pavements Greater Than 5 Years Old

Pavements Identified by the City to be Reconstructed Within 2 Years

Large Projects

Consists of a project requiring a longitudinal trench cut through the paved roadway surface 50 linear feet or greater, or four or more traverse trench cuts per 300 linear feet of roadway.

Complete reconstruction, grind/inlay, or overlay of entire paved surface (all lanes). Pavement section based on pavement design.*

Grind/inlay, reconstruct, or overlay. Width per lane requirements in Section 4B.175. Pavement section based on pavement design.

Depending on intended reconstruction strategy, could utilize lesser pavement restoration. Minimum restoration is patch pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-8.

Small Projects

Consists of a project requiring a longitudinal trench cut through the paved roadway surface less than 50 linear feet or less than four pavement cuts per 300 linear feet of roadway.

Patch pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-8. Pavement restoration fee assessed per OMC 12.20.270.

Patch pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-8.

Depending on intended reconstruction strategy, could utilize lesser pavement restoration. Minimum restoration is patch pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-8.

Emergency Projects

A project that could not be foreseen requiring immediate attention for the preservation of life or property.

Grind/inlay, reconstruct, overlay, or patch (dependent on project size [see above]). Width pursuant to lane requirements in Section 4B.175. Pavement section based on pavement design.

Grind/inlay, reconstruct, overlay, or patch (dependent on project size [see above]). Width pursuant to lane requirements in Section 4B.175. Pavement section based on pavement design.

Depending on intended reconstruction strategy, could utilize lesser pavement restoration. Minimum restoration is patch pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-8.

Septic to Sewer Projects

Consists of a sewer main extension for a single property converting to a public sewer connection without an increase in ERUs.

Patch pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-8. Pavement restoration fee assessed per OMC 12.20.270, unless the project is the result of a failed septic system.

Patch pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-8.

Patch pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-8.

*    If it is determined by the Public Works Director that full paved surface restoration impacts are excessive (i.e., traffic congestion, business impacts), restoration can be reduced to trench restoration only and a fee-in-lieu equal to the cost of full paved surface restoration assessed.

G.    Construction Requirements

1.    All trench and pavement cuts will be made uniformly by wheel or saw cutting. If edge of trench line degrades, ravels, or is non-uniform, additional saw cutting will be required prior to final patch or paving.

2.    Tack will be applied to the existing pavement and edge of cut and will be emulsified asphalt grade CSS-1 as specified in the latest version of the WSDOT Standard Specifications. Tack coat will be applied as specified in Section 5-04 of the latest version of the WSDOT Standard Specifications, except that longitudinal joints between successive layers of asphalt concrete will be displaced laterally a minimum of 12 inches unless otherwise approved by the City Engineer. Fine and coarse aggregate will be in accordance with Section 9 03.8 of the latest version of the WSDOT Standard Specifications. Asphalt concrete over 3 inches thick will be placed in equal lifts not to exceed 3 inches each.

3.    Grinding. Connection to existing asphalt at centerline, lane edges, and overlay ends shall be made by grinding. Feathering of asphalt is not acceptable without written approval from the City Engineer. Grind can be a few inches off centerline to avoid existing striping.

4.    Surface smoothness will be pursuant to Section 5-04 of the latest version of the WSDOT Standard Specifications. The paving will be corrected by removal and repaving of the trench only.

5.    Asphalt concrete pavement for wearing course will not be placed on any traveled way between October 1 and April 1 without written approval from the City Engineer.

6.    Asphalt for prime coat will not be applied when the ground temperature is lower than 50o F without written permission of the City Engineer.

7.    Asphalt concrete will not be placed on any wet surface, or when the average surface temperatures are less than those specified in the following table, or when weather conditions otherwise prevent the proper handling or finishing of the bituminous mixtures.

 

Table 11: Surface Temperature Limitations 

 

Surface Temperature Limitations

Compacted Thickness (Feet)

Surface Course

Sub-Surface Courses

Less than 0.10

55° F

55° F

0.10 to 0.20

45° F

35° F

0.21 to 0.25

35° F

35° F

8.    All joints on trenching or overlays will be sealed using crack sealant as specified in the latest version of the WSDOT Standard Specifications Section 9-04.10 (ASTM D-1190).

9.    When trenching within the roadway shoulder(s), the shoulder should be restored to its original or better condition.

10.    The final patch will be completed as soon as possible and will be completed within three days after first opening the trench. This time frame may be adjusted if delays are due to inclement paving weather or other adverse conditions that may exist. However, delaying of final patch or overlay work is allowable only subject to the City Engineer’s approval. The City Engineer may deem it necessary to complete the work within the three-day time frame and not allow any time extension. If this occurs, the contractor will perform the necessary work as directed by the City Engineer.

4B.180 Trench Backfill

All crushed surfacing materials will conform to Section 4-04 of the latest version of the WSDOT Standard Specifications. The subgrade will be compacted to 95 percent maximum density, as described in Section 2-03 of the latest version of the WSDOT/APWA Standard Specifications.

All granular backfill material will conform to Section 9-03.19 of the WSDOT Standard Specifications. Trench will be compacted to 95 percent maximum density, as described in Section 2-03 of the WSDOT/APWA Standard Specifications.

The contractor may only use the native material for trench backfill (not bedding) upon prior written approval from the City Engineer, except that the top 8 inches of trench will be 2-inch minus ballast. All trench backfill materials below the roadway and sub-base level will be compacted to 95 percent density.

When trench width is 18 inches or less and is within the traveled way, trench will be backfilled with controlled density fill (CDF) as defined in Section 2-09.3(1)E of the WSDOT Standard Specifications. The aggregate shall be 3/8-inch minus.

Backfill compaction and placement will be performed in compliance with WSDOT Standard Specifications.

Replacement of the asphalt concrete or Portland cement concrete pavement will conform to the latest version of the WSDOT Standard Specifications.

4B.190 Survey and Staking

All surveying and staking shall be performed as required in Chapter 3, section 3.056 of these Standards.

4B.195 Utility Coordination

A.    Introduction. Excavations in city streets disrupt and interfere with the public use of city streets and damage the pavement. The purpose of this section is to reduce this disruption, interference, and damage by promoting better coordination among utilities making excavations in city streets and between these utilities and the City. Better coordination will assist in minimizing the number of excavations being made wherever feasible and will ensure that excavations in city streets are, to the maximum extent possible, performed before, rather than after, the resurfacing of the streets.

B.    Requirements

1.    Any public or private utility owning, operating, or installing facilities in city streets, alleys, sidewalks, or any other public places that provide water, sewer, gas, electric, communication, video, or other utility service shall prepare and submit to the Public Works Director a utility master plan, in a format specified by the Director, that shows the location of the utility’s existing facilities in city streets, alleys, sidewalks, and other public places, and shows all of the utility’s planned major utility work in city streets, alleys, sidewalks, and other public places. Utilities shall submit an initial utility master plan no later than 180 days after the effective date of the ordinance adopting this section. Thereafter, each utility shall submit semi-annually, on the first regular business day of January and July, a revised and updated utility master plan.

Utility master plans shall be submitted in the following format:

a.    One hard copy of the City of Olympia base map at 1:200 scale [base map provided by the City Utility Mapping Section, (360) 753-2670] showing street location, size, and type of proposed facilities.

b.    A digital copy base map in the City’s latest version of AutoCAD, currently Release 13 format, showing the above requirements in a layer to be designated by the City. Digital-based maps will be made available by the City. If unable to provide a digital map or have a consulting firm perform the work, the utility can pay City mappers to perform this service.

c.    A hard copy list in a spreadsheet format as designated by the City.

d.    A digital copy list of MS Excel spreadsheet format as designated by the City.

The City will merge all information onto one master map and database (including all City projects) and make hard and digital copies available to any utility upon request.

As used in this subsection, the term “planned major utility work” refers to any and all future excavations planned by the utility when the utility master plan or update is submitted that will affect any city street, alley, sidewalk, or other public place.

2.    The Public Works Director shall prepare a two-year repaving plan showing the street resurfacing planned by the City for the next two years. The two-year repaving plan shall be revised on a semi-annual basis. The Director shall make the City’s two-year repaving plan available for public inspection. In addition, after determining the street resurfacing work that is proposed for each year, the Director shall send a notice of the proposed work to all utilities that have current utility master plans on file. A utility not having an updated utility master plan on file with the City may have their project permit delayed.

3.    The City of Olympia’s Six-Year CFP is updated annually and will be made available to utilities upon request.

4.    The City and private utilities will notify adjacent property owners approximately six months prior to project construction to inform them of new pavement restoration requirements and encourage installation of new services and/or upgrades.

5.    Prior to applying for an excavation permit, any person planning to excavate in the City’s streets, alleys, sidewalks, or other public places shall review the utility master plans and the City’s two-year repaving plan on file with the Director and shall coordinate, to the extent practicable, with the utility and street work shown on such plans to minimize damage to and avoid undue disruption and interference with the public use of such streets, alleys, sidewalks, or other public places.

6.    Each utility will look for opportunities to combine projects and share trenches. The utilities will provide a reasonable assurance that other utilities have been contacted and given an opportunity to participate in the project.

7.    Utilities/developers must show how they plan to serve properties adjacent to their proposed frontage improvements. This is to ensure all properties can be served in the future without cutting into the new street. Services are typically provided through main or service connection stubouts past the edge of the pavement.

8.    Utilities that plan ahead and construct projects prior to City repaving projects may have their pavement restoration requirements reduced.

4B.200 Testing

Testing will be required at the developer’s or contractor’s expense. The testing will be ordered by the developer or contractor, and the chosen testing lab will be approved by the City Construction Inspector. Testing will be done on all materials and construction as specified in the most current version of the WSDOT Standard Specifications and with frequency as specified herein. Copies of the test and sample results will be provided to the City within three days of the test results.

In addition, the City will be notified before each phase of street construction commences (i.e., staking, grading, subgrade, ballast, base, top course, and surfacing).

 

Table 12: Testing and Sampling Frequency Requirements 

Item

Test

Acceptance Sample

Gravel Borrow

Grading & SE

1 - 4000 Ton

Select Borrow

Grading & SE

1 - 4000 Ton

Gravel Borrow for Structural Earth Wall, See Note 7

Grading & SE

1 – 4000 Ton

Sand Drainage Blanket

Grading

1 - 4000 Ton

Gravel Base

Grading, SE & Dust Ratio

1 - 4000 Ton

CSTC

Grading, SE & Fracture

1 - 2000 Ton

CSBC

Grading, SE & Fracture

1 - 2000 Ton

Streambed Sediment

Grading

1 - 500 tons

Maintenance Rock

Grading, SE & Fracture

1 - 2000 Ton

Ballast

Grading, SE & Dust Ratio

1 - 2000 Ton

Permeable Ballast

Grading & Fracture

1 - 2000 Ton

Backfill for Sand Drains

Grading

1 - 2000 Ton

Crushed Coverstone

Grading, SE & Fracture

1 - 1000 Ton

Crushed Screening

5/8 - No. 4

Grading & Fracture

1 - 1000 Ton

1/2 - No. 4

Grading & Fracture

1 - 1000 Ton

No. 4 - 0

Grading & Fracture

1 - 1000 Ton

Gravel Backfill for

Foundations

Grading & SE

1 - 1000 Ton

Walls

Grading, SE & Dust Ratio

1 - 1000 Ton

Pipe Zone Bedding

Grading & SE

1 - 1000 Ton

Drains

Grading

1 - 500 Ton

Dry Wells

Grading

1 - 500 Ton

PCC Paving

Coarse Aggregate See Note 4

Grading

1 - 2000 CY

Fine Aggregate See Note 4

Grading

1 - 2000 CY

Combined Aggregate See Note 4

Grading

1 - 2000 CY

Air Content

Air

1 - 500 CY

Cylinders (28-day)

Compressive Strength

1 - 500 CY

Core

Density

1 - 500 CY

 

Thickness

1 - 500 CY

Cement See Note 2

Chemical & Physical Certification

 

PCC Structures

Coarse Aggregate See Note 4

Grading

1 - 1000 CY

Fine Aggregate See Note 4

Grading

1 - 1000 CY

Combined Aggregate See Note 4

Grading

1 - 1000 CY

Consistency

Slump

1 for every 5 trucks, See Note 8

Air Content

Air

1 for every 5 trucks, See Note 8

Cylinders (28-day)

Compressive Strength

1 for every 5 trucks, See Note 8

Cement

Chemical & Physical Certification

 

Grouts See Note 2

Compressive Strength

1 set per day

Hot Mix Asphalt

Completed Mix, See Note 1

 

 

 

Grading & Asphalt Content

1 - 1000 Ton

 

Compaction

1 - 100 Ton

Hot Mix Asphalt Aggregate

Aggregate

SE, Fracture, Uncompacted Void Content of Fine Aggregate, See Note 3

1 - 2000 Ton

Mineral Filler

SP, G & PI

Certificate

Asphalt Materials

 

Certification

 

Asphalt Binder (PG, Etc.)

Verification:

2-1 Quart

Every other mix acceptable sample, See Note 6

Emulsion for Bituminous Surface Treatment

Verification:

2-1 Quart

Every other shipment

Emulsified Asphalt for Fog Seal

Verification:

None Required

 

Emulsion for HMA Tack Coat

Verification:

2-1 Quart

1 sample per project (Statistically Evaluated Projects Only)

Compaction See Note 9

 

Embankment

1 - 2500 CY

Cut Section

1 - 500 LF

Surfacing

1 - 1,000 LF (per layer)

Backfill

1 - 500 CY

Note 1-Mix design conformation samples shall be submitted to the State Materials Laboratory Bituminous Materials Section. For all projects, beginning with the first Acceptance sample, submit one sample (two representative quarters) Every 10,000 mix tons (one conformation sample for every ten Acceptance samples). The conformation samples should be taken in conjunction with and be representative quarters of the acceptance samples taken for the project as described in WSDOT Test Method 712.

Note 2-Cement may be accepted by the engineer based on the Manufacturer’s Mill Test Report number indicating full conformance to the Specifications. The engineer has the option of taking samples at the job site for submission to the State Materials Laboratory for testing.

Note 3-The first sample of asphalt binder will be taken with the second Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) mix sample. For nonstatistical HMA, take one sample for every 2,000 tons of mixture.

Note 4-The frequency for fine, course, and combined concrete aggregate samples for PCC Paving and PCC Structures shall be based on the cubic yard (CY) of concrete.

Note 5-Sample the first truck, and each load until two successive loads meet specifications, and then randomly test one load for every ten loads. If at any time one load fails to meet specifications, continue testing every load until two successive loads meet specifications, and then randomly test one load for every ten loads.

Note 6-For materials placed in a non-structural application outside the roadway prism such as slope flattening or shoulder dressing, acceptance for compaction may be based on visual inspection to the satisfaction of the engineer.

Note 7-The gravel borrow for structural earth walls shall be tested for Los Angeles Wear and Degradation prior to placement and the test data may come from an approved source in the aggregate source approval database. For geosynthetic reinforcement, the gravel borrow shall be tested for pH prior to placement. For metallic reinforcement, the gravel borrow shall be tested for pH, resistivity, chlorides, and sulfates prior to placement. If the resistivity of the backfill material equals or exceeds 5,000 ohm-cm, the specified chloride and sulfates limits may be waived. If the aggregate source has variable quality, additional testing may be required. Refer to the Engineer for direction.

Special Note: The tolerance limits in the table above do not apply to statistically accepted material.

4B.210 Traffic Calming Devices

Traffic calming in Olympia neighborhoods is used to improve neighborhood livability by reducing the speed and impact of vehicular traffic on residential neighborhoods by incorporating traffic calming devices. The following are approved for installation as traffic calming devices:

A.    Traffic Circle pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-40A, 4-40B, 4-40C. Signing for traffic circles will be pursuant to Standard Drawings 4-40D, 4-40E, 4-40F, 4-40G, or 4-40H;

B.    Fourteen-foot Local Speed Bump pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-42A;

C.    Twenty-two-foot Collector Speed Bump pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-42B;

D.    Chokers, Curb Extensions;

E.    Chicanes; and

F.    Semi- and Full Diverters.

In new developments, traffic calming devices may be required by the City or may be requested by developers if City Standards are met.

All traffic calming devices will be reviewed and approved by Public Works Transportation. In new developments, the devices should be reviewed at the time of the preliminary design review and again upon final approval of the plans.

4C SIDEWALKS AND CURBS

4C.020 Design Standards

Plans for the construction of sidewalks and curb, or curb and gutter, are to be submitted as part of the street plans when applicable.

The City has set forth minimum standards as outlined in Section 3.040 that must be met in the design and construction of sidewalks and curb, or curb and gutter. Because these are minimum standards, they may be modified by the City Engineer should the City Engineer feel circumstances require increased or decreased widths.

4C.030 Sidewalks

Sidewalks will be 4 inches thick and will be constructed of pervious concrete meeting the requirements of Appendix 6. Impermeable Portland Cement concrete sidewalks may be approved for a project, if site conditions limit or prohibit the use of pervious concrete. A deviation request for the use of impermeable concrete shall be submitted to the City Engineer, per section 1.050 of the EDDS. When the sidewalk and curb or curb and gutter are contiguous, the width of the sidewalk will be measured from face of curb to back of sidewalk. Curbs integral to pervious concrete sidewalks are not allowed.

A.    Arterial streets. Sidewalks and curb or curb and gutter will be required on both sides of all arterial streets interior to the development. Sidewalks and curb or curb and gutter will also be required on the development side of streets abutting the exterior of said development. Arterial streets for purposes of this subsection will include major arterials, secondary arterials, and collector streets.

B.    Local access streets. Sidewalks will be required on both sides of local access streets interior to the development and on the development side of local access streets abutting the exterior of said development including cul-de-sacs.

C.    The design and construction of all sidewalks and curb or curb and gutter, and walkways will meet the following minimum standards:

The width of sidewalks will be as shown in the street design drawings. Those sidewalks designated in the Comprehensive Bike Plan of the City as bike paths will, in addition, meet the minimum width requirements established for said bike paths. The City Engineer will require that the design of all sidewalks provide for a gradual rather than an abrupt transition between sidewalks of different widths or alignments.

D.    Form and subgrade inspection by the City is required before sidewalk is poured.

E.    Monolithic pour of curb and sidewalk will not be allowed.

F.    For driveway requirements, see Section 4B.140.

G.    Repair, maintenance, and upkeep of the sidewalk and all streetside features, including landscaped areas and trees, are the responsibility of the abutting property owner.

4C.040 Curb or Curb and Gutter

Cement concrete curb or curb and gutter will be used for all street edges as specified in Standard Drawings for each street classification unless otherwise approved by the City Engineer. All curb or curb and gutter will be constructed of commercial concrete as shown on Standard Drawing 4-14, 4-14A, 4-14B, or 4-14C, as applicable. Curb and gutter shall not be installed adjacent to bicycle lanes, or on Major Collectors and Arterials.

Form and subgrade inspection by the City are required before curb or curb and gutter are poured.

4C.050 Curb Ramps

All sidewalks must be constructed to provide access in accordance with the standards of state law. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Public Right-Of-Way Accessibility Guidelines (PROWAG) provide regulations and guidance for curb ramp placement and geometry.

Curb ramps will be constructed of impermeable (standard commercial) concrete. Form and subgrade inspection by the City are required before a curb ramp is poured.

Curb ramps will be installed in accordance with applicable City Standard Drawing(s).

4C.060 Staking

All surveying and staking will be performed by an engineering or surveying firm capable of performing such work. The engineer or surveyor directing such work will be licensed by the State of Washington.

A preconstruction meeting will be held with the City prior to commencing staking. All construction staking will be inspected by the City prior to construction.

The minimum staking of curb or curb and gutter and sidewalk will be as follows:

Stake top back of sidewalk or top face of curb at a consistent offset for vertical and horizontal alignment every 25 feet (50 feet in tangent sections).

Staking will be maintained throughout construction.

4C.070 Parking Bulb-outs

On local access streets, parking bulb-outs are required for block faces that are greater than 350'. The parking bulb-outs placed at both street ends will define a parking lane. A 100' no parking zone in the center of the block is also required to accommodate Emergency Vehicle access. Refer to Standard Drawing 4-13B for typical block configuration.

4C.071 Pedestrian Bulb-outs

Curb bulb-outs are required on all Arterials, Major Collectors and Neighborhood Collector streets where on-street parking exists. Curb bulb-outs are also required on all Downtown streets where on-street parking exists. Typical layout of a pedestrian bulb-out is shown in Standard Drawings 4-13A and 4-13A1.

When a 10' travel lane is adjacent to a pedestrian bulb-out, the edge of the bulb-out shall be set back 1' from the edge of the travel lane. If the travel lane is 11' or greater, no additional setback is required and the edge of the bulb-out will extend to the edge of the on-street parking.

Downtown is defined in Section 2.020, and shown in Appendix 4 of this Chapter.

4D BIKEWAYS

4D.020 Design Standards

The design of bicycle paths will depend upon their type and usage. Bikeway surfacing will be as outlined in Section 4B.160.

All minimum design standards as set forth in Section 3.040 will apply. The minimum design standards for bikeways will be as defined in the WSDOT Design Manual, Division 15, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities.

Bike lane markings will be installed pursuant to WSDOT Standard Plan M-9.50-01 and City of Olympia Standard Drawing 4-27D.

Normally bikeways are shared with other transportation modes, although they may be provided exclusively for bicycle use. Bikeways are categorized as follows:

A.    Class I, Bike Path. A separate facility for use principally by bicyclists, but may be shared with pedestrians. These facilities are separated from motor vehicle roadways.

B.    Class II, Bike Lane. A portion of the motor vehicle roadway that is designated by signs and pavement markings for bicycle use. These facilities are adjacent to the motor vehicle roadway.

C.    Class III, Bike Route. A street that is designated with signs as a bicycle route where bicycle usage is shared with motor vehicles on the street, or less desirably, with pedestrians on a sidewalk or walkway. Where bicycle usage is shared with motor vehicles, the curb lane width will be increased to 14 feet.

D.    Class IV, Shared Roadway. An unsigned facility within commercial and high-density urban centers where sidewalk bicycling is not permitted. No special designations or design criteria are directed toward bicycle use.

E.    Bike lanes on Arterial, Major Collectors and Neighborhood Collectors. All arterials and major collectors will be built or rebuilt with a Class II bicycle facility, or bike lane. This includes the extension or connections of these classes of streets. Select neighborhood collectors will be built or rebuilt with bike lanes. Local access streets are not required to have bike lanes. See Table 1 for street classifications.

Consistent with the 2009 Bicycle Mater Plan, the following arterials and major collectors are exempt from a Class II bicycle facility.

Arterials exempt from bicycle facilities:

•    Pacific Avenue, SE, from Pacific Avenue “Y” to City Limits

•    Black Lake Boulevard, SW, from US 101 to Harrison Avenue

•    Carlyon Avenue, SE, from Quince Street to Capitol Boulevard

•    Sleater Kinney Road, SE, from I-5 to Martin Way

•    Jefferson Street, SE, from 8th Avenue to Union Avenue

•    Cooper Point Road, SW, from Caton Way to Capital Mall Drive

•    4th Avenue from Simmons Street to Jefferson Street

•    State Avenue, NE, from Franklin Street to Water Street

•    Lilly Road, SE, from Pacific Avenue to Martin Way

Major Collectors exempt from bicycle facilities:

•    Lilly Road, NE, from Martin Way to Providence St. Peter Hospital

•    5th Avenue, SE, from Water Street to Eastside Street

•    Adams Street, SE, from State Avenue to 8th Avenue

•    Legion Way, SE, from Eastside Street to Fir Street

•    8th Avenue, SE, from Capitol Way to Eastside Street

•    Carriage Loop, SW

•    Carriage Street, SW

•    Central Street, NE, from Bigelow Avenue to 11th Avenue

•    Fir Street, NE, from Legion Way to Pine Street

•    Wilson Street, NE, from 12th Avenue to Pine Avenue

•    Wilson Street, SE, from 18th Avenue to 22nd Avenue

•    O’Farrell Avenue, SE, from Capitol Boulevard to Galloway

•    Eskridge Boulevard, SE, from Galloway to Cain Road

•    Galloway Street from Eskridge Boulevard to O’Farrell Avenue

•    Carlyon Avenue from Quince Street to Capitol Boulevard

While these are exempt from bike lanes, the City may retrofit these streets to add bike lanes through reconfiguration of lanes or on-street parking.

Selected Neighborhood Collectors that will be built or rebuilt with bike lanes:

•    Ensign Road from Lilly Road to Trail

•    Fern Street from 9th Avenue to 16th Avenue

If a shoulder or additional lane width exist on these streets, these dimensions must be retained.

F.    Class I - IV Bikeways, as appropriate, will be provided when traffic analysis or traffic planning indicates substantial bicycle usage that would benefit from a designated bicycle facility as determined by the City except where noted herein.

4D.030 Staking and Testing

Staking and testing will be done in accordance with street staking and testing as outlined in Sections 4B.190 and 4B.200.

4E TRAILS OR SHARED-USE PATHS

4E.010 Design Standards

The design of trails or shared-use paths (also called pathways) will depend upon their type and usage. Trails or shared-use path surfacing shall be as described below and in Table 13.

All minimum design standards as set forth in Section 3.040 will apply. The minimum design standard for bikeways will be as defined in the WSDOT Design Manual, Chapter 1515, Shared-Use Path Design.

Trails or shared-use path widths will be installed pursuant to City of Olympia Standard Drawing 4-2L. The trails or shared-use paths in the standard are sorted into three classes. The classes are designed to meet the needs of commuters and recreational users as well as preserve habitat and environmentally sensitive areas.

A.    Commuter Multi-Use. This trail/path class will be used in areas where trail demand is the highest, and is designed to accommodate pedestrians and bicycles. Paved with impervious asphalt, it is the widest trail/path, intended for commuter and recreational use.

B.    Neighborhood Connector. This trail/path class is designed as a primarily recreational walkway and bikeway. Narrower than Class I, it is suitable for steeper areas, but is paved with impervious asphalt and will link trails, neighborhoods, and destinations.

C.    Recreational Pedestrian. This trail/path class is designated to accommodate pedestrians in a natural environment. It is a low-impact trail/path which can be used in “sensitive areas.” This trail/path is the narrowest, and surfaced with compacted crushed rock to 95 percent.

The following table summarizes the design standards for the three trail/path class standards.

Table 13: Trail and Shared-Use Path Design Standards 

Trail Class

Trail Width

Vertical Clearance

Surface Material*

Maximum Grades

Minimum Corridor Width

User

Commuter Multi-use

12 Feet + 2 Feet Grass Shoulder

10 Feet

2 Inch Asphalt

2 Inch CSTC

6 Inch Gravel Base

8% Maximum less than 5% recommended

22 Feet

High use commuter, bicycle, pedestrian

Neighbor-hood Connector

10 Feet + 2 Feet Grass Shoulder

10 Feet

2 Inch Asphalt

2 Inch CSTC

4 Inch Gravel Base

8% Maximum less than 5% recommended

20 Feet

Primarily pedestrian

Recreational Pedestrian

3 to 6 Feet Minimum

8 Feet

3 Inch 1/4 Minus (compacted to 95%)

Geotextile

4 Inch CSBC

10% Maximum

16 Feet

Recreational, pedestrian

*A porous pavement section, if considered for a project, must be submitted for approval per the deviation requirements in section 1.050.

Refer to Standard Drawing 4-2L for trail section and WSDOT Design Manual, Chapter 1515, Shared-Use Path Design.

Required on all trails:

Maximum Grades: When grade is greater than 5 percent, provide 5-foot-square resting area adjacent to trail every 200 feet.

Minimum Curve Radius (Class I and II): Level or rolling = 90 feet, downgrades greater than 4% = 260 feet.

Minimum Design Speed: Level or rolling = 20mph, downgrades greater than 4% = 30mph.

Trails with bicycles must design for sight stopping distance on all vertical and horizontal curves based on a 4.5 foot eye height.

Sign posts must be set back a minimum of 2 feet from edge of pavement.

Planted trees must be set back a minimum of 4 feet from edge of pavement.

4E.020 Pathway Illumination

Construction of all paved pathways, shared-use paths and trails shall provide illumination meeting the standards specified in Appendix 5, section 9-29.10(2) C, Ornamental Illumination System – Pathways.

4F ILLUMINATION

4F.010 General

All new commercial or residential subdivisions, short plats, or property development requiring review by the Site Plan Review Committee will provide streetlights in accordance with the standards for such improvements of the City, and they will be owned and operated by the City. Illumination of trails, shared-used paths and pathways is required.

4F.020 Design Standards

A street lighting plan submitted by the applicant and approved by the City Engineer will be required for all streetlight installations. Type of installation will be as set forth in WSDOT Standard Specifications and as directed by the City except where noted herein.

Refer to the City of Olympia Streetlight Installation Guidelines for specific equipment and installation guidelines and procedures.

All public streetlight designs will be prepared by an engineering firm capable of performing such work. The engineer will be licensed by the State of Washington. All developments will submit the lighting plan on a separate sheet. After the system is completed and approved, a set of Record Drawings conforming to section 3.065 of these Standards shall be submitted to the City as a permanent record.

Streetlights will be located in accordance with the Illumination Standards, Tables 14 and 15, and Standard Drawing 4-30. In addition, intersections will be illuminated to 1.5 times the highest foot-candle requirement of the streets surrounding the intersection, if none of the intersecting streets’ average maintained horizontal illumination level (foot-candles) is equal to or greater than one foot-candle. Exception: In residential and intermediate classes, local streets intersecting collector streets do not need 1.5 times the illumination at intersections provided a luminaire is placed at the intersection. Streetlight layout will be first considered for one-sided street placement then opposite-side street placement. Staggered spacing will be allowed upon approval of the engineer where it is necessary to achieve the average maintained horizontal illumination or there is an established staggered pattern and it is necessary to continue this pattern.

The Local Access Street classification requires the use of ornamental lamp posts for streetlight poles. All other street classifications require the use of high-mast decorative ornamental fiberglass streetlight poles with an acorn-style luminaire and decorative bracket arm mounted to the pole.

All luminaires shall be Light Emitting Diode (LED), with a color temperature rating between 3,500 and 4,300 Kelvin. Streetlight spacing calculations for all street classifications, except Local Access and Neighborhood Collector, shall be submitted for review and approval and demonstrate that the requirements of this section are met.

Specifications for each type of streetlight pole are available at the Community Planning and Development Department.

Table 14: Illumination Standards 

Street Class

Area Class

# of Lanes

Luminaire LED Equivalent to HPS (Watt)

Mounting Height

Curb Overhang

Maximum Spacing

One Side

Both Sides

Staggered

Local

Res

20

2-In

100

12

0

 

 

150

Int

20

2-In

100

12

0

 

 

150

Res

25

2-In

100

12

0

 

 

150

Int

25

2-In

100

12

0

 

 

150

Neighborhood Collector

Res-Int

27

2-In

200/50

30/12

2

 

 

300

Neighborhood Collector with Swale

Res-Int

27

2-In

200/50

30/12

1

 

 

300

Neighborhood Collector Boulevard

Res-Int

18/10/18

2-In w/ Blvd

200/50

30/12

2

 

 

300

Neighborhood Collector with Swale

Res-Int

18/10/18

2-In w/ Blvd

200/50

30/12

1

 

 

300

Major Collector*

Residential

2

Calculate – Determine Wattage

30/12

2

X

 

 

 

Residential, Int and Ind

4

Calculate – Determine Wattage

30/12

2

X

 

 

 

Int and Ind

2 and 3

Calculate – Determine Wattage

30/12

2

X

 

 

 

Commercial

All

Calculate – Determine Wattage

30/12

2

X

 

 

Major Collector Boulevard*

All Classes

All

Calculate – Determine Wattage

35/12

2

 

X

 

Commercial Collector*

All Classes

All

Calculate – Determine Wattage

35/12

3

X

 

 

Commercial Collector Boulevard*

All Classes

All

Calculate – Determine Wattage

35/12

3

 

X

 

Major Industrial Collector*

All Classes

All

Calculate – Determine Wattage

35/12

3

X

 

 

Arterial*

All Classes

All

Calculate – Determine Wattage

35/12

2

X

 

 

Arterial Boulevard*

All Classes

All

Calculate – Determine Wattage

35/12

2

 

X

 

Pedestrian Way, Trails, and Shared-use Paths*

All Classes

All

Calculate – Determine Wattage

12

0

X

 

 

For the purposes of this section, area classes are determined by zoning as follows:

Commercial

Downtown Business

General Commercial

Commercial Services - High Density

Medical Services

Central Waterfront

Community Retail

Professional Office/Residential

Residential Mixed Use

Commercial Service - High Density

Community-Oriented Shopping Center

Industrial

Light Industrial/Commercial

Industrial

Intermediate

Neighborhood Retail

Planned Unit Development

Neighborhood Centers

Residential

Single-Family Residential

Two-Family Residential

Residential Multifamily

High-Rise Multifamily

Mixed Residential

Neighborhood Village

Planned Residential Development

Urban Village

As new zones are created, they will be classified by the Public Works Director. If street widths differ from those in Standard Drawings 4-2A through 4-2K2, other spacings will be determined by using the following criteria:

Table 15: Average Maintained Horizontal Illumination (Foot-Candles) 

Road Class

Residential

Intermediate

Industrial

Commercial

Local

*

*

N/A

N/A

Collector

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.2

Arterial

0.8

1.2

1.4

1.6

Sidewalk

0.2

0.6

0.6

0.9

Pedestrian Way, Trails, and Shared-use Paths

0.5

1.0

1.0

2.0

Uniformity Ratio:

6:1 average: minimum for Local Streets

4:1 average: minimum for Collectors

3:1 average: minimum for Arterials and Boulevards

Sidewalk and pedestrian uniformity ratio (average:minimum) will be 6:1 for residential, 5:1 for intermediate and industrial, and 4:1 for commercial.

Light Loss Factor (LLF) = 0.85. LLF includes factors such as Luminaire Dirt Depreciation and Lamp Lumen Depreciation.

Minimum Weak Point Light - 0.2fc except residential Local Streets.

In addition, intersections will be illuminated to 1.5 times the highest foot-candle requirement of the streets surrounding the intersection if none of the intersecting streets average maintained horizontal illumination level (foot-candles) is equal to or greater than one foot-candle.

* Intersection lighting required and then at the spacing specified in the Illumination Standards Table 14.

Line loss calculations will show that no more than 5 percent voltage drop occurs in any circuit. Branch circuits will serve a minimum of four luminaries.

Pole foundations will be pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-33 or 4-33A. Poles will be approved by the City.

All streetlight electrical installations, including wiring conduit and power connections, will be located underground.

Area Classifications

Commercial: That portion of a municipality in a business development where ordinarily there are large numbers of pedestrians and a heavy demand for parking space during periods of peak traffic or sustained high pedestrian volumes and a continuously heavy demand for off-street parking space during business hours. This definition applies to densely developed business areas outside of, as well as those that are within, the central part of a municipality.

Intermediate: That portion of a municipality that is outside of a downtown area but generally within the zone of influence of a business or industrial development, characterized often by moderately heavy nighttime pedestrian traffic and a somewhat lower parking turnover than is found in a commercial area. This definition includes densely developed apartment areas, hospitals, public libraries, and neighborhood recreational centers.

Residential: A residential development, or a mixture of residential and commercial establishments, characterized by few pedestrians and a low parking demand or turnover at night. This definition includes areas with single-family homes, townhouses, and small apartments. Regional parks, cemeteries, and vacant lands are also included.

Pedestrian Way, Trails and Shared-use Paths: Public sidewalks, trails and shared-use paths for pedestrian and bicycle traffic generally not within rights-of-way for vehicular traffic roadways. Included are skyways (pedestrian overpasses), subwalks (pedestrian tunnels), walkways giving access to park or block interiors, connections to neighboring uses, and crossings near centers of long blocks.Trails and shared-use paths are designed to meet the needs of commuters and recreational uses.

4F.030 Technical Requirements for Streetlight Construction

1.    All workmanship, materials, and testing will be in accordance with the EDDS, WSDOT Standard Specifications, MUTCD, National Electrical Code (NEC), and the City of Olympia Streetlight Installation Guidelines unless otherwise specified below. In cases of conflict, the most stringent guidelines will apply.

2.    A right-of-way obstruction permit, electrical permit, and inspections are required for all streetlight installations within the City of Olympia. The contractor is responsible for obtaining said permits prior to any type of actual construction. These permits are available from the Community Planning and Development Department, 601 4th Avenue East, Olympia, WA.

3.    A clearly marked service disconnect will be provided for every lighting circuit. The location and installation of the disconnect will conform to the NEC and Standard Drawing 4-19. The photocell window will face north unless otherwise directed by the City. The service disconnect will not be mounted on the luminaire pole. The service disconnect will be of a type equal to a Milbank CP3B-11C15AALSP2, 120/240 VAC, 103W, Caltrans Type 3B with contactors, photo electric cell, and test switch. All service disconnects will be used to their fullest capabilities (i.e., maximum number of luminaries per circuit).

4.    All lighting wire will be copper with a minimum size of #8. All wire will be suitable for wet locations. All wire will be installed in Schedule 40 PVC conduit with a minimum diameter of 1 1/2 inches. A bushing or bell end will be used at the end of a conduit that terminates at a junction box or luminaire pole. Conductor identification will be an integral part of the insulation of the conductors throughout the system (i.e., color-coded wire). Equipment grounding conductor will be #8 copper. All splices or taps will be made by approved methods utilizing epoxy kits rated at 600 volts (i.e., 3-M 82-A2). All splices will be made with pressure-type connectors (wire nuts will not be allowed). Direct burial wire will not be allowed. All other installation will conform to NEC, WSDOT Standard Specifications, and MUTCD standards.

5.    Each luminaire pole will have an in-line fused watertight electrical disconnect located at the base of the pole. Access to these fused disconnects will be through the hand-hole on the pole. The hand-hole will be facing away from oncoming traffic. Additional conductor length will be left inside the pole and pull or junction box equal to a loop having a diameter of 1 foot. Load side of in-line fuse to luminaire head will be cable and pole bracket wire, 2-conductor, 19-strand copper, #10, and will be supported at the end of the luminaire by an approved means. Fuse size disconnect installation and grounding in pole will conform to NEC standards.

6.    Approved pull boxes or junction boxes will be installed when conduit runs are more than 200 feet. In addition, a pull box or junction box will be located within 10 feet of each luminaire pole and at every street crossing. Boxes will be clearly and indelibly marked as lighting boxes by the legend “L.T.” or “LIGHTING.” See WSDOT Standard Plans. All empty conduit runs will terminate inside a J-Box and have 14-gauge coated copper tracer wire inside the conduit with accessible ends (2-foot tails).

7.    All lighting poles will be tapered round shafts with a linear taper of between 0.125 and 0.14 inches per foot. In existing developed areas, the City may approve/require use of other poles to establish consistency within the developed area.

8.    Mounting heights, arm length, power source, luminaire, and bolt patterns will be as follows:

Mounting Height:

_____ft.

Arm Length:

_____ft.

Power Source:

240 VAC, single phase, 3-wire

Luminaire Type:

_____watt, Light Emitting Diode (LED)

 

Flat lens, medium cutoff I.E.S. Type 3 distribution

Bolt Pattern:

4 bolt, _____diameter bolt circle

9.    Cement concrete bases will follow Standard Drawing 4-33 or 4-33A. Conduit will extend between 3 and 6 inches above the concrete base.

10.    Refer to Standard Drawings 4-30, 4-31, and 4-31A for typical streetlight installation layout.

11.    Any modification to approved plans will be reviewed and approved by the City prior to installation.

4F.040 Staking

All surveying and staking for Streetlights shall meet the requirements of Section 3.056. In addition, the minimum staking of luminaries will be as follows:

A.    Location and elevation to the center of every pole base.

B.    Location and elevation of each service disconnect.

C.    Location and elevation of each J-box.

4F.050 Testing

All luminaries will be subject to an electrical inspection. Lamp, photocell, and fixture will be warranted per Section 2.030F,a minimum 2-years unless the Manufacturer’s Warranty exceeds this period, then the period of the Manufacturer’s Warranty applies.

4G SIGNALS

4G.010 General

Signals will be installed pursuant to the requirements set forth herein. This work will consist of furnishing and installing a complete and functional traffic control system of controllers, signals, and appurtenances as required by the City.

4G.020 Design Standards

Signal systems will be designed in accordance with the specifications as set forth in the WSDOT Design Manual and the WSDOT Standard Specifications and City of Olympia Traffic Signal Design Guidelines.

All public signal designs will be prepared by an engineering firm capable of performing such work. The engineer will be licensed by the State of Washington. All applicable requirements set forth in Section 3.040 will be included. Approval of plans and specifications will be obtained before construction commences.

Signal or strain pole foundations will be pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-34.

The beacon and gong assembly for emergency vehicle preemption indication will be pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-36.

4G.030 Induction Loops

Induction loops will be constructed pursuant to WSDOT Standard Specifications 8-20.3(14)C, WSDOT Standard Plan J-50.10, Standard Drawing 4-35, and the following:

A.    Loops will not be cut into final lift of new asphalt.

B.    Loops will be preformed in crushed surfacing top course (CSTC) before paving or will be cut in existing asphalt or leveling course to sub-base before intersection is overlaid.

4G.040 Staking

All surveying and staking will be performed by an engineering or surveying firm capable of performing such work. The engineer or surveyor directing such work will be licensed by the State of Washington. Staking will be maintained throughout construction.

A preconstruction meeting will be held with the City prior to commencing staking. All construction staking will be inspected by the City prior to construction.

The minimum staking of signals will be as follows:

A.    Location with cut or fill to center of all pole bases.

B.    Location of junction box.

C.    Location of all corners of controller base.

D.    Location of service disconnect.

E.    Locations of conduit crossings.

4G.050 Testing

All signals will be subject to any necessary electrical inspections as well as requirements as set forth in the WSDOT Design Manual and the WSDOT Standard Specifications.

A signal system will not be approved or accepted by the City until the signal has performed correctly to the City’s satisfaction for a 30-day “checkout” period as outlined below.

Controller and cabinet testing will be required at WSDOT District 3 Laboratory and/or the City of Olympia. All specifications and material samples will be submitted to the City for review and approval prior to installation.

4G.060 Checkout Procedures

The contractor will call for an intersection checkout after completing the controller cabinet installation along with all other signal equipment complete with wiring connections. All parts and workmanship will be warranted for one year from date of acceptance.

New signals will operate without any type of failure for a period of 30 days. The contractor will have technical personnel available to respond to system failure within 24 hours during the 30-day checkout period.

Failure of any control equipment or hardware within the checkout period will restart the 30-day checkout period.

4H MISCELLANEOUS STREETSIDE FEATURES

4H.010 General

Miscellaneous features included herein will be developed and constructed to encourage the uniform development and use of streetside features wherever possible.

4H.020 Design Standards

The design and placement of roadside features included herein will adhere to the specific requirements as listed for each feature and when applicable to the appropriate standards as set forth in Sections 3.010 and 3.040.

4H.030 Surveying and Staking

All surveying and staking shall be performed as required in Chapter 3, Section 3.056 of these Standards.

4H.040 Testing

Testing will be required at the developer’s or contractor’s expense on all materials and construction as specified in the WSDOT Standard Specifications and with a frequency as specified in Section 4B.200 above, or the WSDOT Construction Manual, whichever is more stringent.

4H.050 Survey Monuments

A.    All existing survey control monuments that are disturbed, lost, or destroyed during surveying or construction will be replaced with the proper monument as outlined in B and C below by a land surveyor registered in the State of Washington at the expense of the responsible builder or developer.

B.    State permit required. WAC 332-120 shall be adhered to: According to WAC 332-120 Survey Monuments - removal or destruction, a surveyor licensed in the State of Washington shall adequately search the records and the physical area of the proposed construction for known or existing survey monuments. Any found monuments shall be referenced and reestablished in accordance with current applicable state laws. Before any earth disturbing activities take place, the contractor’s surveyor shall sign and seal the Monument Preservation Documentation Letter, Appendix 3, and submit it to the engineer.

C.    A cast-in-place concrete surface monument with sufficient ferrous metal embedded to allow for detection by a magnetic detection device pursuant to City of Olympia standards is required. Cap will be Berntsen RB Series or brass plug marker.

D.    Required Monument Locations. Monument plan shall be submitted to City Surveyor for review and approval before any monuments are installed. Appropriate monuments will be placed as follows:

1.    At or near all street intersections.

2.    At the PC and PTs of all horizontal curves.

3.    At PI of all horizontal curves of streets where the PI lies within the limits of the traveled roadway.

4.    At all corners, control points, and angle points around the perimeter of subdivisions as required by the City.

5.    At all section corners, quarter corners, and sixteenth corners that fall within the right-of-way.

E.    The monument case will be installed after the final course of surfacing has been placed.

4H.060 Bus Stops and Amenities

A.    Public Transit will use the following guidelines in placement and design of public transit bus stop zones and passenger amenities. To provide greater passenger, pedestrian and vehicular safety, bus stops should be of adequate length to allow the vehicle to clear crosswalks and not obstruct traffic. The bus capacity at a stop (i.e., number of bus bays) should be increased with the rate of bus arrivals and passenger boardings. Whenever possible, bus stops should be located on the far side of street intersections to reduce the space required for the bus stop and to minimize conflicts between buses re-entering the traffic stream and vehicles making right turns onto cross streets.

Population densities generally dictate the number and placement of public transit bus stops. The City and Intercity Transit, the public transit system, will use the following general guidelines to determine frequency and spacing of stops on any given Intercity Transit route:

1.    The Central Business District (CBD) and environs bus stops can be placed approximately every 440 feet (9 to 12 per mile or one every 1 to 2 blocks).

2.    Urbanized fringe (fully developed areas with mixed apartments, single-family housing, or no open space other than parks and schools) approximately every 700 feet (7 to 8 per mile or every 2 to 3 blocks).

3.    Suburban areas (mostly single-family housing with pockets of open space and undeveloped land) every 1,250 feet (4 per mile) as needed in open areas.

4.    In order to evaluate a new route and build ridership, placement of bus stop zones may initially depart from the above guidelines.

5.    New service will not be initiated prior to the establishment of designated bus stops.

6.    Bus stops can be initially located on an average of 4 to 6 stops per route mile along local residential collection/distribution segments of a new route.

7.    Additional stops may be added if warranted but will not exceed the basic stop spacing guidelines of 8 to 10 stops per mile and no two stops within 600 feet of one another.

8.    Site designs for businesses, residential subdivisions, and multi-family developments along transit routes will accommodate transit use. This may include the location of a building entrance near a transit stop, pedestrian facilities, sheltered or unsheltered transit stops, and/or a bus bay. Connectivity to surrounding streets and trails shall be provided to reduce walking distance to transit routes consistent with block spacing criteria 2.040.3(e), including provision of pedestrian facilities.

9.    All new bus stops will comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements. All “landing pads” require no more than a 2 percent grade. Bus stops with shelters require a minimum landing pad of 6' wide by 8' deep. Confirmation of any new stop location and design will be coordinated with Intercity Transit staff.

B.    The Olympia School District and the North Thurston Public Schools District will use the following criteria in placement and design of school bus stops:

1.    A school bus stop will be required for each new residential subdivision or apartment complex where school children are to be boarding or deboarding unless it is determined by the school district that a new bus stop is not required because adjacent facilities already exist for the site.

2.    Placement will be determined by the school district and the City.

3.    Location of school bus stops will be designed with safety as a paramount concern. Major arterials with high traffic counts should be avoided where possible and only used when bus pullouts are available and significant protection is provided for children.

4.    School bus stops will be designed to complement the residential environment and provide convenient location and access for neighborhood children, including sidewalk access and connections to pedestrian facilities.

5.    Every effort will be made to make school bus stops and sidewalk access to school bus stops a safe and friendly pedestrian environment.

6.    The school district should make every effort to coordinate the location of school bus stops with Intercity Transit.

C.    The physical location of any bus stop zone will be primarily determined by the following standards: maximizing safety, operational efficiency, and minimizing impacts to adjacent property. Bus pullouts or bulb-outs may be required on Arterial, Major Collector and Commercial Collector streets for safe bus berthing and to minimize impacts on traffic flow of buses stopping. Additionally, school bus pullouts or bulb-outs may be required on Local Access streets if road geometries require, such as determined by the City and the school district.

D.    Maintaining adequate separation between driveways/intersections and bus stop zones, pullouts and bulbouts can increase the safety and efficiency of both the roadway and transit service.

When locating a bus stop pullout in reference to existing driveways or locating a driveway in reference to an existing bus pullout, the following guidelines need to be taken into consideration.

1.    A minimum distance of 105 feet, 125 feet preferred, should be maintained between the pullout and the driveway on arterial roadways and a minimum of 55 feet, 75 feet preferred on local streets. This distance is measured from the edge of the driveway to the front or back of the transit vehicle, whichever end is closer.

2.    A bus pullout should not be located where the transit vehicle will block sight distance from a driveway or intersection.

3.    Driveways should not be located within the taper of a bus pullout.

When locating a public transit bus stop zone, the length of the zone will reflect the general space distance needed to maneuver a 40' long transit vehicle and the roadway speed limit. Within the urban core, this distance is 55' - 65'.

Design standard guidelines for a bus stop zone, pullout or a bulbout shall be obtained from Intercity Transit. Suggested guideline reference for bus stop zones, pullouts and bulbouts can be found in the Washington State Department of Transportation Design Manual.

E.    All Intercity Transit and school district bus stops will be identified in some fashion. This may include pavement marking, bus stop sign and/or passenger shelter. Contact Intercity Transit for details required for Intercity Transit bus stops.

F.    A passenger shelter can be required for any bus stop and reflects criteria established by Intercity Transit and/or the City for when a shelter is needed. The following requirements apply to bus stop shelters:

1.    Passenger shelters for Intercity Transit sites and school district sites will be designed to engineering standards set by Intercity Transit and the City. This includes shelters that are transparent for passenger visibility and safety, sight distance for approaching vehicles, protection from the elements, and reasonably vandal-resistant for easy maintenance. Additional passenger amenities or service features at these stops are subject to change. Shelters for school stops will not look like a public transit shelter unless used by both transportation systems.

2.    Intercity Transit has standard bus stop and passenger shelter designs that include a bench, information display panels, and a trash can. Shelters can be purchased directly from Intercity Transit for any designated public transit stop requiring a passenger shelter. These public shelters become the property of Intercity Transit unless designated otherwise by prior agreement. An alternate shelter design will be considered based upon approval by the City and Intercity Transit and constructed and maintained by the proposer or their designated party.

3.    Only Intercity Transit approved shelters will be maintained by Intercity Transit. School district bus stop shelters will be maintained by the subdivision’s Homeowners Association or apartment owner, whichever is appropriate.

4.    Shelter size will be appropriate to anticipated service and use. The size of the Intercity Transit shelter will be determined by Intercity Transit and the City. School bus shelters will provide a minimum of 50 square feet of shelter for each 25 lots in a subdivision or each 25 two or more bedroom units in an apartment complex.

5.    The following criteria will be applied by the City’s Community Planning and Development Department to public transit bus stop facilities:

a.    Provide ADA accessible walkways paved with a hard all-weather surface linking various sections of subdivision and developments to peripheral streets with bus stops.

b.    In designing walkways, provide access through mid-blocks to decrease distances to bus facilities and provide flexibility for pedestrians.

c.    Provide ADA accessible ramps and other facilities consistent with universal and barrier-free design standards along walkways leading to a bus stop.

d.    Developments enclosed by walls or fences will provide openings or gates for walkways to provide direct access between developments and bus stops.

e.    Use street name signs to mark pedestrian walkways.

f.    Separate streets and parking areas from pedestrian pathways by grade separations, landscaping, and other devices. A minimum 4- to 6-foot planting strip with trees will be provided to buffer sidewalks or walkways from streets and parking areas. When possible, a second row of trees should be provided between the sidewalk and adjacent property.

g.    Public transit bus stop zones will have a minimum 50' clear zone free of trees or shrubs on the leading side of the bus and a clear zone around the shelter to allow good visibility for both vehicle safety and security of pedestrians at the stop.

h.    Provide pedestrian facilities such as lighting, signs, and trash cans as warranted by anticipated use. (See illumination standards in Tables 14 and 15.)

i.    New development street systems should be designed so as to minimize pedestrian travel to bus stops.

4H.070 Mailboxes

A.    During construction, existing mailboxes will be accessible for the delivery of mail or, if necessary, moved to a temporary location.

Temporary relocation will be coordinated with the U.S. Postal Service. The mailboxes will be reinstalled at the original location or, if construction has made it impossible, to a location as outlined below and approved by the U.S. Postal Service.

B.    Location

1.    Bottom or base of box will be 36 inches to 42 inches above the street surface.

2.    Front of mailbox 18 inches behind vertical curb face or outside edge of shoulder.

3.    New developments. Clustered mailboxes are required. Contact the U.S. Postal Service for details. See Detail 4-18.

C.    Mailboxes will be set on posts strong enough to give firm support but not to exceed 4-inch x 4-inch wood or one 12-inch-diameter pipe, or material and design with comparable breakaway characteristics.

4H.080 Guardrails

For purposes of design and location, all guardrails along roadways will conform to the criteria of the WSDOT Design Manual as may be amended or revised.

On West Bay Drive, the Ironwood Guardrail System will be required.

4H.090 Retaining Walls

A.    Rock walls may be used for erosion protection of cut or fill embankments up to a maximum height of 8 feet in stable soil conditions that will result in no significant foundation settlement or outward thrust upon the walls. For heights over 4 feet or when soil is unstable, a structural wall of acceptable design, stamped by a licensed structural engineer, will be used. Rock walls over 4 feet high will be subject to inspection by a geotechnical engineer as outlined in the following paragraph.

Any rock wall over 30 inches high in a fill section will require an engineered design by a geotechnical engineer. The geotechnical engineer will continuously inspect the installation of the wall as it progresses and will submit inspection reports, including compaction test results and photographs taken during the construction, documenting the techniques used and the degree of conformance to the geotechnical engineer’s design.

In the absence of such a rock wall design, walls having heights over 6 feet or walls to be constructed in conditions when soil is unstable require a structural wall having a design approved by the Public Works Department or the Community Planning and Development Department if outside the right-of-way. The design of structural walls will be by a professional structural engineer qualified in retaining wall design. Structural walls require issuance of a building permit prior to construction.

B.    The rock material will be as nearly rectangular as possible. No stone will be used that does not extend through the wall. The rock material will be hard, sound, durable, and free from weathered portions, seams, cracks, and other defects. The rock density will be a minimum of 160 pounds per cubic foot.

C.    The rock wall will be started by excavating a trench having a depth below subgrade of one-half the base course or 1 foot (whichever is greater).

D.    Rock selection and placement will be such that there will be minimum voids and, in the exposed face, no open voids over 6 inches across in any direction. The final course will have a continuous appearance and will be placed to minimize erosion of the backfill material. The larger rocks will be placed at the base of the rockery so that the wall will be stable and have a stable appearance. The rocks will be placed in a manner such that the longitudinal axis of the rock will be at right angles or perpendicular to the rockery face. The rocks will have all inclining faces sloping to the back of the rockery. Each course of rocks will be seated as tightly and evenly as possible on the course beneath. After setting each course of rock, all voids between the rocks will be chinked on the back with quarry rock to eliminate any void sufficient to pass a 2-inch-square probe.

E.    The wall backfill will consist of 1 1/2-inch washed rock or as specified by a licensed engineer. This material will be placed to an 8-inch minimum thickness between the entire wall and the cut or fill material. The backfill material will be placed in lifts to an elevation approximately 6 inches below the top of each course of rocks as they are placed until the uppermost course is placed. Any backfill material on the bearing surface of one rock course will be removed before setting the next course.

F.    Perforated drainage pipe and filter fabric will be installed pursuant to Standard Drawing 4-26 and connected to a stormwater system. This pipe requirement may be waived by the engineer upon confirmation that no subsurface water problem exists.

4H.100 Street Trees

A.    Species, cultivars, or varieties

1.    The Urban Forester may provide a list of trees appropriate for planting as street trees.

2.    Other tree species or their varieties may be planted as street trees, with approval of the Urban Forester, if they are appropriate for the planting location and are generally free of health problems or other limitations.

3.    Some planting locations may require a specific species to ensure consistency with citywide streetscape designs. Only the designated species or variety shall be planted in these areas, unless otherwise authorized by the Urban Forester.

B.    Planting stock requirements.

1.    Size. Unless otherwise specified by the Urban Forester, all tree planting stock shall conform to American Standards for Nursery Stock (ANSI Z60.1-1990) and shall be at least 1 3/4-inch caliper.

2.    Grade. Unless otherwise specified by the Urban Forester, all trees shall have comparatively straight trunks, well-developed leaders and crowns, shall exhibit evidence of proper nursery pruning practices, and shall have a branch height of at least 6 feet. At the time of planting, all trees must be free of mechanical injuries and other objectionable features that affect the future form and beauty of the plant.

C.    Street tree spacing and location. The City Engineer or Urban Forester may vary the following standards as necessary to ensure public safety and consistent streetscape design. Spacing and location of trees shall be determined by the Urban Forester in accordance with local conditions; the species, cultivars, or varieties used; and their mature height, spread, and form.

1.    Generally, all large trees, at maturity, shall be spaced 40 to 60 feet, center to center; all medium trees shall be spaced 35 feet, center to center; and all small trees shall be spaced 25 feet center to center.

2.    In planting locations less than 5 feet wide, or where overhead lines or building setbacks present a special problem, the Urban Forester may vary these requirements or make site-specific recommendations to allow for the planting of trees where deemed appropriate.

3.    Trees shall be planted at least 15 feet from driveways and alleys, and at street intersections, the distance shall be that specified in Section 4B.150 (Sight Obstruction).

4.    No tree shall be planted closer than 20 feet to a utility pole or a streetlight to allow for maintenance and light penetration.

D.    Tree Grates

Street trees planted in sidewalks shall be in tree grates conforming to City Standards.

E.    Planting Bed Preparation (Planting Strip configuration)

1.    Top Soil Specifications. The top soil (top 12 inches of soil) shall be amended to meet the design specifications for compost-amended soil and mulch pursuant to Standard Drawing 5-8 (Post-Construction soil quality and depth.)

2.    Subsoil Specifications: The Subsoil (12-36” deep) density needs to be high enough to avoid settling, yet low enough to allow root growth. Subsoil should have a density of 93-106 lbs/cu.ft. (1.5 to 1.7 MG/m3). Structural Soil meeting the requirements of section G below may be required by the City Engineer or Urban Forester. A vibrating plate compactor should be used between lifts to settle the soil. Number of passes required needs to be determined on site. A starting point is two passes of a 20-inch (55 cm) impact plate vibrating compactor on a moist (not wet) soil to achieve the desirable density.

3.    Subsoil Volume: The required volume of Subsoil per tree will be calculated by the Urban Forester or City Engineer, based on the species, anticipated mature tree size, soil type and soil conditions. In general, approximately 1,000 cubic feet of Subsoil per tree will be required, calculated with an assumed depth of no less than 3 feet.

F.    Planting Bed Preparation (Tree Pit configuration)

For tree pits in a sidewalk located in the right of way, Structural Soil meeting the minimum specifications in Subsection G below shall be installed for the Subsoil, to ensure adequate soil volume and conditions are provided for the growth and health of street trees planted in a tree pit configuration. Alternative technologies may be submitted for approval through the deviation process outlined in Section 1.050 that meet or exceed the quantitative and qualitative aspects of structural soil in these applications.

G.    Structural Soil for Street Trees

1.    Structural Soil, if required, shall consist of a mix of the following:

a.    Crushed rock meeting the WSDOT specification for Gravel Backfill for Drywells, 9.03.12(5), except that all material must have at least one fractured face (i.e. crushed).

b.    Loam/Organic topsoil.

c.    Soil binder such as “Stabilizer” brand.

d.    Water.

2.    Proportions of materials

Material

Amount for 1 CY of Structural Soil*

Amount for 4.6 CY*

Crushed Rock

23.2 cubic feet (0.86 CY)

4 CY

Topsoil

5.9 cubic feet (0.22)

1 CY

Soil Binder

13.7 ounces

4 pounds

Water

1.6 gallons

7.4 gallons

*    When mixed together, some of the topsoil fills in the voids of the crushed rock material, resulting in the net volume being about 10% less than the sum of the volume of the two materials before mixing.

The target moisture content is 20% by weight of the topsoil weight. The above water contents assume the top is dry. The amount of water that will need to be added will be dependent on the moisture content of the raw materials. Actual amounts of water used will be determined during mixing.

3.    Mixing procedure

Mix Structural Soil in batches of an appropriate size for the equipment being used. The end result is to be a material that is uniformly blended together. Do not batch in quantities that will not allow the equipment to completely mix the material. Determine batch size and quantities of each material needed for the batch.

a.    Start with half of the crushed rock material.

b.    Add all of the topsoil material.

c.    Add the soil binder.

d.    Add half of the estimated water.

e.    Add the other half of the crushed rock material.

f.    Mix the material together.

g.    Slowly add water to the mixture and continue to mix. The final amount of water will vary with moisture content of the crushed rock and topsoil. Add water in incremental amounts and mix the material between the additions of water.

h.    Stop adding water and mixing when there is a minute amount of free topsoil remaining. The topsoil will coat the crushed rock and not fall out of the material. All of the crushed rock should be uniformly coated with topsoil. There should be no clumps of topsoil or uncovered crushed rock in the mixture.

i.    If too much water is added to the mixture water will drain out of the material and the topsoil will wash off of the crushed rock. If this occurs this batch of material is to be discarded and shall not be incorporated into the completed work.

4.    Placement

Protect soils and mixes from absorbing excess water and from erosion at all times. Do not store materials unprotected from rainfall events. Do not allow excess water to enter site prior to compaction. If water is introduced into the material after grading, allow material to drain or aerate to optimum compaction moisture content.

All areas to receive Structural Soil mixture shall be inspected by the City before starting placement of mixture. All defects such as incorrect grading, compaction and inadequate drainage, etc., shall be corrected prior to beginning placement of Structural Soil.

Confirm that the sub-grade is at the proper elevation and compacted as required. Sub-grade elevations shall slope parallel to the finished grade. Clear the excavation of all construction debris, trash, rubble and foreign material. Fill any over-excavation with approved fill and compact to the required sub-grade compaction.

Install Structural Soil in 6-inch lifts and spread uniformly over the area. Delay placement 24 hours if moisture content exceeds maximum allowable, protect Structural Soil with plastic or plywood during delay.

Bring Structural Soils to finished grades as shown in Standard Drawing 4-50. Immediately protect the Structural Soil material from contamination by water by covering with plastic or plywood.

4H.110 Parking Lots

A parking lot construction permit is required prior to surfacing any unsurfaced designated parking area.

Stormwater retention will be provided and will follow the criteria as set forth in Chapter 5 of these Standards.

Number of plans and specifications will be as required by the Community Planning Development Department and be submitted for review and approval by the City with respect to stormwater discharge and on-site retention or detention, matching street and/or sidewalk grades, access locations, parking layout, and to check for future street improvement conformity and City zoning regulations.

Parking lot surfacing materials for a permanent all-weather surface include asphalt concrete pavement and cement concrete pavement. Gravel surfaces are not acceptable or approved surface material types.

Combination grass/paving systems are approved surface material types; however, their use requires submittal of an overall parking lot paving plan showing the limits of the grass/paving systems and a description of how the systems will be irrigated and maintained. If the City determines the grass/paving system is not appropriate for the specific application, alternate approved surfacing materials will be utilized.

Minimum requirements for parking lot capacity will be determined by the City.

4H.120 Parking Meters

When parking meters are installed, moved, or replaced, installation will be according to Standard Drawing 4-41A and 4-41B.

4I ACCESS POINTS AND INTERSECTION CRITERIA

4I.010 General

Driveways and access points on all Arterial, Major Industrial Collector, Commercial Collector, and Major Collector streets, as defined in Tables 2 and 3 of this Chapter, shall be designed and constructed in conformance with the latest standards established by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO), the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), and this document.

Access control includes:

A.    Reduce the number of access points or increase their spacing so that vehicle conflict areas or maneuver areas do not overlap.

B.    Limit the type of conflict by preventing certain turning maneuvers.

C.    Remove turning vehicles or queues from through lanes.

D.    Reduce the speed differential in through lanes between through vehicles and turning vehicles.

E.    Consider the impact of access points on adjacent or nearby properties as well as across the street.

4I.020 Applicability

These regulations shall apply to all new developments fronting on Arterial, Major Industrial Collector, Commercial Collector, and Major Collector streets as defined in the Street Design Standards Table 2 and Section 4B.030 of these Standards. For a development that combines more than one underlying lot, these regulations, including the number and spacing of access points, shall apply to the development as a whole, not to each underlying lot. If a development to which these regulations has been applied changes ownership, these regulations continue to apply to all future owners.

“Desirable conditions” shall be applied when sufficient space or street frontage is available. If sufficient space or street frontage for desirable conditions is not available, then lesser distances, down to but not less than the numbers labeled on “limiting conditions,” may be applied. Numbers for minimum spacing are based on driveways two lanes wide. In cases where driveways are wider than two lanes, there must be a corresponding increase in numbers for minimum spacing. “Access points” refer to driveways or other connections to private property. “Intersections” refer to points where public streets or streets interconnect.

4I.030 Methods of Measurements

Driveway throat width is measured perpendicular to the centerline of the driveway between lines defined by the radii, whether or not that occurs inside the property lines and is physically marked with curbing.

Driveway throat length is measured along the centerline of the driveway from the back edge of the driveway apron and the nearest vehicle aisle or circulation street.

Dimensions in this section refer to distances from (or along) the face of the curb. In the absence of a curb, the measurement is considered to be from (or along) the edge of pavement.

Driveway angles are measured between the driveway centerline and centerline of the roadway.

4I.040 Spacing of Access Points, Same Side of Street

A.    The numbers in Table 16 shall be the minimum distance allowed between the centerlines of adjacent access points. Figure 1 shows an example of this situation.

 

Table 16: Minimum Access Spacing Based on Separation of Conflict Area 

Speed on Adjacent Street

Desirable Conditions

Limiting Conditions

25

120

75

30

185

100

35

245

160

Distance in feet measured center to center of access drives.

Figure 1: Example of access spacing. Desirable condition at street speed of 25 mph.

B.    In situations where site distance is limited, the numbers in Table 17 shall be the minimum distance allowed between the centerlines of adjacent access points or the centerline of an access point and the near side of the nearest street. If a development improves sight distance, then Table 16 shall apply.

Table 17: Minimum Access Spacing Where Sight Distance is Limited 

Speed on Adjacent Street

Desirable Conditions

Limiting Conditions

25

150

100

30

210

160

35

300

240

Distance in feet measured center to center of access drives.

C.    In situations where an access point is served by one or more turn lanes, the numbers in Table 18, plus any necessary storage space in the turn lane based on expected turning volumes, shall apply. These numbers shall be the minimum distance allowed between the centerline of any access points served by a turn lane and the adjacent access point in the upstream direction; or the centerline of an access point and the near side of the nearest street in the upstream direction. In the downstream direction, Table 16 or 17 will apply. Figure 2 shows an example of access spacing with a turn lane.

Table 18: Minimum Access Spacing for Access Points Served by Turn Lanes 

Speed on Adjacent Street

Desirable Conditions

Limiting Conditions

Deceleration

Storage

Total

Deceleration

Storage

Total

25

85

100

185

75

50

125

30

185

100

285

160

50

210

35

280

125

405

240

75

315

    Source: Tables 16, 17 and 18 were adapted from ITE, Transportation and Land Development.

    Distance in feet measured center to center of access drives. Total distance includes deceleration distance plus distance needed to maneuver into the turn lane. It may be necessary to add vehicle storage space to the deceleration distance.

Figure 2: Example of access spacing for access point served by turn lane. Desirable condition at street speed of 25 mph.

4I.050 Alignment of Offset of Cross-Street Access Points

A.    If the Traffic Impact Analysis determines that there is or will be a need to signalize proposed access points, then proposed access points shall be aligned directly opposite any existing or proposed access points or T-intersection across the street.

B.    Where driveways are to be signalized, a minimum spacing of 1,320 feet to any other signalized intersection should be maintained.

C.    Driveways should be placed directly opposite from each other whenever possible. If this is not possible, it is necessary to provide adequate left-turn storage capacity in advance of each driveway and avoid the overlap of vehicles waiting to turn left into the driveways. If separation cannot be achieved, consideration should be given to combining the driveways. As shown in Figure 3, left-turn storage distance can be calculated using opposite and left-turn traffic volumes.

D.    The requirements of A, B, and C above shall not apply if the street to be accessed has a permanent median and/or traffic control device that prevents any cross-street movement of traffic or if the Public Works Director determines that adhering to said requirements would create a hazardous or undesirable situation.

Figure 3: Nomograph for left-turn storage at an unsignalized intersection.

The nomograph is used by reading horizontally from the opposing traffic volume, Vo on the vertical axis and reading vertically from the left-turn volume, VL, on the horizontal axis and locating the minimum storage length, S, at the point where the horizontal and vertical lines cross. For example, 100 left-turning vehicles per hour, VL, with an opposing through volume, Vo, of 950 vph, will require a minimum storage length of about 150 feet. Source: M.D. Hamelink.

Note: Deceleration distance must be added to storage length to obtain the total length of turn bay.

4I.060 Corner Clearance from Intersections

Tables 19 and 20 can be used to determine minimum corner clearance for roadways operating at various speeds under signalized or unsignalized traffic control. Select the letter corresponding to the roadway and driveway configuration. Then locate the clearance value associated with that letter for the appropriate class of roadway at its prevailing operating speed. The guidelines provided below offer additional standards in establishing corner clearances. These include:

A.    In cases where corner clearances are not attainable because property frontages are narrow, access should be located as close as practicable to the property line most distant from the intersection. At such locations, serious consideration should be given to physically prohibiting left turns into and out of the driveway.

B.    Driveway locations near controlled intersections must not interfere with traffic operations that develop from the 90th percentile queue length. This situation must be checked for Item C and H in Tables 19 and 20. Conduct independent intersection queue analysis for determination. In situations where this is unavoidable, the City Engineer may limit the access point to a right-turn only in-and-out operation.

Table 19: Signalized Intersection Control

Minimum Corner Clearances for Urban Conditions 

Item

Street Operating Speed

 

25

30

35

A

150

230

275

B

75

115

135

C1

150

230

275

D

150

230

275

E

95 or 0

115 or 0

135 or 0

1    Listed distances are minimum, refer to 4I.060 (B)

Figure 4

 

Table 20: Stop Sign Intersection Control

Minimum Corner Clearances for Urban Conditions 

Item

Street Operating Speed

 

25

30

35

F

95

115

135

G

75

85

105

H1

95

115

135

J

95

115

135

K

95 or 0

115 or 0

135 or 0

1    Listed distances are minimums, refer to 4I.060 (B)

Figure 5

4I.070 Number of Access Points

No development shall have more than one access point unless the Traffic Impact Analysis or Emergency Service requirements determine that additional access points are needed to serve the expected volume of traffic; to establish efficient movement of vehicles, including trucks, buses, or emergency vehicles; to reduce traffic conflicts; and provided that adequate space exists.

4I.080 Access Location Based on Street Class

When a development will be situated so that there is a choice of possible access points onto streets of different classes as defined in the Street Design Standards, Table 2, then access shall be allowed only on the street of lower class, unless the Traffic Impact Analysis determines that the street of lower class cannot provide adequate access capacity, sight distance, separation or roadway intersections, safety, or vehicle maneuver area. However, an industrial or commercial development should not access a Neighborhood Collector street, Local Access street, or residential alley, as defined in the Street Design Standards, Table 2, if an alternative is available. A residential alley serves exclusively residential properties.

Access to corner lots shall be located on the minor street whenever possible and as close as possible to the property line most distant from the intersection.

4I.090 Combined or Shared Access

Any development expected to generate no more than 50 peak-hour trips, according to trip generation data from ITE or other reliable source, may be required to share access with an adjacent site or sites in order to reduce the total number of access points. When shared access is not feasible at the time of development but may be feasible in the future, any access point(s) shall be located at or near the edge of the property and designed to facilitate future connection to/from adjacent sites, provided such location does not conflict with other provisions of these regulations. Traffic connections between sites shall be designed and located so as not to encourage high-speed traffic, traffic conflicts with pedestrians, or through traffic.

4I.100 Direction of Driveways (One-Way or Two-Way)

Installing two, one-way driveways is warranted at point locations on all types of roadways and shall use the following criteria:

A.    The level of development should be less than 60 driveways per mile.

B.    Roadway ADT should be greater than 10,000, and roadway speed shall be less than 35 mph.

C.    At a commercial site, at least 40 vehicles per hour are expected to turn left across through traffic to enter the driveway during peak periods.

D.    Frontage widths should be at least 150 feet where practical to ensure that minimum drive separation distances can be attained.

4I.110 Adjustment for Street Gradient

If the street to be accessed has a gradient of three percent or more, distances specified in these regulations shall be adjusted to compensate for the effects of gradient on vehicle acceleration or deceleration.

4I.120 Drive-Through Windows

Drive-through windows and the approaches to them must be located and designed to accommodate on-site the maximum expected vehicle queue, with no spillover of the vehicle queue onto adjacent streets or adjacent sites and with no interference with vehicles, pedestrians, and bicyclists at points of access or egress.

4I.130 Monitoring and Enforcement

If an access point for a new development is found not to be in compliance with these regulations, the City may order, by certified letter to the developer, that any noncomplying access point(s) be made to comply within 90 days. Any such access point not made to comply within 90 days may be closed by a barricade installed by the City. Any barricade installed according to these provisions shall be moveable or otherwise situated to allow emergency access.

4I.140 Design of Access Points and Driveways

The point of intersection between streets and access drives serving developments shall be designed as much as feasible within the constraints of the given terrain and available land area to minimize interference with through traffic on the street and to minimize conflict between vehicles at the access point and between vehicles and pedestrians or bicycles. The following design features shall apply where appropriate:

A.    All Access Points

1.    Access point geometrics. The maximum driveway width for two-way access drives onto an arterial or collector shall be 20 feet for residential, 30 feet for commercial uses, and 35 feet for industrial uses. Maximum driveway widths for one-way access drives onto an arterial or collector shall be 20 feet for residential, 20 feet for commercial, and 25 feet for industrial uses. A wider driveway width may be approved where a substantial percentage of oversized vehicle traffic exists, where divisional islands are desired, or where multiple exit or entrance lanes are needed.

The maximum driveway width onto a local access street shall be 20 feet for residential uses and 26 feet for commercial uses.

2.    Angle. The angle between the extended centerline of a driveway and the centerline of the street being accessed shall be 90 degrees, or as close to 90 degrees as feasible. In no case shall an angle of less than 60 degrees nor more than 120 degrees be allowed.

3.    Visual clues of access. Signs, landscaping, and other on-site features near an access point shall be designed and located to provide clues to the location of the access point without interfering with drivers’ sight distance and without significantly reducing the ability to see vehicles on the driveway or on the street.

4.    Change of existing access. A developer may be required to change and/or abandon existing curb cuts, driveway designs, and other access-related features established for a previous development or land use.

5.    Design vehicles. For commercial developments where access by trucks with trailer is not expected to be routine, the geometric design of access points shall be based primarily on the turning characteristics of passenger cars (defined by the AASHTO “P” design vehicle).

For industrial developments or any other development where access by trucks with trailers is expected to be routine, the geometric design of access points to be used by trucks shall be based on the turning characteristics of the AASHTO “WB-50” design vehicle.

Developments where on-site bus access is expected shall be designed to accommodate bus movement as defined by the AASHTO “BUS” design vehicle.

6.    Pedestrian and bicycle movement. As much as is feasible within the parameters of these regulations, access points and driveways shall be designed to minimize conflict between vehicles and pedestrians or bicycles. Access points and driveways shall be designed to minimize the total risk and delay for vehicles, pedestrians using sidewalks or crosswalks, and bicycle riders using bike paths, streets, or driveways.

7.    All driveways will be designed so that vehicles entering and exiting are able to turn without encroaching on adjacent lanes, either on the roadway or in the driveway.

8.    Driveways must be noticeable to all drivers. This can be accomplished through the use of contrasting pavement, driveway and curb or curb and gutter color, compared to the roadway. Contrasting pavement can help to guide and regulate drivers.

9.    Grade. The access drive shall intersect the street with a continuous, smooth grade not interrupted by curb, gutter, sidewalks, or any other rough, bumpy, or off-grade feature. Sidewalks or bike paths crossing such access points shall be at grade.

10.    Striping. Multi-lane driveways shall have lanes delineated by paint stripes. Lanes in the same direction shall be delineated by a skip white line 4 inches wide. Lanes in opposite direction (if not separated by a median) shall be delineated by a double solid yellow line, with each stripe 4 inches wide.

11.    Markings, like signs, have the function of controlling traffic to encourage safe and expeditious operation. Markings either supplement the traffic signs or serve independently to indicate certain regulations or hazardous conditions. All pavement markings shall meet the standards set forth in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) and City of Olympia Standards.

12.    All traffic signs within the right-of-way shall meet the standards set forth in the MUTCD and City of Olympia Standards.

B.    High Volume Access Points

For any development expected to generate at least 75 vehicle trips in the development’s peak hour, the following conditions shall apply in addition to those under Section A above.

1.    Throat length. Throat length is defined as the distance along an access driveway between the back edge of the driveway apron and a development’s parking area. For high-volume access points, adequate throat length for various land uses is specified in Table 21. A development with more than one access point or with multi-lane access driveways may be allowed shorter throat length if adequate vehicle storage can be provided on each access driveway.

In the downtown business area (designed “DB” on the City of Olympia Zoning Map) and along high-density residential corridors, the City Engineer may allow a shorter throat length or may change other guidelines in keeping with that area’s high density and pedestrian/transit orientation.

Table 21: Minimum Throat Length and On-site Vehicle Storage 

Land Use

Size

Min. Throat Length (ft.)

Min. Total Storage (ft.)

Light Industrial

<100,000 ft2

50

100

100,000 - 500,000 ft2

100

600

>500,000 ft2

200

1,000

Discount Store

30,000 ft2 or less

50

300

30,000 ft2

75

600

Shopping Center

<250,000 ft2

50

500

250,000 - 500,000 ft2

75

1,000

500,001 - 750,000 ft2

200

1,500

750,000 ft2

250

2,000

Supermarket

20,000 ft2 or less

75

300

>20,000 ft2

125

500

Apartment

<100 units

50

300

100-200 units

75

500

>200 units

125

750

Quality Restaurant

15,000 ft2 or less

50

100

>15,000 ft2

75

150

Drive-in Restaurant

2,000 ft2 or less

75

100

>2,000 ft2

100

200

General Office

<50,000 ft2 or less

50

500

50,000 - 100,000 ft2

75

750

100,001 - 200,000 ft2

100

1,000

200,001- 500,000 ft2

150

1,500

>500,000 ft2

250

2,000

Motel

105 rooms or less

75

150

>150 rooms

100

200

Source: Adapted from ITE, Transportation and Land Development.

2.    Curb return. All high-volume access points must provide curb return radii from private driveways to public streets as described in Table 22. By a Traffic Impact Analysis, a lower standard design may be allowed provided that the expected traffic volume can be adequately and safely accommodated. If significant truck traffic is expected, wider lanes and greater curb return radii may be required.

Table 22: Curb Return Radius for High Volume Access Drives 

Land Use

Desirable (ft.)

Maximum (ft.)

Minimum (ft.)

Apartment/Commercial

20

25

15

Industrial

30

30

20

Source: Adapted from ITE, Transportation and Land Development.

3.    Signalization. High-volume access points may be signalized if the Traffic Impact Analysis determines that signalization is warranted. Any signal so installed shall be coordinated with other nearby signals.

4.    Street median opening. The most important design element for the raised divider is the median width that must be adequate to completely shadow left-turning vehicles from through vehicles. Median width shall be as specified in the standard street cross section designated by functional class. For conditions that do not apply to the standard street cross section, refer to Table 23.

Where a median and/or pedestrian crossing island is desirable or required in a two-way center turn lane, refer to Standard Drawing 4-48.

Median openings should be designed to accommodate the design vehicle turning at a reasonable rate of speed. Semicircular radii may be used on the noses of medians up to 6 feet wide. Bull-nosed medians should be used for medians of greater width, using a minimum inside turning radius of 40 feet and a minimum nose-to-nose dimension of 40 feet for passenger vehicle design. To accommodate SU vehicles, a 50-foot control radius is recommended, and for WB-40 vehicles, a 75-foot radius.

Table 23: Recommended Median Widths2 

Function

Minimum Width (ft.)

Desired Width (ft.)

Separation of Opposing Traffic

41

10

Pedestrian Refuge and Space for Traffic Control

61

14

Left-turn Speed Change and Storage

14

20

Crossing/Entering Vehicle Protection

20

40

U-turns, Inside-to-inside Lane

26

60

1    Cannot accommodate left-turn lanes, hence such turns must be made from the through lanes unless prohibited by signs.

2    Use in situations not covered by standard street cross sections.

Source: ITE, Guidelines for Urban Major Street Design.

Providing openings within a raised median barrier allows selected driveways full or partial left-turn access into or out of the driveway. Benefits gained from providing median openings can include:

a.    Limits left-turn access into or out of a driveway to a specific location, thereby reducing vehicle conflict points.

b.    Improves the operation of both the driveway and the roadway by the reduction of vehicle points.

c.    Provides an access point that may prevent a more circuitous route required to enter or leave driveways that could cause added traffic on local parallel streets. Table 24 shows the recommended spacing for barrier openings.

Table 24: Minimum Spacing Between Median Openings* 

Speed on Adjacent Street

Desirable Conditions

Limiting Conditions

25

300

140

30

370

190

35

460

240

All speeds, openings provided at all arterials, collectors, and some local streets.

* Plus 25 feet for each car stored in turn lane at expected maximum queue length.

Source: Adapted from ITE, Transportation and Land Development.

C.    Low-Volume Access Points

For any development expected to generate less than 75 vehicle trips in the development’s peak hour, the following conditions shall apply in addition to those under Section A above.

1.    Driveways will be constructed to the City of Olympia Engineering Design and Development Standards, Standard Drawing 4-7, Cement Concrete Driveway.

2.    Left-turn lane warrants. Left turns shall be prohibited to and/or from driveways under the following conditions:

a.    Inadequate corner clearance (prohibit left turns to and from).

b.    Inadequate sight distance (prohibit left turns with inadequate sight distance).

c.    Inadequate driveway spacing (prohibit left turns to and from).

In addition, where volume warrants it, left-turning vehicles should be given a left-turn bay.

Figure 6 provides a method for determining the warrant that must be met in order to add left-turn lanes. A left-turn lane is determined to be warranted when a set percent of left turns are expected based on a relationship of the opposing volume to the advancing volume per lane. Drawing lines vertically from the advancing volume axis and horizontally from the opposing volume axis allows a determination of the warrant where the lines intersect. If the actual left-turn volume, measured in percentage of the advancing intersection of the vertical and horizontal lines, then a left turn is likely warranted. For example, if the advancing volume is 500 vehicles per hour (vph) and the opposing is 250 vehicles per hour, the lines intersect between the 5 percent and 10 percent curves at approximately 8 on the figure. Therefore, if the left-turn volume equals 8 percent or more of the advancing volume, 40 vph or more, then the left-turn is likely warranted. Left turns must be a minimum of 5 percent of approach volume in order to use this figure. As the advancing and opposing volumes increase, the percentage of left turns required decreases. This is because as the advancing volume increases, the need to remove left-turn vehicles from the advancing volume increases and as the opposing volume increases, the harder it becomes for the left-turning traffic to cross the opposing traffic.

Channelization will also depend upon other standards such as site circulation, traffic volumes, accident history, and parking layouts.

Figure 6: Left Turn Warrant

Appendix 1: List of Drawings

Title

Drawing No.

File Type
(DWG includes all drawings in chapter)

 

Chapter 4 – All

PDF DWG

Minimum Clear Site Triangle

4-1A

PDF DWG

Clear Site Triangle for Uncontrolled Intersections

4-1B

PDF DWG

Clear Site Triangle for Stop or Yield Controlled Intersections

4-1C

PDF DWG

Arterial Boulevard

4-2A

PDF DWG

Arterial Boulevard with LID Swale

4-2A-LID

PDF DWG

Arterial

4-2B

PDF DWG

Arterial with LID Swale

4-2B-LID

PDF DWG

Major Industrial Collector

4-2C

PDF DWG

Major Industrial Collector with LID Swale

4-2C-LID

PDF DWG

Commercial Collector Boulevard

4-2D

PDF DWG

Commercial Collector

4-2E

PDF DWG

Commercial Collector with LID Swale (sheet 1 of 2)

4-2E-LID1

PDF DWG

Commercial Collector with LID Swale (sheet 2 of 2)

4-2E-LID2

PDF DWG

Major Collector Boulevard

4-2F

PDF DWG

Major Collector Boulevard with LID Swale

4-2F-LID

PDF DWG

Major Collector

4-2G

PDF DWG

Major Collector with LID Swale

4-2G-LID

PDF DWG

West Bay Drive Major Collector Series:

4-2G1 through 4-2G7

Harrison Avenue to Park Property South Border

4-2G1

PDF DWG

Harrison Avenue to Park Property South Border-Notes

4-2G1A

PDF DWG

Park Property South Border to Garfield Trail

4-2G2

PDF DWG

Park Property South Border to Garfield Trail-Notes

4-2G2A

PDF DWG

Garfield Trail to Brawne Avenue Intersection

4-2G3

PDF DWG

Garfield Trail to Brawne Avenue Intersection-Notes

4-2G3A

PDF DWG

Brawne Avenue Intersection to Park Property North Border

4-2G4

PDF DWG

Brawne Avenue Intersection to Park Property North Border-Notes

4-2G4A

PDF DWG

Park Property North Border to Base of Schneider Hill

4-2G5

PDF DWG

Park Property North Border to Base of Schneider Hill-Notes

4-2G5A

Park Property North Border to Base of Schneider Hill-Notes Continued

4-2G5B

Schneider Hill

4-2G6

PDF DWG

Schneider Hill-Notes

4-2G6A

PDF DWG

Schneider Hill to Marina-Model

4-2G7

PDF DWG

Schneider Hill to Marina-Notes

4-2G7A

PDF DWG

Boulevard Road

4-2G8

PDF DWG

Legion Way Commercial Collector Plum Street to Cherry Street

4-2G10

PDF DWG

Neighborhood Collector Boulevard

4-2H

PDF DWG

Neighborhood Collector Boulevard with LID Swale

4-2H-LID

PDF DWG

Neighborhood Collector Street

4-2I

PDF DWG

Neighborhood Collector Street with LID Swale

4-2I-LID

PDF DWG

Local Access Street Block Spacing

4-2J

PDF DWG

Local Access Street with Swale Block Spacing

4-2J1

PDF DWG

Local Access Street with Full Dispersion

4-2JX2

PDF DWG

Local Access Street Block Spacing <350 Ft.

4-2K

PDF DWG

Local Access Street with LID Swale Block Spacing <350 FT

4-2K-LID

PDF DWG

Trails/Shared Use Path

4-2L

PDF DWG

Roadway Pavement for Commercial Alleys

4-3

PDF DWG

Roadway Pavement for Residential Alleys-Plan View

4-4A

PDF DWG

Roadway Pavement for Residential Alleys-Section Views

4-4B

PDF DWG

Cul-de-sac or Temporary Intersection “T”

4-5

PDF DWG

Pavement Design

4-6A

PDF DWG

Pavement Design Worksheet

4-6B

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Driveway Entrance Type 1

4-7A

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Driveway Entrance Type 2

4-7B

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Driveway Entrance Type 3

4-7C

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Driveway Entrance Type 4

4-7D

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Driveway Entrance Pay Limits

4-7E

PDF DWG

Trench-Pavement Restoration Detail

4-8

PDF DWG

Pavement Replacement

4-8A

PDF DWG

Concrete Pavement Replacement

4-8B

PDF DWG

Asphalt Pavement Restoration

4-8C

PDF DWG

Pervious Concrete Sidewalk

4-9A

PDF DWG

Pervious Concrete Underdrain System

4-9B

PDF DWG

Impermeable Concrete Sidewalk

4-9C

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Integral Curb and Walk Type “A”

4-9D

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Integral Curb and Walk Driveway

4-9E

PDF DWG

Sidewalk Spacing Expansion Joints & Score Marks

4-10

PDF DWG

Perpendicular Curb Ramp Type “A”

4-12A

PDF DWG

Perpendicular Curb Ramp Type B (Shown with Buffer)

4-12B

PDF DWG

Perpendicular Curb Ramp Type C

4-12C

PDF DWG

Parallel Curb Ramp Type A

4-12D

PDF DWG

Parallel Curb Ramp Type B

4-12E

PDF DWG

Combination Curb Ramp (Sheet 1 of 2)

4-12F1

PDF DWG

Combination Curb Ramp (Sheet 2 of 2)

4-12F2

PDF DWG

Single Direction Curb Ramp (Sheet 1 of 2)

4-12G1

PDF DWG

Single Direction Curb Ramp (Sheet 2 of 2)

4-12G2

PDF DWG

Curb Ramp Pay Limits

4-12H

PDF DWG

Intersection Radii

4-13

PDF DWG

Curb Bulb-Out Adjacent to Vehicle Lane

4-13A

PDF DWG

Curb Bulb-Out Adjacent to Bike Lane

4-13A1

PDF DWG

Local Access Street Parking Bulb-out

4-13B

PDF DWG

One-Lane Narrow Point

4-13C

PDF DWG

Two-way Angle Slow Point, Sheet 1 of 2

4-13C1

PDF DWG

Two-Way Angle Slow Point, Sheet 2 of 2

4-13C2

PDF DWG

Mountable Concrete Traffic Island for Two-way Angle Slow Point

4-13D

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Traffic Curb

4-14

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Curb and Gutter

4-14A

PDF DWG

Type “W” HMA Wedge Curb

4-14B

PDF DWG

Cement Concrete Wedge Curb and Gutter

4-14C

PDF DWG

Replacement of Existing Curb and/or Sidewalk Typical Pavement Patching

4-14D

PDF DWG

Bikeway Classes

4-16

PDF DWG

Mailbox Cluster

4-18

PDF DWG

Service Disconnect for Streetlights and Traffic Signals

4-19

PDF DWG

Poured in Place Monument

4-20

PDF DWG

Case Monument

4-23A

PDF DWG

Rock Retaining Wall Drainage

4-26

PDF DWG

Landscape Timbers

4-26A

PDF DWG

Striping Detail

4-27A

PDF DWG

Striping Detail

4-27B

PDF DWG

Striping Detail

4-27C

PDF DWG

Bicycle Detector Symbols

4-27D

PDF DWG

Striping Detail Marking Patterns

4-27F

PDF DWG

Typical Street Light Layouts

4-30

PDF DWG

Typical Street Light Installation

4-31

PDF DWG

Street Light Installation Details Combined

4-31A

PDF DWG

Crosswalk and Curb Ramp Locations/Stop Bar Dimensions for Retrofit Situations

4-32

PDF DWG

Bar-type Crosswalk Detail

4-32A

PDF DWG

Streetlight Standard Foundation

4-33

PDF DWG

Luminaire-Foundation for Pedestrian Scale Poles

4-33A

PDF DWG

Signal or Strain Pole Foundation

4-34

PDF DWG

Type “D” Loop for Bicycle Lanes

4-35

PDF DWG

Beacon/Gong Assembly for Emergency Vehicle Preemption Indication

4-36

PDF DWG

Mast Arm Street Sign Construction

4-37

PDF DWG

Street Name Sign

4-37B

PDF DWG

Chip Seal Rumble Strip Making Detail

4-38

PDF DWG

Right-in, Right Out Detail

4-39

PDF DWG

Traffic Circle

4-40A

PDF DWG

Traffic Circle Intersection Diagram

4-40B

PDF DWG

Traffic Circle Dimension Chart

4-40C

PDF DWG

Traffic Circle Sign Detail

4-40D

PDF DWG

Traffic Circle Sign Detail

4-40E

PDF DWG

Traffic Circle Sign Detail

4-40F

PDF DWG

Traffic Circle Sign Detail

4-40G

PDF DWG

Traffic Circle Sign Detail

4-40H

PDF DWG

Typical Parking Meter Post Installation

4-41A

PDF DWG

Typical Parking Meter Post Placement and Parking Stall Layout

4-41B

PDF DWG

Speed Cushion

4-42A

PDF DWG

22-Foot Speed Bump

4-42B

PDF DWG

14-Foot Speed Bump

4-42C

PDF DWG

Speed Bump/Cushion Details

4-42D

PDF DWG

Typical Pedestal for Controller Cabinet and Service

4-43

PDF DWG

Standard Utilities Locations Schematic

4-44

PDF DWG

Typical Sign Installation Detail

4-45

PDF DWG

Private Access Lane

4-46

PDF DWG

Fire Lane Sign

4-47

PDF DWG

Pedestrian Refuge Landscaped Island Details

4-48

PDF DWG

Pedestrian Refuge Concrete Island Details

4-48A

PDF DWG

Street Tree Frame and Grate Details

4-49

PDF DWG

Typical Tree Planting and Staking Detail

4-50

PDF DWG

Appendix 2: Index of Tables

Table

Page No.

Table 1: Street Classification and Number of Lanes

6

Table 2: Street Design Standards

10

Table 3: Street Characteristics

11

Table 4: West Bay Drive Street Streetside Improvements

15

Table 5: Boulevard Road Street Frontage Improvements

16

Table 6: East Downtown Streetside Improvements

17

Table 7: Centerline Offsets

19

Table 8: Intersection Sight Distance

21

Table 9: Uncontrolled Intersection Sight Distance

22

Table 10: Pavement Restoration Requirements

26

Table 11: Surface Temperature Limitations

27

Table 12: Testing and Sampling Frequency Requirements

32

Table 13: Trail and Shared-Use Path Design Standards

41

Table 14: Illumination Standards

43

Table 15: Average Maintained Horizontal Illumination (Foot-candles)

47

Table 16: Minimum Access Spacing Based on Separation of Conflict Area

65

Table 17: Minimum Access Spacing Where Sight Distance is Limited

65

Table 18: Minimum Access Spacing for Access Points Served by Turn Lanes

66

Table 19: Signalized Intersection Control - Minimum Corner Clearances for Urban Conditions

68

Table 20: Stop Sign Intersection Control - Minimum Corner Clearances for Urban Conditions

69

Table 21: Minimum Throat Length and On-site Vehicle Storage

74

Table 22: Curb Return Radius for High Volume Access Drives

74

Table 23: Recommended Median Widths

75

Table 24: Minimum Spacing Between Median Openings

76

Appendix 3: Monument Preservation Documentation Letter

 

Monument Preservation Documentation

I, __________________, representing __________________, pursuant to

 

(Licensed Surveyor)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Contractor)

 

 

 

 

 

WAC Chapter 332-120 Survey Monuments-Removal or Destruction, certify that I have reviewed the construction plans for __________________ and complied

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Project)

 

 

 

 

 

 

with the following:

1. Defined the areas where the proposed construction may disturb or destroy survey monuments.

2. Made a diligent search of survey records in Thurston County to determine possible locations and type of existing monuments.

3. Made a diligent field search within the defined construction limits at locations determined from the survey records research.

4. Made an additional diligent field search for unrecorded monuments at locations not defined from survey records but in locations where survey monuments typically exist.

5. Supplied City of Olympia with a map outlining the project boundary search area with the individual search areas being further defined indicating the type of monument found or that the monument was searched for and not found. (Map attached)

6. Each found monument has been referenced to at least 3 nearby points not likely to be destroyed with this construction. (Copies of references attached)

7. Permits have been obtained from the Department of Natural Resources according to WAC Chapter 332-120. (Copies of permits attached)

This certification is for the expressed purpose of preserving the existing location and type of survey monuments within the construction area. It is not for the purpose of verifying that these monuments mark the location of previously surveyed positions.

Signed and Sealed,

Appendix 4: Downtown Boundaries

Appendix 5 TRANSPORTATION-RELATED SPECIAL PROVISIONS

INTRODUCTION

SECTION 1-10,    TEMPORARY TRAFFIC CONTROL

SECTION 5-04,    HOT MIX ASPHALT

SECTION 8-20,    ILLUMINATION, TRAFFIC SIGNAL SYSTEMS, INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS, AND ELECTRICAL

SECTION 8-21,    PERMANENT SIGNING

SECTION 8-22,    PAVEMENT MARKING

SECTION 9-28,    SIGNING MATERIALS AND FABRICATION

SECTION 9-29,    ILLUMINATION, SIGNAL, ELECTRICAL

INTRODUCTION

This Appendix 5 of Chapter 4 of the EDDS supplements, modifies or replaces the Standard Specifications for Road, Bridge and Municipal Construction, 2016 edition, as issued by the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) (hereafter “Standard Specifications”). The Standard Specifications, as modified or supplemented by this appendix, are part of the EDDS and shall govern all associated work.

The deletion, amendment, alteration, or addition to any subsection or portion of the Standard Specifications is meant to pertain only to that particular portion of the section, and in no way should it be interpreted that the balance of the section does not apply.

SECTION 1-10, TEMPORARY TRAFFIC CONTROL

1-10.2(2) Traffic Control Plans

(January 1, 2015 – OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

If the Contractor intends to propose de-energizing or otherwise altering the function of the signals at a signalized intersection within or adjacent to the work zone, the Contractor must submit for approval a Contractor-developed plan to do so at least 15 working days before such alteration is proposed to begin. Such a temporary signal alteration plan shall include a written justification for altering the function of the signals, including any safety concerns related to pedestrian and vehicular (including emergency vehicles) traffic within the work zone.

SECTION 5-04, HOT MIX ASPHALT

5-04.3(3)A Material Transfer Device/Vehicle

(January 1, 2010 - OLY GSP)

Delete this section in its entirety

5-04.3(5)A Preparation of Existing Surfaces

(January 1, 2015 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

All surface iron including, but not limited to, manhole rings and covers, valve box covers, catch basin frame and grates, and monument case and covers shall be lowered prior to pavement planing and pulverization. The only exception to this will apply to catch basins where the frame and grates are integral to the curb and lowering them would require removal and replacement of curb and gutter. Prior to lowering the iron, the Contractor shall establish three (3) reference points per surface iron.

All vegetation including root structures and moss shall be removed in their entirety within the paved areas including adjoining curbs, gutters, and sidewalks. Further, any vegetation overgrowth, that in the opinion of the Engineer would impair paving operations, shall be trimmed and removed six inches from proposed HMA edge limits.

Driveway preparation shall include saw cutting, filling, and grading the transitional area required to provide a HMA approach between the edge of pavement and driveway regardless of the existing surface treatment or width. Where a driveway or sidewalk interferes with the new roadway surface, the Engineer shall mark in the field where the asphalt or concrete shall be sawcut. All material that must be removed from the driveway shall be hauled and properly disposed of off the project site.

All imported material required to match grade for driveway bases shall be paid for by the unit bid item “Crushed Surfacing Top Course.” All adjacent driveways shall require some preparation. Temporary access shall be provided for all driveways prior to paving. There shall be no additional compensation for those driveways requiring more preparation than others.

5-04.3(7)A2 Statistical and Non-Statistical Evaluation

(November 20, 2013 - APWA GSP)

Delete this section and replace it with the following;

5-04.3(7)A2 NonStatistical and Commercial Evaluation

Mix designs for HMA accepted by Nonstatistical or Commercial evaluation shall:

•    Be submitted to the Project Engineer on WSDOT Form 350-042

•    Have the aggregate structure and asphalt binder content determined in accordance with WSDOT Standard Operating Procedure 732 and meet the requirements of Sections 9-03.8(2) and 9-03.8(6).

•    Have anti-strip requirements, if any, for the proposed mix design determined in accordance with WSDOT Test Method T 718 or based on historic anti-strip and aggregate source compatibility from WSDOT lab testing. Anti-strip evaluation of HMA mix designs utilized that include RAP will be completed without the inclusion of the RAP.

At or prior to the preconstruction meeting, the contractor shall provide one of the following mix design verification certifications for Contracting Agency review:

•    The proposed mix design indicated on a WSDOT mix design/anti-strip report that is within one year of the approval date

•    The proposed HMA mix design submittal (Form 350-042) with the seal and certification (stamp & signature) of a valid licensed Washington State Professional Engineer.

•    The proposed mix design by a qualified City or County laboratory mix design report that is within one year of the approval date.

The mix design will be performed by a lab accredited by a national authority such as Laboratory Accreditation Bureau, L-A-B for Construction Materials Testing, The Construction Materials Engineering Council (CMEC’s) ISO 17025 or AASHTO Accreditation Program (AAP) and shall supply evidence of participation in the AASHTO Material Reference Laboratory (AMRL) program.

At the discretion of the Engineer, agencies may accept mix designs verified beyond the one year verification period with a certification from the Contractor that the materials and sources are the same as those shown on the original mix design.

Evaluation of anti-strip additives are to be provided as part of the mix design acceptance criteria. Acceptable anti-strip evaluations include 1.) a WSDOT validated mix design showing the validated anti-strip additive and dosage 2.) an historic anti-strip determination from WSDOT not greater than two (2) calendar years old or 3.) a passing TSR test at the anti-strip dosage proposed by the Contractor.

No paving shall begin prior to Contracting Agency approval of the Contractor provided mix design.

5-04.3(7)A3 Commercial Evaluation

(February 5, 2014 – OLY GSP)

Delete this section and replace with the following:

For commercial HMA, the Contractor shall select a class of HMA and design level of Equivalent Single Axle Loads (ESAL’s) appropriate for the required use.

5-04.3(8)A1 General

(November 20, 2013 - APWA GSP)

Delete this section and replace it with the following:

Acceptance of HMA shall be as defined under nonstatistical or commercial evaluation.

Nonstatistical evaluation will be used for all HMA not designated as Commercial HMA in the contract documents.

The mix design will be the initial JMF for the class of HMA. The Contractor may request a change in the JMF. Any adjustments to the JMF will require the approval of the Project Engineer and must be made in accordance with Section 9-03.8(7).

Commercial evaluation may be used for Commercial HMA and for other classes of HMA in the following applications: sidewalks, road approaches, ditches, slopes, paths, trails, gores, prelevel, and pavement repair. Other nonstructural applications of HMA accepted by commercial evaluation shall be as approved by the Project Engineer. Sampling and testing of HMA accepted by commercial evaluation will be at the option of the Project Engineer. Commercial HMA can be accepted by a contractor certificate of compliance letter stating the material meets the HMA requirements defined in the contract.

5-04.3(8)A2 Aggregates

(January 1, 2010 – OLY GSP)

Delete this section and replace with the following:

The acceptance criteria for aggregate properties of sand equivalent, voids in mineral aggregate (VMA), fracture and gradation will be their conformance to the requirements of Section 9-03.8(2) the Standard Specification. Sampling and testing of aggregates accepted by commercial evaluation will be at the option of the Project Engineer.

5-04.3(8)A4 Definitions of Sampling Lot and Sublot

(November 20, 2013 - APWA GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

For HMA in a structural application, sampling and testing for total project quantities less than 400 tons is at the discretion of the engineer. For HMA used in a structural application and with a total project quantity less than 800 tons but more than 400 tons, a minimum of one acceptance test shall be performed:

i.    If test results are found to be within specification requirements, additional testing will be at the engineers discretion.

ii.    If test results are found not to be within specification requirements, additional testing as needed to determine a CPF shall be performed.

5-04.3(8)A5 Test Results

(November 20, 2013 - APWA GSP)

The first paragraph of this section is deleted.

5-04.3(8)A6 Test Methods

(November 20, 2013 - APWA GSP)

Delete this section and replace it with the following:

Testing of HMA for compliance of Va will be at the option of the Contracting Agency. If tested, compliance of Va will be by WSDOT Standard Operating Procedure SOP 731. Testing for compliance of asphalt binder content will be by WSDOT FOP for AASHTO T 308. Testing for compliance of gradation will be by WAQTC FOP for AASHTO T 27/T 11.

5-04.3(9) Spreading and Finishing

(January 1, 2010 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

The Contractor shall complete the first lift of HMA over the entire length of the project, before the final lift will be allowed to be installed. If traffic signal loops are required, all loops shall be installed prior to the final lift.

5-04.3(12) Joints

(January 1, 2010 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

Cold joints shall be allowed only at locations approved by the Engineer. Upon completion of paving operations, all cold joints including longitudinal joints shall be sealed with PG 64-22 asphalt binder.

5-04.3(17) Paving Under Traffic

(February 5, 2014 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

The Contractor shall keep intersections open to traffic at all times, except when paving operations through an intersection requires closure. Such closure shall be kept to the minimum time required to place, compact, and cool the HMA mixture as appropriate. Each individual intersection closure or partial closure shall be addressed in the Paving Coordination Plan including closure requirements for adjacent and intersecting streets.

SECTION 8-20, ILLUMINATION, TRAFFIC SIGNAL SYSTEMS, INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS, AND ELECTRICAL

8-20.3(5)A General

(August 5, 2013 – OLY GSP)

Delete and replace the third paragraph with the following:

All new conduit and all innerduct shall be blown clean with compressed air. Then in the presence of the Engineer, an 80 percent sizing mandrel, correctly sized for the raceway, shall be pulled through to ensure that the raceway has not been deformed. This shall be done prior to pulling wire or fiber optic cable and after final assembly is in place.

8-20.3(5)B Conduit Type

(April 1, 2013 – OLY GSP)

Delete item 2,”All pole risers…”, from paragraph two.

(April 1, 2013 – OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) conduit shall be used for all traffic signal and illumination system installations.

8-20.3(5)B2 Non-Metalic Conduit

(April 1, 2013 – OLY GSP)

Revise the third paragraph to read:

Nonmetallic conduit bends, where allowed, shall conform to Article 352.24 of the Code. Eighteen-inch radius elbows shall be used for PVC conduit of 2-inch nominal diameter or less. Standard sweep elbows shall be used for PVC conduit with greater than 2-inch nominal diameter unless otherwise specified in the Plans. All conduits, in addition to whatever illumination or signal wiring the plans call for, must have a pull line for future use. This pull line must be a minimum of 200-pound tensile polypropylene and be run between the junction boxes or termination points of all conduits. All conduits shown for future use shall have a pull line for future use as described above and an approved toning wire installed per 7-08.3(2)K for locate purposes. When HDPE conduit is used for directional boring, it shall be continuous, with no joints, for the full length of the bore. The conduit run shall be extended to the associated outlets with the same schedule HDPE or PVC conduit. Entry into associated junction box outlets shall be with the same schedule PVC conduit and elbows. The same requirements apply for extension of an existing HDPE conduit crossing.

8-20.3(5)E Method of Conduit Installation

(December 2, 2013 – OLY GSP)

Revise the first sentence to read:

Conduit shall be placed under existing pavement by approved open trenching, directional boring, jacking, or drilling methods at locations approved by the Engineer.

8-20.3(6) Junction Boxes, Cable Vaults, and Pull Boxes

(January 1, 2010 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

Junction boxes are shown on the plans for readability. Final locations shall be made in the field as approved by the Engineer. Junction boxes containing both street lighting and traffic signal wiring shall be marked T.S. clearly on the lid. Junction boxes for street lighting shall be marked S.L. clearly on the lid.

The Standard Plan conduit inch diameter capacity for Type 1 junction box is increased to 10 and for Type 2 junction box is increased to 16.

Type 2 junction boxes shall be provided with 12" deep extension boxes.

Type 3 or larger junction boxes shall meet the specifications outlined in WSDOT Standards Plans.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-20.3(6)A Adjusting Junction Box

(January 1, 2015 - OLY GSP)

Existing junction box locations may be required to be adjusted up to one-foot horizontally and/or vertically. The distance between the top conduit and the new junction box lid shall be maximized but not exceed 12 inches. Existing conduits coming into and/or leaving the junction box shall be exposed and adjusted as required to fit into the new junction box location. Hand digging shall be required during these adjustments.

Contractor shall supply and install a new WSDOT locking standard junction box in place of the existing junction box as part of adjusting junction box work.

8-20.3(8) Wiring

(January 1, 2015 - OLY GSP)

Delete and replace the seventh paragraph with the following:

Aerial illumination splices shall employ vice or crimp type pressure connectors. Splice insulation shall be epoxy type only.

(April 7, 2014 - OLY GSP)

Delete and replace the second sentence in the eleventh paragraph with the following:

Every conductor at every wire termination, connector, or device shall have an approved wire marking sleeve bearing, as its legend, the circuit number indicated in the Contract.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-20.3(8)A Illumination System Wiring

(January 1, 2010 - OLY GSP)

An approved conductor support is required at the fixture end of the luminaire arm.

Additional conductor length shall be left inside the pole equal to a loop having a diameter of one foot.

8-20.3(10) Service, Transformer, and Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) Cabinets

(July 26, 2010 - OLY GSP)

Delete the second and fifth paragraphs.

(April 15, 2011 – OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

The service pedestal shall be 100-amp single-phase three-wire 120/240 volt, 60 HZAC, housed in a rainproof enclosure. A main breaker is not required and meter socket is required. It shall be UL listed. The service pedestal shall have mechanical contactors for each streetlight circuit, one test switch, 5th jaw in 9 o’clock position, and one photocell. The service pedestal shall be concrete pad mounted according to manufacturer's recommendations, and placed on a silicone seal pad, and caulked in a manner which will prevent water from entering the enclosure at that point. The following material is pre-qualified for use:

1.    Milbank Type CP3 B11C15AALSP2;

The service pedestal shall be equipped with a photoelectric cell. The following material is pre-qualified for use:

1.    Area Lighting Research model BF-PV 105-305 V

2.    Ripley Lighting Controls model 6390B-2MTD 105-306 V

3.    Tork model 5217 or 5237 105-305 V

4.    Intermatic model LC4536LA 208-277 V

5.    Or approved equivalent

The service hookup will be made by the serving utility.

8-20.3(13)A Light Standards

(October 11, 2002 – OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

All streetlight poles shall have a four anchor bolt pattern. Breakaway bases are not required unless specified by the Engineer.

SECTION 8-21, PERMANENT SIGNING

8-21.2 Materials

(January 1, 2010 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

When called for in the plans R1-6A, S1-1, S5-1, S5-101, S4-3, W11-1, W11-2, W16-7P, W16-9P shall be fluorescent yellow-green color.

Add the following new sub-sections:

8-21.3(13) New Sign Post and Base

(April 1, 2008 - OLY GSP)

Contractor shall supply and install a new signpost and base in the location directed by the Engineer in accordance with City of Olympia Standard Drawings.

SECTION 8-22, PAVEMENT MARKING

8-22.1 Description

(March 31, 2009 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

LONG LINE MARKINGS:

Longitudinal line marking patterns shall be based on City of Olympia Standard Drawings.

TRANSVERSE MARKINGS:

Stop Line

A SOLID WHITE line, 24-inches wide unless noted otherwise in the contract.

Bicycle Lane Symbol

The bicycle lane symbol is a white marking consisting of 6-foot-high arrow indicating the direction of travel, and a 6-foot-high bicycle symbol, conforming to WSDOT Standard Plan.

The arrow and bicycle symbol shall be for designated bicycle lanes.

Bar-Type Crosswalk

Bar type crosswalks shall consist of a SOLID WHITE line, 24-inches wide by 10-feet long, placed 2 to 3 feet apart and parallel to traffic flow where shown on the plans or as directed by the Engineer.

Parallel Type Crosswalk Line

A SOLID WHITE line, 12-inches wide, installed parallel to another crosswalk line with an 8-foot space between the lines, installed perpendicular to traffic flow.

SYMBOL MARKINGS:

Parking Stall Marking

The “T” or “L” forming the parking stall markings shall be a solid white line 4-inches wide. The dimensions for the “T” and “L” are as shown on City of Olympia Standard Drawings or as directed by the Engineer.

Traffic Arrows

All traffic arrows shall meet WSDOT Standard Plans for symbol markings for low speed roadways.

8-22.2 Materials

(December 3, 2013 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

Plastic pavement markings (preformed tape or sprayed application) shall be used for all transverse, long line, and symbol markings unless otherwise noted in the plans.

1.    For new asphalt surfaces, the Contractor shall use preformed tape and the following materials are pre-qualified for use:

Type C-1 (Cold Applied Pre-formed Tape) for Flat/Transverse, Flat/Long Line, and Symbol “Inlay” Applications

2.    For existing asphalt or bituminous surfaces and ALL Portland Cement Concrete Surfaces, the Contractor shall use either preformed tape or sprayed applications and the following materials are pre-qualified for use:

Type B (Pre-formed Fused Thermoplastic) for Flat/Traverse and Symbol Applications

Type D (Liquid Cold Applied Methyl Methacrylate) for Flat/Transverse, Long Line, Symbol Spray, and Extruded Applications

3.    For new bituminous surface treatment (BST), the Contractor shall use sprayed applications and the following materials are pre-qualified for use:

Type D (Liquid Cold Applied Methyl Methacrylate) for Flat/Transverse, Long Line, Symbol Spray, and Extruded Applications

Paint pavement markings (including curb painting) shall be low VOC waterborne paint when paint is called for on the plans.

8-22.3 Construction Requirements

(January 1, 2010 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

For new asphalt surfaces, the Contractor shall use preformed tape installed by the “inlay” method, which shall be installed during the final lift, or surface lift, of the asphalt paving operations.

The Contractor shall provide a copy of purchase orders and delivery schedules for all necessary material supplies at least 30 days prior to the first day of asphalt paving.

The Contractor shall provide adequate labor resources, equipment and materials to ensure that the pavement markings are properly installed in the surface at the same pace as the asphalt paving operations.

At least ten (10) calendar days prior to the start of paving, the Contractor shall provide a detailed Paving Coordination Plan, which shows the relationship between the asphalt paving operations, the pavement marking operations, and traffic control. The plan shall include the following:

1.    Work Task

2.    Location

3.    Schedule

4.    Critical Sequence Requirements

5.    Staking Needs

6.    Written confirmation that appropriate pavement marking materials have been received by contractor.

SECTION 9-28, SIGNING MATERIALS AND FABRICATION

9-28.1 General

(January 1, 2012 - OLY GSP)

Delete the section and replace with the following:

Unless noted otherwise in the Plans, permanent signs shall be constructed of sheet aluminum. Temporary or construction signs may be constructed of either medium- or high-density overlay plywood. Sign overlay panels shall be 0.05-inch aluminum panels. All signs, except internally illuminated signs, shall be reflectorized.

See ASTM D 4956 for reflective sheeting type designations. Standard control signs and guide sign borders, letters, numerals, symbols, shields, and arrows shall being accordance with the WSDOT Sign Fabrication Manual M 55-05.

All Regulatory, Warning and Guide signs shall be constructed entirely of Type III or IV reflective sheeting. Sign legends for all signs shall be constructed of Type III or Type IV reflective sheeting. Sign legends include: borders, letters, numerals, symbols, shields, and arrows. Reflective legend sheeting types shall not be mixed on individual signs.

9-28.9 Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic Signs

(April 1, 2008 - OLY GSP)

Delete this section in its entirety.

9-28.11 Hardware

(January 1, 2012 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

Permanent signing attached to luminaire poles shall be strapped to the pole.

Strapping shall be 3/4-inch wide and a minimum 0.020-inch thick. The following material is pre-qualified for use:

1.    Band-It, #C163 or C916

2.    Independent Metal Strap C., Inc., #3420-SS

3.    Hayata Co., #LB 300206

4.    Or approved equivalent.

The following material is pre-qualified for use for the one bolt flared leg bracket:

1.    Band-It, #D021 or D022

2.    Independent Metal Strap C., Inc., #Plus 4-SS

3.    Hayata Co., #SB-1/7

4.    Or approved equivalent.

The following material is pre-qualified for use for the value clips or wing seals:

1.    Band-It, #C156

2.    Independent Metal Strap C., Inc., #06-SS

3.    Hayata Co., #WS2016

4.    Or approved equivalent.

The following material is pre-qualified for stainless steel bolts:

1.    Band-It, #D002

2.    Independent Metal Strap C., Inc., #516-SS

3.    Hayata Co., #BW-1/7

4.    Or approved equivalent.

9-28.14(2) Steel Structures and Posts

(April 15, 2011 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

Sign posts shall be nominal 2-inch square, pre-punched galvanized steel tubing. The pre-punched holes shall be 7/16-inch diameter spaced at 1-inch on center. Sign posts shall be 12 gauge in thickness. Sign post lengths shall be a minimum of 10-feet. Refer to City of Olympia Standard Drawings for sleeve and foundation requirements.

SECTION 9-29, ILLUMINATION, SIGNAL, ELECTRICAL

9-29.2(1)A Standard Duty Junction Boxes

(August 6, 2012 – OLY GSP)

Delete the first paragraph under Concrete Junction Boxes and replace with the following:

The Standard Duty Concrete Junction Box steel frame, lid support, and lid shall be hot dipped galvanized in accordance with AASHTO M 111. All Standard Duty Concrete Junction Boxes shall have slip resistant surfaces.

9-29.2(2)A Standard Duty Cable Vaults and Pull Boxes

(August 4, 2014 – OLY GSP)

Delete the second and third paragraph and replace with the following:

Concrete for Small and standard duty cable vaults and standard duty pull boxes shall have a minimum compressive strength of 4,000 psi. The lid frame shall be anchored to the vault/box concrete lid by welding headed studs ⅜ by 3 inches long, as specified in Section 9-06.15, to the frame. The wire fabric shall be attached to the studs and frame with standard tie practices. The vault/box concrete lid shall contain ten studs located near the centerline of the frame and wall. Studs shall be placed one anchor in each corner, one at the middle of each width and two equally spaced on each length of the vault/box.

All Small and Standard Duty Cable Vaults and Pull Boxes shall have slip resistant surfaces. The Standard Duty Cable Vaults and Pull Boxes steel frame, lid support and lid shall be hot-dip galvanized in accordance with ASTM M 111.

9-29.6(1)A Decorative Light Standards

(July 26, 2010 – OLY GSP)

Revise the section title and supplement this section with the following:

A.    Ornamental Streetlight System - Lamp Posts

1.    Ornamental lamp posts shall be as manufactured by Shakespeare Composite Structures , #AS00-12OS41XX SSSY20-6.3-OS9X, or approved equivalent.

2.    The standard pole specifications are supplemented with the following:

a.    Base cover: The ornamental base cover shall be a two-piece clam shell type.

b.    The finish color shall be Shakespeare Dark Green, or approved equivalent.

c.    Post shaft construction: A galvanized steel tenon shall be used.

d.    The finish color shall be Shakespeare Dark Green, or approved equivalent.

B.    Ornamental Streetlight System - Highmast Streetlight Standards

1.    The decorative ornamental streetlight standards shall be consistent with Shakespeare Composite Structures #SSSY20-AHZ2399S9BZ0102 (30-foot luminaire) or #SSSY20-AHZ2899S9BZ01XX (35-foot luminaire) or approved equivalent.

2.    An acorn style luminaire and decorative bracket arm shall be mounted to the standard and be consistent with the luminaire specified in Section 9-29.10(2).The acorn style luminaire and decorative bracket arm shall be perpendicular with and facing the sidewalk.

3.    Mast arm lengths shall be as specified on the plans.

4.    The standard pole specifications are supplemented with the following:

a.    Tenon: The pole shall have a galvanized steel tenon firmly bonded to the pole shaft, in order to accommodate the decorative mast arm. The tenon shall be painted to match the pole.

b.    Finish: The finish color shall be Shakespeare Dark Green, or approved equivalent.

c.    Base cover: The ornamental base cover shall be a two-piece clam shell type. The finish color shall be Shakespeare Dark Green, or approved equivalent.

d.    The decorative ornamental streetlight standards have a maximum mast arm length capability of 10 feet. Decorative ornamental streetlight standards requiring a 6-foot arm shall be consistent with Pacific Lighting, #PL392-6, King Luminaire #KA-72-T-1-6’, or approved equivalent; an 8-foot arm shall be consistent with Pacific Lighting #PL392-8, King Luminaire #KA-72-T-1-8’, or approved equivalent; or a 10-foot arm shall be consistent with Pacific Lighting #PL392-10, King Luminaire #KA-72-T-1-10’ or approved equivalent. The finish color shall be Dark Green, as manufactured by Sherwin Williams Company # PGT8-00285, or approved equivalent.

5.    The mounting height for the cobra head luminaire shall be 30 or 35 feet.

9-29.10(1) Conventional Roadway Luminaires

(December 3, 2013 - OLY GSP)

Supplement this section with the following:

Light Emitting Diode (LED) Luminaires

The following LED luminaire is prequalified for use:

LEOTEK GCA1-80E-MV-NW-2-GY-530-WL-SC.

LEOTEK GCA1-80E-MV-NW-3-GY-530-WL-SC

LEOTEK GCA1-90E-MV-NW-2-GY-530-WL-SC

LEOTEK GCA1-90E-MV-NW-3-GY-350-WL-SC

LEOTEK GCA1-90E-MV-NW-3-GY-530-WL-SC

All luminaires considered to be equivalent shall meet or exceed the photometric curve results and meet the following requirements:

1.    Die cast aluminum housing with universal four-bolt slip fitter mount to a 2-inch outside diameter mast arm;

2.    Electrical components are accessed without tools (tool-less access) with a removable power door. Stainless steel latches shall be used. Quick electrical disconnects are used for the terminal block and LED board;

3.    LED’s shall produce a minimum of 95% of initial intensity at 100,000 hours of life;

4.    LED’s are tested in accordance with IESNA LM-80 testing procedures;

5.    LED’s are 100% mercury and lead free;

6.    Nominal LED correlated color temperature of 4300K;

7.    Photometry: Luminaire is photometrically tested by a certified independent testing laboratory in accordance with IESNA LM-79 testing procedures;

8.    Optical systems: The fixture shall have Type II asymmetrical distribution, full cut-off;

9.    Luminaire is powered by 240 volts;

10.    Luminaire is UL listed for use in wet locations;

11.    Optical system maintains an IP66 rating;

12.    Field adjustable drive current;

13.    The LED fixture shall have a minimum 5-year warranty;

LED luminaires shall have a photoelectric receptacle. A shorting cap shall be installed in the photoelectric receptacle.

Each LED luminaire shall have an in-line fuseholder, SEC Model 1791-SF, or approved equivalent, with a FRM-5 fuse on each phase conductor at the base of the pole. Access to these fuseholders shall be through the hand hole on the pole. Additional conductor length shall be left inside the pole equal to a loop having a diameter of 1 foot.

Light Emitting Diode (LED) Pedestrian-scale Luminaires

The following LED luminaire is prequalified for use:

Noribachi FIN.024.LIN, with wattages:

20-watt to replace 50-watt HPS bulb and socket

40-watt to replace 100-watt HPS bulb and socket

All luminaires considered to be equivalent shall meet or exceed the photometric curve results and meet the following requirements:

1.    Install within specified pedestrian-scale fixture

2.    Standard AC input: up to 480VAC

3.    EMI filter: 47CFR, part 2, part 15

4.    Power factor: >9

5.    Total harmonic distortion: <20%

6.    Surge protection: IEC/EN 61000-.-5 EMC test standard

7.    Rated life of 100,000+ hrs

8.    Operating temp: -30o C to +60o C

9.    No toxic chemicals/ROHS compliant

10.    ETL certified, meets UL and CSA standards, and DLC qualified

11.    Manufactured in the USA

12.    The LED fixture shall have a minimum 5-year warranty;

9-29.10(2) Decorative Luminaires

(July 26, 2010 - OLY GSP)

Delete this section and replace it with the following:

A.    Ornamental Streetlight System - Highmast Streetlight Standards

The illumination system shall use decorative ornamental streetlights and pedestrian scale light shall be mounted at a height of 12 feet on the ornamental decorative streetlight standard. This luminaire and bracket arm shall be King Luminaire #K118-LAR-III-“Lamp Wattage” (MOG)-HPS-240(MT)-K13/KA-16-S-SP/OLY or approved equivalent. The lamp used in this luminaire shall be 50 or 100 watt as specified on the plans. The bracket arm and luminaire base shall be painted Dark Green, as manufactured by Sherwin Williams Company # PGT8-00285, or approved equivalent.

Two conductor No. 10 AWG pole and bracket cable shall be installed between this fixture and the in-line fuse holders at the base of the pole. The No. 10 AWG pole and bracket cable shall be spliced into the in-line fuse holders.

B.    Ornamental Streetlight System - Lamp Posts

The luminaire shall be King Luminaire #K118-LAR-III-“Lamp Wattage” (MOG)-HPS-240(MT)-K13-SP/OLY or approved equivalent. The lamp wattage in this luminaire shall be 50 or 100 watt, as specified on the plans.

The finish color shall be Dark Green, as manufactured by Sherwin Williams Company # PGT8-00285, or approved equivalent.

C.    Ornamental Illumination System - Pathways

1.    The lamp posts shall be ornamental lamp posts as detailed in subsection 9-29.6(1)A.A above.

2.    Luminaires shall be LED, grade A319 cast aluminum Skyline Pillar K582 by King LED, catalog number K582-P4FL-3-40 SSL 8060-240-4-PS-NR-3000K-NW TXT GREEN, or approved equivalent.

a.    Luminaires shall have a color temperature rating of 3000K (+/- 250K).

b.    Multi-wattage selector switch.

c.    The finish color shall be Dark Green, as manufactured by Sherwin Williams Company # PGT8-00285, or approved equal.

9-29.12(1) Illumination Circuit Splices

(January 1, 2015 - OLY GSP)

Delete this section and replace it with the following:

Illumination circuit splices shall be solderless crimped connectors to securely join the wires, both mechanically and electrically, as defined in Section 8-20.3(8). The splice shall be encapsulated in a molded splice enclosure.

9-29.12(1)B Molded Splice Enclosures

(January 1, 2015 - OLY GSP)

Delete this section and replace it with the following:

Epoxy resin cast-type insulation shall employ a clear rigid plastic mold. The molded splice shall be designed for wye or in-line splices. The material shall be compatible with the insulation material of the insulated conductor or cable. The component materials of the resin insulation shall be packaged ready for convenient mixing without removing from the package.

Appendix 6 PERVIOUS CONCRETE CONSTRUCTION SPECIFICATION

The following changes are to be made to the most recent edition of the WSDOT Standard Specifications when constructing pervious concrete sidewalks in Olympia:

SECTION 8-30, PERVIOUS CONCRETE SIDEWALKS

Add the following new section:

8-30.1 Description

This Work consists of constructing pervious cementitious sidewalk applications including excavation, subgrade preparation, geotextile, and aggregate subbase that shall allow surface water to infiltrate through the pervious surface into the supporting materials.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.2 Materials

Materials shall meet the requirements of the following Sections except as modified below:

Portland Cement and Blended Hydraulic Cement

9-01

General Requirements (Aggregate for Portland Cement Concrete)

9-03.1(1)

Fine Aggregate for Portland Cement Concrete

9-03.1(2)

Deleterious Substances

9-03.1(2)A

Gravel Backfill for Drains

9-03.12(4)

Premolded Joint Filler for Expansion Joints

9-04.1(2)

Concrete Curing Materials and Admixtures

9-23

Water

9-25

Construction Geosynthetic

9-33

Portland cement shall be Type I or Type II conforming to ASTM C150 or Type I-P low alkali blended cement conforming to ASTM C595.

Fly ash, Class C or Class F may be used to replace up to 25% of the cement content.

Fine aggregate gradation shall have 100% passing the No. 6 sieve. All aggregate shall be crushed producing angular shaped aggregate. Aggregate that is pea-shaped, rounded, irregular or partly rounded in shape will not be allowed.

Admixtures shall be used to prevent early hydration or drying of the mix.

Geotextile for Underground Drainage shall be non-woven, moderate survivability, Class C geotextile.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3 Construction Requirements

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(1) Pervious Concrete Mix Design

The Contractor shall propose a mix design for pervious concrete and shall submit the mix design to the Engineer for acceptance prior to constructing the test panel.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(1)A Mix Design Criteria

The Contractor shall include the following elements and results of the described procedures in the proposed mix design:

1.    The cementitious content, including pozzolans if used, shall be a minimum of 500 pounds per cubic yard.

2.    The mix shall incorporate one or more hydration stabilizing admixtures.

3.    The mix shall be designed to have a total void content greater than 15 percent and less than 30 percent, after it has cured in-place for seven days.

4.    The water/cement ratio shall be between 0.27 and 0.35.

5.    No more than 25 percent of Portland cement in the mix, by weight, may be replaced by fly ash, ground granulated blast furnace slag, or a combination of both.

6.    Other admixtures as the Contractor may propose.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(1)B Job Mix Formula

Once accepted by the Engineer, the mix design shall become the Job Mix Formula (JMF) and shall not be modified. The JMF shall be determined from information submitted under this Section and from results of test panel testing as described in Section 8-30.3(4)A. The JMF shall include the following:

1.    Batch weights of all constituents.

2.    Portland cement type and brand.

3.    Pozzolan type and source.

4.    Admixture type and brand.

5.    Aggregate source(s).

6.    Fresh density of the pervious concrete mix.

Modifications to the JMF will not be allowed and any modified mix placed in the Work will be rejected. The Contractor may propose modifications to the JMF by submitting a new mix design and shall be required to construct new test panel so that a new JMF can be determined. Only one (1) JMF shall be valid at any time. Admixture dosages may be modified as needed to maintain mix properties.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(2) Contractor’s Qualifications

The Contractor shall employ no less than one (1) NRMCA certified Pervious Concrete Craftsman who shall be on site, overseeing each placement crew during all pervious concrete placement, or the Contractor shall employ no less than three (3) NRMCA certified Pervious Concrete Installers, who shall be on site working as members of each placement crew during all pervious concrete placement.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(3) Submittals

The Contractor shall submit the following items to the Engineer for acceptance prior to placing any pervious concrete pavement or test panel:

1.    Batch weights for all constituents of one (1) cubic yard of the pervious concrete mix.

2.    A manufacturer’s Certificate of Compliance shall be submitted for aggregate gradation. If in the opinion of the Engineer the aggregate used on site appears to have aggregate that may be retained on a No. 6 sieve, the Engineer may sample the aggregate and test the gradation.

3.    The target voids content of the proposed pervious concrete mix after it has cured.

4.    The design water / cement ratio of the proposed mix design.

5.    The fresh density of the proposed pervious concrete mixture.

6.    The source and gradation of underdrain backfill material.

7.    Catalogue cuts for all proposed admixtures

8.    Catalogue cuts for proposed geotextile.

9.    Manufacturer certification(s) of the current lot of Portland cement and pozzolans, if used.

10.    Current certifications by the NRMCA for the Contractor’s personnel who will be installing sidewalk for “Pervious Concrete Craftsman” and “Pervious Concrete Installer”. “Pervious Concrete Technician” is not a suitable alternative for the craftsman or installer requirements.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(4) Acceptance

Production placement of pervious concrete shall not occur until the Contractor has completed a test panel of pervious concrete sidewalk that meets all acceptance criteria and is accepted by the Engineer. The Contractor should allow time in the project schedule for the construction and acceptance of the test panel.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(4)A Test Panel

The Contractor shall construct a test panel of pervious concrete sidewalk with a minimum surface area of 270 square feet. The width of the test panel shall be equal to the nominal width of the sidewalk to be placed. The test panel shall be representative of the production pervious concrete sidewalk in all aspects including subbase depth and preparation. The Engineer will observe and accept each element of test panel construction. Construction and evaluation of the test panel will occur as follows:

Coordinate the location of the test panel with the Engineer. Notify the Engineer at least five (5) working days before constructing the pervious concrete sidewalk test panel. Notify the Engineer when each element of the test panel is ready for inspection.

The completed test panel shall be used to validate the pervious concrete mix design and the JMF. The fresh density and void content at three random locations will be determined in accordance with ASTM 1688. The average unit weight of the three samples shall be within eight pounds per cubic foot.

After the concrete is hardened, three infiltration tests will be conducted within the test panel area. The infiltration test shall be in in accordance with ASTM C 1701. The acceptable infiltration rate will be determined by the average infiltration rate of the three tests and shall be greater than 100 inches per hour.

The Engineer may test the hardened density and void content by coring three - four inch diameter cores for reference purposes only in accordance with ASTM C42. If and when coring is completed, the Contractor shall fill the holes with mix meeting the proposed JMF and shall match adjacent pavement color, texture and grade.

The completed and accepted test panel shall be maintained and protected throughout the duration of the Work and may not be demolished and disposed of without written permission from the Engineer. If the test panel is incorporated into the Work, it shall remain in-place and be accepted as a single lot.

The Contractor shall remove, replace, and dispose of any unsatisfactory portions of test panel to the nearest joint as determined by the Engineer.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(4)B Lot Definition and Acceptance

For acceptance, pervious concrete sidewalk will be divided into lots as determined by the Engineer. A single lot will typically be represented by the lesser of: one (1) day’s production or 360 square yards of pervious concrete in place. Where the Contractor has more than one crew placing pervious concrete, lots will be associated with each crew. Representative lot size will be determined to the nearest square yards. Acceptance of a lot of pervious concrete sidewalk will be based on the following criteria:

1.    Grade: Pervious concrete sidewalk shall be true to plannednot deviate from the proposed grades deviate from gradeas shown on the Plans by more than ¼ inch in ten (10) feet. Where abutting existing flatwork (facilities) such as sidewalks, walkway, curbs, driveways or other pavements, the pervious concrete sidewalk will shall be flush to such facilities.

2.    Line: Pervious concrete sidewalk edges shall be true to planned lines plus or minus ½ inch at any point.

3.    Slope: Pervious concrete sidewalk shall be sloped as shown on the Drawings. Slope shall be consistent to within ¼ inch in 10 feet.

4.    Conformance to JMF: The pervious concrete used shall conform to the JMF within the limits as determined from the accepted test panel.

5.    Fresh Density or Unit Weight (test panel only or when determined by the Engineer): The unit weight of each sample taken for acceptance will be determined in accordance with ASTM C 1688. The unit weight of each sample for each lot shall be within eight (8) pounds per cubic foot of the unit weight as accepted in the JMF.

6.    Infiltration Rate: The infiltration rate of each lot will be tested at four random locations within the lot in accordance with ASTM C 1701. The average of all four (4) tests shall be greater than 100 inches per hour.

7.    Manufacturer’s Certificate of Compliance: If concrete is delivered to the site with standard ready mix concrete trucks, each load of pervious concrete transported to the location of placement shall have an original Manufacturer’s Certificate of Compliance as specified in Section 6-02.3(5)B delivered with the load.

8.    Appearance: Each lot of finished pervious concrete sidewalk will be inspected for appearance by the Engineer. The pervious concrete sidewalk shall have a consistent surface texture, shall not be raveled, shall be free of ridges or other surface imperfections, and shall be free of cracks.

9.    Surface Texture: See Section 8-30.3(10)C.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(4)C Rejection

Pervious concrete sidewalk that does not meet the acceptance criteria put forth in Section 8-30.3(4)B will be rejected by the Engineer on a lot by lot basis.

Pervious concrete sidewalk that has been rejected by the Engineer, or the Contractor, shall be removed and replaced at no additional cost to the Owner.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(5) Subgrade

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(5)A Subgrade Preparation

Subgrade for pervious concrete sidewalk shall be excavated, graded and compacted as specified in Section 8-14.3(2) except that the subgrade shall be compacted to the point where it is firm and unyielding. Prior to placing the geotextile fabric, the surface of the subgrade shall be scarified to a depth of ¼ to ½ inch. Once scarified, neither materials nor equipment shall be permitted within the prepared subgrade area.

Separation check dams shall be installed to prevent lateral flow within the underdrain system. The interval of the check dams shall be every 15 feet in sidewalk locations, as shown in the Plans, and coincide with control joints in curb and sidewalk. Check dams shall be constructed of compacted native material.

Add the following new sub-section:

8-30.3(5)B Underdrain System

The underdrain system shall be placed on the prepared subgrade within the sidewalk location. Geotextile fabric shall be placed on the prepared subgrade prior to placing the underdrain system. Care shall be taken to provide full coverage and to prevent the geotextile from being torn. Damaged geotextile shall be removed and replaced as determined by the Engineer. Overlaps of the geotextile shall be a minimum 1 foot or to the manufacturer’s recommendation, whichever is greater.

Gravel Backfill for Drains shall be placed on top of the fabric to the depth shown on the Plans. The surface of the gravel backfill shall be compacted with a vibrator plate compactor. After the gravel has been compacted, the geotextile fabric shall wrap across the top of the gravel to prevent concrete from integrating with the gravel.

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8-30.3(6) Equipment

Pervious concrete mixing and batching shall be accomplished using either volumetric site-mixed mobile mixers or standard ready mix concrete trucks.

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8-30.3(7) Placing, Spreading, and Compacting Concrete

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8-30.3(7)A Side Forms

Pervious concrete sidewalks shall be constructed using side forms. Slip form paving will not be allowed. Forms for pervious concrete sidewalks shall be made of steel or wood and shall be in good condition, clean and be capable of being anchored in place so that they will be true to grade, line and slope. Forms that are bent, warped, unclean or otherwise deemed inadequate by the Engineer, shall not be used. If pervious concrete is to be placed against a curb or other existing structure, the curb or structure shall be used as a side form for the pervious concrete sidewalk placement.

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8-30.3(7)B Placing, Spreading, and Compacting

The Engineer will inspect all formwork and subbase/subgrade prior to placing pervious concrete. All surfaces shall be dampened just prior to concrete placement.

Pervious concrete shall be placed on the prepared subbase in a single lift and as close to its final position as possible in a continuous operation so as to minimize evaporation or drying. Where necessary, the pervious concrete may be spread with square edged shovels or rakes prior to strike off. In no case will the use of a concrete vibrator be used to move or consolidate pervious concrete. Pervious concrete shall be struck off or screeded to a depth sufficient to allow for compaction to grade.

Contractor’s personnel shall take care to avoid foot traffic in the pervious concrete to prevent non-uniform compaction and to keep contaminating material from the mix. Foot traffic on fresh concrete shall not be allowed after it has been struck off.

Within 20 minutes of discharge from the truck, the concrete shall be compacted, finished and covered for curing. The compacted effort shall be sufficient to compact the fresh pervious concrete to grade without drawing excessive paste to the surface. Edges and joints shall be finished by hand with a ½ inch radius edging tool.

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8-30.3(8) Joints

The Contractor shall install expansion and control joints at the spacing shown on the Plans. The preferred method of installing control joints is with a rolling jointer or grooving roller. If the pervious concrete is setting too quickly to properly roll in a control joint, the Contractor shall cut the control joint with a power driven concrete saw. Concrete saws shall not tear, spall or otherwise damage the pervious concrete.

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8-30.3(9) Finishing

Finishing equipment for pervious concrete sidewalks shall be designed for the intended work, shall be clean and in good operating condition. Rolling screeds shall be used to screed off the pervious concrete to the form heights. Vibrating screeds shall not be used for striking off pervious concrete. Other equipment used for striking off the pervious concrete may be used as along as it leaves a smooth surface at the planned grades and not cause excess paste to be left on, or drawn to, the surface.

If rollers are used to compact, the rollers shall be of sufficient weight and width to compact the pervious concrete to grade without marring the surface. Rollers used for compacting pervious concrete shall not cause the surface to close or otherwise clog and shall produce a surface that is free of ridges or other imperfections. Rollers used for producing expansion joints shall be designed and manufactured for the purpose, shall have sufficient weight to produce the joint and shall not otherwise damage or mar the surface

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8-30.3(10) Surface Smoothness

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8-30.3(10)A Smoothness Testing Equipment

The Contractor shall provide a 10 foot straight edge to be used for measuring the profile of the pervious concrete sidewalk. The straight edge device shall be designed so that it may be easily moved from location to location without marring the surface of the freshly compacted pervious concrete. The 10 foot straight edge shall be accepted by the Engineer prior to placing pervious concrete.

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8-30.3(10)B Surface Smoothness

The surface of the pervious concrete sidewalk will be checked immediately after compaction for grade and slope using the 10 foot straightedge as provided by the Contractor. Where the surface is found to not meet the requirements of Section 8-30.3(4)B, it shall be immediately corrected by recompacting, removing excess pervious concrete, or by adding pervious concrete.

If it is necessary to correct grade or slope by removing excess pervious concrete, the surface shall be recompacted and the edges retooled. If the grade or slope is to be corrected by adding pervious concrete mix, the surface shall be lightly scarified and additional concrete added. The surface shall be recompacted to grade and the edges retooled. Any corrections to the surface shall occur before the pervious concrete has set or has hydrated to the point where the mix is unworkable. Pervious concrete sidewalk that is out of specification with regard to grade or slope will be rejected to the nearest planned joints.

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8-30.3(10)C Surface Smoothness and Texture

Surface texture is a function of aggregate size, shape, and gradation. The following photos are examples of an acceptable texture and three unacceptable textures of pervious concrete surfaces within the City. The coins and scale are shown for point of references only. If in the opinion of the Engineer, the pervious concrete surface differs too greatly from the acceptable surface or more closely resembles one or more of the unacceptable surfaces, the Contractor shall remove and replace those panels at no cost to the City.

Acceptable Surface Texture

(Henderson Blvd. SE, between Eskridge Blvd. SE and Carlyon Ave. SE)

Unacceptable Surface Texture

(Cooper Crest St. NW (west side of street), approx. 175 ft. north of 20th Ave. NW)

Unacceptable Surface Texture

(Decatur St. SW, between 11th Ave. SW and 12th Ave. SW)

Unacceptable Surface Texture

(Cain Rd. SE, between North St. SE and Holiday Way SE)

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8-30.3(11) Curing

Immediately after the pervious concrete sidewalk has been compacted and checked for grade and slope, the Contractor shall apply the sheet material for curing. If the surface appears dry, the surface shall be lightly misted with water prior to applying the sheet material for curing. The sheet material for curing shall be fixed in-place as to not damage the pervious concrete sidewalk surface. Pervious concrete shall be placed, struck off, finished and have the curing materials in-place within twenty (20) minutes of the time the pervious concrete is discharged from the truck.

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8-30.3(12) Weather Limitations

Mixing and placing concrete shall be discontinued when a descending air temperature in the shade away from artificial heat reaches 50ºF and shall not be resumed until an ascending air temperature in the shade and away from artificial heat reaches 50ºF.

Mixing and placing pervious concrete shall only occur when the ambient air temperature, as measured at the placement location away from the shade and away from artificial cooling sources, is less than 85°F.

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8-30.3(13) Protection of Pervious Concrete Sidewalks

As part of the Construction Stormwater Pollution Protection Plan (SWPPP), rain runoff and sediment shall be prevented from entering the area of pervious sidewalk construction, including excavation, until the pervious concrete has cured for a minimum 7 days, and the adjacent areas that sheet flow/drain onto the pervious pavement are permanently stabilized from erosion and plantings are established. Once pavement is placed, sheet material for curing shall continually be maintained until the adjacent areas are permanently stabilized.

The Contractor shall take all precautions to protect the pervious concrete sidewalk from damage throughout the course of the work. Pervious concrete sidewalk that is damaged or has been adversely impacted by the introduction of foreign materials shall be rejected and replaced to the nearest expansion joints.

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8-30.3(14) Removal and Replacement of Defective Sidewalks

Pervious concrete sidewalk that has been corrected shall match the adjacent, undisturbed pervious concrete sidewalk. If in the opinion of the Engineer the corrected pervious concrete sidewalk does not match the adjacent Work, the repaired area will be removed and replaced to the nearest planned joints.