Chapter 6.10
LAND USE DEVELOPMENT STANDARDS

Sections:

Article I. Tourist Core Area Plan

6.10.010    Introduction.

6.10.020    Applicability.

Article II. Bijou/Al Tahoe Community Plan Design Standards

6.10.030    Introduction.

6.10.040    Applicability.

6.10.050    Commercial area theme.

6.10.060    Public service/recreation theme.

Article III. “Y” Industrial Community Plan Design Standards

6.10.070    Preferred industrial area design standards.

Article IV. Tahoe Valley Area Plan/Specific Plan

6.10.080    Introduction.

6.10.081    Applicability.

Article V. Citywide Design Standards

6.10.090    Purpose – Intent – Applicability.

6.10.100    Procedures for compliance.

6.10.110    Site design.

6.10.120    Building design.

6.10.130    Setbacks of buildings and structures.

6.10.140    Snow storage.

6.10.150    Landscaping.

6.10.160    Exterior lighting.

6.10.170    Reserved.

6.10.180    Street right-of-way improvements.

6.10.190    Scenic highway corridors.

6.10.200    Shorezone.

Article VI. Fences and Walls Design Standards

6.10.210    Purpose.

6.10.220    Applicability.

6.10.230    Fence height and setbacks (standard application).

6.10.240    Fence height setbacks – Alternatives.

6.10.250    Standards.

6.10.260    Nonconforming fence regulations.

6.10.270    Process and fee.

6.10.280    Enforcement.

Article VII. Parking, Driveway and
Loading Spaces

6.10.290    Purpose.

6.10.300    Applicability.

Division 1. Driveways

6.10.310    Definitions.

6.10.320    Standards.

Division 2. Parking

6.10.330    Definitions.

6.10.340    Standards.

6.10.350    Alternatives.

6.10.360    Nonconforming aprons, driveways and parking areas.

Division 3. Parking Demand Ratios

6.10.370    Resulting fractions.

6.10.380    Employee parking.

6.10.390    Use definitions.

6.10.400    Maximum limit.

6.10.410    Parking ratios.

Article VIII. Reserved

Article IX. Carnival and Outdoor Arts and Crafts Show Standards

6.10.430    Intent.

6.10.440    Temporary carnivals.

6.10.450    Temporary arts and craft shows.

Article X. Service Station Change of Use

6.10.460    Conditions.

Code reviser’s note: The attachments, exhibits, and TRPA documents referenced in this chapter are available in the office of the city clerk.

Article I. Tourist Core Area Plan

6.10.010 Introduction.

The tourist core area plan has been adopted by the city to establish a framework that will achieve redevelopment and reinvestment in properties, on the ground environmental improvements, enhancement of the built environment, enhancement of the transportation and circulation network, and increased access to recreation opportunities. The tourist core area plan is consistent with the policies of the city general plan and TRPA Regional Plan. However, the tourist core area plan provides more detailed direction than the city general plan and TRPA Regional Plan. It addresses land use regulations, development and design standards and environmental improvements for the plan area. (Ord. 1060 § 1 (Exh. A). Code 1997 § 5-1)

6.10.020 Applicability.

The tourist core area plan establishes land use policy, zoning, and development standards applicable to all property and projects within the boundaries of the plan area.

The policies, zoning regulations, and development standards contained within the tourist core area plan shall be applied to all future development within the plan area.

A. The tourist core area plan document shall be adopted and amended by city council ordinance.

B. If conflicts occur between the requirements of the tourist core area plan and city-wide policy or regulation, the requirements of the tourist core area plan shall apply. (Ord. 1060 § 1 (Exh. A). Code 1997 § 5-2)

The former Article I, Stateline/Ski Run Community Plan Design Standards, was amended in its entirety by Ord. 1060. Previous ordinances are 903 and 1002.

Article II. Bijou/Al Tahoe Community Plan Design Standards

6.10.030 Introduction.

The purpose of the Bijou/Al Tahoe community plan design standards is to establish special design standards that will enable this community plan area to achieve the desired urban form. Design standards are based on area themes rather than use as identified by the following matrix:

Land Use Matrix/Theme/Section

District

Land Use Theme

Section

1

Bijou

Commercial

1

2

Harrison

Commercial

1

3

Lucky/Payless

Commercial

1

4

Government Center

Public Service/Recreation

2

(Ord. 903. Code 1997 § 5-10)

6.10.040 Applicability.

All projects within the Bijou/Al Tahoe community plan area shall meet the standards contained within this chapter. In addition, all projects within this community plan are required to meet the city-wide design and lighting standards as well. Should a conflict occur between the city-wide standard and the community plan standard, the community plan standard shall apply. (Ord. 903. Code 1997 § 5-11)

6.10.050 Commercial area theme.

Districts

Map and Use Matrix Identification

Bijou

1

Harrison

2

Lucky/Payless

3

A. Permitted Uses. Refer to use matrix for each district.

B. Height.

Standard: For all districts refer to TRPA Code of Ordinances, Chapters 15 and 22.

C. Bulk.

Standard: For all districts, refer to redevelopment design element, SLTCC 6.10.080(A)(2).

Special Standard: The following special bulk standards apply to:

Harrison (2):

1. It is encouraged that the building height vary at the back of the sidewalk from one to two floors.

D. Coverage.

Standard: For all districts refer to the TRPA Code of Ordinances, Chapters 15 and 20.

E. Setbacks.

Standard: For all districts refer to PAS and other land use regulations and city-wide design standards.

Special Standard: The following special setback standards apply to:

Harrison (2):

1. Those properties fronting Harrison Avenue, north of Los Angeles to Merced Avenue, buildings shall have a 10-foot setback from the right-of-way which may be reduced if the area is not required to implement the required public and scenic improvements. (Refer to Exhibit 10 of the Bijou/Al Tahoe community plan.)

2. Setbacks to accommodate sidewalk cafe size outdoor dining shall be a minimum depth of 15 feet.

F. Site Design.

Standard: For all districts refer to city-wide design standards.

Special Standard: The following special site design standards apply to:

Harrison (2):

The urban design concept for this area is to create a retail streetscape permitting the pedestrian to window shop and enter the shops from the sidewalk.

To accomplish this, the following site design standards are required:

1. Those properties fronting Harrison Avenue, north of San Francisco Avenue to San Jose Avenue, buildings shall be designed as indicated on Exhibit 10 of the Bijou/Al Tahoe community plan, to maintain a unified appearance in the district.

a. Sidewalks, parking areas, and landscaping shall be designed as indicated on Exhibit 10 of the Bijou/Al Tahoe community plan to maintain a uniform appearance in the district.

b. Outdoor dining areas shall be visually attractive and visible from the pedestrian streetscape, by incorporating landscaping, street furniture and pedestrian oriented amenities.

G. Architectural Treatment.

Standard: For all districts refer to city-wide design standards and South Tahoe redevelopment design element, SLTCC 6.10.080(E).

Special Standard: The following special site design standards apply to:

Bijou (1):

1. Natural wood shall be used on all elevations of the exterior of all buildings (remodel or new construction). Stucco or stone materials may be blended with the wood to provide interest and variety.

2. A landscape boulevard theme (five-foot-wide meandering sidewalk, 10-foot turf strip between back of curb and sidewalk, conifer trees spaced 20 feet apart) shall be incorporated into every project (remodel or new construction), to provide a uniform setting.

3. Art in public places shall be reviewed by both the CSLT and TRPA prior to placement to avoid view blockage and ensure placement is within landscaped/pedestrian areas only. Public art should be reflective of the natural heritage and work to further develop a sense of identity for the area.

Harrison (2):

1. Buildings shall be well articulated and shall incorporate architectural features which reflect “Vintage Tahoe.” Major changes in the facade (e.g., walls and roof lines) shall occur on a minimum 50-foot module to maintain the pedestrian character of the street.

2. To achieve “Vintage Tahoe,” building designs shall include, at a minimum, all of the following:

a. Roof slopes of not less than 7:12 pitch, or more than 12:12;

b. Covered entrances;

c. Rock, brick, or real wood materials (klinker or used brick);

d. Frame windows (real wood, gridded glass).

3. The ground floor elevation of a building facing the sidewalk shall be visually and physically “penetrable” with transparent window surfaces, and entry points at frequent intervals (usually one per 50 feet).

4. Incorporate architectural elements to provide visual interest and relief from flat surfaces, such as textured materials, offset planes, differentiated piers and columns, recessed entries and windows and awnings.

5. Particular attention shall be given to the craftsmanship within the pedestrian’s range of touch and view, such as the use of special store-front detailing, facade ornamentation, and flower boxes to reinforce the pedestrian character of the street.

6. Ground floor activities shall be limited to those which contribute to a pedestrian environment, such as retail and restaurant uses.

7. To unify and create a pedestrian oriented atmosphere, the following “Vintage Tahoe” amenities shall be incorporated into all projects:

a. Trash receptacles;

b. Street furniture;

c. Bicycle racks.

8. Art in public places shall be reviewed by both the CSLT and TRPA prior to placement to avoid view blockage and ensure placement is within landscaped/pedestrian areas only. Public art should be reflective of the natural heritage and work to further develop a sense of identity for the area.

H. Signage.

Standard: For all districts refer to the city sign ordinance, Chapter 6.40 SLTCC. Note: This community plan has its own specific set of sign standards in addition to the city-wide standards.

Special Standard: The following special standards shall apply to:

Harrison (2):

1. For properties between San Francisco and San Jose Avenues, free-standing signs shall be prohibited due to the pedestrian oriented development standards (setbacks).

2. Building signs shall be limited to 40 square feet based on the pedestrian atmosphere.

Special Standard: The following special standards shall apply to:

Bijou (1) and Lucky/Payless (3):

1. Free-standing signs shall be limited to those as permitted by the city-wide sign ordinance.

Conformance to the sign ordinance shall be required at the time a sign permit is issued or 15 years from the date of the adoption of the sign ordinance (amortization schedule).

2. Building signs shall be limited to those as as permitted by the city-wide sign ordinance.

I. Parking.

Standard: For all districts refer to the city-wide driveway, parking, and loading space regulations in Article VII of this chapter.

Special Standard: The following standards shall apply to:

Harrison (2):

1. Parking shall be located only at the rear of all new development, or those properties which are “redeveloped” (building removed and rebuilt, excluding rebuild of foundation).

2. For properties between Los Angeles and San Jose Avenues, which front Harrison Avenue, parking may be permitted as indicated on Exhibit 10 of the Bijou/Al Tahoe community plan, to be consistent with the plan for the area. This on-street parking shall not be calculated as project area or project specific parking, unless Harrison Avenue is abandoned by the CSLT to the adjoining properties.

Special Standard: All districts.

1. Existing and new parking areas shall be upgraded through the use of permanent landscaping (including, at a minimum, irrigation system, mounding and trees/shrubs which include conifer plantings) to ensure screening of the vehicles. Interior parking lot landscaping shall be set as a high priority within all districts to screen vehicles.

J. Public Improvements.

Standard: For all districts refer to redevelopment design element, SLTCC 6.10.080(E)(9), city-wide design standards, and city lighting standards.

Special Standard: The following standards apply to:

Bijou (1) and Lucky/Payless (3):

1. Projects subject to the requirements of the city-wide design standards shall be conditioned to provide the following improvements where applicable.

a. Five- to 10-foot-wide sidewalks.

b. Six-inch vertical concrete curbs unless otherwise required by Caltrans or the city of South Lake Tahoe.

c. Conifer trees planted 30 feet on center and pockets of shrubs planted 20 feet on center.

d. Pedestrian street lights 12 feet high, 50 feet on center or low level lights 25 feet on center.

e. Transit shelters design shall be reviewed jointly by the CSLT, and STAGE, to insure uniformity and screening with landscaping.

The improvements should be consistent with the typical sections provided as guidelines below or approved area-wide improvement plans. The detailed specifications of the improvements shall be established at the time of project approval by TRPA, the city of South Lake Tahoe, and Caltrans.

U.S. Highway 50 Cross-Section Guideline. Four travel lanes, median divider or center turn lane, four-foot bike lanes, 30-foot building setbacks from property line, limited access, no parking, six-foot sidewalk, lighting and landscaping. Option 1 is for pedestrian districts or developments with limited space in pedestrian areas. Option 2 is for strip commercial districts and noncommercial/tourist areas.

Arterials Cross-Section Guideline (Johnson Boulevard, Al Tahoe Boulevard, Rufus Allen Boulevard). Two travel lanes with four-foot bike lanes, 40- to 80-foot right-of-way with 10-foot building setbacks from the property line, five-foot sidewalks, limited access, no parking, lighting and landscaping.

Local Commercial Streets Guideline. Two 12-foot travel lanes (with parking option), 40-foot right-of-way with 10-foot building setbacks from the property line, six-foot sidewalks, lighting, and landscaping.

Street Improvements. The street amenities established by the city of South Lake Tahoe shall be placed throughout the district to provide unity. The city and Caltrans shall establish the curb line and flow lines for all frontages consistent with the cross sections.

Street Lighting. At intersections and when required by traffic safety, street lighting shall meet the standards of Caltrans or city of South Lake Tahoe. In other areas the street lights 12 feet high shall be spaced 50 feet on center along the curb.

Harrison (2):

1. Projects subject to the requirements of the city-wide design standards shall be conditioned to provide the following improvements where applicable. (Refer to Exhibit 10 of the Bijou/Al Tahoe community plan.)

a. Five- to 10-foot-wide sidewalks.

b. Six-inch vertical concrete curbs unless otherwise required by Caltrans or the city of South Lake Tahoe.

c. Conifer trees planted 30 feet on center and pockets of shrubs planted 20 feet on center.

d. Street lighting shall be provided through the use of fixtures placed on the structures and pole lights shall be prohibited.

e. Replace the existing pole lights in the El Dorado boat ramp parking area with new lights which conform to the city-wide lighting standards.

The improvements should be consistent with the typical sections provided as guidelines below or approved area-wide improvement plans. The detailed specifications of the improvements shall be established at the time of project approval by TRPA, the city of South Lake Tahoe, and Caltrans.

Street Improvements. The street amenities established by the city of South Lake Tahoe shall be placed throughout the district to provide unity. The city and Caltrans shall establish the curb line and flow lines for all frontages consistent with the cross sections.

Street Lighting. At intersections and when required by traffic safety street lighting shall meet the standards of Caltrans or city of South Lake Tahoe lighting standards. In other areas the street lights 12 feet high shall be spaced 50 feet on center along the curb. The recommended style of the lights is provided in the appendix pertaining to the adopted CSLT lighting standards. (Ord. 903. Code 1997 § 5-12)

6.10.060 Public service/recreation theme.

Districts

Map and Use Matrix Identification

Town Center

4

A. Permitted Uses. Refer to use matrix for district uses.

B. Height.

Standard: Refer to TRPA Code of Ordinances, Chapter 37.

Special Standard: The following shall apply to:

Lake Tahoe Community College property:

Height issues for this site shall be addressed by TRPA on an individual project basis, and may be in excess of TRPA Code of Ordinances, Chapters 15 and 22, based on project setback, visibility, or other design criteria.

El Dorado County and city properties located in 56-Acre project area:

For public and quasi-public owned buildings, the maximum height permitted is 42 feet, with no minimum cross slope or roof pitch requirements, provided TRPA makes Finding 1, Finding 3, Finding 4, Finding 5, Finding 7, and Finding 8 of Section 37.7.

C. Bulk.

Standard: Refer to redevelopment design element, Sections 1 and 2.

D. Coverage.

Standard: Refer to TRPA Code of Ordinances, Chapter 30.

E. Setbacks.

Standard: Refer to City-Wide Design Manual, Section 3 of Chapter 1 and 2.

Special Standard: In addition to the city-wide design standards, the following shall apply to specific properties located within the town center district, including:

The vacant seven-and-one-half-acre parcel north of Al Tahoe and west of Johnson Boulevard (adjacent to the existing El Dorado County Government Center) shall require a minimum of a 50-foot setback from Johnson Boulevard and an increased interior sideyard setback of 20 feet in that area of the property adjoining the residentially developed district.

The vacant 12-acre parcel, north of Al Tahoe and east of Johnson Boulevard (adjacent to Bijou Community Park) shall require a minimum of a 50-foot setback from Johnson Boulevard for development.

Development on the Lake Tahoe Community College property shall have a minimum setback of 50 feet from Al Tahoe Boulevard.

F. Site Design.

Standard: Refer to City-Wide Design Manual, Section 2, Chapters 1 and 2.

Special Standard: In addition to the City-Wide Design Manual, the following standards shall apply to the entire town center:

1. A natural forest setting shall be preserved by designing projects that maintain the maximum number of trees, shrubs, boulders, and other natural amenities at a project site. Landscaping shall be designed to blend with the native surroundings, including trees, shrubs, ground covers and flowers.

2. Sidewalks shall connect all buildings within project area.

G. Architectural Treatment.

Standard: Refer to City-Wide Design Standards, Section 2 of Chapters 1 and 2 and city lighting standards.

Special Standard: In addition to the city-wide design standards, the following standards shall apply:

1. Buildings shall be designed with interest (no box forms, variations in elevation, etc.) and shall incorporate architectural features which blend with the surrounding buildings.

2. Wood siding or natural appearing siding shall be used on the exterior of all remodeled newly constructed buildings.

3. Roofs shall have a minimum pitch of 5:12 and a maximum roof pitch of 12:12. Roofs may have a minimum pitch of 0:12 on public and quasi-public owned buildings within El Dorado County and City Properties located in 56-Acres project area.

4. Real stone shall be incorporated into the building design. Manufactured stone may be used on a project only if the applicant demonstrates the application of the stone will appear “real.”

5. All projects shall incorporate day use amenities, including outdoor furniture, bicycle racks and trash receptacles.

H. Signage.

Standard: For all districts refer to the city sign ordinance, Chapter 6.40 SLTCC. Note: This community plan has its own specific set of sign standards in addition to the city-wide standards.

Special Standard: The following special standard shall apply to the Chamber of Commerce office area, adjacent to the campground by the lake:

1. The existing “Community Banner” area may be maintained and used for the purpose of displaying a maximum of three banners at a time, and shall be displayed for community events only. Banner size requirement shall be restricted to the physical limits of the display area. Banner colors shall conform to the city-wide ordinance standards, dark background and light letters. Banner permits are not required from the CSLT, however, the Chamber of Commerce is to maintain a record of banner activity (when displayed, length of time, and by whom). The existing structure which holds up the banner should be improved aesthetically.

Special Standard: The following special standard shall apply to:

The area within the Government Center identified as the “Special Events Area”:

1. When a special event is approved for the above noted site, by the CSLT parks and recreation and planning departments, one banner (visible from a public right-of-way) may be placed at the site. Any banner placed at the site shall conform to size, color, and placement standards as set forth in the city-wide sign ordinance. This banner may be placed in a location other than in the community banner display area. Any banner placed within the interior boundaries of the special events area, which is not visible from a street shall not be considered the allowed banner.

I. Parking.

Standard: For all districts refer to the city-wide driveway, parking, and loading space regulations in Article VII of this chapter.

Special Standard: The following special standard shall apply to:

The area within the campground by the lake, which fronts Lake Tahoe Boulevard, bounded by the Senior Citizens Center and Chamber of Commerce:

1. To encourage the “special event center” improvements within the campground by the lake, the parking which is currently located in the above described area shall be relocated and combined with other existing on-site parking areas, except for the adequate number of spaces which are required by the City Parking Code for the Chamber of Commerce and Lake Tahoe Museum.

Special Standard: The following special standard shall apply to:

The area currently identified as the El Dorado County Government Center (courthouse, jail, etc.), bounded by Al Tahoe and Johnson Boulevards:

1. Parking facilities which front Johnson Boulevard shall be screened by landscaping improvements (mounding, shrubs, trees, including conifers, etc.). This standard shall apply to new construction or remodeled buildings upon the submittal and approval of a project application with TRPA. The landscape improvements shall be reviewed and approved by both TRPA and the CSLT.

2. Construction of new government offices on the seven and one-half acre vacant parcel, north of the El Dorado County government offices shall require joint review by TRPA, CSLT, and the applicant, regarding the potential for combined/shared parking facilities and access to the project areas.

Special Standard: The following shall apply to all new projects or projects which increase the square footage of an existing structure:

1. Interior parking shall be improved through the placement of permanent landscaping to screen vehicles.

J. Public Improvements.

Standard: Refer to redevelopment design element, SLTCC 6.10.080(E)(9), and city-wide design standards.

Special Standard: The following special public improvement standard applies to:

Government Center (4):

1. Projects subject to the requirements of the city-wide design standards shall be conditioned to provide the following improvements where applicable:

a. Five- to 10-foot-wide sidewalks.

b. Six-inch vertical concrete curbs unless otherwise required by Caltrans or the city of South Lake Tahoe.

c. Street trees, including conifers, 30 feet on center and pockets of shrubs planted 20 feet on center or a combination of both subject to an approved landscape plan.

d. Pedestrian street lights 12 feet high, 50 feet on center or low level lights 25 feet on center. In the El Dorado Beach area only low level lights shall be permitted.

e. Transit shelter design shall be reviewed by CSLT and STAGE to insure uniformity and screening through the use of permanent landscaping.

The improvements should be consistent with the typical sections provided as guidelines below or approved area-wide improvement plans. The detailed specifications of the improvements shall be established at the time of project approval by TRPA, the city of South Lake Tahoe, and Caltrans.

U.S. Highway 50 Cross-Section Guideline. Four travel lanes, median divider or center turn lane, four-foot bike lanes, 30-foot building setbacks from property line, limited access, no parking, six-foot sidewalk, lighting and landscaping. Option 1 is for pedestrian districts or developments with limited space in pedestrian areas. Option 2 is for strip commercial districts and noncommercial/tourist areas.

Arterials Cross-Section Guideline (Johnson Boulevard, Al Tahoe Boulevard, Rufus Allen Boulevard). Two travel lanes with four-foot bike lanes, 40- to 80-foot right-of-way with 10-foot building setbacks from the property line, five-foot sidewalks, limited access, no parking, lighting and landscaping.

Local Commercial Streets Guideline. Two 12-foot travel lanes (with parking option), right-of-way with 10-foot building setbacks from the property line, six-foot sidewalks, lighting, and landscaping. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1159 § 1 (Exh. 1). Code 1997 § 5-13)

Article III. “Y” Industrial Community Plan Design Standards

6.10.070 Preferred industrial area design standards.

Introduction. The purpose of the South “Y” Industrial Tract design standards is to establish modifications to the city-wide design standards that are appropriate to a preferred industrial area. Such modifications will allow industrial uses to dominate within the tract, functioning as South Lake Tahoe’s core area for industrial uses, while providing a clearly defined and screened boundary to the adjacent residential and roadway uses.

Applicability. All projects within the South “Y” Industrial Tract shall meet the standards contained within this chapter. Where not superseded by the standards found in this chapter, the city-wide design and lighting standards also apply. Should a conflict occur between the city-wide standard and the community plan standard, the community plan standard shall take precedence.

This article shall apply to:

1. All new development projects.

2. All major remodel projects.

3. All additions, including installation of industrial-style storage containers.

4. Where indicated, commercial changes in operation.

5. Where indicated, new open storage.

A. Permissible Uses.

Standard: Refer to use matrix for the South “Y” Industrial Tract community plan.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to new projects determined by TRPA to potentially affect a Source Water Protection Zone (wells numbered 03231413W11 or 03231413W12):

1. New project applications for uses that constitute possible contaminating activities within these zones must make the findings and meet the requirements of Chapter 82 of the TRPA Code in order to be approved.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to existing possible contaminating activities determined by TRPA to potentially affect a Source Water Protection Zone (wells numbered 03231413W11 or 03231413W12):

1. These uses must submit a spill control plan that meets the TRPA Code requirements.

B. Height.

Standard: Refer to TRPA Code of Ordinances, Chapters 15 and 22.

C. Bulk.

Standard: Refer to city-wide design standards.

Special Standard: The following special standard replaces the city-wide design standard relating to scale and massing of structures.

1. Because the community plan has screening requirements for uses visible from Lake Tahoe Boulevard and D Street; within the tract, industrial uses are permitted to dominate.

Special Standard: The following special standard modifies the city-wide design standard relating to design of structures shall be compatible with its environment:

1. Buildings and structures shall be evaluated based on the impact the structure has on scenic backdrop as seen from the Lake Tahoe Boulevard and D Street.

D. Coverage.

Standard: Refer to Chapter 20 of the TRPA Code of Ordinances.

E. Setbacks.

Standard: Refer to city-wide setback standards found in Chapter 6.55 SLTCC.

F. Site Design.

Standard: Refer to city-wide design standards and Chapter 71 of the TRPA Code of Ordinances.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to projects determined by TRPA to have the potential to exceed the area noise standard (65 CNEL):

1. Project application shall include a noise analysis for consideration as part of the environmental review process. The following performance standards for the stationary or industrial noise sources or projects will be used to evaluate specific project impacts. Impacts will be measured at the property line of a noise-sensitive receiving use:

 

Noise Level Descriptor

Daytime

(7 a.m. – 7 p.m.)

Evening/Nighttime
(7 p.m. – 7 a.m.)

Hourly Leq, dB

55

45

Maximum level, dB

75 (single event)

65

Each of the noise levels specified above should be lowered by five dB for simple tone noises, noises consisting primarily of speech or music, or for recurring impulsive noises. Noise measurements conducted for noise analyses shall follow TRPA protocols for the CNEL measurements that are described in the 2001 Threshold Evaluation.

Projects shall incorporate design features and self-monitoring components (to be determined during the permitting process) to ensure compliance with noise standards. Monitoring results should clearly indicate whether the standards are being met and they shall be provided to the city of South Lake Tahoe and TRPA. If project monitoring demonstrates that standards are consistently being met, the monitoring requirement may be discontinued after one year of data showing no violations. If standards are not being met, adaptations to attenuate the noise must be incorporated into the project and monitoring should continue until one year’s worth of results demonstrate no noise violations.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to projects that have a fuel tank or use other potentially contaminating materials as part of their operations:

1. Project application shall include a spill contingency plan, when required by TRPA, Lahontan, or county environmental management, which addresses how to respond to accidental spills.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to projects determined by TRPA or Lahontan regional water quality control board to require a storm water pollution protection plan:

1. Project application shall include a storm water pollution protection plan that meets the content requirement dictated by the water quality agency.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all projects proposed on an existing developed project area:

1. Best management practices shall be installed for the property at the time the project.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all existing developed project areas seeking to add commercial floor area obtained from the community plan allocation:

1. Best management practices shall be installed for the entire parcel.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all properties that gravity drain to the Industrial Tract stream environment zone restoration project:

1. Rather than provide for on-site infiltration of the 20-year, one-hour storm, the project proponent may elect to discharge their run-off to the Industrial Tract stream environment zone restoration project for complete treatment under certain circumstances described in the South “Y” Industrial Tract community plan.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all existing developed properties that propose installation of an industrial-style storage container:

1. A city of South Lake Tahoe planning division minor design review application is required.

2. When used in association with commercial buildings and uses, these containers must have commercial floor area.

3. Storage containers may be placed only on TRPA-verified existing land coverage or create new land coverage after permitting consistent with the land coverage constraints of the property.

4. Installation of containers in existing parking lots may not reduce the amount of parking spaces available below that required to support the uses on the property.

5. No storage containers shall encroach into a setback area.

6. Any storage container visible from D Street or Lake Tahoe Boulevard must comply with design review requirements related to prefabricated or factory-built buildings or structures. Other containers need not comply with local design standards.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all properties that propose installation of up to five-foot-high fences within the 20-foot front yard setback between 10 to 20 feet from the front yard property line:

1. The land area between the front property line and the fence shall be landscaped with native vegetation, including shrubs and trees planted outside of the “clear zone”;

2. The project shall install physical barriers to prevent parking in landscaped/open space areas;

3. The landscape plan shall be reviewed and approved by the city planning division;

4. A hold harmless agreement with the city is required;

5. The property’s street address must be posted on the fence.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all properties that back to Lake Tahoe Boulevard and any of these properties that obtain any of the community plan allocation of CFA:

1. All existing developed properties (by October 15, 2010) and all new development must be screened along the entire length of the property (unless there is a grandfathered access to Lake Tahoe Boulevard). Screening shall be by means of an eight-foot solid wood fence of the design specified in the Industrial Tract fence checklist of the Industrial Tract community plan.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to screening of service areas. Screening of service areas is required only for applicable projects located on D Street properties. It also applies to any of these properties that obtain CFA from the community plan allocation:

1. Applicable projects, including new open storage, must screen the nearby residential areas and Lake Tahoe Boulevard from view, noise, and dust. If the environmental documents for these developments indicate that the use will have adverse effects related to view, noise and dust, then the environmental documents must define the appropriate level of screening.

2. New parking and storage within the front yard setback of D Street is prohibited.

3. For undeveloped properties, installation of a landscaped strip at least 20 feet wide is required, incorporating a sidewalk in the public right-of-way. This landscaped strip should consider incorporation of a vegetated berm, and must include either a solid wood fence or masonry wall in order to accomplish visual screening. The heights and dimensions of the berm and fence/wall must effectively screen the proposed industrial uses. The parking and building, if not visually part of the industrial use, need not be fully screened.

4. For existing developed properties proposing major remodels or additions, the intent of the standard for undeveloped properties must be addressed within the constraints imposed by existing site development.

5. Exception: These screening requirements will be waived if the land is classified as stream environment zone (when SEZ-appropriate landscaping will be required) or if another environmental constraint should discourage or prohibit fill.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to screening of all mechanical equipment. Such screening is required only for mechanical equipment that would be visible from D Street or Lake Tahoe Boulevard:

1. The architectural design of a project shall include elements that provide a positive visual screen of all mechanical equipment including, but not limited to, utility hardware on the roof, building or the ground, refuse containers, satellite receiving dishes, communication equipment, electrical transformer boxes, and the like.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to off-site pedestrian circulation requirements. Off-site pedestrian circulation (sidewalk) requirements for applicable projects and changes in use to a special use for D Street properties only:

1. Standard asphalt sidewalks (five feet in width) are required for projects located along D Street. Sidewalks shall be designed and developed so as not to be parked upon.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to dumpster enclosure design requirements:

1. Dumpster enclosures are required only when dumpster is visible from Lake Tahoe Boulevard or D Street.

2. Dumpster enclosures are not required where the dumpster is located such that it is not visible from D Street or Lake Tahoe Boulevard if the dumpster is located outside of the public street right-of-way.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to roadway dimensions:

1. “Minimal” roadway dimensions shall consider the size/type of vehicle intended to use the roadway and shall be designed appropriately.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to disruption and revegetation of the site. The city-wide design standards are supplemented for all applicable projects with the following direction:

1. Project applications shall incorporate design elements (e.g., bollards, fences, boulders, etc.) to ensure that open space not dedicated to impervious coverage, including revegetated and landscaped areas, is protected from encroachment of industrial uses, including snow removal, parking, and other uses that could create soft coverage.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to sediment basins. The city-wide design standards are supplemented for all applicable projects if the project area cannot accommodate basins as described in the city-wide standard, such as for some existing developed sites:

1. In order to meet water quality requirements, an alternative is to fence and vegetate the basin in order to preclude access for public safety purposes.

Special Standards: The following special standards apply to landscape requirements for applicable projects within the Industrial Tract. The city-wide design standards are supplemented for all applicable projects as follows:

1. Protection: Ensure that landscaped areas and open space are protected from encroachment of industrial uses, snow storage, parking, and other uses that could create soft coverage though the installation of bollards, fences, boulders, or other barriers.

2. SEZ: If landscaping is placed in areas mapped as SEZ, SEZ-appropriate native species only are required. No irrigated turf may be used and no fill may be placed. No fertilizer may be used in SEZs.

3. Placement: Landscape treatments should be encouraged for all properties as a means of softening building contours, mitigating building scale and to break up impervious coverage and reduce the amount of paved or dirt areas.

4. D Street: Buffer walls and/or fences with landscape plantings where they front D Street.

5. Species: Native, drought-resistant landscaping with low fertilizer requirements is required within the community plan area.

6. Minimum plant sizes and spacing: In general, shrubs shall be a minimum of one-gallon pot size, although native plantings can be supplemented by super cells.

Groundcovers shall be a minimum of “six-pack” size and planted to the recommended spacing specifications for the species.

7. Irrigation: When native plants are used for the landscape treatment, permanent irrigation may not be required depending upon the appropriateness of the species for the site.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to existing developed parcels that obtain CFA from the community plan allocation:

1. The project area shall provide for and protect landscaped areas.

G. Architectural Treatment.

Standard: Refer to city-wide design standards.

Special Standard: The following special standard replaces the city-wide design standard relating to interior spaces exposed to public view on Lake Tahoe Boulevard where the Lake Tahoe Boulevard fence standard does not apply:

1. The city-wide standard is inapplicable, as industrial activities are appropriate for the area.

Special Standard: The following special standard supplements the city-wide design standard relating to building design compatible with environment:

1. No specific architectural style or design theme is required. The community character is industrial, thus design solutions should be compatible with the industrial function of the individual use which is being constructed.

Special Standard: The following special standard replaces the city-wide design standard relating to building materials and color:

1. Building materials must be appropriate to the area’s industrial uses. Exterior building colors should be compatible with the surrounding environment and not compete with surrounding elements for attention. Specifically, the building color should not become de facto “signing” for the site. Building colors shall be earth-toned in darker shades and consistent with TRPA’s building color requirements. Primary or other bright colors should be used sparingly as accents, such as on trim.

H. Signage.

Standard: Refer to city-wide design standards.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all existing developed project areas seeking to add commercial floor area obtained from the community plan allocation:

1. All signs within project area shall be retrofitted to be in compliance with the city ordinance for signs and advertising structures.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all new or expanded commercial uses or any commercial change in operation:

1. Signs shall be brought into compliance with the city ordinance for signs and advertising structures.

I. Parking and Driveway Standards.

Standard: Refer to city-wide design standards.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all existing developed project areas seeking to add commercial floor area obtained from the community plan allocation:

1. Project areas shall meet city of South Lake Tahoe parking/snow storage requirements on site for all uses.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to all projects:

1. All project applications shall include a technically adequate, project-specific parking analysis that considers any special parking needs of the site (e.g., the need for larger parking spaces to support the semi trucks or outside equipment storage needs that might use the parking area). Use the city of South Lake Tahoe parking ratios to provide guidance, but:

1. Projects resulting in reductions to the parking demand ratios shall be required to obtain a city of South Lake Tahoe use permit.

2. In project approvals that include a parking reduction, the site plan shall include a parking design and snow storage that meets the parking ratios, indicating which of these parking spaces will not initially be constructed. Ensure that enough land coverage (including the potential for transferred land coverage) is available on-site in the event that the additional parking is needed in the future.

3. Condition the project that, if city staff determines the site to be underparked at any time in the future, the second phase of the parking shall be installed.

Special Standard: The following special standard applies to project applications for existing developed properties:

1. Developments shall provide limited and clearly defined access drives rather than permitting unrestricted vehicle access along the entire property frontage.

J. Public Improvements.

Standard: Refer to city-wide design standards.

Special Standard: City-wide design standards relating to new road construction projects and street improvements required apply only as follows. The following special standard applies only to applicable projects and changes in use to a special use for D Street properties. It also applies to any D Street properties that obtain CFA from the community plan allocation:

1. Standard asphalt sidewalks (five feet in width) are required for projects located along D Street. Sidewalks shall be designed and developed so as not to be parked upon. (Ord. 903; Ord. 930; Ord. 1002. Code 1997 § 5-14)

Article IV. Tahoe Valley Area Plan/Specific Plan

6.10.080 Introduction.

The Tahoe Valley area plan/specific plan has been adopted by the city to establish a framework that will achieve redevelopment and reinvestment in properties on the ground environmental improvements, enhancement of the built environment, enhancement of the transportation and circulation network, and increased access to recreation and open space opportunities. The Tahoe Valley area plan/specific plan is consistent with the policies of the city general plan and TRPA Regional Plan. However, the Tahoe Valley area plan/specific plan provides more detailed direction than the city general plan and TRPA Regional Plan. It addresses land use regulations, development and design standards and environmental improvements for the plan area. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1002; Ord. 1087 § 1 (Exh. A). Code 1997 § 5-16)

6.10.081 Applicability.

The Tahoe Valley area plan/specific plan establishes land use policy, zoning, and development standards applicable to all property and projects within the boundaries of the plan area.

The policies, zoning regulations, and development standards contained within the Tahoe Valley area plan/specific plan shall be applied to all future development within the plan area.

A. The Tahoe Valley area plan/specific plan document shall be adopted and amended by city council ordinance.

B. If conflicts occur between the requirements of the Tahoe Valley area plan/specific plan and citywide policy or regulation, the requirements of the Tahoe Valley area plan/specific plan shall apply. (Ord. 1087 § 1 (Exh. A))

Article V. Citywide Design Standards

6.10.090 Purpose – Intent – Applicability.

A. Purpose. The scenic beauty of the Lake Tahoe region has been recognized as a national treasure through many eyes, including those of the U.S. Congress. The visual quality of the natural landscape is the primary contributor. National treasure status has afforded the region unparalleled stewardship. The concept of stewardship carries through to the design and development of the built environment and the way it fits into the natural setting becomes critical. This Manual of Design Standards and Guidelines represents a concerted effort to keep this area a national treasure while accommodating the sensitive development and use of land.

B. The Intent. The citywide design standards relate to the aesthetic considerations of project development. There are other codes, i.e., the Plan Area Statements and Other Land Use Regulations or the TRPA Code, that will outline the parameters which you are entitled to use in developing your property. These standards will tell you how to aesthetically and sensitively refine those parameters into a project that will fit into the natural setting.

C. Applicability. The development and design standards contained in this article are applicable to projects that include any of the following components:

1. New, rebuild, remodel, modification or relocation of structures greater than 120 square feet;

2. Expansion or additions to existing structures greater than 500 square feet or five percent of the existing floor area;

3. Expansion or addition to existing structures which increase structure height;

4. New or modified parking areas containing four or more parking spaces;

5. Projects which involve the addition of 1,000 square feet or more new hard land coverage;

6. Projects that are not exempt from CEQA; and

7. Other proposals without buildings or structures which may potentially affect the general appearance of the city, including public projects, such as erosion control projects.

D. Exceptions. The above projects are required to comply with all the design standards contained within this article as a part of their project approval, with the following exceptions:

1. Projects for which the cost of public improvements may be prohibitive, based on a case-by-case review, may submit schedules for compliance. Depending on the magnitude of the improvements, the maximum schedule for completion shall be five years.

2. Projects which are in assessment districts (or are contained in approved public works projects) which are committed to implement the public improvements.

3. Projects for which the city has found the standard not to be applicable as a result of the city variance process (SLTCC 6.55.630). The city shall consult with the TRPA regarding exceptions and required TRPA findings, including those which may affect the scenic thresholds on Highway 50, 89 and Pioneer Trail. (Note: the TRPA cannot approve a variance to a scenic threshold if it affects the scenic threshold rating.)

4. Exterior remodeled structures shall only be required to comply with those standards which are directly affected by the construction.

E. Approval Process.

1. Table 1 below identifies the review authority responsible for making decisions on permits where the development and design standards of this article apply and the appeal authority for each type of application. Except as indicated otherwise in this article, the appeal procedures in Chapter 2.35 SLTCC apply.

Table 1. Review Authority

Type of Decision

Role of Review Authority

Director (or Staff Designee)

Planning Commission

City Council

Public Hearing Required

Minor Design Review

D

 

 

 

Major Design Review

 

D

A

Yes

Major Design Review – Multifamily Objective Standards

D

A

 

No

Single-Family, Duplex, Triples Objective Standards

D

A

 

No

Special Use Permit

 

D

A

Yes

Fence Permit

D

A

A

No

Permit Extensions/Revisions

At the discretion of the director with the authority to refer to the planning commission

 

 

 

2. “Director” means the director of development services of the city of South Lake Tahoe or the director’s designee. (Ord. 903; Ord. 985 § 1; Ord. 1105 § 1 (Exh. B); Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-17)

6.10.100 Procedures for compliance.

A. To use these provisions the following steps should be taken:

1. Review all codes applicable to your property.

2. Determine whether your property lies within the boundaries of a plan area, community plan or area plan. Projects proposed within a community plan or area plan are subject to design and development standards contained in those plans.

3. Determine whether your property lies within the Airport Influence Area of the Lake Tahoe Airport. Properties within the AIA are subject to policies and standards contained in the adopted Lake Tahoe Airport Land Use Compatibility Plan.

4. Residential projects are subject to the standards contained in Chapter 6.85 SLTCC. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-18)

6.10.110 Site design.

A. Site Determinants. Site design or site planning is the arrangement of indoor and outdoor spaces to accommodate the activities of a proposed use. An important goal of site design is to fit the buildings and other structures into the landscape in such a way that leaves the natural features of the site intact and functional, and screen undesirable uses and structures from public view.

1. Standard: Natural Features. Existing natural features outside of the building footprint shall be retained and incorporated into the site design to the greatest extent feasible. Projects shall be designed to avoid disturbance of rock outcrops and stream environment zones and to minimize vegetation removal and maintain the natural slope of the project site.

2. Standard: Use of Disturbed Areas/Revegetation. Projects shall be designed to use existing disturbed areas rather than undisturbed areas and revegetate the areas not covered with impervious surfaces for the siting of all improvements except when:

a. Disturbed area is precluded from development by setbacks or other limitations;

b. The disturbed lands are classified as sensitive lands and alternative sites classified as nonsensitive exist on the parcel;

c. The use of the disturbed lands would require more total disturbance than use of undisturbed lands;

d. Avoidance of other development impacts is of more importance than the preservation of undisturbed areas; and

e. The degree of existing disturbance is minor, and the area shall be restored as part of the project.

3. Standard: Screening of Service Areas. Site design shall provide a positive visual screening of service areas. This includes service yards, maintenance yards, warehousing areas, outdoor storage (including autos waiting repair) and above-ground fuel storage tanks, dumpsters and the like.

Positive visual screening of service areas shall be accomplished by use of landscaping, building orientation, walls or sight-obscuring fencing (also see Article VI of this chapter). Said walls or fencing shall conform to Article VI of this chapter, be a minimum of six feet high and utilize landscaping to soften the “public” side of the wall or fence.

4. Standard: Pedestrian Circulation. A pedestrian circulation system shall be incorporated into the site plan to assure that pedestrians can move safely and easily both on the site and between properties and activities within the neighborhood year-round.

5. Standard: Dumpster Enclosures Design Standards. All commercial properties shall be required to have dumpster enclosures conforming to the following:

a. Enclosures shall be constructed of either wood or concrete block and placed on a concrete base which has a slight slope to allow for drainage.

b. Enclosures shall be constructed to allow for a one- to two-foot space on either side of the dumpster(s) for easy maneuverability.

c. A gate will be required unless the opening faces into the property and is not visible from a public street or adjacent properties. The gate shall be sight obscuring and have a minimum of a one-foot clearance to allow for ice and snow buildup. (Note: Chain link with wooden slats does not qualify as sight obscuring. See Article VI of this chapter.) If the gate is required to be removed for repair purposes, it shall be replaced within one month unless an extension is requested due to unforeseen circumstances.

d. If the enclosure is to be of wooden materials, it shall be constructed of substantial materials including a minimum of four-by-four posts, galvanized pipe, and bolts. See city staff for preapproved design.

e. Exceptions to the setback requirement (with applicable conditions) shall be permitted provided the findings of SLTCC 6.55.630, Granting of variance, can be made.

f. A building permit shall be required for the enclosures and will include a fee. The preapproved plans will not require plan check or design review/fee (see city planning staff for preapproved designs).

Note: If the enclosure is being constructed on existing hard coverage, a qualified exempt will be required from TRPA; if constructed on soft coverage or an area that was not previously covered, TRPA review will be required.

g. It is the responsibility of the property owner or designated manager to maintain access to the dumpsters during inclement weather which includes adequate gate clearance.

h. There shall be no refuse or bulk items accumulating around or within the enclosure. In the event this problem occurs, the provisions of SLTCC 4.150.110 will apply which allows the city to authorize a special pickup or increase the number of weekly pickups.

B. Designing for View. Due to topography, landform and the outstanding natural landscape features in the region, views and viewsheds take on added importance as site design features. The economic importance of views and viewsheds is readily apparent in the relative cost of homes and land which have views. When analyzing views and viewsheds, your goal should be to identify the location and extent of views from your site as well as views to your site. A good rule of thumb is that if you can see a particular place such as a road or a recreation area or even a neighbor’s house from your site, then a person in any of those locations can likely see your site.

Views come in a variety of shapes and sizes. These can range from a filtered view of the lake through a stand of trees to a panoramic view of an entire shoreline with no visual obstructions. It is important to identify and map all the views you can. It is just as important to consider views to your site from public places such as roads, the lake, and recreation areas as it is to consider views out from your site. How your project affects views from public places will in the long run be more important to maintaining the scenic quality of and visual access to those resources which attract people in the first place.

The following standards only apply to a building’s additional height, as permitted by the TRPA Code of Ordinances, Chapter 22:

1. Standard: When viewed from major arterials, scenic turnouts, public recreation, areas or the waters of Lake Tahoe, but not less than 300 feet, the additional height will not cause a building to extend above the forest canopy, when present, or a ridgeline.

2. Standard: The building shall be designed to minimize the interference with the existing views within the area to the extent practicable.

3. Standard: That portion of the building which is permitted the additional height shall be adequately screened as from major arterials, the waters of lakes, and other public areas from which the building is frequently viewed.

The adequacy of the screening is based on a combination of the following which cause the additional height to blend or merge into the background:

a. The horizontal distance from which the building is viewed;

b. The extent of screening;

c. The proposed exterior colors and materials.

C. Grading and Drainage.

1. Standard: Cuts.

a. The maximum cut slope shall be determined on the basis of the risk of soil instability or soil erodibility as shown by an information report or other available information.

b. If the material of the slope is of such composition and character as to be unstable under anticipated conditions, the city (and referred to the TRPA) shall require such measures as are necessary to ensure the stability of the slope. Such measures may include, but are not limited to, reduction of the slope angle and mechanical stabilization of the slope.

c. Setbacks shall be as set forth in Chapter 70 of the Uniform Building Code. As a condition of approval, the [city] TRPA may impose setbacks as set forth in the design review manual. (Note: Uniform Building Code, Chapter 70, Grading Setbacks)

d. Where mechanical stabilization or containment of the slope by other than the use of natural material is employed, conditions of approval may require screening by vegetation.

2. Fills.

a. The maximum fill slope shall be determined on the basis of the risk of instability or soil erodibility as shown by an information report, a subsurface soil and geological report or other available information.

b. No organic material, such as vegetation or rubbish, or any other material not capable of proper compaction, or otherwise not conducive to stability, shall be permitted in fills.

c. Borrowing for fill is prohibited unless approved by the [city] TRPA.

d. All fills shall be compacted to a minimum of 90 percent of maximum density as set forth in Chapter 70 of the Uniform Building Code.

e. Grading setbacks shall be as set forth in Chapter 70 of the Uniform Building Code. As a condition of approval, the [city] TRPA may impose setbacks as set forth in the design review manual.

3. Standard: Grading. All grading shall be kept to a minimum. Extensive regrading of a site to create building pads for construction is not recommended. Buildings shall be fitted to the land with graded areas limited, whenever possible, to the portion of the site to be covered by the structure. When graded areas cannot be covered by the structure, they shall be screened from public views by the building.

In order to minimize the visual impacts associated with grading, the following is required:

a. The overall shape, height and grade of any cut or fill slope shall be designed to simulate the existing natural contours and scale of the natural terrain of the site;

b. The angle of a graded slope shall be gradually adjusted so that it merges smoothly into the angle of the natural terrain;

c. Graded slopes shall be promptly revegetated with a ground cover or combination of ground cover, shrubs, and trees to reduce the visual impact of the graded slope and to stabilize the slope and minimize erosion. Rocks may be used to help stabilize graded slopes; however, they should be used sparingly and interspersed with trees, shrubs and ground cover.

4. Standard: Roadway Dimensions. Minimal roadway dimensions shall be required to reduce the amount of grading to reduce the visual impact. The extent of the dimension shall be a result of the environmental process.

5. Standard: Disruption and Revegetation of Site. Grading shall be designed to minimize the disruption to existing vegetation (including ground covers, shrubs, and trees). Revegetation of graded areas shall utilize plant materials that will blend well with the surrounding vegetation and are on TRPA’s List of Approved Plant Species. (Also see TRPA Handbook of Best Management Practices.)

6. Standard: Slope Contours. When graded slopes (either cut or fill) extend horizontally for more than 100 feet (such as along roadways), the contours shall be curved or broken to create an undulating bank with greater visual variety and a more natural appearance.

7. Standard: Retaining Walls. The maximum height of retaining walls shall be limited to eight feet. When slopes greater than eight vertical feet must be retained, terraces shall be used to create smaller grade changes (three to five feet or less). Areas between terraces shall be wide enough to accommodate landscape planting pockets to soften the wall’s appearance. Downhill sides of retaining walls shall also be planted in order to help screen the structure. Also see the TRPA Handbook of Best Management Practices.

Long, straight unbroken retaining walls (greater than 100 feet) with no articulation or other surface features are not permitted.

8. Standard: Sediment Basins. The basins shall be designed to integrate with the natural environment using such techniques as terraced sides to remove the “cut” appearance of basins, curvilinear design rather than rectangular design forms, and the use of low fencing (three feet high) with landscaping to integrate the fence with the site.

D. Screening Methods.

1. Standard: Fences and Walls. Sight-obscuring fences and walls shall be used to provide a positive visual screen and shall conform to the city fence requirements which provides standards for wall and fence location, materials and construction standards.

2. Standard: Landscape Material. The use of landscape material to provide a positive visual screen shall not be allowed unless the landscape material is of sufficient density and size to provide the positive visual screen. Said plant material may be either existing or new or a combination of both. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-19)

6.10.120 Building design.

This manual does not advocate a building style, but rather focuses on various elements that need to be incorporated into the building. Design style may be discussed within each community plan area.

A. Design.

1. Standard: Building Design Compatible with Environment. The design of buildings shall take into account:

a. Provisions for usable outdoor spaces;

b. Use of a comprehensive design palette;

c. Establish an architectural style;

d. Articulate building facades;

e. Roof design;

f. Design for snow, including safe placement of electrical and gas meters;

g. Incorporate signage into the building;

h. Integrate auxiliary structures including such elements as newspaper racks, phone booths, vending machines.

2. Standard: Screening of All Mechanical Equipment. The architectural design of a project shall also include elements that provide a positive visual screen of all mechanical equipment. Mechanical equipment includes, but is not limited to, utility hardware on the roof, building or the ground, refuse containers, satellite-receiving dishes, communication equipment, electrical transformer boxes, and the like.

3. Standard: Roof Treatment.

a. All new buildings and substantial roof modifications shall incorporate pitched roofs with a slope of no less than 5:1, nor more than 12:12, and shall not have flat roof areas. Exceptions to the flat roof area may be made by planning staff provided the following findings can be made:

i. The flat portion of the roof is not visible from a public right-of-way (parking lots are not considered public rights-of-way); and

ii. The flat roof area is the minimum necessary to comply with the building height requirements or to accommodate mechanical systems and the like; and

iii. Landscape screening specific to mitigate the impact of the flat roof is sited; or

iv. The flat roof is for covered parking, in which case the design of the structure must be concealed with architecture, site planning or landscape material so as not to be the predominant view from a public right-of-way.

b. Roof slopes greater than 12:12 may be used when the following findings are made:

i. The use of a greater roof slope is limited to turrets; and

ii. The allowable building height is not exceeded; and

iii. The turret comes to a point (no exception for flat roofs); and

iv. The approval is subject to the design review process; and

v. The steeper roof slope does not create, or create an illusion of, a mansard roof shape.

c. Roof slopes less than 5:12 may be used for public service buildings qualifying for additional height, as described in TRPA Code Section 22.4.A(5), provided the following findings can be made:

i. The lesser roof slope is required to minimize the additional height necessary for the building; and

ii. The roof slope and additional height are necessary for the functionality of the building specific to the public service (such as school gymnasiums or industrial functions); and

iii. The building complies with all design standards and guidelines to the maximum extent practicable.

4. Standard: Roofing Material. Roofs, including visible mechanical equipment and skylights, shall be constructed of nonglare finishes that minimize reflectivity.

5. Standard: Scale and Massing of Structures. The siting, scale and massing of new buildings and structures shall be subordinate to the area’s scenic features. Projects shall not decrease the visibility of such features.

6. Standard: Building Materials and Color. See appropriate community plan for specific urban design standards and palette of materials and color. If location is not in a community plan, or the community plan does not establish a standard, see the design standards guidelines. For public service buildings that have industrial functions, and are not visible from Lake Tahoe, a designated scenic corridor, or a designated Class I or II bike path, exceptions may be made to the guidelines, provided the building is designed to be compatible with the surrounding environment and uses. The building design must not compete with surrounding elements for attention and building colors should not become de facto “signage” for the site. Color shall be earth-toned in darker shades. However, primary or other bright colors should be used sparingly as accents, such as on trim. All street frontages and areas adjacent to residential uses shall be well-landscaped to screen buildings to the maximum extent feasible.

7. Standard: Interior Spaces Exposed to Public View on US 50, Highway 89 and Lake Tahoe Boulevard. Those buildings containing such uses that have or require large doors, wider than six feet, that normally expose the interior space to public view during business hours, such as service stations and lube/oil stores, shall not be allowed to have the interior area visible from US 50, Highway 89 and Lake Tahoe Boulevard unless a permanent positive visual screen is provided.

B. Building and Structure Heights. Building and structure heights are primarily regulated by the TRPA Code, Chapters 15 and 22, and thus not reiterated here. For the redevelopment demonstration plan area, see the Stateline/Ski Run community plan area in this document for requirements. The redevelopment height standards take precedence over TRPA Code, Chapter 22.

From a scenic standpoint, however, building and structure heights need to address one primary issue, compatibility with the natural environment. Compatibility is evaluated based on preserving and even enhancing views of scenic features such as the lake, a ridgeline, or a meadow. This standard emphasizes preserving public or common views as opposed to individuals’ views. When designing a project, it will be important to consider how it affects public views of scenic features.

1. Standard: Design of structures shall be compatible with natural environment. Based on the review process, buildings and structures shall be evaluated based on the impact the structure has on views of the natural environment as well as the scenic backdrop as seen from the public streets.

C. Historic Structures and Sites. Historic structures and sites at Lake Tahoe are an important link with the past. Today buildings are being reproduced in attempts to return to a distinguished design theme. Steeply pitched roofs, deep covered porches, dormers, board and batten siding, window mullions, and rock wainscoting are among design elements which helped create the “Old Tahoe” building style. Many of these design elements are being revisited as the region as-a-whole attempts to create a memorable impression as one of America’s finest destination resort areas.

1. Standard: The construction, reconstruction, repair, maintenance and demolition of designated historic structures and sites shall conform to the Secretary of Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings. Copies of this document are available at the city offices. Also see TRPA Code, Chapter 29, for their review process.

2. Standard: At such time as the Tahoe Meadows homeowners develop design guidelines (as noted in the PAS 090), all required projects shall be designed consistent with these guidelines. (Ord. 903; Ord. 985 § 1; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-20)

6.10.130 Setbacks of buildings and structures.

Setbacks of buildings and structures from the street (property line) are traditional land use and site planning tools which serve several purposes. In commercial areas, building setbacks should be utilized to create visual interest to allow for substantial landscaped areas, and to avoid the tunnel-like effects associated with strip development along the highways.

A. Standard: Setbacks. The minimum setbacks of buildings and structures are regulated by:

1. The city of South Lake Tahoe Plan Area Statements and Other Land Use Regulations Code; or

2. The community plan; or

3. The redevelopment plan; or

4. Subsection 30.5.D of the TRPA Code.

The redevelopment and the community plans take precedence over the city plan area statements and other land use regulations should a conflict occur.

Note: Exceptions to the TRPA 20-foot setback for property fronting scenic roadways are regulated by Section 30.5.D of the TRPA Code.

B. Standard: SEZ Setbacks. Buildings, other structures and land coverage shall be set back from SEZs in accordance with Chapter 37 of the TRPA Code.

C. Standard: Other setbacks for grading are set forth in Chapter 64 of the TRPA Code. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-22)

6.10.140 Snow storage.

Accommodating snow removal and storage presents unique challenges to site planning and design. During snow months, roofs, parking areas, and walkways become areas which need to be cleared of snow for safety and convenience. When snow is not disposed of off site, provisions need to be made to store the snow on site. Of consideration in planning for snow storage is the ability to meet surface water discharge standards.

A. Standard: Commercial, tourist accommodation, industrial, public service, and recreation projects shall provide, within the project area, snow storage areas of a size adequate to store snow removed from parking, driveway and pedestrian areas or have arrangements by means of recorded easements or arrangements to remove and store accumulated snow off site. Adequacy and location of snow storage shall be approved by the city.

B. Standard: Snow storage infiltration shall conform to the TRPA’s Handbook of Best Management Practices. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-23)

6.10.150 Landscaping.

Landscaping can be used to successfully integrate the built environment into the natural environment. It can also provide pleasant outdoor spaces for people, mitigate noise and air quality impacts, and help screen undesirable elements. Regional climatic and physiographic conditions generally impact landscape and plant materials and must be taken into account early in the design process. It is recommended that landscape design and planning take advantage of the different visual environments in formulating a design theme or concept as well as to conserve water.

A. Standard: Landscape Plan. A landscape plan shall take into consideration the following elements:

1. Planning and Design. Develop a landscape plan that allows for proper placement of plants and material.

2. Grouping of Plant Selection. Group by water needs (hydrozones).

3. Soil Analysis. Determine the type of soil and plant the appropriate plant material that will flourish.

4. Efficient Irrigation. Design and installation shall reflect hydrozones.

5. Practical Turf Areas. Place turf in appropriate areas to achieve maximum use.

6. Use of Surface Mulches. By using mulches, water at the root basins will last longer.

7. Appropriate Maintenance. Maintenance includes a sound water management plan. In order to establish newly installed plant materials, some form of irrigation system shall be provided. Once established, some form of permanent irrigation system shall be provided that will ensure the growth and survivability of the plant materials. Fertilizer use must be well thought out and carefully managed and is prohibited in SEZs.

B. Standard: Species on the TRPA recommended native and adapted plant list shall be used for lawns and landscaping. Modifications to these standards may be considered on a case-by-case basis by both the city and TRPA.

Plant species not found on the recommended native and adapted plant list may be used minimally in the landscape as accent plantings. Such plants shall be limited to borders, entry ways, flower beds, and other similar locations to provide accents to the overall native or adapted landscape design.

C. Standard: Minimum plant sizes and spacing for projects other than single-family home projects and erosion control/revegetation projects; the following spacing shall be required for woody plant materials at time of planting:

1. Trees shall be a minimum of six feet tall or one-and-one-half-inch diameter at breast height.

2. Shrubs shall be a minimum of three-gallon pot size where upright shrubs have a minimum height of 18 inches and minimum spread of 18 inches, and spreading shrubs have a minimum spread of 18 to 24 inches.

3. Ground covers shall be a minimum four-inch pot size or one-gallon container and shall be a maximum 24 inches on center spacing.

D. Standard: US 50 Landscape Concept.

1. To create a clean and attractive edge to the built environment, a turf edge shall be installed along the highway frontage at a minimum, between the curb line and the sidewalk, except at:

a. Locations of existing or restored meadows; or

b. Where a significant length of frontage is not developed and has existing natural vegetation.

2. To restore a vertical natural element to the highway and to reduce the impact of the built environment, each property shall be responsible for having randomly spaced evergreen trees within the front yard setback, said evergreen trees shall be Jeffrey Pine or approved equal. The number of trees required shall be based on a ratio of one tree per 35 feet of highway frontage. The exception to this standard shall be meadows and lake views which front on US 50. In those cases, the trees and shrubs shall be thinned or removed to “frame” or open views of the meadows or the lake. The depth of the removal or thinning shall be based on the design review process.

E. Standard: Obstruction of Views. New landscaping shall not be located in such a manner that would create safety problems or obstruct significant views, either when first installed or upon maturity.

F. Standard: Landscaped Setbacks. All structures shall have a landscaped setback (either existing natural vegetation or introduced plantings) from any public roadway. The existing practice of having no landscaping between the facade of a structure and the roadway is not allowed. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1146 § 1; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-24)

6.10.160 Exterior lighting.

The functional objectives in providing exterior area lighting are to illuminate areas necessary for safe and comfortable use. In certain situations, area lighting can add to the aesthetic appeal of a site by highlighting architectural features of a building or illuminating pathways and landscape plantings. In these instances, only the special features of a building or landscape can be illuminated.

A. Standard: Outdoor lights (including winter seasonal display) shall not blink, flash, change intensity or give the illusion of movement.

B. Standard: Temporary and seasonal installation of string lights, rope lights, or other decorative lighting is allowed for seasonal lighting between November 1st and March 1st subject to the following criteria:

1. Lights shall not be installed for more than 90 days;

2. Lights shall be LED or low voltage (24 volts or less);

3. Installation may be subject to building or fire department inspection.

C. Standard: Installation of string lights, rope lights, or other decorative lighting for a period longer than 90 days or outside of the November 1st through March 1st season will require approval of a minor design review application. Review of the application will include a review of the total amount of exterior lighting on a site, curfew hours for lighting to be turned off, and energy efficiency. Lights shall be LED or low voltage (24 volts or less). A building permit may also be required for some lighting installations and installation may be subject to building and/or fire department inspection.

D. Standard: Lighting may be used for outdoor landscaping, parking lots, streetlights, walkways, illumination or highlighting architectural or landscape features only, and shall not be designed for, or used as, an advertising display. Illumination utilizing exterior light fixtures is permitted, provided the following criteria are met:

1. Lighting shall only be directed downward (not above the horizontal plane) to avoid sky-lighting. Up-lighting for any purpose including the lighting of architecture or landscape architecture is not permitted except with overhead shields to prevent nighttime sky-lighting.

2. The light source (bulbs), within a fixture as seen in elevation, shall not be visible, including the cobra head fixture style.

3. No light (freestanding or building mounted) shall spray off site. The use of cutoff shields, or other devices as approved by staff shall be required, including parking garages. (Note: parking garages shall not have fluorescent lighting.)

4. The maximum height of exterior architectural building lighting and landscape lighting shall be 26 feet and the light source is shielded from view.

Exception: In areas which have been approved for additional height under Chapter 22 of the TRPA Code and projects within this area have been approved, consistent with the city of South Lake Tahoe redevelopment design standards, the following lighting standards may be utilized subject to finding that the lighting is used only to assist in the activation of a public pedestrian retail space on Highway 50 as well as private interior spaces of hotels/timeshare hotels or public interior spaces such as the Gondola Plaza and ice rink areas. The intent of this exemption is not to illuminate secondary streets such as Transit Way, the private Van Sickle Road, Park Avenue and Cedar Avenue:

5. The exterior architectural lighting is allowed on vertical walls up to the eave of the roof line or peak of the wall in the case of a gable roof of a building or structure. Specifically, lighting of distinguished architectural features such as entries, arcades, chimneys, cornices, balconies, exterior trusses, highly textured materials, knee braces, enriched architectural facades or landmark features is permitted. Wall lighting of blank walls or repetitive wall facades is not permitted.

6. Exterior architectural features lighting shall be restricted to incandescent type lights with concealed light sources. No direct feature lighting shall be allowed which produces glare on adjacent properties or public travel corridors.

7. Architectural features lighting may be attached to buildings or structures as down lights, soffit lights or wall mounted lights. Lighting with non-building-mounted flood lights is allowed subject to city approval to ensure the light fixture and the light are not visible from the travel way or other public areas.

8. Landscape lighting is allowed to highlight elements of the landscape architecture or existing landscape features through the use of down lighting. Down lighting landscape can be done with concealed fixtures or fixtures with lens hoods to screen the light source. Landscape lighting fixtures must be dark colors including brown, gray, black or green.

a. The lighting is subject to a visual analysis.

b. Roofs, in part or in total, shall not be illuminated. Such prohibition includes such methods as flood lighting, reflective material, or lighting strips, including neon/fluorescent tubing, and the like.

c. The entire freestanding lighting assembly (pole and fixture) shall be painted a dark earth tone color such as black, dark green, or dark brown, so as to blend into the forest character of the city.

d. Lighting levels shall not exceed a maximum of 25 foot-candles, measured within one foot of the base at ground level.

e. The maximum height standard for any freestanding pole light (public or private) shall not exceed 20 feet.

Exception: Cobra head fixtures placed at major intersections of state highways which conform to the state standard for height of such poles.

f. Low pressure sodium lights (monochromatic orange color) are not allowed.

9. Standard: Searchlights. The commercial operation of searchlights for advertising or any other purpose is prohibited. (Ord. 903; Ord. 914 § 1; Ord. 1002; Ord. 1033 § 1(Exh. A); Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-25)

6.10.170 Reserved.

(Ord. 1152 § 2)

6.10.180 Street right-of-way improvements.

The improvement of the public right-of-way is necessary for the safety and convenience of the residents, improving the quality of the community and the lake and unifying the appearance of the community with the establishment of a consistent set of improvement standards.

A. Standard: All new road construction projects or the repair of existing improvements within the publicly owned right-of-way shall comply with the City of South Lake Tahoe Public Improvement Engineering Standards.

B. Standard: Road fixtures, including but not limited to retaining walls, safety barriers, traffic signals and controllers, light standards, and other structures, shall be designed and installed in compliance with the with the City of South Lake Tahoe Public Improvement Engineering Standards.

C. Standard: Color of road fixtures (other than signals, their auxiliary equipment and sign standards). Refer to the City of South Lake Tahoe Public Improvement Engineering Standards for specific details.

D. Standard: Signal poles and their ancillary equipment and sign structures. Refer to the City of South Lake Tahoe Public Improvement Engineering Standards for specific details.

E. Standard: Retaining walls and other erosion control devices. Refer to the City of South Lake Tahoe Public Improvement Engineering Standards and Chapter 7.20 SLTCC, Grading, Erosion and Sediment Control, for specific details.

F. Standard: Street improvements required. Public and private projects shall be required to construct off-site improvements including curb, gutter, sidewalk and other improvements required by the city engineering division, consistent with the standards contained within the City of South Lake Tahoe Public Improvement Engineering Standards, including street right-of-way improvements and landscaping standards, SLTCC 6.10.150, or at the discretion of the city engineer provide in-lieu fees when:

1. The project involves new construction on raw land, a vacant lot and/or is a demolition and reconstruction project;

2. The project is processed as a special use permit and is determined by the city engineering division that the off-site improvements are necessary for the orderly development of the area;

3. A public project, not subject to the special use permit process, is determined by the city engineering department to need off-site improvements for the orderly development of the area. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1002; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-27)

6.10.190 Scenic highway corridors.

The Lake Tahoe region offers many outstanding opportunities to view and photograph scenic resources. Many of these opportunities are available while driving around the lake on the main highways (US 50, State Routes 28, 89, 207, 267 and 431, and Pioneer Trail). The highways listed are also travel routes used in TRPA’s scenic quality thresholds. Maintaining and in some cases upgrading the scenic quality of the view from the road is the primary goal behind both scenic highway corridors and scenic quality thresholds.

All projects which are within the scenic highway corridors, as defined by the TRPA, of US 50, 89 and Pioneer Trail shall meet design standards listed below. (Note: A scenic corridor is defined as including the street right-of-way and property abutting such right-of-way, a distance of 300 feet.)

A. Standard: All new electrical lines which operate at 32 kilovolts or less, including service connection lines, shall be placed underground. Exceptions to this requirement will be based on the city finding that undergrounding would produce a greater environmental impact than above-ground installation. When new electrical lines are permitted to be installed above ground, the new lines, poles and hardware shall be screened from view of the scenic highway to the maximum extent possible.

B. Standard: All new communication lines including telephone lines, cable television lines, and service connection lines shall be placed under- ground. Exceptions to this requirement will be based on the city finding that undergrounding would produce a greater environmental impact than above-ground installation. When new communication lines are permitted to be installed above ground, the new lines, poles, and hardware shall be screened from view of the scenic highway to the maximum extent possible.

C. Standard: See also standards for street right-of-way improvements.

D. Standard: TRPA Code Section 30.13 development standards for rural transitional corridors shall apply to the applicable sections of Pioneer Trail. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-28)

6.10.200 Shorezone.

The shorezone is regulated by the TRPA Code, Chapters 54 and 55, and not reiterated here. As a result, all projects which fall within this area shall be referred to the TRPA for review. The city’s review will be limited to providing input into the TRPA process and processing the project through the city permit process. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-29)

Article VI. Fences and Walls Design Standards

6.10.210 Purpose.

This article sets forth the requirements, standards and locations for placing fences on private property within the city of South Lake Tahoe. In addition, this article establishes procedures to bring fences into conformance. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-30)

6.10.220 Applicability.

This article shall apply to all new fences constructed on private property after the date of adoption. All fences built prior to the date of adoption of the ordinance codified in this article may remain subject to the conditions of this article. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-31)

6.10.230 Fence height and setbacks (standard application).

(Note: The intent of the setbacks within this chapter is to insure an adequate setback for snow removal and sight safety. As a result, each setback assumes a minimum distance between the road travelway and the property line of four feet. Should this not be the case, the staff has the right to modify the setback accordingly or require the additional standards for fences within setbacks.)

A. Commercial/Public Service. All commercial/public service land use classifications shall conform to the following:

1. Front Yard.

a. Maximum three feet high up to 20-foot front yard setback.

b. Maximum eight feet high at and beyond 20-foot front yard setback.

2. Side Yard.

a. Interior. Maximum eight feet high between front yard setback and rear property line.

b. Street.

i. Maximum three feet high up to 15-foot street side yard setback.

ii. Maximum eight feet high at and beyond 15-foot street side yard setback.

3. Rear Yard.

a. Interior. Maximum eight feet high on rear property line.

b. Street.

i. Maximum three feet high up to 15-foot street rear yard setback.

ii. Maximum eight feet high at and beyond 15-foot rear yard setback.

B. Other Land Use Classifications. Recreation and conservation land use classifications shall conform to the residential land use classification fence heights and setbacks contained in Chapter 6.85 SLTCC. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-32)

6.10.240 Fence height setbacks – Alternatives.

A. Commercial/Public Service. All commercial/public service land use classifications may conform to the following alternatives:

1. Front Yard. No alternatives.

2. Side Yard – Interior. No alternative.

3. Street Side Yard. The six-foot-high street side yard fence may be placed within the 15-foot street side yard subject to:

a. The land area between the street side yard and the fence shall be landscaped with ground cover, shrubs and trees. A landscape plan, including a method of irrigation, shall be submitted for review and approval by the planning division; and

b. That a “clear zone” be maintained at the street corner, whether the intersection is controlled or not; and

c. That a “clear zone” be maintained for all access drives through the street side yard equal to the depth of the zoning code building setback; and

d. A hold harmless agreement shall be provided; and

e. Must conform to construction standards.

4. Street Rear Yard. No alternatives.

B. Other Land Use Classifications. No alternatives. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-33)

6.10.250 Standards.

A. General.

1. A fence may be constructed of a permanent material such as wood, chain link, stone/rock, concrete block/brick, iron or other material approved by staff. Nondimensional lumber may be used if the fence is a split-rail fence or log type fence.

2. Fencing types prohibited include, but are not limited to, barbed wire (see exception), razor wire, chicken wire, electrified fences, pallet fences, trailers or other similar storage units, spiked fences, paper, visqueen plastic and the like.

Wire mesh fences shall be allowed, provided the following standards are met:

a. The wire is of a heavy gauge (10 or greater); and

b. The supports meet the same design standards for wood fences; and

c. The wire mesh shall not be galvanized.

B. Wood.

1. All wood fences shall conform to:

a. Material shall be of dimensional lumber that has been milled into standard sizes of two-by-four, four-by-four, four-by-six, one-by-six, one-by-eight, etc.

b. Wooden fence posts shall be redwood, cedar, or pressure-treated material.

c. Fence post holes shall be a minimum of 12 inches in diameter and 27 inches deep.

d. The lower three inches of the post hole shall be filled with three inches of gravel or crushed stone.

e. Post holes shall be filled with concrete after installation of the post.

f. Fence specifications:

Height (in feet)

Post Size (inches)

Space between Posts (in feet)

3

4x4

8

4

4x4

8

5

4x4

8

6

4x4

8

7

Height requires separate application to building division for permit

8

Height requires separate application to building division for permit

g. Fences within setback areas:

Height

Post Size

Space between Posts

3 to 6 feet

4x6

6

(Cannot exceed six feet between posts in setback)

h. All wooden fence designs shall incorporate cross rails that run horizontally at approximately eight inches up from ground level and eight inches down from the top of the fence. Cross rails shall be a minimum of two by four. Cross rails shall be attached to posts with a minimum of two 16d galvanized box nails at each end. It is suggested that metal hangers be used to give additional support, especially if the fence is within the city’s snow storage easement. All fence boards shall be attached with a minimum of two 8d galvanized nails at each end.

i. Wooden fences in setback areas shall be constructed with the fence boards applied to the street side of the fence.

j. Alternate construction standards and designs will be considered. Engineering calculations, consistent with the city building department codes, shall be submitted to the building department to justify the design.

C. Chain Link Fences. The following chain link fencing standards shall be applied to any public or private property within the city. (Single-family dwellings are not exempt.)

1. Chain link fencing shall require city planning department approval to determine compliance with applicable standards. If the proposal is in compliance, city staff shall approve the fencing. At the discretion of the zoning administrator, any noncomplying proposal may be forwarded to the planning commission for final determination. Any decision of the planning commission arising out of this chapter’s provisions is appealable pursuant to Chapter 2.35 SLTCC.

2. The standards for chain link fencing shall not be applied to:

a. Fences erected for construction site purposes, so long as such fencing is to be removed within six months after its placement on the site. The planning staff may extend this time on a case-by-case evaluation if the following findings can be made:

i. The property owner can demonstrate that he/she has exercised due diligence in working toward the completion of the project. Construction activities have been undertaken and completed in accordance with a set of approved construction plans.

A property owner shall not be deemed to have failed to exercise due diligence in any case where inclement weather has halted construction, the discovery of site contamination due to the existence of hazardous materials or other significant health hazards results in delays imposed by the El Dorado County health department or any other governmental entity having jurisdiction, or legal proceedings have occurred which have delayed construction beyond the control of the property owner.

ii. A schedule for removal of the fence is submitted which, in the reasonable discretion of city staff, provides a removal date that coincides with the estimated construction completion date, as may be mutually agreed upon by the city building official or his designee, planning department staff and the property owner.

b. Any chain link fencing which is not visible from the public right-of-way or adjacent property.

3. Fencing erected prior to the effective date of the ordinance codified in this article which does not conform to the standards provided in this article shall be allowed to remain pursuant to SLTCC 6.10.260, Nonconforming fence regulations.

4. The standards applicable in reviewing chain link fencing (excluding construction fencing, see subsection (C)(2) of this section) shall be as follows:

a. Chain link fencing shall conform to all applicable standards within this section regarding location, height and setbacks.

b. Use of chain link fencing shall be limited to protecting property while allowing for the visual surveillance of the property from outside the fence.

c. By the design of chain link fencing, the interior of the property is exposed to view. As a result, landscaping, building orientation and design, parking and storage enclosed by chain link fencing shall conform to applicable city ordinances, regulations and design review standards to ensure an attractive as-built environment.

d. Randomly spaced evergreen and deciduous trees, as well as boulders or other appropriate landscaping devices, shall be placed on either side of the fencing to enhance the natural environments.

e. Redwood slatted chain link or other slating material in chain link fencing is prohibited in commercial areas as it interferes with visual surveillance and does not provide permanent and adequate screening for sight-obscuring purposes.

f. Color. Galvanized chain link fencing (i.e., poles, mesh, bracing, etc.) is prohibited. Black, brown or green colored vinyl coated chain link fencing (i.e., poles, mesh, bracing, etc.) shall be used.

g. Construction. Chain link fencing shall be constructed in such a manner as to compensate for snow load and wind load. This shall include, but not necessarily be limited to, the following construction guidelines:

i. The use of wooden posts, pressure-treated or redwood, is encouraged as replacements for metal posts. Such wooden posts should be a minimum of six inches by six inches.

ii. Metal posts, if used, shall have a minimum diameter of two inches if over six feet in height, or a minimum diameter of one and one-half inches if less than six feet in height.

iii. Tension wires shall replace the standard “top rail” in chain link fence construction, with wire connectors anchoring the tension wire to the fabric at a minimum interval of one every six inches due to snow and ice buildup.

iv. Construction standards shall conform to the State of California Department of Transportation specifications.

h. Layout. Long straight runs on chain link fencing should be avoided. Chain link fencing should be laid out with offsets randomly set, depending on the site.

D. Clear Zones. For the purpose of creating visibility to and from the public right-of-way, as well as preserving adjacent property views, the following “clear zones” are required:

1. Street Corner. That a “clear zone” be maintained at the street corner, whether the intersection is controlled or not. The clear zone is created by extending the front property line and street side property line to a point and measuring from the point along the front property line and street side yard property line to a distance of 25 feet to a point and connecting these two points to create a “clear zone” triangle (see Figure B in this section).

2. Garage/Access Drives. That a “clear zone” be maintained for all garages and access drives. This clear zone created by drawing a 45-degree angle from each side of the garage door opening (or width of access drive away from the driveway). This 45-degree angle shall terminate at the alternate setbacks (see Figure B in this section).

3. Interior Property Lines. That a “clear zone” be maintained between adjoining interior property lines should an alternative fence setback be used. This clear zone is created by measuring along the interior property line the distance equal to the standard fence setback to a point. From the point, draw a 45-degree angle onto the property that is taking advantage of the alternative fence setback, to a point where the 45-degree line intersects the alternative fence setback (see Figure B in this section).

4. General. Nothing over three feet high may be placed within the “clear zone.” A tree is permitted within the clear zone if its branches are eight feet above ground level.

E. Exceptions.

1. Retaining walls for erosion control are not considered a fence and therefore are exempt from the setback requirement unless:

a. They are over three feet high in the front or street side yard; and

b. Located within the “clear zone.”

2. On double frontage lots (e.g., lots with two street frontages and not a corner lot) the property owner shall stipulate the yards. If the rear yard adjoins a street, it shall have no setback, unless:

a. A vehicle access is provided in which case a “clear zone” shall be maintained; or

b. If the rear fence is adjacent to another property’s front yard, then a clear zone shall be maintained between all driveways on either property.

3. Barbed wire or spiked fencing may be permitted by staff, subject to the following:

a. The barbed wire (three strands or less) or spiked fence tops are placed on the top of a six-foot or taller fence; and

b. The subject property has documented a security problem. Examples of such documentation could be from the FAA mandating the use of barbed wire, police report indicating vandalism, or the necessity to keep stored items outside that could be considered a potential safety hazard, such as electrical transformers and the like. Such documentation shall be subject to city review on a case-by-case basis; and

c. The barbed wire or spiked fence will be screened with landscaping, subject to city review and approval; and

d. The fence is a conforming fence; and

e. The property has a documented security problem as noted in subsection (E)(3)(b) of this section; and

f. Provide a hold harmless agreement for the city; and

g. The supports shall also be colored to match the fence posts and fabric; however, the barbed wire does not have to be colored to match.

4. Entrance portals (does not have a gate) may be permitted by staff, subject to the following:

a. Obtain a building permit; and

b. Provide a hold harmless agreement for the city; and

c. The portal, if located within the clear zone of the driveway, cannot block the views of those entering or leaving the site. Any structure greater than a six-inch-by-six-inch post within eight feet of the ground shall be considered as blocking views.

F. Maintenance. All fences and landscaping required for the alternative fence height and the limited use of barbed wire or spiked fence (see exception above) shall be properly maintained so as not to present a safety hazard or nuisance or a blight to the neighborhood. Failure to maintain the fence and/or landscaping as required by the alternative fence standards is considered to be a violation of this article.

 

(Ord. 903; Ord. 1105 § 1 (Exh. B); Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-34)

6.10.260 Nonconforming fence regulations.

“Nonconforming fence” means a fence which does not comply with one or more provisions of this article, such as height, material, setback, or clear zone, as of the date of the ordinance codified in this article.

A. Continuation and Maintenance. A nonconforming fence may be continued, and may be maintained, except as provided in this article or otherwise provided by law.

B. Adding on to Nonconforming Fences. No person shall add on to a nonconforming fence in any manner which increases its nonconformance, such as:

1. Nonconforming Height. Adding additional height or adding additional fence length to the nonconforming fence.

C. Maintenance or Repair of Existing Nonconforming Fences. Maintenance or repair, including structural repairs, may be made to any nonconforming fence or portions thereof, provided the nonconforming portion(s) of the fence is not changed or if the change does occur, it is in conformance with the code. Examples allowed include:

1. Maintenance: replacing of existing four-foot-high nonconforming fence boards with new four-foot-high boards.

Conformance maintenance: replacing the four-foot-high boards with three-foot-high boards for fences within the front yard setback.

2. Repair: replacing existing two-by-four posts with new two-by-four posts.

Conformance repair: replace the two-by-four posts with four-by-four posts.

D. Reconstruction of Damaged Nonconforming Fences. A nonconforming fence damaged by fire or calamity may be reconstructed. If the fence is reconstructed, the nonconforming portions of the fence which relate to the health, safety and welfare shall be brought into conformance with this code. Health, safety and welfare include fences within the front, street side yard and “clear zones” which do not meet the provisions of this code including construction standards. Such examples of health, safety and welfare include:

1. A fence within the eight-foot street side yard that is destroyed as a result of a heavy winter that has four-by-four posts at eight feet on center may be rebuilt if the fence conforms to the standards of having four-by-six posts at six feet on center.

2. A six-foot fence within the front yard setback may be rebuilt if the fence height is reduced to three feet.

3. A five-foot fence within a “clear zone” may be rebuilt if the fence height is reduced to three feet.

E. Compliance. All portions of nonconforming fences shall be brought into conformance with this article, including meeting the required construction standards, when:

1. The nonconforming fence is clearly on the subject property; and

a. The property owner applies to the building department for a building permit which requires a site plan, such as a new house, garage, carport, second story additions, exterior remodeling, new decks, re-siding and the like.

2. The nonconforming fence is on the property line; and

a. The property owner, who applies to the building department for a building permit, does not have complete control over nonconforming portions of the fence, as evidenced by a land survey or other accurate means to determine property lines and fences as approved by staff, shall not be required to bring the nonconforming portions of the fence into conformance.

The following shall not require compliance: re-roof, interior remodel, electrical and gas conversions and the like. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-35)

6.10.270 Process and fee.

An “across-the-counter” fence permit shall be issued by the planning division, on a form provided by the division for all new fences constructed after the adoption of this article. Said application shall include, but not be limited to, a plot plan showing the following:

A. Property lines and paved street location;

B. Building locations;

C. Existing and new fence locations;

D. Building and fences on adjacent property;

E. Fence height;

F. Construction standards.

It is the property owner’s responsibility to determine all property lines and assume all liability in regard to curb disputes and any claim in regard to snow removal.

Construction of a fence or performing repairs without a fence permit shall be considered a violation of this article. Should a fence exceed six feet, a separate permit from the building department will be required. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-36)

6.10.280 Enforcement.

The fence standards shall be enforced through the planning division.

Should a fence be found to not be in compliance with this article, the owner has the following options:

A. Modify the fence to conform to the requirements; or

B. Seek a variance through the variance process contained in Chapter 6.55 SLTCC.

Should the property owner fail to comply with the standards within this article, the property owner shall be considered in violation of this article and subject to the code violation process. This process may culminate in either removal of the fence, or a fine or both. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-37)

Article VII. Parking, Driveway and Loading Spaces

6.10.290 Purpose.

This article sets forth minimum standards for driveways, parking and loading facilities to minimize interference with traffic flow on the street and highway system of the city and to discourage the establishment of unnecessary impervious surfaces. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-38)

6.10.300 Applicability.

This article shall apply to:

A. All new development including parking lots; or

B. Any expansion to, or to include, any additional uses, and any change of use which results in increased parking requirements. (Note: This article applies only to the increased requirement.) (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-39)

Division 1. Driveways

6.10.310 Definitions.

A. “Aprons” means that improved portion within the city right-of-way between the front property line and the edge of the improved travelway.

B. “Driveway” means that improved portion on private property that provides access to parking areas. A driveway may be either one-way or two-way.

C. “Right-of-way” means that area between front property lines used, owned and maintained by public agencies for construction of public uses.

D. “Travelways” means that portion within a right-of-way improved for vehicular traffic. The travelway width is usually less than but may be equal to the width of the right-of-way. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-41)

6.10.320 Standards.

A. Standard: New driveways shall be oriented 90 degrees to the street centerline and be designed and located so as to cause the least impacts on traffic, water quality and safety.

B. Standard: The State of California Department of Transportation. On state highways, the ingress/egress standards of the State of California Department of Transportation, Caltrans, shall apply as appropriate. (Any conflicting standards, the state standards shall apply.)

C. Standard: Slope of Driveways. The maximum grade throughout any portion for access roads shall not exceed five percent measured from the public street flowline perpendicular to a point 20 feet from the property line. Excepting the maximum grade throughout any portion for driveways for single-family and duplexes shall not exceed 10 percent measured from the public street flowline perpendicular to a point 20 feet from the property line.

D. Standard: Best Management Practices. Driveways shall be managed in accordance with Chapter 25 of the TRPA Code except no infiltration trenches are allowed within the city right-of-way.

E. Standard: Width of Driveways for Tourist Accommodation, Commercial, Public Service and Recreation Uses. Two-way driveways serving tourist accommodation, commercial, public service, and recreation uses shall have a minimum width of 20 feet and a maximum width of 30 feet. One-way driveways serving such uses shall have a minimum width of 10 feet and a maximum width of 15 feet. For two-way driveways with median dividers serving such development, each direction shall have a minimum width of 10 feet and a maximum width of 17 feet.

Note: The minimum width of 10 feet shall be increased to 13 feet if the driveway adjoins a state highway.

F. Standard. No parking space shall be located in any required yard adjacent to a public street, except that only one required parking space shall be permitted in the driveway located within the required yard setback adjacent to a public street for a single-family, duplex or triplex use. A single-family residence legally constructed without a garage may pave a 20-by-20 driveway within the required yard setback adjacent to a public street to provide one required parking space.

G. Standard: Service Drives. Uses other than single-family houses, including secondary residences, which do not require the preparation of a traffic analysis, may be permitted an additional service driveway for maintenance and garbage removal. The service driveway shall be at least 10 feet wide and no more than 12 feet wide. Uses which require the preparation of a traffic analysis may be permitted an additional service driveway or driveways for maintenance and garbage removal provided the traffic and air quality impacts of such driveways are mitigated.

H. Standard: On-Site Turning Movements. All off-street parking shall be served by a driveway as required by this article, and shall provide sufficient area for on-site turning movements so that no vehicles will have to back out onto any public right-of-way or other access road, except for lots which contain either one or more single-family, duplex or triplex structures on the lot. In these cases, vehicles will be permitted to back out onto the public right-of-way; however, the driveways must conform to subsection (D) of this section.

I. Standard: Vertical Clearance. No entranceway for vehicular access to any garage or parking space shall have less than seven feet vertical clearance. An entranceway under a porte cochere, canopy or other structure shall have no less than 13 feet unobstructed vertical clearance when such access is to be used by trucks or fire equipment and shall be marked accordingly.

J. Standard: Development with more than one driveway shall have all driveways snow staked in a manner consistent with city policy in order to aid in proper snow removal efforts. The staking should consist of two two-inch by two-inch by eight-foot wooden stakes placed on both sides of each driveway. The stakes should be driven two feet into the soil on the property line and should be painted red on the top two feet of each stake. Stakes shall be installed at the beginning of each snow season (approximately October 1st) and shall be removed in the spring (approximately April 1st). The stakes shall be of such a material so as not to damage the snow removal equipment, such as wood or plastic.

K. Standard: Multiple Driveways on One Lot. Due to the city snow removal procedures and traffic safety, circular driveways shall meet the standard of 90 degrees to the centerline of the street but for only a distance of 15 feet behind the property line. At such a point, the drive may have a minimum of a five-foot radius. If no radius is proposed or required by staff due to on-site turning movements, the circular portion of the drive shall start at 20 feet from the property line. In addition, there shall be a minimum of a 30-foot separation between drives as measured at the property line. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1064 § 1 (Exh. A); Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-42)

Division 2. Parking

6.10.330 Definitions.

A. “Parking space” means an area for the parking of a motor vehicle plus those additional areas required to provide for safe ingress and egress from such space. The area set aside to meet these provisions must be usable and shall have permanent driveway access for off-street parking.

B. “Parking facility” means a clearly identifiable location for vehicular parking. A parking facility may be a parking area, parking lot, or parking structure.

C. “Mixed use” means whenever there is a combination of two or more distinct uses on one lot or building site, the total number of parking spaces required to be provided for such lot or building site shall be not less than the sum total of parking spaces required for each of the distinct uses. No off-street facilities provided for one use shall be deemed to provide parking facilities for any other use, except as provided under “shared parking.”

D. “Shared parking” means the use of a parking facility where the total spaces are less than what is required for a “mixed” use. If allowed per a community plan, on-street parking is considered to be a part of a shared parking facility. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-44)

6.10.340 Standards.

A. Standard: All other parking areas shall be paved with a finished thickness of two inches of asphalt-concrete (AC) properly compacted on a four-inch aggregate base compacted to a relative compaction of 95 percent with the approved native subgrade, compacted to a relative compaction of 90 percent, at a minimum slope of two percent and a maximum of five percent. These requirements shall be a standard which may be reduced by the city, provided the following findings are made:

1. The proposed parking space is temporary; or

2. The soil conditions, moisture conditions, or proposed slope of the pavement warrants the reduction. This shall be verified by a soils report (prepared by a licensed soils engineer) and approved by the city engineer.

B. Standard: Retain Parking Spaces. Off-street automobile parking spaces being required in connection with any existing building or use shall be retained so long as such building or use remains, unless an equivalent substitute number of such spaces are provided and retained thereafter which conform to the requirements of this article. This regulation shall not require the establishment of more automobile parking space than is required herein for a new building or use.

C. Standard: Encroachment Permit Required. An encroachment permit shall be required for providing access to all off-street parking areas or lots. Prior to the issuance of the encroachment permit, the planning department shall approve the parking design, except for single-family and duplexes which shall be approved by the engineering department.

D. Standard: Plot Plan Required. A plot plan of any proposed off-street parking area, other than single-family, shall be submitted to either the planning department at the time of the application for design review for the building to which the parking area is an accessory, or to the engineering department at such time as an encroachment permit is applied for to use any land for a parking area.

The scale of the plot plan shall be kept to a size so that all information indicated will be legible but shall be no smaller than one inch equals 20 feet. The plot plan shall be completely dimensioned to scale and shall show all the following details:

1. Land use classification setbacks and statement of use.

2. Scale of the plot plan.

3. All adjacent street, alleys and points of ingress and egress.

4. Sidewalks, curbs and gutters.

5. Entire ownership of the lot or parcel being developed.

6. Use, total floor area, existing and proposed structures.

7. Height of building and number of stories.

8. Completely dimensioned parking layouts.

9. Grading and drainage plan of parking lot, including topography and design typicals using the city’s standard plans.

10. Landscaping, walls, fences and lighting.

11. Type of pavement.

12. Existing tree(s) to be removed or retained.

13. Areas of snow storage.

14. Location of light standards and proposed illumination plan covering entire parking area.

15. In addition to the above, multiple residential plot plans shall indicate the number of dwelling units.

16. Hospital plans shall indicate the total number of beds.

17. Assessor parcel number and physical address.

E. Standard: Location. All off-street facilities shall be located as follows: All parking facilities shall be located on the same lot parcel or building site project area as the use for which such spaces are provided, except that:

1. Parking for any use other than a single-family detached dwelling may be located on a different lot or lots, subject to the use permit process; provided, that such lot or lots are located within a commercial/public service land use classification and are less than 300 feet distant from the lot line of the use for which such parking is provided or a vehicle shuttle is provided if lot exceeds 300 feet. Such lot or lots shall be under common ownership with the lot or building site for which such spaces are provided and documented by a deed restriction.

2. When included in a community plan, parking on the street may be considered in determining the adequacy of parking facilities. If this occurs, the city shall not be responsible for clearing of snow within the parking stall within this area and a separate private agreement is required to remove the parking lot stall snow in this area subject to the city approval.

F. Standard: No parking space shall be located in any required yard adjacent to a public street, except that only one required parking space shall be permitted in the driveway located within the required yard setback adjacent to a public street for a single-family, duplex or triplex use.

G. Standard: Underground Facilities. Underground parking facilities shall conform to all applicable provisions of this section; except, that when no part of such facility extends more than three feet above the lowest level of the natural grade, such facility may then project into any required yard area, subject to the following conditions:

1. That yards shall at all times be accessible to pedestrians and fire equipment with no structural projections interfering with such access.

2. Front and exterior side and rear yards shall be landscaped above such structures.

H. Standard: Off-Street Parking Facility Design. Parking facilities shall be designed to provide the required parking spaces within a minimum amount of area. Parking facilities should minimize coverage and minimize impacts on water quality. Projects may have imposed, as conditions of approval, appropriate provisions of the design guidelines, as well as the following improvements:

1. Size of Spaces. All parking spaces shall conform in size to the following minimum standards. No parking space shall be less than nine feet wide or less than 19 feet long except:

a. In areas adjacent to landscaping, the parking space length may be reduced to 17 feet for vertical or diagonal parking provided an approved wheel stop is located outside the 17 feet.

b. Spaces for compact cars may be reduced to 15 feet in length (13 feet with wheel stops) and eight and one-half feet wide. Such spaces for compact cars shall not exceed more than 10 percent of the total off-street parking requirement.

c. Compact car parking spaces, in addition to the 10 percent allowed by subsection (H)(1)(b) of this section, may be allowed by special use permit issued by the zoning administrator if:

i. The parking facility exceeds 20,000 square feet in size;

ii. The designated compact car parking spaces are located together in a portion(s) of the parking facility in a manner consistent with reasonable design standards for such facilities;

iii. The compact car spaces are identified by approved signage;

iv. Reasonable provisions have been made for enforcement of restrictions on the use of designated spaces by compact cars only;

v. The total compact spaces within the parking facility shall not exceed 25 percent of the maximum spaces which are allowed by the parking ratios;

d. Parking within a Garage or Carport. Minimum dimensions are a clear space of nine feet wide and 19 feet in depth and a height of seven feet.

e. Off-Street Parking Facility Required Improvements.

i. Aisles shall be improved as follows, except for single-family and duplexes:

Angle of Parking

Two-Way (feet)

Aisle-Widths One-way (feet)

Aisle-Widths

Parallel*

11

N/A**

30°

11

N/A**

45°

13

N/A**

60°

18

N/A**

90°

24

24

*    For parallel spaces, not less than three feet of additional maneuver area per space shall be provided at one end of each space.

**    Angle parking can only have one-way aisles.

ii. Every parking space shall be clearly marked. All markings shall be maintained so they are always visible and legible.

iii. Traffic circulation within any parking facility shall be designed to ensure that no automobile need enter a public street in order to progress from one aisle to any other aisle within the same lot, nor enter a public street backwards in order to leave such lot. If such circulation is not otherwise possible, directional signs or markings shall be provided in all facilities in which one-way traffic has been established.

iv. Turning Radius within Parking Lots. All areas used for off-street parking shall be served by a driveway as required in this section and shall also provide sufficient area for on-site turning movements so that no traffic will have to back out onto any traveled way, except for parking areas serving single-family dwellings, duplexes and triplexes, when situated in other than a building group.

v. Any such facility shall be prepared, graded, and paved in such manner to ensure that all surface waters will drain in accordance with the technical specifications of the city engineer, which shall be provided to ensure that no surface waters from such facility shall be discharged across, over or upon any public sidewalk abutting thereto.

vi. Bumper guards or wheel stops shall be provided in such a manner to ensure that no portion of any parked vehicle shall touch any wall, fence or building, nor shall project beyond any lot lines bounding such facility; except, that two or more uses utilizing a common area are exempt on the common boundary. Said wheel stop types shall be approved by the city.

vii. Where a commercial parking lot abuts property classified for residential uses, a six-foot-high, sight-obscuring fence shall be constructed.

viii. There shall be a bumper or vehicular barrier provided where such areas abut a sidewalk to keep the cars from encroaching onto the public sidewalk.

ix. Any lights provided to illuminate such parking areas shall be arranged to reflect the light away from adjoining premises and shall conform to the city lighting standards (see citywide design standards).

x. No person shall pave within the drip line of a tree that is to be retained unless the drip line extends more than five feet from the trunk of the tree. In the case where the drip line is more than five feet from the trunk of the tree, no person shall pave within five feet of the trunk of the tree; provided, that if paving extends around less than 50 percent of the circumference of the trunk of the tree, such paving may be placed within one foot of the tree.

xi. No vehicle access shall be located within the curb radius of a corner lot or within 15 feet of the curb radius.

xii. That a backup turning space five feet deep by 24 feet wide be provided at the end of a 90-degree parking space which has no access to a driveway.

xiii. See the standards within the citywide design standards for pedestrian circulation and driveways, parking and loading spaces for parking lot landscaping.

xiv. Handicapped/Disabled Parking.

(I) New construction and remodeling shall conform to state of California law, Title 24 of the California Code of Regulations, and shall be administered by the chief building official. Contact the city building division for standards.

(II) For preexisting lots, prior to the requirements of Title 24 (1991), compliance of handicap standards shall be based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) administered by the federal government, available from the Federal Department of Justice, Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, 1111 18th St. NW, #501, Washington DC, 20036, (202) 653-7834.

xv. All parking areas/driveways shall install landscaping or parking barriers (approved by the city) to prevent encroachment into nonimpervious coverage areas. City shall approve the materials and installation of said barriers as a part of building permit, encroachment permit or through the city design review process.

xvi. The side yard setback for nonresidential parking lots may have a zero setback unless:

(I) The parking lot adjoins a residential PAS, in which case the setback shall be five feet; and/or

(II) The less-than-five-foot setback interferes with an existing driveway on an adjacent property.

f. Landscape of Parking Lots.

i. Landscaped Perimeter. Off-street parking areas for commercial/public service land use classifications shall have a landscaped perimeter. The minimum width of the perimeter shall be equal to the required yard setback. Where the perimeter faces a public street, recreation area, or the lake, a three-foot-high screen shall be provided.

ii. Trees. All parking areas shall provide random tree planting in the landscape perimeter at a ratio of one tree for every four parking spaces provided. This ratio may be adjusted as a part of the design review process to ensure adequate site visibility.

iii. Landscaped Islands. Landscaped islands within parking areas are encouraged as a means to break up the visual dominance of parked vehicles. Landscaped islands allow the retention of significant existing vegetation, while providing opportunities to add additional landscaping. Existing vegetation, especially large trees, will benefit from pervious planting beds above root systems. Vegetation in landscaped islands must be adequately protected from vehicle damage by such methods as curbing, tree wells, changes in grade, boulders and other parking barriers.

The location, number and size of the islands will be subject to the design review process and will be based on the size of the lot, the vegetation to be saved and the on-site snow removal program. Any reduction or elimination of landscape islands shall result in the increase in perimeter landscaping.

iv. Maintain Sight Distances. In order to allow drivers safe visibility at intersections of driveways and streets, no obstruction in excess of three feet high shall be placed within a triangular area formed by the street and driveway at property line and a line connecting them at points 25 feet from their intersection. Trees pruned high enough (eight feet off the ground) to permit driver visibility may be permitted.

v. Emergency Vehicle Access. Provide adequate access for emergency vehicles and for those persons attempting to render emergency services. Said minimum access shall be 20 feet. In the event one-way drives (less than 20 feet wide) are developed, there needs to be an overall clear width of some form of hardscape, 20 feet wide for emergency vehicles.

g. Snow Storage.

i. Parking areas shall be sloped at least two percent to prevent ponding and icing.

ii. Snow storage shall not be located within required parking spaces and their access drives, public rights-of-way or public snow storage easements.

2. Standard: Parking Demand Exceeds Requirements. Should the use demand additional parking spaces, above what is required by the parking ratios, and such demand negatively impacts the adjoining neighborhoods, then the city has the right to revisit the use to resolve the parking impact through such methods as requiring an off-site parking lot, transit management plan, and the like. Failure to resolve the impact shall result in a zoning enforcement action subject to the penalties contained therein.

3. Standard: On-Street Parking. Unless otherwise allowed, street parking shall only be permitted in locations designated as a part of an adopted community plan where such parking is used to meet the on-site parking requirements. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-45)

6.10.350 Alternatives.

A. Exceptions. The standards may be modified subject to the provisions of the introduction section of the citywide design standards. In addition to those provisions, the city shall also find:

1. The environmental impact will be lessened by the lesser improvement; and

2. Traffic safety for vehicles and pedestrians will be enhanced by the lesser improvement; and

3. The lesser improvement will substantially meet the intent of the requirement.

B. Modification of the Parking Demand Ratios.

1. In lieu of the parking demand ratios required by this article, an applicant may submit to the city (and referred to TRPA) a technically adequate parking analysis to reduce the ratios. A parking analysis shall include:

a. A parking demand ratio estimate.

b. Proposed measures or programs (if any) that will be incorporated into the project that are not based on use. Such measures are to be included in a transportation management plan, which would outline such transit incentives as reduced or free bus passes for tenants/employees, shelters, and if not on a bus route, shuttle systems and the like.

c. Schedule of funding and cost of implementation of transportation management plan measures.

d. Any additional information as deemed necessary.

2. The city shall process this parking analysis as a use permit, along with the appropriate conditions, to reduce the parking demand ratios when it finds:

a. Adequate off-street parking will be provided for the proposed use as determined by a parking analysis;

b. The environmental impact of the use will be lessened by the reduction in parking spaces (staff may condition the use permit);

c. Traffic safety for other vehicles and pedestrians will be enhanced by the lesser requirement.

3. In addition to the above, if the parking analysis is done to establish a shared parking facility, the city shall also find:

a. The uses have different peak periods;

b. The parking demand will not overlap;

c. The parking facility will meet peak demand;

d. The property owners are willing to sign reciprocal agreements for “shared parking” approved as to form and substance by the city. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-46)

6.10.360 Nonconforming aprons, driveways and parking areas.

A. Definition. “Nonconforming apron, drive or parking area” means one which was lawfully existing on the adoption date of the ordinance codified in this article and does not conform to the standards contained within this article.

B. Standards.

1. Standard: Continuation. A nonconforming apron, driveway and parking area may be continued, except as provided in this section or otherwise provided by law.

2. Standard: Enlargement. No person shall enlarge a nonconforming apron, driveway or parking area in any manner which increases its noncompliance.

3. Standard: Expansion, Addition or Change of Use. No person shall expand, add to or change the use of a commercial building that results in the increase in the number of parking spaces without bringing the apron, driveway and increased number of parking spaces into conformance.

4. Standard: Minor Maintenance and Repair Permitted. The minor maintenance and repair of any nonconforming portion of an apron, drive or parking area is permitted. Minor maintenance and repair are those which maintain and repair an existing apron, drive or parking space including such activities as pothole patching, seal coating and crack repair. Minor maintenance is considered that maintenance and repair which preserves the existing condition of the apron, drive or parking area.

5. Standard: Major Maintenance and Repair Not Permitted. The major maintenance and repair of any nonconforming portion of an apron, drive or parking area is not permitted. Major maintenance and repair is considered that maintenance and repair which improves the existing condition of the apron, drive or parking area. Examples of major maintenance and repair include the removal and replacement of nonconforming portions of an apron, driveway or parking lot material that is not considered a pothole, or the resurfacing of an apron drive or parking area not considered a seal coat.

Note: Installation, repair or replacement of walkways whether separate or contiguous to a driveway, within the 10-foot setback of any property line fronting a city travelway, is not allowed. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-47)

Division 3. Parking Demand Ratios

6.10.370 Resulting fractions.

When calculating the number of off-street automobile parking spaces required by this section for any particular use, building or structure, or integrated group of uses, buildings or structures, any resulting fraction less than one-half shall be disregarded and any fraction one-half or greater shall be construed as requiring one additional parking space. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-48)

6.10.380 Employee parking.

Each use shall be responsible for developing a program for employee parking at the time of use or project approval. Said program may include such methods as providing additional parking spaces, development of a transit management plan, creating an off-site parking plan, development of staggered work schedules and the like. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-49)

6.10.390 Use definitions.

Use the TRPA Code of Ordinances, Chapter 18, for use definitions. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-50)

6.10.400 Maximum limit.

The maximum number of spaces permitted is 1.25 times the minimum number listed under SLTCC 6.10.410, with the only exceptions being for single-family, mobile home and summer house. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-51)

6.10.410 Parking ratios.

A. Residential

Employee housing

Use multiple-family dwelling rate

Multi-person dwelling (dormitories, boarding or rooming houses)

1 space/2 beds; and

1 space/10 beds (guest parking)

Nursing and personal care

1 space/3 beds; and

1 space/employee

Residential care

1 space/4 beds; and

1 space/live-in employee; and

1 space/5 beds (guest parking)

B. Tourist Accommodation

Bed and breakfast facilities

Use hotel/motel rate

Hotel, motel and other transient dwelling units (applies to both redevelopment and nonredevelopment projects)

1 space/guest room or unit; and

1 space/6 employees

Time sharing (hotel/motel design)

Use hotel/motel rate

Time sharing (residential design)

Use hotel/motel rate

C. Commercial

1. Retail

Auto, mobile home and vehicle dealers

1 space/500 s.f. gross site area

Building materials and hardware

1 space/300 s.f. GFA; and

1 space/2,000 s.f. gross site area

Eating and drinking places

1 space/150 s.f. GFA; or

1 space/4 customers or seats

Food and beverage retail sales

1 space/150 s.f. GFA

Furniture, home furnishings, and equipment

Furniture

1 space/500 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Other

1 space/300 s.f. GFA

General merchandise stores

1 space/300 s.f. GFA

Mail order and vending

1 space/500 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Nursery

1 space/employee; and

1 space/300 s.f. GFA

Outdoor retail sales (art and craft shows)

1.5 space/vendor; and

1 space/vendor for vendor parking

Service stations

1 space/300 s.f. retail/office area; and

2 spaces/service bay (this space does not include the space within the bay)

2. Entertainment

Amusements and recreation services

Arcade

1 space/150 s.f. GFA

Bowling

5 spaces/lane (includes accessory uses)

Health spa/gym

1 space/300 s.f. GFA; and

1 space/200 s.f. GFA with organized classes

Ice/roller rink

1 space/employee; and

1 space/250 s.f. GFA

Tennis (indoor/ outdoor) and racquet ball, etc.

1 space/employee; and

3 spaces/court

Theater

1 space/3 seats

Other

1 space/35 s.f. GFA

Privately owned assembly and entertainment

Auditorium

1 space/employee; and

1 space/150 s.f. GFA; or

1 space/3 seats

Cabaret

1 space/employee; and

1 space/3 seats

Convention

1 space/employee; and

1 space/400 s.f. GFA

3. Services

Animal husbandry services

1 space/200 s.f. GFA outside of kennel

Auto repair and service

1 space/300 s.f. retail/office area; and

2 spaces/service bay (this space does not include the space within the bay)

Broadcasting studios

1 space/400 s.f. GFA

Business support services

1 space/400 s.f. GFA

Contract construction services

1 space/1,500 s.f. GFA storage; and

1 space/300 s.f. GFA office

Financial services

1 space/200 s.f. GFA

Health care services

1 space/150 s.f. GFA; and

1 space/2 employees

Laundries and dry-cleaning plant

1 space/400 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Personal services

Laundromat

1 space/150 s.f. GFA

Other

1 space/250 s.f. GFA

Professional offices

1 space/250 s.f. GFA

Repair services

1 space/400 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Sales lots

1 space/1,000 s.f. GSA

Schools, business and vocation

1 space/150 s.f. GFA

Schools, preschool

1 space/employee; and

1 space/5 students

Secondary storage

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

4. Light Industrial

Batch plants

1 space/500 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Food and kindred products

1 space/500 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Fuel and ice dealers

1 space/500 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Industrial services

1 space/400 s.f. GFA

Printing and publishing (newspaper offices shall be computed as professional offices)

1 space/500 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1000 s.f. storage area

Recycling and scrap

1 space 400 s.f. GFA

Small scale manufacturing

1 space/400 s.f. GFA

5. Wholesale/Storage

Storage yards

1 space/500 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Vehicle and freight terminals

1 space/employee; and

1 space/bay (does not include bay space)

Vehicle storage and parking

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Warehousing

Mini warehouse

1 space/employee

Other

1 space/1,000 s.f. GFA

Wholesale and distribution

1 space/nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

D. Public Service

1. General

Churches

1 space/3 seats in the chapel or sanctuary and related rooms; and

1 space/400 s.f. gross floor area in all other related buildings

Collection station (temp. collection area, no sorting)

1 space/500 s.f. nonstorage area; and

1 space/1,000 s.f. storage area

Cultural facilities

1 space/employee; and

1 space/250 s.f. GFA

Day-care centers

1 space/employee; and

1 space/five students

Government offices

1 space/250 s.f. GFA

Hospitals

1 space/3 employees; and

1 space/2 beds; or

1 space/1,000 s.f. GFA, whichever provides the greater number; and

1 space/300 s.f. GFA of emergency room area

Local assembly and entertainment

Use privately owned assembly and entertainment rate

Local public health and safety facilities

1 space/employee; and

1 space/1,000 s.f.

Power generating

1 space/employee; or

1 space/maintenance vehicle

Publicly owned assembly and entertainment

Use privately owned assembly and entertainment rate

Public utility centers

3 spaces/2,500 s.f. facility area

Regional public health and safety facilities

1 space/employee; and

1 space/1,000 s.f.

Schools (the city does not regulate the parking requirements for schools; the state of California and the TRPA do)

College

1 space/employee; and

1 space/2 full-time students; and

1 space/4 seats in auditorium, stadium or gymnasium; and

1 space/100 s.f. nonclassroom meeting area

Kindergarten through secondary

Elementary

1 space/employee; and

1 space/500 s.f. nonclassroom area

High school

1 space/employee; and

1 space/3 students; and

1 space/4 seats auditorium, etc.; and

1 space/100 s.f. nonclassroom meeting area

E. Recreation

1. Urban Recreation

Recreation centers

1 space/employee; and

1 space/300 s.f. GFA

Participant sports facilities

Swimming

1 space/employee; and

1 space/75 s.f. pool area

Tennis

3 spaces/1 court

Other

Case-by-case

Sports assembly

1 space/3 seats; and

1 space/employee

2. Developed Outdoor Recreation

Developed campgrounds

1 space/employee; and

1 space/10 campsites or cabins (guest parking)

Golf courses

Driving range

1 space/employee; and

1 space/tee

Executive (par 3)

1 space/employee; and

40 spaces/nine holes

Other

1 space/full-time employee; and 10 spaces/hole

Group facilities

1 space/1,000 s.f. park area

Marinas

1 space/employee; and

1 space/3 moorings or slips

Recreational vehicle

1 space/1 employee; and

1 space/RV site; and

1 space/10 RV sites (guest parking)

F. All Other Uses

All other uses

Case-by-case

Notes:

1.    Where used above, “employee” refers to the number of employees for the largest shift.

2.    For the purpose of this article, “floor area” in the case of offices, merchandise or service types of uses, shall mean the gross floor area used or intended to be used by tenants, or for service to the public as customers, patrons, clients or patients, including areas occupied by fixtures and equipment used for display or sales of merchandise. It shall include all areas for public and nonpublic purposes, including, but not limited to, storage, incidental repair, processing or packaging of merchandise, shop windows, offices incidental to the management or maintenance of stores or buildings, toilets or restrooms, utilities, or dressing, fitting or alteration rooms.

G. Loading Space Requirements. In any district, in connection with every building or part thereof hereafter erected which is to be occupied for manufacturing, storage, warehousing, goods display, retail sales, hotels, hospital, mortuary, laundry, dry cleaning establishment or other uses similarly requiring the receipt or distribution by vehicles of material or merchandise, there shall be provided and maintained on the same lot with such building, off-street loading spaces in accordance with the following schedule:

Gross Floor Area (sq. ft.)

Loading Space

10,000 – 15,000

1

15,001 – 25,000

2

25,001 – 40,000

3

40,001 – 60,000

4

Each additional 75,000

1

A 12-foot vertical clearance shall be maintained in all loading space areas and access thereto. (Ord. 903; Ord. 1152 § 2. Code 1997 § 5-52)

Article VIII. Reserved

Article IX. Carnival and Outdoor Arts and Crafts Show Standards

6.10.430 Intent.

To create a balance between the local business owner’s ability to maintain an economically viable enterprise and the ability of local nonprofit organi-

zations to raise funds to support their charitable programs. (Ord. 937 § 1. Code 1997 § 5-54)

6.10.440 Temporary carnivals.

The term “temporary carnival” shall be defined as any traveling commercial entertainment company which may include but not be limited to amusement rides, games, sideshows and the like.

All applications for temporary carnivals shall be subject to the following minimum conditions of approval:

A. Applications for a use permit to conduct a temporary carnival must be submitted to the city’s planning department between October 15th and December 1st of the year preceding the summer season during which the event will occur;

B. The applicant must successfully demonstrate the event will result in a benefit to the public;

C. Only one temporary carnival shall be permitted during the period from Memorial Day through September 30th each year. The applicant demonstrating the greatest public good, in the discretion of the planning department, shall be granted the exclusive right created by this condition;

D. The duration of any temporary carnival shall not exceed seven consecutive calendar days;

E. The location of the proposed carnival shall be on a site appropriately zoned for commercial activity or otherwise permitted within an adopted community plan area;

F. The applicant, upon receipt of approval for operation of a carnival, shall obtain a business and professions certificate in accordance with Chapter 3.35 SLTCC, and shall submit evidence therefor to the planning department a minimum of 10 business days prior to the date of commencement of the carnival.

The zoning administrator or planning commission shall have the right to impose additional discretionary conditions which may be deemed necessary in the special use permit process. (Res. 1998-31. Code 1997 § 5-54.1)

6.10.450 Temporary arts and craft shows.

Outdoor arts and craft shows, as defined herein, are those shows that are granted permits by the city of South Lake Tahoe for the sole purpose of exhibit, display and sale of hand-produced arts and crafts, as well as fine art. Excluded are those handmade or manufactured items which have been purchased from another craftsperson or manufacturer for resale purposes.

All temporary arts and crafts shows shall obtain a permit and shall be subject to the following provisions:

A. Standards for Merchandise and Artists/Vendors. The following criteria and standards shall be used to review the proposed exhibitors, and the following standards shall apply to all approved exhibits:

1. Hand Produced. All arts and crafts and fine arts exhibited, displayed and sold shall be limited to those that are hand produced, except as follows:

a. Arts and crafts and fine arts may use premanufactured parts or goods as raw materials that are essential for the production of the final good or product.

b. Premanufactured items shall not be sold as an individual product, but may be incorporated and sold as part of the art or craft such as a premanufactured chain or bracelet for a hand-crafted art or craft, or premanufactured beads for a necklace, bracelet or earrings, or a premanufactured tee-shirt when decorated with beading, painting or other similar embellishment created by an artist.

2. Demonstrations. Exhibitors are encouraged to demonstrate artistry or craftsmanship by producing items during the show.

3. Variety. Shows shall incorporate a sampling of many types of arts and crafts and fine art.

B. Appearance Standards. The promoter shall provide the conditions of approval and appearance standards of the shows and the individual displays to each exhibiting artist. The following standards shall apply:

1. The arts and crafts shows shall provide a layout and design to present an attractive and quality appearance along the highway. Layout of the booths should be perpendicular to the roadway.

2. No display of merchandise, cartons, or items associated with the exhibit shall be visible from the street or highway.

3. Each exhibitor shall contain all merchandise, equipment and accessories within the individual booth enclosure.

4. Handcrafted items, including wearing apparel, shall not be displayed by hanging from wires or ropes stretched between poles. Items hung for display shall be kept within the confines of the booth.

5. Umbrellas, including those used with tables, shall not contain advertising copy.

6. Food may be sold in the exhibit area only and shall require approval of the El Dorado County environmental management department. Refuse containers shall be provided at each booth selling food products.

7. An adequate number of trash receptacles shall be provided throughout the site.

8. All signs shall be subject to the standards and guidelines in the South Lake Tahoe City Code and shall be included in the arts and crafts permit.

9. All signs shall be professionally made.

10. Balloons, pennants, flags, windsocks, whirligigs, costumed persons shall not be allowed unless they are located in the interior display area and are no higher than six feet from the ground.

11. An adequate number of portable sanitary units are required. Sanitary units must be screened from view from the surrounding streets.

12. Adequate on-site parking shall be provided for customers. Vendors shall not park on the site during the event except for loading and unloading merchandise. Exhibitor’s vehicles shall not be parked in the public right-of-way. One off-site parking space per exhibitor shall be provided.

13. Electrical cords used for temporary power shall not extend over any public right-of-way. On-site electrical cords shall not be placed in any areas for pedestrian or vehicle circulation unless it is covered with a ramp approved by the building official. All temporary power cords shall require approval of the building division.

C. Operational Standards. All arts and crafts or fine arts shows shall operate as follows:

1. Duration and Setup. The duration of any temporary arts and crafts show shall not exceed four calendar days. Show setup shall be limited to 24 hours immediately preceding the show, and tear down, including complete clearing of debris, shall be completed within 12 hours of the completion of the show. No sales shall take place during the aforementioned setup or tear down periods.

2. Trash Removal. Trash receptacles shall be emptied on a regular basis.

3. Sanitary units shall be serviced on a regular basis during the show.

4. Compliance. To ensure the show participants comply, the promoter or his/her representative named in the application shall be on site at all times and monitor the vendors or artists.

5. Corrections/Self Enforcement. The promoter and/or his representative shall notify exhibitors immediately to correct any noncompliance the city identifies. The item(s) that do not comply shall be immediately removed, or the exhibitor shall provide evidence to the promoter the item is a qualified item.

D. City Enforcement. The city will enforce violations that occur during a season and may prevent recurring offenders from participating in future years.

E. Maximum Number of Shows.

1. A maximum of eight arts and crafts shows shall be held within the city limits for each summer season commencing Memorial Day weekend through the end of September each year.

2. A maximum of four arts and crafts shows shall be held at any one site during each summer season. Proposed sites shall be adequate in size to meet the permit conditions for booth setup/access, sanitary facilities, parking, and ingress and egress. Each site is eligible for up to four shows per season, provided a standard arts and crafts permit is submitted by December 1st of each year and all other provisions of this section are met.

F. Eligible Applicants. Only local merchants’ associations, local nonprofit/service organizations, professional promoters/organizers and the property owners of approved arts and crafts show sites shall be eligible to make application for a permit to conduct an arts and crafts show.

Exception: The only exception is that those arts and crafts shows, including fine arts shows which are an incidental component to a special event, shall be exempt from these conditions. “Incidental component” shall mean the inclusion of nine or less arts and crafts booths as accessory to a permissible event.

G. Business License Required. The show promoter/organizer and each individual exhibitor shall pay for and obtain a business and professions tax certificate from the city of South Lake Tahoe in accordance with Chapter 3.35 SLTCC. Each promoter/exhibitor shall pay an administrative fee pursuant to SLTCC 3.35.050, and a business tax at the rate set forth in SLTCC 3.35.310 applicable to Schedule A of SLTCC 3.35.330.

H. Sales Tax. Each individual exhibitor must obtain a sales and use tax license certificate from the California State Board of Equalization, and pay all applicable sales taxes. Any exhibitor holding an existing city of South Lake Tahoe business and professions certificate for retail sales does not need an additional certificate to participate in arts and crafts shows.

I. Exhibitor Information to City. The promoter/organizer shall, a minimum of 14 calendar days prior to the show, submit to the finance department an alphabetized list of all participating exhibitors. The list shall indicate those exhibitors having a valid business and professions tax certificate and sales tax certificate, indicating their respective license numbers. City finance staff shall verify the list and provide the promoter/organizer with the total dollar amount which remains to be paid, if any. Throughout each show, each exhibitor shall retain a copy of the receipt indicating their payment of the applicable fees and receipts showing all sales taxes collected and paid. Failure to produce such evidence of payment of local fees or collection of sales taxes may result in removal of the exhibit from the show. The promoter shall also provide a signed statement from each exhibitor acknowledging they will comply with the standards for merchandise.

J. Failure to comply with any provision of this section shall be a basis to deny future permits. (Res. 1998-31; Ord. 931; Ord. 937 § 1; Ord. 1058 § 1 (Exh. A); Ord. 1090 § 1 (Exh. A). Code 1997 § 5-54.2)

Article X. Service Station Change of Use

6.10.460 Conditions.

Upon a new operator commencing any type of business activities other than automobile service station operations within any structure which has previously been utilized as an automobile service station, the new business operator shall, at a minimum, comply with the following conditions:

A. All underground fuel tanks shall be removed in accordance with state law and local ordinances.

B. All pumps, pump islands, pump or other overhangs, any and all other service islands, or any other structure or portion thereof specific to an automobile service station shall be removed and all legally required permits to do so shall be obtained.

C. Remodel of the automobile service station shall be subject to the use permit process and shall require a minimum of:

1. Closure of all non-essential driveways;

2. Twenty-foot landscaping setback from street frontage;

3. Elimination of existing bays and bay doors with frontage on Highway 50;

4. Curb, gutter, sidewalk; and

5. All nonconforming signage must be removed.

D. Any automobile service station which has been inoperative and in a dilapidated or unsightly condition for a period in excess of 180 days from the date of notice by the city of inoperative, dilapidated or unsightly condition, shall be subject to the nuisance abatement process contained in Chapter 4.40 SLTCC.

E. This provision shall apply to any application filed on or after May 1, 1991, irrespective of the effective date of the ordinance codified in this article. (Ord. 903. Code 1997 § 5-55)