Chapter 31.08
GRAND JUNCTION CIRCULATION PLAN

Sections:

Article I. General Provisions

31.08.010    Adoption.

31.08.020    Vision.

31.08.030    Purpose.

31.08.040    Planning area.

31.08.050    Executive summary.

31.08.060    Plan elements.

31.08.070    Background.

Article II. Plan Elements

31.08.080    Section A: Maps.

31.08.090    Section B: Strategies/Policies – Complete streets policies (Policy).

31.08.100    Section B: Strategies/Policies – Apply the principles of an integrated transportation system (Strategy).

31.08.110    Section B: Strategies/Policies – Incorporate sub-area maps (Strategy).

31.08.120    Section B: Strategies/Policies – Improve interconnectivity with Grand Valley Transit (GVT) (Strategy).

31.08.130    Section B: Strategies/Policies – Improve the Urban Trails System both on and connecting to active transportation corridors (Strategy).

31.08.140    Section B: Strategies/Policies – Maintain/improve vehicular and nonvehicular circulation (Policy).

Article III. Appendices

31.08.150    Appendix A – Maps.

31.08.160    Appendix B – Background on previous adopted transportation plans.

31.08.170    Appendix C – GVT Transit.

31.08.180    Appendix D – Resources.

Article IV. City of Grand Junction Complete Streets Policy

31.08.190    Vision.

31.08.200    Purpose.

31.08.210    Complete streets principles/context sensitive design standards.

31.08.220    Exceptions.

31.08.230    Applicability.

31.08.240    Performance measures.

31.08.250    Implementation strategies.

Article I. General Provisions

31.08.010 Adoption.

The Grand Junction Circulation Plan is adopted as part of the Comprehensive Plan.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.020 Vision.

The community envisions a safe, balanced and environmentally sensitive multi-modal, urban transportation system that supports greater social interaction, facilitates the movement of people and goods, and encourages active living, mobility independence, and convenient access to goods and services for all users.

A multi-modal transportation system should accommodate pedestrians, bicyclists, motorists, movers of goods, and transit; and should be safe and navigable for all users. It must provide transportation options to all users including those with limited mobility such as children, seniors, and persons with disabilities.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.030 Purpose.

(a)    The Grand Junction Circulation Plan (“Circulation Plan”) is a strategic document adopted by both the City of Grand Junction and Mesa County. This document moves forward the transportation principles, strategies and vision to create an urban area-wide multi-modal circulation plan as identified in: the Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan adopted in 2010; the 2010 Circulation Plan; and the 2001 Urban Trails Plan.

(b)    It supports the Grand Valley 2040 Regional Transportation Plan’s sound planning principles and best practices including:

(1)    Reducing congestion;

(2)    Easing commutes;

(3)    Improving roadway safety;

(4)    Enhancing sidewalks, bike, and multi-use trails; and

(5)    Maintaining an efficient and effective transportation system.

(c)    It builds on the transportation goals found in the Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan, including:

(1)    Designing streets and walkways as attractive public spaces;

(2)    Constructing streets to include enhanced pedestrian amenities; and

(3)    Developing a well-balanced transportation system that supports automobile, local transit, pedestrian, bicycle, and freight movement while protecting environmental conditions of air, water and natural resources.

(d)    The Circulation Plan will be used by elected officials and staff to guide the assignment of financial resources for infrastructure construction, future development and dedication of other funds for transportation purposes.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.040 Planning area.

This Circulation Plan is applicable to transportation corridors within the Urban Development Boundary as defined by the Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan Future Land Use Map. Minor exceptions occur where a particular corridor falls both within and outside of the Urban Development Boundary and whereby consistency of standards along the length of the corridor would be beneficial to the traveling public.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.050 Executive summary.

The Circulation Plan establishes a comprehensive approach to transportation planning through the following four sections (Plan Elements). Conceptual and corridor maps have been created to aid decision makers and City and County staff to improve the transportation systems. See GJMC 31.08.150, Appendix A – Maps, for full-page maps.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.060 Plan elements.

(a)    The Network Map identifies important corridors and linkages connecting centers, neighborhoods and community attractions.

(b)    The Street Functional Classification Map identifies the functional classification of the roadway corridors that connect neighborhoods, employment centers and local attractions and amenities. Many of these corridors are also major truck routes providing heavy truck movement and access to the Grand Junction community. There are over 50 proposed changes since the map was last adopted by City Council and Mesa County Board of County Commissioners in 2010. These changes include adding road segments, reclassifying some existing road segments and removing others from the map.

(c)    The Active Transportation Corridors Map replaces the Urban Trails Master Plan/Map and identifies major corridors important for nonmotorized travel by providing critical, continuous and convenient connections for bicyclists and pedestrians. The corridors are broadly defined and could accommodate active transportation as part of the road network or as separated paths. This Circulation Plan identifies corridors important for active transportation and does not attempt to identify trails that are predominately recreational in nature. In the city limits, it proposes using trails on, along, adjacent to or near canals, ditches and drainages for nonmotorized route connections only where there is not another safe or better alternative for nonmotorized transportation on the road network.

(d)    Specific Strategies and Policies. Goals and policies identified in the Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan and strategies and policies identified in the Circulation Plan will help the community achieve its vision of becoming the most livable city west of the Rockies. A balanced transportation system will be achieved through the following strategies and policies that are further described in the Circulation Plan.

(1)    Adopt a Complete Streets Policy for Grand Junction and develop and adopt a Complete Streets Policy for Mesa County.

(2)    Develop or revise policies for support of an integrated transportation system.

(3)    Provide conceptual and corridor maps that will be used by decision makers and staff to improve transportation systems.

(4)    Improve interconnectivity between Grand Valley Transit and centers, neighborhoods and community attractions.

(5)    Improve the Urban Trails System on and connecting to active transportation corridors.

(i)    Provide guidance on incentives for trail construction;

(ii)    Provide guidance on standards for trail construction;

(iii)    Provide guidance on ownership and maintenance of trail system;

(iv)    Maintain or improve multi-purpose trails;

(v)    Provide wayfinding to attract visitors to the trail system and improve the ability of residents and visitors to find area attractions.

(6)    Maintain or improve circulation of vehicles on road system.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.070 Background.

(a)    The 2010 Circulation Plan was adopted as an element of the Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan. It is limited to a brief description of the planning area and the principle that development should support an integrated transportation system. It also includes a functional classification street network map, of future, general vehicular circulation patterns for collector and arterial streets and highways to accommodate the ultimate buildout of the urban area.

(b)    The 2001 Urban Trails Plan was developed as a strategic tool to guide the future course of trail development in the Grand Valley. The Plan identifies the locations for new nonmotorized facilities and serves as a guide for the development, protection, management, operations and use of a trail system that meets the demands of the growing community. The Plan identifies the opportunity to utilize the natural waterways, drainages and canals to create an interconnected system of safe and efficient means of nonmotorized travel.

(c)    This Circulation Plan acknowledges the planning that was previously completed and incorporates the previous findings into a broader framework for transportation to include more than a functional classification of streets. The Circulation Plan works to combine urban trails planning with street planning and establish goals and policies with a multi-modal approach to transportation within the Urban Development Boundary established in the Comprehensive Plan. In addition to these two plans, the City and County also have adopted transportation plans for specific neighborhoods and geographic areas (see GJMC 31.08.150, Appendix A – Maps).

(d)    The following adopted plans have shaped the transportation planning in the community and have been adopted by one or both, the City of Grand Junction and Mesa County, and can be found at www.mesacounty.us/planning and/or at http://www.gjcity.org. These plans serve as the foundation for the updated Circulation Plan.

(1)    2010 Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan (GJMC Title 31);

(2)    Grand Valley 2040 Regional Transportation Plan;

(3)    2001 Urban Trails Master Plan;

(4)    2002 Redlands Area Transportation Plan (Chapter 34.28 GJMC);

(5)    2004 Pear Park Neighborhood Plan (GJMC Title 37);

(6)    2014 Orchard Mesa Neighborhood Plan (GJMC Title 39);

(7)    2011 Clifton/Fruitvale Community Plan;

(8)    2007/2011 North Avenue Corridor Plans and Zoning Overlay (GJMC Title 32);

(9)    24 Road Subarea Plan and Overlay (GJMC Title 33).

(e)    Access Management Policies and Access Control Plans. The City, County and CDOT have various access management plans and policies. This Circulation Plan update has been developed to work in conjunction with these policies, which can be found in the following documents:

(1)    Mesa County Standard Specifications for Road and Bridge Construction (RB Spec) – www.mesacounty.us/publicworks/roads/specifications.aspx;

(2)    Mesa County Road Access Policy – www.mesacounty.us/RoadAccessPolicy.aspx;

(3)    City of Grand Junction Transportation Engineering Design Standards (TEDS) (GJMC Title 29);

(4)    Access Control Plans with the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT). Some corridors fall under the ownership and jurisdiction of CDOT. CDOT has specific “Access Control Plans” that are implemented through intergovernmental agreements with Mesa County and/or Grand Junction for the State Highway system which affects driveways, street intersections and signalization spacing on these roads. The roads include Interstate-70, I-70 Business Loop, State Highway 141, State Highway 340, U.S. Highway 6 (North Avenue), and U.S. Highway 50, all of which run through the Grand Junction community.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

Article II. Plan Elements

31.08.080 Section A: Maps.

(a)    The Network Map. The Network Map is a conceptual view of the community from an overall “30,000 foot” vantage point that identifies important corridors and linkages connecting centers, neighborhoods and community attractions. It is used to support more detailed planning, such as the Active Transportation Corridors Map. It is implemented through capital construction of streets, sidewalks and trail infrastructure. A full-page map is included in GJMC 31.08.150, Appendix A – Maps, as Figure 1.

(b)    The Active Transportation Corridors Map (Nonmotorized Transportation Map). This Circulation Plan establishes the Active Transportation Corridors Map, to create a network of critical, continuous, safe, and convenient connections for nonmotorized transportation (bicycles, pedestrians, motorized wheelchairs, e-bikes where permitted by law, etc.). While it may be used for recreation or connect to the Colorado River and other trails, the active transportation corridors are intended to provide a complete alternative network of nonmotorized traffic routes. This includes using existing streets and future trails along waterways (canals, ditches and drainages) to connect neighborhood, schools, parks and other open space areas, as well as commercial and business districts with each other. It further identifies specific corridors that follow and support the Network Map and links important centers identified in the Comprehensive Plan’s Future Land Use Map with neighborhoods and other attractions and local amenities.

Active transportation corridors will include some canal, ditch and drainageway alignments where they provide the safest and best connections between neighborhoods and area attractions. This focused approach limits the use of canals, ditches and drainageways to only those routes that are most viable and critical for the active transportation network. During the planning, design and construction of these corridors the best route can be established which may include a combination of canals, ditches, drainageways, roads or other properties to locate the actual active transportation nonmotorized corridor on. Final location of these routes may be located on, along, adjacent to or near the canals, ditches and drainageways, but will be constructed to respect canal and drainage companies’ operations.

The Active Transportation Corridors Map will be used to support more detailed planning and implementation, including capital construction of sidewalks, bike lanes and trail infrastructure. Active transportation corridors can be improved during new development projects or through capital improvement projects and through the development of drainageways as identified in the Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan.

As property develops there may be situations where trails may be a desired amenity but a route is not shown on the map. An example of this may be providing a connection from an internal subdivision street to an outside collector or arterial street. Constructing these types of site and development specific improvements will provide connectivity that helps the overall transportation system work. See also GJMC 31.08.130, Section B: Strategies/Policies – Improve the Urban Trails System both on and connecting to active transportation corridors (Strategy). A full-page map of the active transportation corridors is included in GJMC 31.08.150, Appendix A – Maps, as Figure 2.

(c)    The Street Plan Functional Classification Map. The Street Plan Map identifies major corridors for general circulation of motorized traffic within the Urban Development Boundary. Roadway classifications include collectors and arterial streets that move more traffic than local subdivision streets. Subdivision and other local streets connect to collector streets that connect to arterial streets. Collector and arterial streets connect community attractions including neighborhood centers, village centers, and downtown together. The map also shows unclassified roads which are important for neighborhood circulation. They establish general locations for these important future local streets in undeveloped areas. The classification of these will be determined via a traffic impact analysis that demonstrates vehicular traffic demand within the area of interest.

There are over 50 changes to the Street Plan Map in this Circulation Plan since the map was adopted by City Council and Mesa County in 2010. These revisions are incorporated into the map and are the result of new development or improved traffic data. A full-page map is included in GJMC 31.08.150, Appendix A – Maps, as Figure 3.

(d)    Horizon Drive Business Improvement District Trail Network Plan. The Horizon Drive BID Trail Network Plan identifies a series of proposed multimodal trail connections within the Horizon Drive corridor area to provide safe, convenient and functional nonmotorized linkages to amenities within the District and to the surrounding area. A full-page map of the Horizon Drive Business Improvement District Trail Network Pan is included in GJMC 31.08.150, Appendix A – Maps, as Figure 6.

(Ord. 4851, 5-1-19; Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.090 Section B: Strategies/Policies – Complete streets policies (Policy).

(a)    Grand Junction – Adopt a Complete Streets Policy. The complete streets policy will support the City of Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan goal to “develop a well-balanced transportation system that supports automobile, local transit, pedestrian, bicycle, air, and freight movement while protecting air, water and natural resources.” A complete streets approach integrates the needs of people and places in the planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance of transportation networks, making streets safer for people of all ages and abilities and thereby supporting overall public and economic health. At the heart of a complete streets policy is the intent for communities to build streets that safely accommodate all modes of transportation.

While the City has historically incorporated complete streets concepts in the design of transportation corridors, this policy memorializes that commitment for all transportation related projects. The Grand Junction complete streets policy recognizes the importance of all modes of transportation and is established for the areas under the jurisdiction of the City of Grand Junction.

The City established the Urban Trails Committee to advise City Council on matters pertaining to the safe, convenient and efficient movement of pedestrians and bicyclists of all ages and abilities. It has been a long-standing goal and desire of the Urban Trails Committee, whose planning jurisdiction is limited to the Persigo 201 service area, to develop and adopt a complete streets policy. That goal was incorporated into the 2017 City Council Strategic Plan as a Key Initiative.

(b)    Mesa County – Develop and Adopt a “Complete Streets” Policy. For Mesa County, an urban area complete streets policy limited to the urban development boundary will be developed that is appropriate to its jurisdiction and supports the Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan by fostering community values of transportation connections, attractive corridors and safe routes for all modes of travel. This policy will be part of the Mesa County Road and Bridge Standards and separate from the complete streets policy adopted by the City of Grand Junction.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.100 Section B: Strategies/Policies – Apply the principles of an integrated transportation system (Strategy).

(a)    An integrated transportation system is defined as a system that provides transportation options and needs for all mobility types. New development shall be designed to continue or create an integrated system of streets and trails that provides for efficient movement of pedestrians, bicycles, and automobiles to and from adjacent development, while also encouraging the use of transit. Design shall allow for through movement of general traffic utilizing connectivity, thus avoiding isolation of residential areas and over-reliance on arterial streets.

(b)    Another aspect of an integrated transportation system is the concept of complete networks. There are limited number of corridor segments that cannot serve all mobility types due to a variety of restrictions such as constrained rights-of-way or an exclusive facility type. Some corridors, like off-street trails, are intended exclusively for bicycles and pedestrians and a small number of corridors can serve vehicles only. However, in all instances the transportation system as a whole should provide effective connections for all modes of travel. The individual corridors, when combined, work together to form an integrated transportation system or “complete network.” This Circulation Plan update was prepared with this concept in mind. The Street Functional Classification Map and the Active Transportation Corridors Map have been developed to work together with the complete network concept in mind.

(c)    Implementation Actions.

(1)    Amend development codes to include requirements for building street networks and identify construction/reconstruction responsibility.

(2)    Amend development codes to establish construction responsibility, design guidelines, and ownership guidance for bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

(3)    Develop methods to incentivize construction of bicycle and pedestrian facilities.

(4)    Revise the City of Grand Junction Transportation Engineering and Development Standards (TEDS) Manual (GJMC Title 29), specifically relating to street and trail design guidelines and cross sections and transit requirements, to support the concepts presented in this plan.

(5)    Revise the City’s Zoning and Development Code to create best practices for street and intersection design alternatives based on anticipated travel patterns and multi-modal demand.

(6)    Update the Mesa County Road and Bridge Standards to include additional options for implementation of the strategies/policies presented in this plan.

(7)    Revise the Mesa County Development Standards to provide the necessary criteria to promote an integrated transportation system.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.110 Section B: Strategies/Policies – Incorporate sub-area maps (Strategy).

(a)    Various plans have been developed for some areas (sub-areas) within the urban development boundary while many other areas still need specific plans. The following list recognizes planning efforts to date that are incorporated into this Circulation Plan.

(1)    Safe Routes to Schools. Studies to improve safety for children between existing neighborhoods and schools continue with projects planned, funded and constructed for Nisley Elementary, Clifton Elementary and West Middle School. Other planning has occurred and will continue to occur for all schools in School District 51.

(2)    Clifton Pedestrian Plan – refer to Clifton/Fruitvale Community Plan.

(3)    Orchard Mesa Pedestrian Plan at the Fairgrounds/Meridian Park Neighborhood Center – refer to Orchard Mesa Neighborhood Plan (GJMC Title 39).

(4)    Redlands area – refer to the Redlands Area Plan (GJMC Title 34).

(5)    North Avenue Corridor Plans (GJMC Title 32).

(6)    Pear Park – refer to the Pear Park Neighborhood Plan (GJMC Title 37).

(7)    Horizon Business District – refer to (future) Horizon Business District Overlay.

(8)    Mesa Mall Environs – (future).

(9)    Safe Routes to Parks and Open Space – (future).

(b)    Implementation Actions.

(1)    Revisit each sub-area plan regularly and update when needed.

(2)    Add to the list as new sub-areas are planned and mapped.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.120 Section B: Strategies/Policies – Improve interconnectivity with Grand Valley Transit (GVT) (Strategy).

(a)    The vision for GVT is to provide a viable transportation choice for all populations that connects communities, neighborhoods, and destinations while improving quality of life and supporting economic vitality in the region. GVT strives to provide an affordable, connected, efficient, and easy to use transit system that attracts all rider types, integrates all modes of transportation and that provides a transportation system that supports jobs, recreation and overall community well-being. Additional statistical information for GVT can be found in GJMC 31.08.160, Appendix B – Background on previous adopted transportation plans.

(b)    To achieve GVT’s vision, the transit system must provide improved interconnectivity and accessibility including first and last mile connections. Many of the improvements will rely on coordination with both Mesa County and City of Grand Junction for implementation.

(c)    Implementation Actions.

(1)    Access. In coordination with its partners, GVT will improve sidewalks, curb ramps, and bike lanes and provide bike racks at bus stops in an ongoing effort to improve access for riders.

(2)    Collaboration. GVT will collaborate and be a strong community partner that works with public, private, and non-governmental organizations to provide transit service options within the transportation system and look to emerging trends and technologies to bring this to fruition.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.130 Section B: Strategies/Policies – Improve the Urban Trails System both on and connecting to active transportation corridors (Strategy).

Creating neighborhood and community connections that are safe, convenient and efficient are very important to providing transportation options. These can include active transportation routes to parks, schools, commercial and employment areas that are off the major, highly traveled ways. Efforts should look at planning at a one-quarter mile radius from a proposed development as well as the entire transportation corridor between major attractions.

Access between neighborhoods and subdivisions and connecting them and other attractions to the active transportation corridors can be accomplished in a variety of ways. Using drainageways and open space areas is deemed the highest priority to make these connections work. See the four examples below.

The City has a history of working with development to create safe and convenient connectors between not only similar land uses, like residential neighborhoods, but also between unlike land uses.

Example 1: Lincoln Park Connection from North Avenue. Creating a safe community connection from collector and arterial streets allows good public access to major attractions and is important in encouraging nonmotorized transportation including transit. A bus stop exists on North Avenue at the entrance of this trail connection.

Example 2: Leach Creek Trail. The Estates and Blue Heron residential subdivisions and development of the Leach Creek bike/pedestrian concrete trail.

Leach Creek Drainage Trail – Connecting G Road and G ½ Rd

 

Example 3: Connection with Patterson Road. Trail across O’Reilly Auto Parts store property connects GVT Transfer Station with Patterson Road via a crosswalk at 24 ½ Road.

Example 4: Neighborhood connections to active transportation corridors. These “neighborhood connections” provide individual subdivisions with access to the larger transportation system and link them with neighborhood subdivisions and other areas of the community. A “pathway” from a subdivision which leads to an active transportation corridor will provide residents with an optional mode of transportation, while providing them access to major attractions in the urban area.

(a)    Incentives for Trail Construction.

(1)    Trails and public streets are part of the transportation network. They provide transportation corridors for commuting purposes; serve as an amenity to the community, new developments, and neighborhoods. Trails have been shown to improve public health, strengthen community social connections and lead to increased property values.1

(2)    Implementation Actions.

(i)    The City or County will seek funding for off-site trail construction to connect development-required trail(s) to the existing trail network (active transportation corridors).

(A)    Revise the City’s Zoning and Development Code (Z&D) and County’s Land Development Code (LDC) to establish responsibility of new development and incentives for constructing trails shown on the Active Transportation Corridors Map and associated connections within their project limits.

(b)    Standards for Trail Design and Construction. All trails should be hard surface, preferably concrete and constructed to meet the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements, follow specific regulations found in the Grand Junction Development Code and Transportation Engineering Design Standards (TEDS) Manual (GJMC Title 29), and be designed according to the latest industry standard.

The type of facility to be constructed for on-street trails shown on the Active Transportation Corridors Map will generally be specified by the standard street cross-sections in the TEDS Manual (GJMC Title 29). However, the flexibility to choose a facility type that exceeds the minimum standards should be allowed and encouraged. Additionally, consideration should be given to implementing innovative pedestrian and bicycle facilities, in accordance with the latest industry standards, when the context of the corridor makes it feasible. Careful selection of the appropriate facility type is particularly important along the CDOT State Highway segments identified as active transportation corridors. For example, because of a corridor’s context, a detached multi-use path or a separated two-way path could be preferred instead of on-street bike lanes. The designs for all projects on State Highway corridors are subject to the review and approval of CDOT staff.

(1)    Standards for trail design and construction must also account for crossings. Trail crossings occur when on-street or off-street trails intersect with another street. Crossings should be designed according to the latest industry standards and guidelines and prioritize the safety of vulnerable road users, pedestrians, and bicyclists.

(i)    The majority of trail crossings will occur at existing street intersections. Design standards pertaining to the application of pedestrian crosswalks will apply.

(ii)    Current design standards and guidelines should be utilized to determine which of the various trail and pedestrian crossing treatments to select. For new crossing locations, an engineering study including a warrant analysis should be performed. The various trail and pedestrian crossing treatments that could be warranted by engineering study include crosswalk signage and markings, flashing warning beacons, pedestrian hybrid beacons, conventional traffic signals with pedestrian signal heads, or a grade separated crossing.

(iii)    When off-street trails cross streets, such as trails along drainageways or trails along canals, the preferred crossing treatment should be a grade separated facility. Ideally this would utilize a structure that accommodates both the trail and the necessary drainage conveyance. If a grade separated crossing cannot be reasonably accommodated, then an engineering study should be performed to select the appropriate at-grade crossing treatment. Ideally all at-grade crossings should occur at signalized intersections.

(iv)    When on-street trails cross CDOT State Highways or City/County arterials, the preferred crossing treatment should be a signalized intersection. A grade separated facility should be provided when it can be accomplished in combination with primarily vehicular bridge structures; such as the 29 Road overpass crossing the I-70 Business Loop. Grade separated trail crossings may also be possible by reallocating space on existing bridge structures; such as the B ½ Road Overpass crossing Highway 50. The designs for all projects crossing State Highway corridors are subject to the review and approval of CDOT staff.

(2)    Implementation Actions.

(i)    Revise the City’s Zoning and Development Code (Z&D) and County’s Land Development Code (LDC) to reflect the intent of the following:

(A)    Off-street trails shown on the Active Transportation Corridors Map shall be 10 feet wide, designed and constructed per the Transportation Engineering Design Standards (TEDS) (GJMC Title 29).

(B)    Minimum standards for on-street trails shown on the Active Transportation Corridors Map shall consist of on-street bike lanes in accordance with standard street cross sections and a detached sidewalk.

(C)    In some cases, because of topography or other concerns, it may be impossible to meet ADA requirements. Soft trails may be acceptable in those instances.

(D)    Per the Stormwater Management Manual (SWMM) (GJMC Title 28), most drainage channels require at least one 12-foot-wide service road. All drainage channel service roads shall also be designed to function as soft trails. If a trail is shown on the Active Transportation Corridors Map along a drainage channel, the service road must be constructed of a hard surface. To achieve the required 12-foot service road width, it can be 10 feet of concrete with compacted road base shoulders.

(c)    Ownership and Maintenance of Trail System.

(1)    This policy is as follows and is different within the jurisdiction of Grand Junction than it is in the unincorporated areas of Mesa County.

(2)    City of Grand Junction Implementation Actions. Revise the Zoning and Development Code to reflect the intent of the following:

(i)    If the trail is shown on the Active Transportation Corridors Map it must be in a tract or easement dedicated to the City of Grand Junction. If the trail is not shown on the Active Transportation Corridors Map the developer shall dedicate an appropriately sized tract or easement to accommodate the trail to the appropriate entity in the following order of descending priority: the City of Grand Junction, the Canal Company/Drainage District, or the Homeowners Association (HOA) per the following:

(A)    When the trail is located adjacent to a drainage channel maintained by the City of Grand Junction, it shall be dedicated to the City. If the Grand Valley Drainage District (GVDD) maintains the channel, dedication shall be to the City and/or the GVDD.

(B)    If the trail is located adjacent to a canal, dedication shall be to the City and/or the canal company.

(C)    Trails connecting internal subdivision streets or trails to external streets or trails shall be dedicated to the City or the HOA.

(D)    Trail connections between neighborhoods shall be dedicated to the City or the HOA.

(3)    Unincorporated Areas of Mesa County Implementation Actions. Establish the following language in the Mesa County Land Development Code and/or Transportation and Engineering Design Standards (TEDS) for developing property:

(i)    Trails connecting internal subdivision streets or trails to external streets or trails shall be dedicated to the HOA, but available for public use with appropriate easements.

(ii)    Trail connections between neighborhoods shall be dedicated to the HOA of which they are a part, but available for public use with appropriate easements.

(iii)    Sidewalks along streets shall be in the Mesa County right-of-way.

(d)    Active Transportation Corridors along Drainageways, Canals and Ditches. As shown in the 2010 Comprehensive Plan, the Colorado River Regional Trail envisioned by Grand Junction, Mesa County and many other partners establishes a regional trail running the length of the Colorado River from the Town of Palisade to the City of Fruita and beyond. Today parts of this trail are already built and more segments will be constructed through the combined efforts of various partners including Colorado Parks and Wildlife, the Colorado Riverfront Commission (One Riverfront), partner municipalities and the Urban Trails Committee.

(1)    Trails along Drainage Ways. North of the Colorado River, drainageways generally orient in a northeast/southwest direction as they drain toward the river. These drainageways create a grid system separate from the grid of the street system and can provide necessary connections for a trail network from many existing and future residential neighborhoods and the Colorado River. In the Redlands, drainageways generally orient from southeast to northwest. Trails can be located within some of the broader drainageways, but may have to be aligned along the edge of narrower drainage corridors.

(2)    Trails along Canals and Ditches. Canals are part of the secondary water system of the valley and generally run along contour lines in a northwest/southeast alignment, following the terrain of the valley. These canals are owned and operated by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) and private irrigation companies, and are located on lands owned by the BOR, in rights-of-way or easements across private land. Using a combination of limited drainageway trails (discussed above) and limited canal trails can create a part of the active transportation corridor grid system.

(3)    The concept of accessing the Colorado River Trail system through these nonmotorized active transportation corridors takes advantage of existing road corridors, greenways, drainages, and a few canal and ditch segments as identified on the Active Transportation Corridors Map to tie most of Grand Junction to the Colorado River Regional Trail.

(4)    City of Grand Junction Implementation Actions. Revise the Zoning and Development Code to reflect the intent of the following:

(i)    Trails along canals and drainages are shown on the Active Transportation Corridors Map for certain segments needed to make essential trail system connections. Utilizing these segments for trail connections will require:

(A)    Cooperation and allowance of public access from the irrigation and drainage providers to ensure public safety along the canal.

(B)    Providing canal and drainage operators the ability to maintain their infrastructure.

(C)    Permission from the underlying landowners and provisions to minimize public impacts on private land (such as fencing).

(D)    Establishment of memorandums of understanding (MOUs) to address liability.

(5)    Unincorporated Areas of Mesa County Implementation Actions. It is Mesa County’s policy to not require trails along drainageways or canals.

(e)    Develop Wayfinding and Marketing for Trails System.

(1)    A wayfinding system for bicyclists and pedestrians consists of comprehensive signing and/or pavement markings to guide bicyclists and pedestrians to their destinations along “active transportation corridors” and other preferred routes. Signs are normally placed at decision points along routes – typically at the intersection of two or more routes, trails, or bikeways, and at other key locations leading to and along bike and pedestrian routes.2

(2)    Implementation Actions for All Transportation Providers/Partners.

(i)    Make trail maps available on key websites including at a minimum: Mesa County, City of Grand Junction, Grand Junction Economic Partners, Chamber of Commerce, Colorado Mesa University, and “Visit Grand Junction.”

(ii)    Distribute hard copy maps/brochures at visitors’ centers/mobile visitor centers/hotels/libraries/schools and other locations that serve as visitor and user destinations.

(iii)    Distribute and/or post full-sized maps at various locations including downtown, the CMU campus, GVT transit centers and at important transit stops showing the multi-modal transportation network (GVT routes, trails, and roads, etc.).

(iv)    Develop a phone app showing different forms of circulation using different modes including photos. A mobile app could also be used to show history or points of interest as well as include the ability to report problems or suggestions.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.140 Section B: Strategies/Policies – Maintain/improve vehicular and nonvehicular circulation (Policy).

In less developed sections of the urban area there is a need for local (subdivision) streets to be constructed in specific locations for better connectivity and access to the collector and arterial street network. These streets have been identified as “Unclassified” on the Street Functional Classification Map and may be reclassified in the future when actual traffic demand is determined with development proposals.

(a)    Stub Streets. Local circulation systems and land development patterns must not detract from the efficiency of adjacent higher order streets nor limit access to undeveloped property within a neighborhood. Requiring stub streets is necessary to provide access and connectivity within a neighborhood. Management of access to higher volume streets, including public and private streets and driveways, is necessary to ensure that efficiency and safety are not unduly compromised.

(b)    Implementation Actions. Revise the Z&D and LDC to reflect the following:

(1)    Unclassified “future” streets are required to be built during development. However, the classification will be determined via a traffic impact analysis that demonstrates vehicle traffic demand within the area of interest (not limited to the development under consideration).

(2)    Developments are required to stub streets to adjacent properties in logical locations, based on the circulation plan and each jurisdiction’s access management policies. This will allow for an interconnected local street system while minimizing the number of points required for access to the general street system. Stub streets may be required for any functional classification street including local streets.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

Article III. Appendices

31.08.150 Appendix A – Maps.

(a)    Figure 1 – Network Map.

(b)    Figure 2 – Active Transportation Corridors Map.

(c)    Figure 3 – Street Plan – Functional Classification Map.

(d)    Figure 4 – Whitewater – Street Plan – Functional Classification Map.

(e)    Figure 5 – Whitewater – Active Transportation Corridor Map.

(f)    Figure 6 – Horizon Drive Business Improvement District Trail Network Plan.

(Ord. 4851, 5-1-19; Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.160 Appendix B – Background on previous adopted transportation plans.

The following adopted plans have shaped the transportation planning in the community and have been adopted by one or both the City of Grand Junction and Mesa County, and can be found at www.mesacounty.us/planning and/or at http://www.gjcity.org. These plans serve as the foundation for the updated Circulation Plan.

(a)    2010 Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan. The Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan was adopted in 2010 by both the City Council of Grand Junction and the Mesa County Planning Commission. The Comprehensive Plan provides the vision and the goal of “Becoming the Most Livable Community West of the Rockies.” Creating a community with an excellent transportation system is essential to achieving this vision. The goals and policies of the Comprehensive Plan are further discussed in this Circulation Plan.

(b)    Grand Valley 2040 Regional Transportation Plan (see gv2040rpt.org). The 2040 Plan was adopted by the Grand Valley Regional Transportation Commission in 2015. To maintain the region’s transportation system, ensure the efficient movement of people and goods, and support future growth and development, transportation services and infrastructure are planned and coordinated through a regional transportation planning process carried out by the Grand Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization (GVMPO). The GVMPO is the federally designated transportation planning organization for the Grand Junction urbanized area and all of Mesa County. The long-term guidance developed in the regional Long Range Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) informs a short-term capital improvement plan, or the Transportation Improvement Program (TIP), and prioritize projects to make the best use of limited funding. The regional plan covers all of Mesa County, including incorporated Grand Junction. The Grand Valley 2040 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) is the most recent update to the region’s overall vision for future transportation infrastructure and investment and identifies the types of investments and strategies needed to address transportation mobility needs in the region. The plan guides future investments in the region’s transportation system to reduce congestion; ease commutes; improve roadway safety; enhance sidewalks, bike, and multi-use trails; and maintain an efficient and effective transportation system that supports the regional economy. It is scheduled to be updated in 2019 by a 2045 Plan.

(c)    2001 Urban Trails Master Plan. The City of Grand Junction last adopted an Urban Trails Master Plan in 2001 and the Mesa County Board of County Commissioners retired it in April 2014, leaving a plan that is limited, outdated and only implemented within the city limits of Grand Junction. The Urban Trails Master Plan defines the type and locations of nonmotorized transportation corridors in the Grand Junction urban area, as well as on-street bicycle and pedestrian facilities. Rather than update the Urban Trails Master Plan, it is being incorporated into this Plan, which will provide more direction, priorities, policies and implementation strategies.

(d)    2002 Redlands Area Transportation Plan. Includes a transportation section that was adopted as part of the Circulation Plan in 2002. There were four key elements of the planning effort: (1) State Highway 340 Access Control Plan; (2) capacity improvements on existing routes; (3) new roadways and neighborhood connections; and (4) multi-modal accommodations.

(e)    2004 Pear Park Neighborhood Plan. Includes a Transportation and Access Management Plan for the Pear Park neighborhood and was adopted as part of the Circulation Plan in 2004. It remains a part of the Circulation Plan today and its detail at a neighborhood level guides development access and street cross sections for major corridors in Pear Park.

(f)    2014 Orchard Mesa Neighborhood Plan. Includes a transportation planning section supporting complete street improvements, multi-modal enhancements for all major corridors on Orchard Mesa including US Highway 50, establishing nonmotorized crossings of U.S. Highway 50 (including the eastbound conversion of the B ½ Road overpass to a pedestrian/bicycle path), and creating safe nonmotorized routes to area attractions, schools, the riverfront, and centers.

(g)    2011 Clifton/Fruitvale Community Plan. Includes the Clifton Transportation Study and Clifton Pedestrian Circulation Study. Adopted in 2006 and amended in 2011, it specifically looks at pedestrian and bicycle improvements to U.S. Highway 6 that runs through Clifton on the way to Palisade.

(h)    2007/2011 North Avenue Corridor Plans and Zoning Overlay. Includes transportation requirements that reinforce a “complete street” infrastructure that support this Circulation Plan.

(i)    24 Road Subarea Plan and Overlay. Adopted in 2000 and updated in 2017, it includes transportation requirements that reinforce a “complete street” infrastructure and support this Circulation Plan.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.170 Appendix C – GVT Transit.

(a)    GVT Transit Summary, Service Areas and Major Corridors. Based on onboard passenger surveys conducted between 2008 to 2016, the two major destinations for Grand Valley Transit (GVT) passengers while riding the bus are home followed by work. Therefore, GVT focuses the system around densities of residential development and centers of employment. Determining factors for route alignments and stop placement focus on transit-dependent populations that include older adult, persons with ambulatory disabilities, low-income, and zero-vehicle populations. Much of this information comes from Census tract data, while the Grand Junction Housing Coalition is another resource.

(b)    GVT Focuses on Specific Corridors. Since the inception of fixed routes in 2000, GVT has focused on particular corridors including the following within the City of Grand Junction: North Avenue, Patterson Road, Orchard Avenue, Horizon Drive, Unaweep Avenue, D ½ Road, D Road, 4th and 5th Street couplets, 7th Street, 12th Street, 29 Road, and 32 Road.

(c)    GVT Daily Boardings and Alightings.

(1)    The busiest stops in 2016 for passenger boardings include the following (in order):

(i)    Downtown Transfer Facility;

(ii)    Clifton Transfer Facility;

(iii)    West Transfer Facility;

(iv)    North Avenue and East of 28 ¾ Road – Walmart;

(v)    1st Street and North of Rood Avenue – City Market;

(vi)    North Avenue and West of 28 ¾ Rd – Texas Road House – North Avenue and East of 28 ½ Rd – Homeward Bound.

(2)    The busiest stops in 2016 for passengers’ alightings include the following:

(i)    Downtown Transfer Facility;

(ii)    Clifton Transfer Facility;

(iii)    West Transfer Facility;

(iv)    North Avenue and Orchard Avenue – West of 29 ¼ Road;

(v)    North Avenue and East of 28 ½ Road – Homeward Bound;

(vi)    North Avenue and West of 29 ½ Road – Career Center;

(vii)    East of 28 ¾ Road – Walmart.

(d)    GVT Seeks Economic and Community Vitality. Provide a transit system that supports jobs, recreation, and overall community well-being.

(e)    GVT Seeks System Preservation. Maintain a financially sustainable transit system operating in a state of good repair.

(f)    GVT Seeks Education and Outreach. Strive to inform and educate the public about transit services and the mobility options they provide for all trip types and populations.

Municipalities and educational institutions can partner with GVT to leverage grant funding for capital improvements.

(g)    Examples of recent successes include:

(1)    Pedestrian and bicycle facilities (crossing beacons, sidewalks, ADA ramps, etc.);

(2)    Buildings (County Fleet addition in Whitewater, park-and-ride facilities);

(3)    Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fueling facilities;

(4)    Litter vacuum for Mesa County Facilities Department;

(5)    CMU coach bus, District 51 and GVT bus pullout on 7th and Elm at new engineering building;

(6)    Connecting the GVT West Transfer Station on 24 ½ Road, to Patterson Road, a “Neighborhood Connection” a trail that was built by O’Reilly Auto Parts providing pedestrian access from 24 ½ Road to Patterson Road.

CMU (7th St) – GVT Bus Pullout

 

GVT Bus Transfer Station across street

Looking west from 24 ½ Rd

 

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

31.08.180 Appendix D – Resources.

(a)    City of Grand Junction.

(1)    www.gjcity.org.

(2)    Grand Junction Comprehensive Plan (GJMC Title 31).

(3)    Transportation Engineering Design Standards Manual (TEDS) (GJMC Title 29).

(4)    Urban Trails Committee.

Additional plans can be found at http://www.gjcity.org/residents/community-development/long-range-planning/.

(b)    Mesa County.

(1)    www.mesacounty.us/planning.

(2)    Mesa County Road Access Policy.

(3)    Mesa County Road and Bridge Specifications.

Additional plans can be found at http://www.mesacounty.us/planning/master-plan.aspx.

(c)    Grand Valley Metropolitan Planning Organization.

(1)    www.rtpo.mesacounty.us.

(2)    2040 Regional Transportation Plan.

(3)    Safe Routes to School.

Additional plans, reports and studies can be found at http://rtpo.mesacounty.us/plans-reports-studies.aspx.

(d)    Colorado Mesa University Natural Resource Center.

(1)    http://www.coloradomesa.edu/natural-resource-center/NRC%20Reports/socioeconomic-studies.html.

(2)    Studies include:

(i)    Grand Valley Public Trail Systems Socio-Economic Study, 2018.

(ii)    Rural Colorado Migration Study, 2018.

(iii)    Mesa County Hedonic House Price Study, 2017.

(Ord. 4808, 7-18-18)

Article IV. City of Grand Junction Complete Streets Policy

31.08.190 Vision.

The complete streets vision is to develop a safe, efficient, and reliable travel network of streets, sidewalks, and urban trails throughout the City of Grand Junction (City) to equitably serve all users and all modes of transportation. Complete streets will provide residents improved access, safety, health and environment—helping Grand Junction to become the most livable community west of the Rockies.

The Comprehensive Plan established specific strategies to implement its vision, guiding principles, goals and policies. In Chapter 5, Balanced Transportation, there are strategies to provide alternatives to getting around the community, increasing connectivity between neighborhoods, schools, parks, shopping and employment areas. It is through the buildout of neighborhood and village centers, along with strategies identified in the Comprehensive Plan and this Circulation Plan that will help the community achieve its vision of becoming the most livable city west of the Rockies.

Grand Junction streets will be designed and maintained to be safe, attractive, accessible, convenient and comfortable for users of all ages and abilities and transportation modes. Complete streets will make the City of Grand Junction more walkable and bikeable, support transit, foster community engagement, and support the local economy and property values. Complete streets will strengthen quality of life by improving public health and safety, advancing mobility, enhancing livability and long-term sustainability to achieve the vision “to become the most livable community west of the Rockies.”

(Res. 48-18, 7-18-18)

31.08.200 Purpose.

The City of Grand Junction commits to improvements that are planned, designed, constructed, operated, and maintained to support safe, efficient and convenient mobility for all roadway users—pedestrians, bicyclists, people who use mobility devices, transit riders, freight traffic, emergency response vehicles, and motorists—regardless of age or ability. Complete streets are necessary to expand everyone’s mobility choices for safe and convenient travel by different modes between destinations throughout Grand Junction and are designed, appropriate to the context, to balance safety and convenience for everyone using the road.

Safety, including a reduction in hazards for pedestrians and bicyclists on Grand Junction roadways, is a fundamental consideration of this complete streets policy. Complete streets also encourage people to more easily make active transportation choices (walking and bicycling), which are associated with improved health outcomes at all stages of life and provide the added benefit of improved air quality.

The City of Grand Junction recognizes that the planning and design of streets and regional roadways should include the entire right-of-way and public realm. A complete streets approach provides a unique opportunity to thoughtfully integrate and advance multiple objectives for the community, now and into the future, while delivering maximum benefits from both public and private investments. A complete street includes an array of integral facilities, including, but not limited to street and sidewalk lighting, pedestrian and bicycle safety improvements, access improvements, compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, public transit facilities and access thereto, landscaping, drainage, and street amenities such as street furniture and shade.

(Res. 48-18, 7-18-18)

31.08.210 Complete streets principles/context sensitive design standards.

(a)    Complete Streets Serve All Users and Modes. The City of Grand Junction shall design, operate and maintain the communities’ streets and rights-of-way to reasonably enable safe, comfortable and convenient access and travel for users of all ages, abilities and income levels. Complete streets equitably considers the needs of motorists, pedestrians, people with disabilities, transit users, bicyclists, and commercial and emergency vehicles, consistent with this policy. The City will strive to prioritize complete street improvements that impact vulnerable and underserved areas and users.

(b)    Complete Streets Design Criteria. The City shall take an innovative approach to develop complete streets that meet or exceed national best-practice design guidelines by thoughtfully applying engineering, architectural, and urban design principles.

(c)    Complete Streets Require Connected Travel Networks. The City of Grand Junction shall prioritize opportunities to create a complete transportation network that provides connected facilities to serve all people and modes of travel, now and into the future. Streets shall be connected to create complete networks that provide travelers with multiple choices of travel routes and that help to reduce congestion on major roadways. The network shall include off-street hard-surface trails for biking and walking where necessary to improve safety and convenience. All roadways and routes need not be optimized for all modes; however, the network shall provide safe, efficient and convenient travel routes for each mode throughout the City, connecting services, schools, parks, civic uses, major centers of activity and attractions.

(d)    Complete Streets Are Attractive, Interesting and Comfortable Places for People. Grand Junction’s streets shall be designed as public amenities and include aesthetic elements such as street trees, landscaping, pedestrian lighting, street furniture, and wayfinding signage wherever possible.

(e)    Complete Streets Require Context-Sensitive Approaches. The City will align land use and transportation goals, policies and code provisions to create complete streets solutions that are flexible and appropriate to the unique circumstances of the surrounding neighborhood, land use patterns and street classification to maximize travel.

(f)    Complete Streets Include All Roadways and All Projects and Phases. The City shall apply this policy, to the greatest extent practicable given budget constraints, to all street projects, including new construction, reconstruction, resurfacing, and maintenance. In addition, safe and efficient travel access for all modes of transportation shall be maintained during construction.

(g)    Complete Streets Require Education, Outreach and Engagement. The City will foster education and outreach on the complete streets policy to City departments and other agencies and will encourage community engagement. Ongoing implementation and monitoring will be communicated to the community.

(Res. 48-18, 7-18-18)

31.08.220 Exceptions.

(a)    Any exception to this policy, including for eligible private projects, must be reviewed and approved by the Transportation Engineering Design Standards (TEDS) Exception Committee, comprised of the Public Works Director, Transportation Engineer, Community Development Director, and the Fire Marshal.

(b)    The following will be considered by the Committee for exceptions to the policy:

(1)    An accommodation is not necessary on the corridors where specific user groups are prohibited;

(2)    Costs of accommodation are excessively disproportionate to the need or probable use, when factoring in both current economic conditions and economic benefits of initial capital cost;

(3)    A clear, documented absence of current and future need exists;

(4)    Transit accommodations that may be excluded where there is no existing or planned transit service;

(5)    Routine maintenance of the transportation network that does not change the roadway geometry or operations, such as mowing, sweeping, spot repair, pothole filling or when interim measures are implemented on temporary detour or haul routes;

(6)    A reasonable and equivalent project existing along the same corridor that is already programmed to provide facilities exempted from the project at hand; or

(7)    The cost of providing accommodations is excessive compared to reasonable access to alternative facilities existing within one-quarter mile of the surrounding network of complete streets to the site.

(Res. 48-18, 7-18-18)

31.08.230 Applicability.

The policy is applicable to all development and redevelopment in the public realm within the City of Grand Junction. It applies to the work of all City departments and other entities working within the public right-of-way. In addition, it is intended to guide all private development that affects streets, the transportation system, and the public realm.

Where new streets and subdivisions are subject to the City of Grand Junction Zoning and Development Code and/or Transportation Engineering Design Standards, the City shall fully and consistently refer to this policy for guidance.

In the existing developed areas of the City, roadway improvements that implement this policy shall be achieved as individual projects advance, as sites and corridors are developed and improved, and as needs and travel-mode balance evolve over time.

(Res. 48-18, 7-18-18)

31.08.240 Performance measures.

Complete streets require appropriate performance measures. The City will track and report performance measures for the transportation system that measure how well the City is conforming to this policy. Indicators shall reflect safe and efficient mobility for all users—pedestrians, bicyclists, transit riders, motorists and freight. The City shall measure the success of this policy using, but not being limited to, the following performance measures:

Performance Measure

Unit/Quantity

Goal

Safety:

 

 

Crashes for all modes

Number

Decrease

Injuries and fatalities for all modes*

Number

Decrease towards zero

 

1. Number of Fatalities

 

2. Rate of Fatalities per 100 Million Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT)

 

3. Number of Serious Injuries

 

4. Rate of Serious Injuries per 100 Million VMT

 

5. Number of Nonmotorized Fatalities and Nonmotorized Serious Injuries

Countdown signals

Number

Increase

Audible traffic signals

Number

Increase

Crosswalk and intersection improvements

Number

Increase

 

Access:

 

 

ADA compliant curb ramps

Number

Increase

ADA compliant accessible routes

Miles

Increase

On-street bike lanes

Miles

Increase

Signal approaches with bike friendly detection

Number

Increase

On-time arrivals for GVT

%

Increase

Bus stops that provide weather protection

%

Increase

Sidewalks

Miles

Increase

Off-street hard-surface trails

Miles

Increase

 

Health and Environment:

 

 

Students who walk or bike to school

%

Increase

Mode share: walk, bike and transit

%

Increase

Vehicle miles traveled (VMT) per capita

Number

Decrease

Notes:

(1)    *The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) Safety Performance Management Final Rule establishes five performance measures as the five-year rolling averages. The GVCP goal or target for 1 – 5 above will be to decrease towards zero.

(2)    As the Safety Performance Rule and other transportation system performance management rules required by the USDOT are implemented, these complete streets performance measures will be updated as applicable.

(Res. 48-18, 7-18-18)

31.08.250 Implementation strategies.

(a)    Policy Integration. The City shall make the complete streets practices a routine part of everyday operations, approach every transportation project and program as an opportunity to improve streets and the transportation network for all users, and work in coordination with other departments, agencies and jurisdictions.

The City will review and revise, as needed, all plans, guidelines, regulations, procedures, and programs to integrate the complete streets principles in all street projects, as feasible.

(b)    Interagency Coordination. Implementation of the complete streets policy will be carried out cooperatively and consistently among all departments in the City of Grand Junction, outside agencies, and, to the greatest extent possible, private developers.

(c)    Training. The City will train pertinent staff on the content of complete streets principles and best practices for implementing this policy.

(d)    Project Selection Criteria (3).

The City will maintain a comprehensive inventory of pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure and will prioritize improvement projects that eliminate gaps in the sidewalk and bikeway network and serves the needs of underserved and vulnerable communities.

The City will utilize interdepartment coordination to promote the most responsible and efficient use of resources for activities within the public way and will seek out appropriate sources of funding and grants for implementation of complete streets policies.

(e)    Oversight Responsibility.The Department of Public Works and the Community Development Department will monitor and implement the complete streets policy, with input and recommendation from the Urban Trails Committee.

(f)    Public Engagement Plan. The City will produce an annual report detailing progress made on the performance measures and implementation of the complete streets policy.

(Res. 48-18, 7-18-18)


1

CMU Study: “The Impact of Natural Amenities on Home Values in the Greater Grand Junction Area” by Nathan Perry, Tammy Parece, Cory Casteneda and Tim Casey – updated June 2017.


2

Adopted from Urban Bikeway Design Guide, Second Edition, National Association of City Transportation Officials, March 2014.