Chapter 20.64
DESIGN STANDARDS

Sections:

20.64.010    Intent.

20.64.020    Purpose.

20.64.030    Duplexes and triplexes in NR zone.

20.64.040    Secondary dwelling units.

20.64.050    Zero lot line and small lot (less than four thousand five hundred s.f.) development.

20.64.060    Low-intensity mixed use, valley commercial/residential.

20.64.070    Neighborhood commercial.

20.64.080    Downtown commercial.

20.64.090    Goose Lake commercial/residential.

20.64.100    General commercial.

20.64.110    Gateway corridor.

20.64.120    Historic overlay zone (reserved).

20.64.130    Low-intensity commercial.

20.64.140    Professional office/residential mixed use.

20.64.010 Intent.

Like many small towns, Shelton developed incrementally as individuals built their homes and businesses lot by lot. This development, over time, has created a pattern of diverse building styles, as opposed to the homogeneity of current large-scale development patterns. The Shelton Vision Statement 2010 and the 1995 comprehensive plan set forth goals and policies to encourage variety in new development, as well as infill development that complements existing land uses. In addition, the vision statement and the comprehensive plan both call for increased pedestrian access throughout neighborhoods and business areas.

These goals must be balanced with the need to accommodate new population, more affordable housing, increased businesses, and higher population densities. It is therefore the intent of this section to provide design standards for new development in some areas, in order to promote growth that accommodates this increased density, while preserving Shelton’s small town nature. (Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.020 Purpose.

No building permit shall be issued for development until the applicant has demonstrated to the site plan review committee that he or she has satisfactorily complied with the applicable requirements of this section. (Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.030 Duplexes and triplexes in NR zone.

Locating duplex and triplex units in the neighborhood residential zone may be controversial because of perceptions that rental units could potentially devalue traditional single-family units. In addition, larger scale of buildings, higher density, and increased parking needs are perceived to detract from single-family neighborhood character.

One way to address these perceptions is to provide duplex and triplex units that blend in with the surrounding area. This can enrich the architectural standards and appearance of the surrounding subdivision or neighborhood. Therefore, applicants who wish to develop duplexes and triplexes shall demonstrate that they have complied with the following special guidelines, to promote outstanding design and quality of such units.

Duplexes and triplexes in the NR zone shall:

A.    Exhibit Similarity to Single-Family Detached Structures. Duplex and triplex units shall be designed to be similar in appearance to single-family detached structures. This can be satisfied by several techniques, including but not limited to the following:

1.    Entry design.

a.    Construct a single entry providing access to multiple units.

b.    Construct entrances on different facades of the structure so only one entry is visible from any one right-of-way.

2.    Location on corner lots. Design duplex or triplex units on corner lots so that each entry can be perceived as a single-family unit from either right-of-way.

3.    Use of similar materials. Attempt to coordinate exterior treatments of duplexes and triplexes with surrounding residences through the use of brick, wood siding, and similar materials that are compatible with the exterior treatment used on existing structures in the surrounding neighborhood.

B.    Employ a Complementary Design. Units shall have a design that provides significant architectural interest and is complementary to single-family units in the area. Two or more of the following techniques should be used to achieve architectural interest:

1.    Incorporation of roof breaks, dormers, brick chimneys;

2.    Modulation of facades and window treatment;

3.    Use of balconies, decks and porches; and/or

4.    Other techniques as determined by the city manager and his/her designee that will provide consistency and compatibility with existing dwellings in the surrounding area.

C.    Exhibit a building design that is compatible with the size, scale, color, material and historic character of the property, surrounding neighborhood and environment when the duplex or triplex is located within a designated historic landmark or on property that is adjacent to a designated historic landmark.

D.    Establish that the site is of sufficient size to accommodate the proposed use; and further that, in the opinion of the city, all yards opens spaces, landscaping, walls/fences, parking, loading and other necessary features are properly provided to assure the proposed use will be compatible with adjacent residential uses and the residential character of the surrounding area.

E.    Provide off-street parking in compliance with Chapter 20.40 SMC.

F.    Utilize landscaping that complements the architecture of the unit and will integrate the proposed development into the existing residential environment. (Ord. 1921-0518 (part), 2018; Ord. 1556-1101 Exh. 1, 2001; Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.040 Secondary dwelling units.

One way to allow higher residential density while preserving single-family neighborhood character is to provide for the construction of additional dwelling units on a single-family lot. These units, also called “accessory dwelling units” or “mother-in-law” apartments, are generally intended to be much smaller than the main unit, occupied by one person (at most two), and one of the two units on the property must be owner-occupied. The following criteria help achieve these intended results.

Secondary dwelling units shall:

A.    Be Smaller in Size than the Primary Dwelling Unit. Excluding any garage areas, the secondary dwelling unit shall not contain less than three hundred square feet and not more than eight hundred square feet, provided that if the secondary unit is completely located on a single floor of a preexisting primary residence or accessory building (e.g., a garage), the city manager or his/her designee may allow increased size in order to efficiently use all floor area, so long as all other standards set forth in this section are met;

B.    Comprise Only a Limited Proportion of the Total Dwelling Area. Excluding any garage areas, the total square footage of the secondary dwelling unit shall not exceed eighty percent of the total square footage of the primary residence. This percentage shall apply to both attached and detached secondary dwelling units;

C.    Be Provided with Adequate Parking. There shall be one off-street parking space in a carport, garage, or designated space provided for the secondary dwelling unit in addition to those which exist on the site for the primary residence;

D.    Be Designed to be Compatible with the Primary Residence. Secondary dwelling units shall be designed to maintain the appearance of the main building of the single-family residence. If the secondary unit extends beyond the current footprint of the principal residence, or if a secondary unit is detached from the main building, it shall be consistent with the existing roof pitch, siding, and windows. In addition, only one entrance will be permitted in the front of the principal residence. A separate entrance for the secondary unit shall be located either off the rear or the side of the building. (Ord. 1921-0518 (part), 2018; Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.050 Zero lot line and small lot (less than four thousand five hundred s.f.) development.

Because of higher densities necessitating compact form and closer proximity of units, building design is critical to successful developments. Design should protect privacy, sustain and create attractive and functional neighborhoods and promote quality living environments.

Small-lot and zero-lot development shall:

A.    Contribute to the architectural character of the street through the use of two or more of the following:

1.    Roof design. Pitched or articulated roof line, or other roof element such as eyebrow roof forms or dormers that emphasize building form and help it to fit in with neighboring structures with prominent roofs.

2.    Architectural details that are proportioned to achieve good human scale such as:

a.    Entry details like porches and recesses;

b.    Occupiable spaces like bay windows and balconies;

c.    Window details like vertically proportioned window openings which are recessed into the face of the building and broken up with smaller panes of glass; and d. Roof details like brackets, chimneys, roof overhangs.

3.    Use of horizontal lap siding, trellises, landscaping, or other special treatment on adjacent side yards is encouraged. This can be effective in creating a separation between yards where zero lot lines are used, or where units are highly visible to one another because of small lot size.

4.    Provide clearly defined building entries which face the street and are well lighted and easily accessible.

a.    The entries should include a transition space from the sidewalks, such as steps, a porch, a terrace, or a landscaped area.

b.    Entries should include eave overhangs, and raised porches are recommended. Raised porches help define private space yet create a pedestrian-friendly streetscape.

c.    If exterior stairways are used, they should be simple, bold projections to fit with the architectural massing and form of the building and the neighborhood. Thin-looking, open metal, prefabricated stairs and railings are discouraged.

B.    Design garages in a way that does not dominate the facade of the residential building:

1.    Garages should be located off alleys, if possible. Garages shall be behind or in back of residences, or stepped back from the facade of the building.

2.    Carports are generally discouraged because they result in a poorer quality appearance and lend themselves to storage activities visible to the general public.

3.    Driveways should be as narrow as possible and shared where possible to minimize disruption of the sidewalk by curb cuts.

4.    Garage sidewalls that face the street should appear to contain habitable space. This can be accomplished by incorporating windows and other design elements into the garage wall that are in character with the remainder of the dwelling.

C.    Create a sense of privacy, through the following suggested techniques:

1.    Locate windows so residents from one unit to the next can not look directly into another unit.

2.    Orient and locate units to maximize privacy.

3.    Use landscaping and architectural features like trellises to block views of adjacent units. (Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.060 Low-intensity mixed use, valley commercial/residential.

The intent of the low-intensity mixed use designation is to maintain the historic and small town character of the existing neighborhood and gateway while allowing compatible commercial development to occur. The designation is to provide for a corridor of residential and commercial uses, in close proximity to each other or integrated within the same structure, which resemble low- to moderate-intensity residential use in design and scale.

A.    Building Design and Character. Uses in the MU and CR-V zones shall:

1.    Limit blank walls. Where the primary entrance of the building is not oriented toward the street, blank walls, retaining walls, and dull building facades can degrade a streetscape and detract from small-town character, as they deaden the surrounding space. Construction of blank walls shall be limited to avoid the disruption of current building patterns. This shall be accomplished through one or more of the following:

a.    Transparent or display windows;

b.    Artwork and/or architectural variation;

c.    Trellises, screening vegetation;

d.    Other methods as determined by the city manager or his/her designee.

2.    Modulate building mass, or employ the addition of dormer windows, covered entrance ways, or porches.

3.    Include pitched roofs consistent with historic residential architectural style. Unless a prominent feature of an historic architectural style that the building attempts to mimic, mansard roofs and flat roofs are discouraged. Pitched roofs with a minimum 5/12 slope are encouraged.

4.    Use materials compatible with residential character. Primary construction from materials such as brick and wood is preferred. Reflective glass and curtain wall construction are not appropriate for these areas.

5.    Design multifamily projects to be oriented toward open space, a court yard, or toward streets through the following or similar techniques:

a.    Use a grid or modified street grid system with most buildings fronting on street.

b.    Locate parking areas behind or under buildings, accessed from alley-type driveways meeting the fire access standards.

c.    Provide direct pedestrian access to each building from the street fronting the building and from the back where the parking is located.

d.    Orient the buildings into U-shaped courtyards where the front door/main entry into the building(s) is from a front courtyard. Access to the courtyard from the rear parking area should be through a well-lighted breezeway or stair way. The buildings would still be located between the street and the parking area.

Uses in the MU and CR-V zone should:

6.    Set off second floors. Where second floors are added, they should include design elements such as recessed areas, balconies, or dormers, should be modulated in order to reduce building mass, or they should be stepped back from the first floor.

B.    Site Characteristics, Relationship of Buildings to Right-Of-Way.

Uses in the MU and CR-V zone shall:

1.    Site service areas appropriately. Service areas shall not be located between the building and the street unless there is no possible alternative location. Screening in the form of landscaping should be used to diminish visibility of service areas.

2.    Consider surrounding uses. If used, perimeter screening in the form of landscaping or residential-scale wood fencing is encouraged. Screening in the form of chain-link fencing with plastic webbing or solid concrete block walls shall be considered blank walls and shall comply with the requirements for blank walls.

Uses in the MU and CR-V zone should:

3.    Use residentially scaled improvements. Site features such as fences, walls, refuse and recycle enclosures, and light fixtures should be designed to be consistent with typical residential development and pedestrian scale. Lighting should avoid glare to adjacent properties.

4.    Provide for internal pedestrian circulation. All buildings within a development should be connected by hard-surfaced walkways to each other and, where practicable, to adjoining commercial properties.

C.    Landscaping. Landscaping for all uses in the mixed use zone shall be consistent with Section 20.60 of the Shelton zoning code. (Ord. 1921-0518 (part), 2018; Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.070 Neighborhood commercial.

The intent of the neighborhood commercial area as a conditional use in neighborhood residential zones is to allow for the location of neighborhood-serving businesses within housing developments.

This commercial area should not intrude upon the primarily residential character of the neighborhood, and should therefore incorporate the appropriate size, scale, and design for the surrounding area.

A.    Building Design and Character. Unless part of a conversion or rehabilitation of an existing residential structure that maintains the original design and nature of the building, structures in the NC area shall comply with the requirements of this subsection.

Buildings in the NC area shall:

1.    Be compatible with the surrounding neighborhood, and use traditional Northwest commercial vernacular. Items to consider include such things as scale, building height, colors, and materials, through the following:

a.    Modulation of building mass, the addition of dormer windows, covered entrance ways, and/or porches.

b.    Materials compatible with the surrounding character. Primary construction of materials such as brick and wood is preferred. Reflective glass and curtain wall construction are not appropriate for these areas.

2.    Provide pedestrian access and protection. Weather protection over entry ways, at a minimum, shall be incorporated into the building design.

Buildings in the NC area should:

3.    Provide continuous protection from the elements. Such items as extended roof overhangs, canopies or awnings can offer protection from the elements. Where buildings are built with zero side and front yard setbacks, owners should cooperate to provide continuous canopies or awnings above the storefronts.

B.    Pedestrian Orientation. Buildings in the NC area shall:

1.    Enhance the pedestrian environment.

a.    Commercial uses shall include pedestrian amenities such as display windows, outdoor eating areas, and street furniture such as benches, bike racks, and trash receptacles.

b.    Site features such as fences, walls, refuse and recycle enclosures, and light fixtures should be designed to be consistent with typical residential development and pedestrian scale. Lighting shall avoid glare to adjacent properties.

2.    Be easily accessed. The primary entrance to all buildings shall be clearly visible, and shall face the sidewalk or central pedestrian plaza.

Buildings in the NC area should:

3.    Create pedestrian-scale interest. In addition to meeting the landscaping standards established in Chapter 20.60 of the Shelton zoning code, window boxes, planter boxes, and hanging baskets should be used to create a friendly pedestrian environment.

C.    Site Characteristics and Arrangement of Commercial Uses. Buildings in the NC area shall:

1.    Site service areas appropriately. Service areas shall not be located between the building and the street unless there is no possible alternative location. Screening in the form of landscaping should be used to diminish visibility of service areas.

2.    Orient buildings toward pedestrian access. Buildings on site shall be oriented toward the sidewalk or common public open space.

Buildings in the NC area should:

3.    Consider visual access and neighboring uses. If used, perimeter screening (landscaping or fencing) should be low enough to provide visibility to the commercial use. Where solid walls are used along a pedestrian pathway, they should be low enough and wide enough to provide seating.

4.    Accent the use of corner lots. Corner lots should be used for pedestrian amenities or buildings which help frame the streetscape.

D.    Mixed Uses on Same Site. Where residential uses are included on the second floor of a commercial building, a private yard area for the residents should be provided in the form of a courtyard, balcony, or deck. (Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.080 Downtown commercial.

A.    Building Design and Character. Unless part of a conversion or rehabilitation of an existing structure that maintains the original design and nature of the building, structures in the DT area are subject to the requirements of this subsection.

Buildings in the DT zone shall:

1.    Demonstrate design compatibility through the use of one or more of the following techniques (items to consider include such things as scale, building height, colors, and materials):

a.    Use of pedestrian-scale display windows, transom windows, and building facades which are compatible with historic buildings in the zone. Multistory buildings are encouraged.

b.    Materials compatible with the surrounding character. Primary construction of materials such as brick and wood is preferred. Reflective glass, metal pole buildings, and curtain wall construction are not appropriate for these areas.

2.    Provide pedestrian access and protection. Weather protection over entry ways, at a minimum, shall be incorporated into the building design.

Buildings in the DT zone should:

3.    Provide continuous protection from the elements. Extended roof overhangs, canopies or awnings can offer protection from the elements. Buildings with zero side and front yard setbacks should provide continuous canopies or awnings above the storefronts.

B.    Pedestrian Orientation. Buildings in the DT zone shall:

1.    Enhance the pedestrian environment.

a.    Commercial uses shall include pedestrian amenities such as display windows, outdoor eating areas, and street furniture such as benches, bike racks, and trash receptacles.

b.    Site features such as fences, walls, and light fixtures should be designed to be consistent with a pedestrian scale. Lighting shall avoid glare to adjacent properties.

2.    Be easily accessed. The primary entrance to all buildings shall be clearly visible, and shall face the sidewalk or central pedestrian plaza.

3.    Limit blank walls. Where the primary entrance of the building is not oriented toward the street, blank walls, retaining walls, and dull building facades can degrade a streetscape and detract from small-town character, as they deaden the surrounding space. Construction of blank walls shall be limited to avoid the disruption of current building patterns. This shall be accomplished through one or more of the following:

a.    Transparent or display windows;

b.    Artwork and/or architectural variation;

c.    Trellises, screening vegetation;

d.    Other methods as determined by the city manager or his/her designee.

Buildings in the DT zone should:

3.    Create pedestrian-scale interest. In addition to meeting the landscaping standards established in Chapter 20.60 of the Shelton zoning code, window boxes, planter boxes, and hanging baskets should be used to create a friendly pedestrian environment.

C.    Site characteristics and arrangement of commercial uses. Buildings in the DT zone shall:

1.    Site service areas appropriately. Service areas shall not be located between the building and the street. Where service areas on alleys abut less intense land uses, screening in the form of landscaping should be used to diminish visibility of service areas.

2.    Orient buildings toward pedestrian access. Buildings on site shall be oriented toward the sidewalk or common public open space.

Buildings in the DT zone should:

3.    Accent the use of corner lots. Corner lots should not be used for parking, and should be used for pedestrian amenities or taller buildings with architectural details which help frame the streetscape.

D.    Mixed Uses on Same Site. Where residential uses are included on the upper floor(s) of a commercial building, a private yard area for the residents should be provided in the form of a courtyard, balcony, or deck. (Ord. 1921-0518 (part), 2018; Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.090 Goose Lake commercial/residential.

Uses in the CR-G shall:

A.    Design multifamily projects to be oriented toward open space, a court yard, or toward streets through the following or similar techniques:

1.    Use a grid or modified street grid system with most buildings fronting on street.

2.    Locate parking areas behind or under buildings, accessed from alley-type driveways meeting the fire access standards.

3.    Provide direct pedestrian access to each building from the street fronting the building and from the back where the parking is located.

4.    Orient the buildings into U-shaped courtyards where the front door/main entry into the building(s) is from a front courtyard. Access to the courtyard from the rear parking area should be through a well-lighted breezeway or stair way. The buildings would still be located between the street and the parking area.

B.    Minimize the impact of driveways and parking lots on pedestrians and neighboring properties by designing and locating parking lots, carports, and garages in a way that creates few interruptions on the street, sidewalk or building facade, using the following or similar techniques:

1.    Locate surface parking at rear or side of lot.

2.    Break large parking lots into small ones.

3.    Minimize the number and width of driveways and curb cuts.

4.    Share driveways with adjacent property owners.

5.    Locate parking in areas that are less visible from the street.

6.    Locate driveways so they are visually less dominant.

C.    Provide adequate screening for support facility needs associated with multifamily and commercial developments. Service areas shall not be located between the building and the street unless there is no possible alternative location. Screening in the form of landscaping should be used to diminish visibility of service areas.

D.    Minimize building scale through the following or similar techniques:

1.    Provide variation and a mixture of one, two and three story units.

2.    Use wall plane articulation/modulation to break a multifamily building into house-size building elements, especially where there is a building height transition.

3.    Design the exterior of multifamily buildings to appear as a single building, such as a large single-family detached dwelling.

E.    Limit Blank Walls. Where the primary entrance of the building is not oriented toward the street, blank walls, retaining walls, and dull building facades can degrade a streetscape and detract from small-town character, as they deaden the surrounding space. Construction of blank walls shall be limited to avoid the disruption of current building patterns. This shall be accomplished through one or more of the following:

1.    Transparent or display windows;

2.    Artwork and/or architectural variation;

3.    Trellises, screening vegetation;

4.    Other methods as determined by the city manager or his/her designee. (Ord. 1921-0518 (part), 2018; Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.100 General commercial.

The intent of the general commercial designation is to provide a location for larger, more intense commercial development. However, even with more intense development, maintenance of a safe, pleasant pedestrian atmosphere is important.

A.    Building Design and Character. Uses in the GC zone shall:

1.    Limit blank walls. Where the primary entrance of the building is not oriented toward the street, blank walls, retaining walls, and dull building facades can degrade a streetscape and deaden the surrounding space. Construction of blank walls shall be limited. This shall be accomplished through one or more of the following:

a.    Transparent or display windows;

b.    Artwork and/or architectural variation;

c.    Trellises, screening vegetation;

d.    Other methods as determined by the city manager or his/her designee.

2.    Provide pedestrian access and protection. Weather protection over entry ways, at a minimum, shall be incorporated into the building design.

Uses in the GC zone should:

3.    Provide continuous protection from the elements. Such items as extended roof overhangs, canopies or awnings can offer protection from the elements. Where buildings are built with zero side and front yard setbacks, owners should cooperate to provide continuous canopies or awnings above the storefronts.

4.    Set off second floors. Where second floors are added, they should include design elements such as recessed areas, balconies, or dormers, should be modulated in order to reduce building mass, or they should be stepped back from the first floor.

B.    Site Characteristics, Relationship of Buildings to Right-Of-Way.

Uses in the GC zone shall:

1.    Be easily accessed. The primary entrance to all buildings shall be clearly visible, and shall face the sidewalk or central pedestrian plaza.

2.    Site service areas and outdoor storage appropriately. Service areas and outdoor storage shall not be located between the building and the street unless there is no possible alternative location.

3.    Screen outdoor storage areas and service areas. Screening in the form of landscaping in accordance with Section 20.60.150 of this title shall be used to diminish visibility of service areas.

4.    Provide for internal pedestrian circulation. All buildings within a development should be connected by hard-surfaced walkways to each other and, where practicable, to adjoining commercial properties.

Uses in the GC zone should:

5.    Consider pedestrian access by locating buildings close to the sidewalk.

C.    Parking, Landscaping. Uses in the GC zone shall:

1.    Provide pedestrian access through parking areas. Where parking is located between the building entrance and the right-of-way, direct pedestrian access in the form of a dedicated pathway shall be provided from the right-of-way to the building entrance. This may be accomplished through the following or similar techniques:

a.    Provision of a raised sidewalk at least six inches above grade;

b.    Crosswalk striping;

c.    Alterations in pavement;

d.    Use of wheel stops along pathway.

Uses in the GC zone should:

2.    Locate parking away from the right-of-way. Parking lots in GC zones (not including abutting parking in the NR zone) which does not front upon a right-of-way shall be relieved of the interior landscaping requirements set forth in Section 20.60.150B of this title. (Ord. 1921-0518 (part), 2018; Ord. 1462-1296 § 2 (part), 1996)

20.64.110 Gateway corridor.

Uses in any portion of any zone designated as a gateway corridor within the comprehensive plan and per definitions of this title shall:

A.    Site buildings, rather than parking areas adjacent to arterial roadways or highways in order to identify these locations as activity centers. Parking must be located beside or behind buildings away from the arterial or highway. Developments should be sited and designed with future build-out of the roadway in mind.

B.    Parking shall be convenient to the buildings, but not dominate the view from the roadway.

C.    Vehicular access and traffic flow shall be carefully considered in the site plan of facilities and designed to the satisfaction of the city engineer and/or adopted city standards.

D.    All loading docks and trash collection facilities shall be located or screened so as to be concealed from view from the arterial roadways.

E.    Site design should consider the potential for shared parking lots as adjacent sites develop.

F.    The site shall provide pedestrian connections from vehicles to buildings, from building to building, and from the site to any required sidewalks at the boundary of the site as appropriate.

G.    Pedestrian connections from buildings to other areas of the property are encouraged.

H.    Outdoor eating areas, rest areas, and other pedestrian amenities are encouraged to be developed within the gateway corridor and may be shared by multiple businesses. (Ord. 1547-0401 § 6 (Exh. 7), 2001)

20.64.120 Historic overlay zone (reserved).

20.64.130 Low-intensity commercial.

The intent of the low intensity commercial is to allow a variety of low scale commercial uses that are designed and sites so as to protect the adjacent neighborhood from adverse impacts.

A.    Building Design and Character. Unless part of a conversion or rehabilitation of an existing residential structure that maintains the original design and nature of the building, structures in the LI-C area shall comply with the requirements of this subsection.

Buildings in the LI-C area shall:

1.    Be compatible with the surrounding neighborhood, and use traditional Northwest commercial vernacular. Items to consider include such things as scale, building height, colors, and materials, through the following:

a.    Modulation of building mass, the addition of dormer windows, covered entrance ways, and/or porches,

b.    Materials compatible with the surrounding character. Primary construction of materials such as brick and wood is preferred. Reflective glass and curtain wall construction are not appropriate for these areas,

2.    Provide pedestrian access and protection. Weather protection over entry ways, at a minimum, shall be incorporated into the building design;

3.    Buildings in the LI-C area should provide continuous protection from the elements. Such items as extended roof overhangs, canopies or awnings can offer protection from the elements. Where buildings are built with zero side and front yard setbacks, owners should cooperate to provide continuous canopies or awnings above the storefronts.

B.    Pedestrian Orientation. Buildings in the LI-C area shall:

1.    Enhance the pedestrian environment:

a.    Commercial uses shall include pedestrian amenities such as display windows, outdoor eating areas, and street furniture such as benches, bike racks, and trash receptacles,

b.    Site features such as fences, walls, refuse and recycle enclosures, and light fixtures should be designed to be consistent with typical residential development and pedestrian scale. Lighting shall avoid glare to adjacent properties;

2.    Be easily accessed. The primary entrance to all buildings shall be clearly visible, and shall face the pedestrian access way or central pedestrian plaza. This requirement shall not be construed in such a way that designs contradict requirements found in Chapter 20.09 that the buildings be oriented so as to minimize impacts to Jefferson or Adams Streets;

3.    Buildings in the LI-C area should create pedestrian-scale interest. In addition to meeting the landscaping standards established in Chapter 20.60 of the Shelton zoning code, window boxes, planter boxes, and hanging baskets should be used to create a friendly pedestrian environment.

C.    Site Characteristics and Arrangement of Commercial Uses. Buildings in the LI-C area shall:

1.    Site service areas appropriately. Service areas shall not be located between the building and the street unless there is no possible alternative location. Screening in the form of landscaping should be used to diminish visibility of service areas;

2.    Orient buildings toward pedestrian access. Buildings on site shall be oriented toward interior sidewalks or common public open space;

3.    Buildings in the LI-C area should consider visual access and neighboring uses. Where solid walls are used along a pedestrian pathway, they should be low enough and wide enough to provide seating;

4.    Accent the use of corner lots. Corner lots should be used for pedestrian amenities or buildings which help frame the streetscape.

D.    Mixed Uses on Same Site. Where residential uses are included on the second floor of a commercial building, a private yard area for the residents should be provided in the form of a courtyard, balcony, or deck. (Ord. 1520-1099 Attch. C, 1999)

20.64.140 Professional office/residential mixed use.

The intent of the professional office/residential mixed use design review standards is to allow a variety of low scale uses that are designed so as to complement the Mason County campus and professional offices uses to the south while protecting the adjacent neighborhood to the north from adverse impacts.

A.    Building Design and Character. Unless part of a conversion or rehabilitation of an historic structure that maintains the original design and nature of the building, structures in the PR-A area shall comply with the requirements of this subsection. Buildings in the PR-A area shall:

1.    Be compatible with the surrounding neighborhood, and use traditional Northwest vernacular architectural styles. The Northwest vernacular architectural style is defined by such features as use of natural, indigenous materials, large exposed timbers, large overhangs, and large expanses of glass. Items to consider include such things as scale, building height, colors, and materials, through the following:

a.    Modulation of building mass, the addition of dormer windows, covered entrance ways, and/or porches.

b.    Materials compatible with the surrounding character. The predominant exterior building materials for new buildings should be brick, horizontal lap siding, or cedar shakes. Generally, stucco and other troweled materials are not appropriate materials unless framed or trimmed in wood. Aluminum or plastic imitations are not encouraged but allowed as long as the detailing of the siding trim reflects the highest industry standards. Mirrored glass, corrugated siding, exposed concrete block, and plywood or T-111 siding are prohibited.

c.    Any portion of the premises that abuts a residential use shall be screened in such a manner so as to reduce noise, light, and glare entering the residential property.

d.    Architectural and site design shall be such that adjacent residences are not presented with blank facades, high-pitched gable end walls, storage areas, or outdoor equipment.

2.    Provide pedestrian access and protection. Weather protection over entryways, at a minimum, shall be incorporated into the building design.

B.    Pedestrian Orientation. Buildings in the PR-A area shall:

1.    Enhance the pedestrian environment.

a.    Commercial uses shall include pedestrian amenities such as display windows, outdoor eating areas, and street furniture such as benches, bike racks, and trash receptacles.

b.    Site features such as fences, walls, refuse and recycle enclosures, and light fixtures should be designed to be consistent with typical residential development and pedestrian scale. Lighting shall avoid glare to adjacent properties.

2.    Be easily accessed. The primary entrance to all buildings shall be clearly visible, and shall face the pedestrian access way or central pedestrian plaza. This requirement shall not be construed in such a way that designs contradict requirements found in this title.

Buildings in the PR-A area shall:

3.    Create pedestrian-scale interest. In addition to meeting the landscaping standards established in Chapter 20.60, window boxes, planter boxes, and hanging baskets should be used to create a friendly pedestrian environment.

C.    Site Characteristics and Arrangement of Commercial Uses. Buildings in the PR-A area shall:

1.    Site service areas appropriately. Service areas shall not be located between the building and the street unless there is no possible alternative location. Screening in the form of landscaping should be used to diminish visibility of service areas.

2.    Orient buildings toward pedestrian access. Buildings on site shall be oriented toward interior sidewalks or common public open space.

3.    Mixed Uses on Same Site. Where residential uses are included on the second floor of an office building, a private outdoor area for the residents shall be provided in the form of a courtyard, balcony, or deck. (Ord. 1785-0511 § 3 (part), 2011)