Chapter 18.27
BD BREWERY DISTRICT ZONE

Sections:

18.27.010    Intent.

18.27.020    Subdistricts.

18.27.030    Applicability of design standards.

18.27.040    Uses.

18.27.050    Table of development standards.

18.27.060    Development standards – General.

18.27.070    Development standards – Bluff subdistrict.

18.27.080    Development and design standards – Triangle, Deschutes, Bates Neighborhood North and Knoll subdistricts.

18.27.090    Development and design standards – Bates Neighborhood South subdistrict.

18.27.010 Intent.

The purpose of the brewery district zone (BD) is to provide design and development standards to transform the brewery district from a largely auto-oriented commercial node into a lively, walkable, and economically vibrant neighborhood center with a mixture of housing and neighborhood-serving businesses in accordance with the goals and objectives of the brewery district plan. Additionally, the BD zone is intended to provide for a mix of uses within the former brewery properties consistent with the city’s economic development and strategic plans and the final report for the Community Visioning Project for the former Olympia Brewery.

The BD zone is intended to foster development that:

A.    Creates a stronger sense of place by facilitating pedestrian access, establishing gathering places for residents and fostering a distinct district identity.

B.    Improves transportation options, safety and access within and across the district.

C.    Expands economic opportunity and activity.

D.    Improves the function and appearance of the built environment.

E.    Guides redevelopment of the former brewery site and integration into the surrounding neighborhood.

(Ord. O2014-007, Added, 07/15/2014)

18.27.020 Subdistricts.

The BD zone consists of the following subdistricts (see Figure 18.27.020):

A.    Knoll. The location overlooking the Deschutes River, with high visibility from the freeway and close proximity to the historic district, makes this a unique economic and community development opportunity. A mixture of uses is desirable to create a vibrant sense of place that appeals to pedestrians and creates a community focal point for Tumwater and the surrounding area. A broad mix of uses is allowed in this subdistrict, including but not limited to retail, personal and professional services, restaurants, educational, entertainment, lodging, and residential.

B.    Valley. Existing industrial buildings located adjacent to rail access make this area ideal for light industrial uses that do not create compatibility issues with other land uses, and for certain kinds of commercial uses that are most appropriately located as neighbors of industrial uses.

C.    Bluff. Vacant land overlooking the valley and in close proximity to residential development to the south and east makes multifamily residential a possibility. A minimum net density of ten units per acre will apply to promote the efficient use of land and to provide a density pattern that will support public transit in the long term.

D.    Triangle. Given its proximity to surrounding residential neighborhoods and the former brewery properties, excellent transit service, and its visibility and access from I-5 and major urban corridors, the Triangle has the potential to transform into a highly pedestrianized neighborhood center with a broad mixture of uses, including medium-density housing and community-serving commercial uses. New development in the Triangle may be a mixture of single-use and mixed use buildings up to five stories in height, and will provide active ground floors that engage the sidewalk (particularly along Cleveland Avenue “Main Street”).

E.    Deschutes. The Deschutes subdistrict benefits from excellent freeway access as well as high volumes of pass-by traffic (which may increase upon completion of the E Street extension), and consequently this area may experience increased development pressure in the future. Given its relative isolation from surrounding residential areas and the remainder of the brewery district, new development in the Deschutes subdistrict will likely remain dependent upon automobile access for its success. Such new development may include a mixture of office and retail uses, as well as housing (which may be desirable adjacent to the park). Design and development standards for the Deschutes are intended to improve the character of development in this area and improve the appearance of this important gateway into the brewery district, with a focus on decreasing the visibility of surface parking areas and improving building frontage conditions along key rights-of-way.

F.    Bates Neighborhood North. Development located in the Bates Neighborhood North subdistrict will create a transition between the small-scale, residential character of development in the Bates Neighborhood South and the higher intensity commercial area in the Triangle and along Capitol Boulevard. Within the Bates Neighborhood North, buildings may provide commercial-style elements and site development patterns, including large ground floor windows, articulated architectural bays, and masonry facades, and may reach up to four stories in height.

G.    Bates Neighborhood South. New development in the Bates Neighborhood South will reflect and be compatible with the detached, single-family structures currently seen in this area. While uses within these structures may be commercial or residential, buildings in this area should continue to be residential in character, mirroring not only surrounding building heights, but also providing site development and building design elements (including setbacks, landscaping, building materials, and architectural elements) that are consistent with the surrounding residential character. New development in the Bates Neighborhood South will be limited to a maximum height of three stories.

(Ord. O2014-007, Added, 07/15/2014)

18.27.030 Applicability of design standards.

A.    The design standards in TMC 18.27.080(B) and 18.27.090(B) apply to:

1.    Any new building or parking structure or expansion of an existing building or parking structure that amounts to or exceeds one thousand square feet;

2.    Exterior remodels or alterations to all buildings and parking structures (such as facade changes, windows, awnings, signage, etc.). Only the portions of the building or site being altered or added to shall be required to comply with the standards. Even if otherwise applying, these standards do not apply to remodels or alterations that do not change the exterior appearance of the building or parking structure. Repair and regular building maintenance activities (including exterior painting, roofing repair, etc.) are not considered remodels or alterations for the purpose of triggering compliance with the standards in this chapter.

B.    Where these design standards conflict with other requirements contained in TMC Title 18 (Zoning), Tumwater development standards or the International Building Code (IBC) or its successor, those requirements shall apply, except that these design standards shall supersede design review guidelines in TMC Chapter 18.43 where conflicts may occur.

(Ord. O2014-007, Added, 07/15/2014)

18.27.040 Uses.

Land uses allowed for each subdistrict are listed in Table 18.27.040. Permitted uses are identified with a “P,” conditional uses with a “C,” and accessory uses with an “A.”

Table 18.27.040 

Land Uses (5)

Triangle (1)

Deschutes

Bates North

Bates South

Knoll (7)

Valley

Bluff

Accessory dwelling units

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Accessory wireless communication antenna (2)

A

A

A

A

A

 

A

Adult family homes

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Agriculture, indoor

 

 

 

 

 

P

 

All existing uses legally established prior to September 1, 2014, except where there is a cessation of the use for two or more years

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Animal clinics or hospitals (6)

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Attached wireless communications facilities (3)

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Bed and breakfasts

P

P

P

P

P

 

P

Breweries, wineries, distilleries

P

P

 

 

P

P

 

Child day care centers; child mini-day care centers

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Churches

C

C

C

 

C

P

C

Community gardens

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Convalescent center, rest home, nursing home

P

P

P

P

P

 

 

Electric vehicle infrastructure

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Energy systems

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Entertainment facilities

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Family child care homes

P

P

P

P

P

 

P

Farmers markets

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Fish hatcheries, associated appurtenances and related interpretive centers

 

 

 

 

 

P

 

Food truck or trailer courts (9)

P

P

P

 

P

P

 

Food trucks or trailers (10)

P

P

P

 

P

P

 

General offices

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Group foster homes

P

P

P

P

 

 

 

Home occupations

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Large scale state or regional transportation facilities (essential public facility)

 

 

 

 

 

C

 

Medical clinics

P

P

P

P

P

 

 

Motels, hotels

P

P

 

 

P

 

 

Movie production; movie studio

 

 

 

 

P

P

 

Museums, libraries, art galleries

P

P

P

P

P

 

 

Noncommercial recreational structures associated with a residential use which include but are not limited to swimming pools and recreational ball courts

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Off-street parking and loading

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Parking structures

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Parks, open space areas and recreational facilities

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Personal and professional services

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Planned unit developments

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Post offices

P

P

 

 

P

 

 

Private clubs and lodges

P

P

P

 

P

P

 

Private garages and carports

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Public parking lot as a primary use

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Residential

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Restaurants, taverns, cocktail lounges, brew pubs and similar dining and drinking establishments

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Retail sales

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Schools

P

P

 

 

P

P

 

Senior housing facilities

P

P

P

P

P

 

 

State education facilities (essential public facility)

 

 

 

 

C

C

 

Storage sheds, toolsheds, greenhouses (8)

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

Support facilities

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Temporary expansions of schools, such as portable classrooms

P

P

 

 

P

P

 

Transportation terminals

C

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wholesaling, manufacturing, assembling, repairing, fabricating, nondistribution warehousing (4)

 

 

 

 

 

P

 

Table 18.27.040 Footnotes:

(1)    Along the Cleveland Avenue Main Street, active ground floor uses are required in accordance with TMC 18.27.080(B)(1)(e).

(2)    Emergency communication antennas and wireless communication facilities are subject to Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) standards and approval, and furthermore both uses are subject to provisions for wireless communication facilities in TMC Chapter 11.20, Wireless Communication Facilities.

(3)    Antennas must be affixed to or erected upon existing buildings, water tanks or other existing structures. Antennas shall not be affixed to a wireless communication support structure. Emergency communication towers are not permitted.

(4)    Warehousing must be for product for use in or production resulting from on-site manufacturing, assembly, repair or fabrication.

(5)    Drive-through uses are prohibited in the Bates North and Bates South subdistricts. For all other subdistricts, drive-through uses are limited to espresso stands less than five hundred square feet in floor area, pharmacies, banks, credit unions, and the reuse of permitted drive-through facilities in existence as of the effective date of O2014-007 (September 1, 2014) for restaurant uses.

(6)    All animals must be kept at all times within a fully enclosed building with adequate controls so that animal noise and odor cannot be detected on adjoining property or in adjoining units with shared walls.

(7)    South of Custer Way, development must consist of two or more of the listed uses; provided, that each use shall occupy a minimum of twenty percent of the gross floor area of the project.

(8)    Buildings or structures for storage, a greenhouse, detached garage, or carport in the Bates South subdistrict accessory to a permitted use are subject to the provisions in TMC 18.42.015.

(9)    Food truck or trailer courts in accordance with TMC 18.42.120.

(10)    Food trucks or trailers in accordance with TMC 18.42.120.

Table 18.27.040 Explanatory Note:

1.    If the box is shaded, the use is not allowed in that zone district.

(Ord. O2019-020, Amended, 11/19/2019; Ord. O2019-007, Amended, 09/03/2019; Ord. O2018-025, Amended, 12/18/2018; Ord. O2018-007, Amended, 10/16/2018; Ord. O2017-006, Amended, 07/18/2017; Ord. O2014-007, Added, 07/15/2014)

18.27.050 Table of development standards.

See Table 18.27.050 for building height, lot coverage, setback, building frontage and density standards for each subdistrict. Refer to the sections that follow for additional standards.

Table 18.27.050: Development Standards 

Subdistrict

Maximum Building Height

Maximum Lot Coverage

Setbacks (7)

Minimum Street-Facing Building Frontage (3)

Minimum Residential Net Density (4)

Minimum Street-Facing Setback

Maximum Street-Facing Setback

Minimum Side Setback

Minimum Rear Setback

Knoll

75 feet

(1)

No minimum

10 feet (2)

No minimum

No minimum

Valley

50 feet (5)

(1)

20 feet

No maximum

10 feet

10 feet

Bluff

40 feet

(1)

10 feet

No maximum

10 feet

10 feet

10 du/acre

Triangle

55 feet

(1)

5 feet along Cleveland Ave., otherwise no minimum (2)

10 feet (2) (6)

No minimum

No minimum

75% along Cleveland Ave.

50% along all other streets

20 du/acre

Deschutes

55 feet

(1)

5 feet facing Capitol Blvd.; no minimum for other streets

No maximum facing Capitol Blvd.; 15 feet maximum for other streets (2)

No minimum

No minimum

50%

20 du/acre

Bates Neighborhood North

45 feet

85%

No minimum

10 feet (2)

5 feet

5 feet

50%

20 du/acre

Bates Neighborhood South

35 feet

75%

5 feet

10 feet (2)

5 feet

5 feet

50%

8 du/acre

(1)    Maximum attainable lot coverage subject to on-site parking requirements in TMC Chapter 18.50, minimum landscaping requirements in TMC Chapter 18.47 and in this chapter, minimum setback requirements, and on-site stormwater management requirements as described in the city of Tumwater drainage design and erosion control manual.

(2)    When maximum setbacks are provided, the setback area must be hardscaped and/or landscaped, in accordance with TMC 18.27.080(A)(2)(b) or 18.27.090(A)(3), whichever applies. Exceptions to the maximum street-facing setback may be granted to allow setbacks of existing buildings to be maintained including expansions of those buildings; to preserve mature tree stands; and to integrate publicly accessible site design elements that encourage pedestrian use and activity along the street. Such site design elements include but are not limited to building modulation, forecourts/plazas, covered or recessed building entryways, public art, seating areas and pedestrian-oriented signs. When maximum street-facing setbacks are increased for site design elements, the setback areas must be landscaped and/or paved pursuant to TMC 18.27.080(A)(2)(b) or 18.27.090(A)(3).

(3)    See Figure 18.27.080.A.5 for illustration of street-facing building frontage requirement.

(4)    When residential uses are provided, either as a single development or as a component of a mixed use development. “du/acre” means dwelling units per acre.

(5)    Maximum height may be increased by ten feet for every fifty thousand square feet of the existing warehouse building that is removed, up to a maximum building height of eighty feet.

(6)    For the Sunset Campus, the maximum street-facing setback shall apply only to Capitol Boulevard.

(7)    Setbacks must meet minimum IBC setback requirements.

(Ord. O2014-007, Added, 07/15/2014)

18.27.060 Development standards – General.

A.    Residential Density Calculation. The calculation of the density requirements in this chapter is based on the portion of the site devoted to residential and associated uses (e.g., dwelling units; private community clubs, open space; stormwater detention, treatment and infiltration). The following land is excluded from density calculations:

1.    Land that is required to be dedicated for public use as open space, right-of-way, or land on which development is prohibited by TMC Title 16, Environment, and land that is to be used for private roads; provided, that portion of open space/park areas that consists of stormwater facilities and that are designed for active and/or passive recreational purposes in accordance with the drainage design and erosion control manual for Tumwater shall not be excluded from density calculations;

2.    Land that consists of lots devoted to uses other than residential and associated uses, including but not limited to churches, schools, and support facilities (except for stormwater detention, treatment and infiltration facilities).

B.    Stormwater Management. All development must comply with the requirements outlined in the city of Tumwater drainage design and erosion control manual.

C.    Signs. All development must comply with signage requirements in TMC Chapter 18.44.

D.    On-Site Parking. All development must comply with parking requirements in TMC Chapter 18.50. The standards in this chapter apply where conflicts may occur.

E.    Open Storage. Open storage is prohibited. Long-term parking of operational company cars, light trucks and vans within parking lots, and semi-trailers and railcars associated with a manufacturing use in the Valley subdistrict shall not be construed to be open storage.

F.    Mechanical Screening. Rooftop mechanical equipment should not be visible from sidewalks along public streets adjacent to the proposed development. To accomplish this, rooftop equipment shall be screened by either a parapet or architectural screen along the building facade that is at least as tall as the equipment, or setting back the equipment from the roof edges sufficient to restrict views of the equipment at a minimum of three feet for each foot of height of the equipment. Solar or other renewable energy systems are exempt from this screening requirement.

G.    Fencing and Landscaping. All development must meet the requirements in TMC Chapters 18.46 and 18.47, in addition to landscaping requirements in TMC Chapter 18.47.

(Ord. O2014-007, Added, 07/15/2014)

18.27.070 Development standards – Bluff subdistrict.

A.    Residential Density. Residential portion of the development must provide a minimum net residential density of ten dwelling units per acre. See TMC 18.27.060(A) for method for calculating density requirements.

B.    Pedestrian Access.

1.    An on-site pedestrian circulation system that links the street and the primary entrance(s) of the structure(s) shall be provided. Sidewalks or pedestrian ways must connect the required pedestrian system to existing pedestrian systems on adjacent developments if adequate safety and security can be maintained. Convenient pedestrian access to transit stops shall be provided.

2.    Where the pedestrian circulation system crosses driveways, parking areas, and loading areas, it must be clearly identifiable, through the use of elevation changes, speed bumps, or a different paving material.

3.    Lighting for parking lots and pedestrian ways shall be provided to ensure safety. Such lighting shall be integrated into the architectural character both in terms of illumination and fixtures. Lighting shall meet the requirements of TMC Chapter 18.50 and TMC 18.40.035.

C.    Open Space/Park Area. For residential developments in the Bluff subdistrict a minimum of ten percent of the gross site area shall be set aside for open space/park area. Such open space/park area shall at a minimum meet the following standards:

1.    For the purpose of calculation of the open space/park requirement, the open space/park area shall be separate and distinct from required yards, setbacks and landscaped areas, but may include areas of native vegetation that are allowed to fulfill the landscaping requirements of TMC Chapter 18.47. Open space/park areas may also include wetlands and their buffers, other critical areas, and stormwater facilities that are designed for active and/or passive recreation opportunities in accordance with the drainage design and erosion control manual for Tumwater.

2.    All open space/park areas must include any two or more facilities for active and/or passive recreation from the lists below. At least one of the required recreation facilities must be from the list of active recreation facilities (this area may include stormwater facilities that are designed for active and/or passive recreation opportunities in accordance with the drainage design and erosion control manual for Tumwater).

a.    Active Recreation Facilities.

i.    Children’s play equipment, such as slides, swings, and play structures.

ii.    A paved hard court for activities such as basketball, tennis, pickleball, etc.

iii.    A flat, open lawn area that may serve as a ball field for active play.

iv.    Other active recreation facility if approved by the community development director upon consultation with the Tumwater parks and recreation director.

b.    Passive Recreation Facilities.

i.    Facilities for walking, such as trails, benches, etc.

ii.    Picnicking facilities, such as picnic tables, shelters, etc.

iii.    Public plazas.

iv.    Year-round water features such as a fountain, pond, stream, etc. These water features may be incorporated as part of a stormwater facility designed in accordance with the drainage design and erosion control manual for Tumwater.

v.    Other passive recreation facility if approved by the community development director upon consultation with the Tumwater parks and recreation director.

3.    The open space/park area shall have convenient access for residents of the development and shall be consolidated to provide maximum access, visibility, usability, minimization of impacts to residential uses, and ease of maintenance. The requirement that the open space/park area be consolidated may be waived by the director of community development upon a finding that the residents of the development would receive a greater benefit if the required open space/park area were provided in another configuration.

4.    The open space/park area shall be designed and placed in consideration of existing and potential open space/park areas on adjacent parcels to consolidate or provide future opportunities for consolidation of neighborhood open space areas.

5.    Except where removal is required to meet recreation requirements in this chapter, existing trees and significant vegetation shall be retained in open space/park areas unless an alternate landscaping plan for such areas is required or approved by the development review committee.

6.    Cash, or like value of land area and improvements within the neighborhood parks planning area where the site is located, may be donated to the city to fulfill the requirements of this section, subject to the approval of the community development director. The donation required will be determined based on impacts of development using a formula based on the requirement of meeting the adopted level of service for neighborhood parks in the Tumwater parks and recreation plan.

7.    Open space/park areas shall be held in single ownership where such ownership assumes full responsibility for maintenance and operation, or held in common ownership by all of the owners in the development area through a homeowners’ association or similar organization. The city as a condition of approval may choose to accept dedication, or the maintenance and operation responsibilities for the area, when the area to be dedicated is one or more of the following:

a.    Greater than five acres.

b.    Adjacent to an established or future city park or school grounds.

c.    Includes access to a body of water, wetland, important fish/wildlife habitat, or other environmentally sensitive area.

d.    If the city determines it is in the public interest to accept public dedication.

(Ord. O2014-007, Added, 07/15/2014)

18.27.080 Development and design standards – Triangle, Deschutes, Bates Neighborhood North and Knoll subdistricts.

A.    Site Development Standards. The intent of the following site development standards is to foster vibrant, pedestrian-oriented development in the Triangle, Deschutes, Bates Neighborhood North, and Knoll subdistricts. New development in these subdistricts should be oriented to the sidewalk, create a safe and comfortable pedestrian experience, and minimize the appearance of vehicular circulation and off-street parking areas.

1.    Building Height. See Table 18.27.050 for maximum building height for each subdistrict. Street-facing ground floors must be a minimum of twelve feet in height, as measured floor to floor (see Figures 18.27.080.A.1, 18.27.080.A.2, and 18.27.080.A.3).

2.    Street-Facing Setbacks.

a.    See Table 18.27.050 for minimum and maximum street-facing setbacks for each subdistrict.

b.    When maximum street-facing setbacks are provided, landscaping, hardscape, or a combination thereof must be provided within the street-facing setback (see Figure 18.27.080.A.2). For parcels in the Triangle subdistrict, maximum street-facing setback areas must provide hardscape adjacent to the public sidewalk for a minimum of fifty percent of the setback area. For parcels fronting Cleveland Avenue, maximum street-facing setback areas must provide hardscape adjacent to the public sidewalk for one hundred percent of the setback area.

3.    Building Orientation.

a.    All buildings must provide at least one building entrance that faces the street and is directly connected to the public sidewalk via a hardscape pathway measuring a minimum of six feet wide (see Figures 18.27.080.A.1, 18.27.080.A.2, and 18.27.080.A.3).

b.    All street-facing building entrances must either be covered by an awning or canopy and/or be recessed behind the front building facade such that it is tucked under the second floor. If an awning or canopy is provided, it must provide a minimum vertical clearance of ten feet and a maximum clearance of thirteen feet six inches. Weather protection structures must project a minimum of four feet from the building facade (see subsection (B)(1)(b) of this section for additional requirements for pedestrian weather protection structures). If only a recessed entry is provided, it must be recessed behind the front facade a minimum of four feet and a maximum of six feet. (Requirements of the International Building Code also apply.)

c.    All street-facing building entrances must be a minimum forty percent transparent, and must remain unlocked during regular business hours.

4.    Forecourts/Plazas. Street-facing forecourts/plazas are encouraged, though not required. When provided, the forecourts/plaza shall be set back a minimum of ten feet and a maximum of thirty feet behind the street-facing building facade (see Figure 18.27.080.A.3).

a.    When provided, forecourts/plazas must be a minimum of twenty feet in length, and may not exceed a total of fifty percent of the total street-facing building facade in length.

b.    The forecourt/plaza shall be adjacent to the public right-of-way.

c.    Buildings shall provide ground floor windows along a minimum of fifty percent of the forecourt/plaza facing building walls, and building entrances facing the forecourt/plaza.

d.    A combination of landscape and hardscape must be provided within the forecourt/plaza area. The forecourt/plaza area shall provide a minimum of fifty percent hardscape. Plants shall be provided in planting beds, raised planters, pots, or tree wells/grates.

5.    Ground Floor Residential Units. When ground floor residential units are provided on a street-facing building facade within ten feet of the street-facing property line, ground floor entries to individual units must be provided. Ground floor unit entries must be oriented and directly connected to the sidewalk, as required in subsection (A)(3)(a) of this section. The unit entrance must be accessed via a raised stoop or porch measuring a minimum of three feet and no more than four feet six inches above grade. Building entrances to street-facing, ground floor residential units must provide an awning or canopy, or must be set back behind the front building facade a minimum of two feet.

6.    Building Frontage. See Table 18.27.050 for minimum street-facing building frontage required within the minimum and maximum street-facing setback area (see Figure 18.27.080.A.5).

a.    Properties fronting more than one public street are required to meet the minimum building frontage requirements along both street frontages, and in so doing must locate the building in the corner of the property within the maximum street-facing setback of both streets.

b.    When forecourts/plazas are provided, the setback portion of the forecourt/plaza may be counted toward the required minimum building frontage.

7.    Surface Parking and Vehicular Circulation. Surface parking must be located to the side or the rear of the building, and may not be located between the building and the street (see Figure 18.27.080.A.5). Vehicular circulation is not permitted between the building and the street.

8.    Driveways and Access. A maximum of one driveway/curb cut is permitted per street frontage. Driveways may be no greater than twenty-four feet in width. Whenever possible, vehicular access should be provided from secondary streets or from alleys.

9.    Surface Parking Screening. When surface parking areas abut a public right-of-way, parking must be screened from view via a landscaped buffer as follows (see Figure 18.27.080.A.6):

a.    Along all public or private street-facing frontages, surface parking must be set back a minimum of ten feet behind the property line.

b.    The parking area must be screened with a continuous row of hedges or shrubs (except where there is a driveway) immediately adjacent to the parking area. The shrubs must be a minimum of three feet high when mature, and must be mostly opaque year round.

c.    In addition to the required shrubs, one tree meeting minimum city standard is required a minimum of every thirty feet on center along all public or private street-facing frontages. The shrubs/hedge may be interrupted with a gap of up to two feet wide in order to accommodate trees.

d.    Grass or ground cover plants must be planted or spaced to result in total coverage of the remainder of the landscaped area between the parking area and the sidewalk within three years.

e.    A three-foot-high masonry wall may be substituted for the hedges or shrubs.

f.    Openings in the setback screening are allowed for pedestrian pathways, sidewalks, plazas, and driveways.

10.    Pedestrian/Bicycle Ways. As illustrated and described within the brewery district plan, multimodal pedestrian/bicycle ways are required in specific locations within the Triangle subdistrict. The intent of these pedestrian/bicycle ways is to provide a network of safe, comfortable, and attractive multimodal connections between land uses and key destinations within the Triangle. Pedestrian/bicycle ways are primarily intended to accommodate pedestrians and bicycles, but may also provide vehicular access. Pedestrian/bicycle ways are also intended to provide additional opportunities for ground floor uses to engage with the public realm by providing building entries, landscaping, and/or outdoor seating. (see Figure 18.27.080.A.7 for examples).

Pedestrian/bicycle ways shall be designed as follows:

a.    Location of Required Pedestrian/Bicycle Ways. Pedestrian/bicycle ways shall be provided within public alleyways and within private development parcels in the approximate locations shown in Figure 18.27.080.A.8. The exact location of pedestrian/bicycle ways within private property may be determined by the property owner; however, they should align with existing pedestrian/bicycle routes and designated street crossings.

b.    Minimum Dimensions (See Figure 18.27.080.A.9).

i.    “Public Zone.” A public use zone measuring a minimum of twenty feet must be provided within pedestrian/bicycle ways. This “public zone” is where the public is encouraged to walk and bike. This zone may also be used by vehicles to access individual buildings. Within private property, pedestrian/bicycle ways must provide a minimum twenty-foot public easement.

ii.    “Semi-Private Zone.” Adjacent to this minimum twenty-foot public use zone, an additional “semi-private” zone may be provided, which may range from four feet to ten feet on either side of the public zone. Retail uses, including outdoor dining activities, may spill into this zone, though no permanent structures are permitted in this zone (except bicycle racks and seating are allowed, in addition to awnings/canopies which are allowed to project over the semi-private zone). When provided, this “semi-private zone” is encouraged to be visually defined through differing pavement treatments and/or a physical buffer to visually separate the semi-private zone from the public zone. Physical buffers may be in the form of landscape beds or planters, street trees, and/or bollards, and must be located entirely outside of the public zone.

c.    Streetscape Design Elements. Pedestrian/bicycle ways are shared street spaces, and the design and streetscape elements provided shall reinforce the shared nature of these streets as follows (see Figure 18.27.080.A.9).

i.    Paving Materials. In order to visually distinguish the pedestrian/bicycle way from surrounding streets, create a more pedestrian-friendly environment, and discourage noncritical vehicular traffic and speeding, textured and/or colored pavements must be provided within pedestrian/bicycle ways. When a “semi-private zone” is provided, the use of differing pavement treatments in this zone is encouraged.

ii.    Curbs. Pedestrian/bicycle ways shall be curbless, and pedestrians, bicycles, and cars shall share the same roadway space.

iii.    Lighting. Pedestrian-scale lighting must be provided along all pedestrian/bicycle ways at a minimum of every thirty feet on center. Lighting may be in the form of sconces or gooseneck fixtures integrated into the ground floor facade of the building, or freestanding pedestrian-scale lighting located within the building setback area or “semi-private zone” of the pedestrian/bicycle way. Lighting shall meet the requirements of TMC 18.40.035.

iv.    Streetscape Elements. Streetscape elements such as pedestrian-scale lighting, landscaping, planters, benches, trashcans, etc., may also be provided within the semi-private zone.

v.    Building Frontage.

(A)    Minimum Building Frontage. Buildings fronting required pedestrian/bicycle ways must provide ground floor building frontage along a minimum of fifty percent of the pedestrian/bicycle way.

(B)    Building Setbacks. For the purposes of determining minimum and maximum building setbacks from pedestrian/bicycle ways, the pedestrian/bicycle way shall be considered a street (whether public or private), and street-facing building setback requirements outlined in Table 18.27.050 shall apply.

(C)    Pedestrian-Oriented Ground Floors. Buildings fronting required pedestrian/bicycle ways are encouraged to provide building entries fronting the bicycle/pedestrian way. When provided, retail uses, including outdoor dining activities, may spill into the “semi-private zone.” Transparent ground floor windows must be provided along a minimum of fifty percent of the ground floor, street-facing facade area. Any glazed portions of entry doors may be used to meet this requirement.

vi.    Driveways and Access. Pedestrian/bicycle ways may accommodate vehicles needing access into individual buildings fronting these streets, and driveways leading to parking areas and/or service bays may be directly accessed off of pedestrian/bicycle ways. All driveways must meet the requirements outlined in subsection (A)(8) of this section. All surface parking areas must be set back and screened in accordance with subsection (A)(9) of this section. Where the required pedestrian/bicycle way is not used to provide limited vehicular access to individual developments, bollards shall be used where the pedestrian/bicycle way meets the public street system in order to prevent automobiles from entering the pedestrian/bicycle way.

11.    Residential Density. For the Triangle, Deschutes and Bates Neighborhood North subdistricts, when residential uses are provided, either as a single development or as a component of a mixed use development, the residential portion of the development must provide a minimum net residential density of twenty dwelling units per acre. See TMC 18.27.060(A) for method for calculating density requirements.

B.    Building Design Standards. The following building design standards are intended to ensure that new development in the Triangle, Deschutes, Bates Neighborhood North, and Knoll subdistricts provides high quality, well-designed buildings with engaging, pedestrian-oriented ground floors, particularly along the Cleveland Avenue “Main Street.”

1.    Pedestrian-Oriented Ground Floors.

a.    Ground Floor Windows.

i.    Transparent ground floor windows must be provided along a minimum of sixty percent of the ground floor, street-facing facade area (see Figure 18.27.080.B.1). Any glazed portions of entry doors may be used to meet this requirement.

ii.    Where residential units are provided on street-facing ground floors, transparent windows must be provided along a minimum of thirty percent of the ground floor, street-facing facade area of the residential portion of the building.

iii.    All street-facing windows and transparent doors must have a visible transmittance (VT) of 0.6 or higher, with the exception of medical and dental offices, which may have tinted windows.

b.    Weather Protection. Street-facing ground floors must provide weather protection in the form of awnings, canopies, arcades, or building overhangs along a minimum of fifty percent of the overall street-facing building length (see Figure 18.27.080.B.1). Portions of the street-facing ground floor providing individual residential units are exempt from this requirement.

All pedestrian weather protection structures must comply with the following:

i.    Protection structures must project a minimum of four feet from the building facade.

ii.    Awnings/canopies must provide a minimum of ten feet and a maximum of thirteen feet six inches of vertical clearance from grade.

iii.    Awnings, canopies, marquees and building overhangs may project into the public right-of-way, subject to the projection requirements of the International Building Code. Projections over a public sidewalk from the building surface are allowed to cover seventy-five percent of the sidewalk width or a maximum of eight feet; provided, that this provision may be decreased by the community development director to avoid conflicts with street trees. Projections into the public right-of-way must be approved by the community development director, public works director and building official.

iv.    Arcades must be on private property.

v.    Pedestrian weather protection structures shall be architecturally integrated with the ground-level design of the building to which they are attached, and must be made of permanent durable materials such as metal, glass, wood or other materials. Canvas and fabric awnings/canopies are not permitted.

c.    Architectural Bays. Divide the street-facing ground floor of commercial/mixed use storefronts into distinct architectural bays that are no more than thirty feet on center. For the purposes of this standard, an architectural bay is defined as the zone between the outside edges of an engaged column, pilaster, post, or vertical wall area that provides a ground floor windowsill/base (see Figure 18.27.080.B.1). Multifamily and residential structures not providing a ground floor commercial component are exempt from this requirement.

d.    Pedestrian-Oriented Building Lighting. Exterior pedestrian-oriented building lighting is required along all street and public space-facing ground floors at a minimum of every thirty feet. Pedestrian-oriented lighting may include sconce or gooseneck fixtures. Exterior, ground floor building lighting shall be integrated into the sign frieze and/or into the column/pilaster/post of the ground floor architectural bays, as illustrated in Figure 18.27.080.B.2.

Lighting must meet city of Tumwater lighting standards.

e.    Active Ground Floor Uses. Along the Cleveland Avenue Main Street, active ground floor uses are required. Active ground floor uses include retail and other commercial uses, public/civic uses and residential lobbies.

2.    General Building Design.

a.    Building Articulation. All building facades shall be articulated such that a change in building material and/or a horizontal change in building plane measuring a minimum of four feet is provided a minimum of every thirty feet. A change in plane may be provided through projecting bays, building recesses, upper-level balconies (projecting or recessed), recessed building entries, and/or building stepbacks. Ground floor facade areas providing commercial uses are exempt from this requirement.

b.    Building Materials.

i.    Structures located between E and C Streets within the Deschutes Subdistrict shall provide stone or brick masonry on street-facing building facades. All other structures in the subdistrict providing ground floor commercial uses shall use masonry as the predominant building material for walls on the street-facing ground floor building facade. For the purposes of this standard, “masonry” includes concrete, stone, or brick and/or stucco.

ii.    Prohibited Materials. The following exterior building materials or finishes are prohibited: vinyl siding; mirrored glass; T-111 type plywood; plain concrete block (not including split faced, colored or other block designs that mimic stone, brick or other similar masonry).

c.    Upper-Floor Windows. Windows are required along a minimum of thirty percent of all street-facing, upper-floor building facade areas. Minimum window coverage includes any glazed portions of doors.

d.    Corner Treatments. Buildings located at the corner of two streets shall locate the primary building entry at or within twenty feet of the corner of the building. In addition, these buildings shall address the corner through one of the following methods, as illustrated in Figure 18.27.080.B.3:

i.    Set back the corner of the building, such that it creates a plaza or forecourt space in front of the building entrance;

ii.    Provide a chamfered (or forty-five-degree “cut”) corner, or a rounded building corner;

iii.    Provide increased building height (and associated roof forms) at or within twenty feet of the corner of the building.

e.    Rooflines. All flat-roofed structures shall provide a projecting cornice or parapet measuring a minimum of twelve inches high and projecting a minimum of six inches.

f.    Tripartite Facades. In the Deschutes subdistrict between E and C Streets, tripartite facades are required for all buildings taller than one story in order to ensure that new development reflects the character of the surrounding historic district. Tripartite facades provide a defined building base, middle, and top, as follows (see Figure 18.27.080.B.4):

i.    Base. The “base” of the building extends from the sidewalk to the bottom of the belt course/string course that separates the ground floor from the upper levels of the building.

ii.    Middle. The “middle” of the building extends from the top of the belt course/string course at the top of the building base to the ceiling of the highest building floor. The “middle” of the building shall provide one of the following elements to help visually distinguish this portion of the building from the base:

(A)    A change in material or color between the ground floor and upper floors.

(B)    Street-facing balconies, decks, or building stepbacks.

iii.    Top. The “top” of the building extends from the ceiling of the uppermost floor to the highest vertical point on the roof of the building. The top of the building shall be visually defined by providing a projecting cornice or parapet measuring a minimum of twelve inches high and projecting a minimum of six inches.

(Ord. O2014-007, Added, 07/15/2014)

18.27.090 Development and design standards – Bates Neighborhood South subdistrict.

A.    Site Development Standards. The intent of the following site development standards is to ensure that new development in the Bates Neighborhood South subdistrict helps to create a vibrant, pedestrian-oriented, mixed use neighborhood with buildings that respect and reflect the area’s existing detached, single-family building stock.

1.    Building height: maximum thirty-five feet.

2.    Lot coverage: combined maximum lot coverage of seventy-five percent.

3.    Setbacks. See Table 18.27.050 for front, side, and rear setback requirements. Landscaping must be provided within all maximum street-facing setbacks (see Figure 18.27.090.A.1).

4.    Building frontage: minimum fifty percent building frontage required within the minimum and maximum street-facing setback area (see Figure 18.27.090.A.1).

5.    Building Orientation and Pedestrian Access. All buildings must provide at least one building entrance that faces the street and is directly connected to the public sidewalk via a hardscape pathway measuring a minimum of three feet wide (see Figure 18.27.090.A.1).

6.    Porches. Buildings must provide a covered porch at front entries. Porches must be a minimum of six feet deep and a minimum of eight feet wide.

7.    Surface Parking and Vehicular Circulation. Surface parking must be located to the side or the rear of the building, and may not be located between the building and the street. Vehicular circulation is prohibited between the building and the street.

8.    Driveways and Access. A maximum of one driveway/curb cut is permitted per street frontage. Driveways may be no greater than twenty-four feet in width. Whenever possible, vehicular access should be provided from secondary streets or from alleys.

9.    Fences. Fences within street-facing setbacks are limited to thirty-six inches in height, and must be a minimum of fifty percent transparent to ensure visibility. Chain link fencing is not permitted.

10.    Residential Density. When residential uses are provided, either as a single development or as a component of a mixed use development, the residential portion of the development must provide a minimum net residential density of eight dwelling units per acre. See TMC 18.27.060(A) for method for calculating density requirements.

B.    Building Design Standards. The intent of the following building design standards is to ensure that new development in the Bates Neighborhood South subdistrict is of high architectural quality and reflects the Craftsman-style design of the surrounding existing structures.

1.    Roofs.

a.    Pitched Roofs Required. Roofs may be hip, gable, or combinations thereof, with a minimum pitch of 3:12 and a maximum pitch of 12:12 (see Figure 18.27.090.B.1). Flat-roofed structures are not permitted. Shed dormers are permitted, and are exempt from minimum pitch requirements.

b.    Eaves/Overhangs. Minimum one-foot roof eaves/overhangs are required.

2.    Windows.

a.    Minimum three-and-one-half-inch-wide trim is required on all windows and minimum five-inch trim is required on all doors.

b.    Windows may be single- or double-hung sash windows, casement, awning, or picture windows (or a combination thereof). Windows shall be square or vertically oriented.

3.    Building Materials. Exterior building materials shall be one or a combination of the following: wood or wood/cement board horizontal lap siding, wood/cement shingles, stone, brick, stucco, and/or board and batten. Thin, adhesive applied brick and stone veneers are not permitted.

(Ord. O2014-007, Added, 07/15/2014)