40.240.820 General Management Area Cultural Resource Review Criteria

A.    General Provisions for Implementing the Cultural Resources Protection Process.

1.    All cultural resource surveys, evaluations, assessments, and mitigation plans shall be performed by professionals whose expertise reflects the type of cultural resources that are involved. Principal investigators shall meet the professional standards published in 36 CFR Part 61 and Guidelines for Evaluating and Documenting Traditional Cultural Properties (Parker and King, no date).

2.    Cultural resource surveys, evaluations, assessments, and mitigation plans shall generally be conducted in consultation with Indian tribal governments and any party who submits written comments on the proposed use related to such surveys, assessments, plans and evaluations. Indian tribal governments shall be consulted if the affected cultural resources are prehistoric or otherwise associated with Native Americans. If the cultural resources are associated with non-Native Americans, such as an historic house or pioneer campsite, the Indian tribal governments do not have to be consulted.

3.    Reconnaissance and Historic Surveys and Survey Reports.

a.    Reconnaissance Survey Requirements and Exceptions.

(1)    Each proposed use or element of a proposed use within an application shall be evaluated independently to determine whether a reconnaissance survey is required; for example, an application that proposes a land division and a new dwelling would require a reconnaissance survey if a survey would be required for the dwelling.

(2)    A reconnaissance survey shall be required for all proposed uses within five hundred (500) feet of a known cultural resource, including those uses listed as exceptions in Section 40.240.820(A)(3)(a)(3).

(3)    A reconnaissance survey shall be required for all proposed uses, except:

(a)    The modification, expansion, replacement, or reconstruction of existing buildings and structures.

(b)    Proposed uses that would not disturb the ground, including land divisions and lot line adjustments; storage sheds that do not require a foundation; low-intensity recreation uses, such as fishing, hunting, and hiking; installation of surface chemical toilets; hand treatment of brush within established rights-of-way; and new uses of existing structures.

(c)    Proposed uses that involve minor ground disturbance, as defined by depth and extent, including repair and maintenance of lawfully constructed and serviceable structures; home gardens; livestock grazing; cultivation that employs minimum tillage techniques, such as replanting pastures using a grassland drill; construction of fences; new utility poles that are installed using an auger, post-hole digger, or similar implement; and placement of mobile homes where septic systems and underground utilities are not involved. The Gorge Commission shall review all land use applications and determine if proposed uses would have a minor ground disturbance.

(d)    Proposed uses that occur on sites that have been disturbed by human activities; provided, that the proposed uses do not exceed the depth and extent of existing ground disturbance. To qualify for this exception, a project applicant must demonstrate that land-disturbing activities occurred in the project area. Land-disturbing activities include grading and cultivation.

(e)    Proposed uses that would occur on sites that have been adequately surveyed in the past. The project applicant must demonstrate that the project area has been adequately surveyed to qualify for this exception. Past surveys must have been conducted by a qualified professional and must include a surface survey and subsurface testing. The nature and extent of any cultural resources in the project area must be adequately documented.

(f)    Proposed uses occurring in areas that have a low probability of containing cultural resources, except:

(i)    Residential development that involves two (2) or more new dwellings for the same project applicant.

(ii)    Recreation facilities that contain parking areas for more than ten (10) cars, overnight camping facilities, boat ramps, and visitor information and environmental education facilities.

(iii)    Public transportation facilities that are outside improved rights-of-way.

(iv)    Electric facilities, lines, equipment, and appurtenances that are thirty-three (33) kilovolts or greater.

(v)    Communications, water and sewer, and natural gas transmission (as opposed to distribution) lines, pipes, equipment, and appurtenances.

(vi)    Areas that have a low probability of containing cultural resources shall be identified by the Columbia River Gorge Commission using the results of reconnaissance surveys conducted by the Gorge Commission, the Forest Service, public agencies, and private archaeologists.

(4)    The Gorge Commission may choose to conduct a reconnaissance survey for proposed uses listed in the exceptions if, in its professional judgment, a reconnaissance survey may be necessary to ensure protection of cultural resources.

b.    A historic survey shall be required for all proposed uses that would alter the exterior architectural appearance of buildings and structures that are fifty (50) years old or older, or would compromise features of the surrounding area that are important in defining the historic or architectural character of buildings or structures that are fifty (50) years old or older.

c.    The Gorge Commission shall conduct and pay for all reconnaissance and historic surveys for small-scale uses in the GMA. When archaeological resources or traditional cultural properties are discovered, the Gorge Commission also shall identify the approximate boundaries of the resource or property and delineate a reasonable buffer zone. Reconnaissance surveys and buffer zone delineations for large-scale uses shall be the responsibility of the project applicant. For this section, large-scale uses include residential development involving two (2) or more new dwellings; all recreation facilities; commercial and industrial development; public transportation facilities; electric facilities, lines, equipment, and appurtenances that are thirty-three (33) kilovolts or greater; and communications, water and sewer, and natural gas transmission (as opposed to distribution) lines, pipes, equipment, and appurtenances.

d.    Reconnaissance Surveys for Small-Scale Uses. Reconnaissance surveys for small-scale uses shall generally include a surface survey and subsurface testing. They shall meet the following guidelines:

(1)    A surface survey of the project area shall be conducted, except for inundated areas and impenetrable thickets.

(2)    Subsurface testing shall be conducted if the surface survey reveals that cultural resources may be present. Subsurface probes shall be placed at intervals sufficient to determine the absence or presence of cultural resources.

e.    Reconnaissance Survey Reports for Small-Scale Uses. The results of a reconnaissance survey for small-scale uses shall be documented in a confidential report that includes:

(1)    A description of the fieldwork methodology used to identity cultural resources, including a description of the type and extent of the reconnaissance survey.

(2)    A description of any cultural resources that were discovered in the project area, including a written description and photographs.

(3)    A map that shows the project area, the areas surveyed, the location of subsurface probes, and, if applicable, the approximate boundaries of the affected cultural resources and a reasonable buffer zone.

f.    Reconnaissance Surveys for Large-Scale Uses.

(1)    Reconnaissance surveys for large-scale uses shall be designed by a qualified professional. A written description of the survey shall be submitted to and approved by the Gorge Commission’s designated archaeologist.

(2)    Reconnaissance surveys shall reflect the physical characteristics of the project area and the design and potential effects of the proposed use. They shall meet the following guidelines:

(a)    Archival research shall be performed before any fieldwork. It should entail a thorough examination of tax records; historic maps, photographs, and drawings; previous archaeological, historic, and ethnographic research; cultural resource inventories and records maintained by federal, state, and local agencies; and primary historic accounts, such as diaries, journals, letters, and newspapers.

(b)    Surface surveys shall include the entire project area, except for inundated areas and impenetrable thickets.

(c)    Subsurface probes shall be placed at intervals sufficient to document the presence or absence of cultural resources.

(d)    Archaeological site inventory forms shall be submitted to the State Historic Preservation Officer whenever cultural resources are discovered.

g.    Reconnaissance Survey Reports for Large-Scale Uses. The results of a reconnaissance survey for large-scale uses shall be documented in a confidential report that includes:

(1)    A description of the proposed use, including drawings and maps.

(2)    A description of the project area, including soils, vegetation, topography, drainage, past alterations, and existing land use.

(3)    A list of the documents and records examined during the archival research and a description of any prehistoric or historic events associated with the project area.

(4)    A description of the fieldwork methodology used to identify cultural resources, including a map that shows the project area, the areas surveyed, and the location of subsurface probes. The map shall be prepared at a scale of one (1) inch equals one hundred (100) feet (1:1,200), or a scale providing greater detail.

(5)    An inventory of the cultural resources that exist in the project area, including a written description, photographs, drawings, and a map. The map shall be prepared at a scale of one (1) inch equals one hundred (100) feet (1:1,200), or a scale providing greater detail.

(6)    A summary of all written comments submitted by Indian tribal governments and other interested parties.

(7)    A preliminary assessment of whether the proposed use would or would not have an effect on cultural resources. The assessment shall incorporate concerns and recommendations voiced during consultation meetings and information obtained through archival and ethnographic research and field surveys.

h.    Historic Surveys and Reports.

(1)    Historic surveys shall document the location, form, style, integrity, and physical condition of historic buildings and structures. They shall include original photographs and maps. Archival research, blueprints, and drawings should be used as necessary.

(2)    Historic surveys shall describe any uses that will alter or destroy the exterior architectural appearance of the historic buildings or structures, or compromise features of the site that are important in defining the overall historic character of the historic buildings or structures.

(3)    The project applicant shall provide detailed architectural drawings and building plans that clearly illustrate all proposed alterations.

4.    The responsibility and cost of preparing an evaluation of significance, assessment of effect, or mitigation plan shall be borne by the project applicant, except for resources discovered during construction. The Gorge Commission shall conduct and pay for evaluations of significance and mitigation plans for resources that are discovered during construction of small-scale and large-scale uses.

5.    Cultural resources are significant if one (1) of the following criteria is satisfied:

a.    The cultural resources are included in, or eligible for inclusion in, the National Register of Historic Places. The criteria for evaluating the eligibility of cultural resources for the National Register of Historic Places appear in the “National Register Criteria for Evaluation” (36 CFR 60.4).

b.    The cultural resources are determined to be culturally significant by an Indian tribal government, based on criteria developed by that Indian tribal government and filed with the Gorge Commission.

6.    The Gorge Commission shall establish a Cultural Advisory Committee (CAC). The CAC shall comprise cultural resource professionals, interested individuals, and at least one (1) representative from each of the four (4) Indian tribes. If a project applicant’s and Indian tribal government’s evaluations of significance contradict, the Cultural Advisory Committee (CAC) shall review the applicant’s evaluation and Indian tribal government’s substantiated concerns. The CAC will submit a recommendation to the responsible official as to whether affected cultural resources are significant.

(Amended: Ord. 2018-03-04)

B.    Cultural Resource Reconnaissance and Historic Surveys.

1.    Consultation and Ethnographic Research.

a.    When written comments are submitted to the responsible official within the comment period provided for in Section 40.240.050(E), the project applicant shall offer to meet with the commenting parties within ten (10) calendar days. The ten (10) day consultation period may be extended upon agreement between the project applicant and the commenting parties. Consultation meetings should provide an opportunity for commenting parties to explain how the proposed use may affect cultural resources. Recommendations to avoid potential conflicts should be discussed. All written comments and consultation meeting minutes shall be incorporated into the reconnaissance or historic survey report. In instances where a survey is not required, all such information shall be recorded and addressed in a report that typifies a survey report; inapplicable elements may be omitted.

b.    A project applicant who is proposing a large-scale use shall conduct interviews and other forms of ethnographic research if parties commenting on the application submit a written request for such research. All requests must include a description of the cultural resources that may be affected by the proposed use and the identity of knowledgeable informants. Ethnographic research shall be conducted by qualified specialists. Tape recordings, maps, photographs, and minutes shall be used when appropriate. All written comments, consultation meeting minutes, and ethnographic research shall be incorporated into the reconnaissance or historic survey report. In instances where a survey is not required, all such information shall be recorded and addressed in a report that typifies a survey report.

2.    Notice of Survey Results.

a.    The responsible official shall submit a copy of all cultural resource survey reports to the SHPO and the Indian tribal governments. Survey reports may include measures to avoid affected cultural resources, such as a map that shows a reasonable buffer zone.

b.    The SHPO and the tribes shall have thirty (30) calendar days from the date a survey report is mailed to submit written comments to the responsible official. The responsible official shall record and address all written comments in the development review order.

3.    Conclusion of the Cultural Resource Protection Process.

a.    The responsible official shall make a final decision on whether the proposed use would be consistent with this section. If the final decision contradicts the comments submitted by the SHPO, the responsible official shall justify how it reached an opposing conclusion.

b.    The cultural resource protection process may conclude when one (1) of the following conditions exists:

(1)    The proposed use does not require a reconnaissance or historic survey, no cultural resources are known to exist in the project area, and no substantiated concerns were voiced by parties commenting on the application within twenty-one (21) calendar days of the date that a notice was mailed.

(2)    A reconnaissance survey demonstrates that cultural resources do not exist in the project area and no substantiated concerns were voiced by commenting parties within twenty-one (21) calendar days of the date that a notice was mailed.

(3)    The proposed use would avoid archaeological resources and traditional cultural resources that exist in the project area. To meet this guideline, a reasonable buffer zone must be established around the affected resources or properties; all ground disturbing activities shall be prohibited within the buffer zone. Buffer zones must preserve the integrity and context of cultural resources. They will vary in width depending on the eventual use of the project area, the type of cultural resources that are present, and the characteristics for which the cultural resources may be significant. A deed covenant easement or other appropriate mechanism shall be developed to ensure that the buffer zone and the cultural resources are protected. An evaluation of significance shall be conducted if a project applicant decides not to avoid the affected cultural resource. In these instances, the reconnaissance survey and survey report shall be incorporated into the evaluation of significance.

c.    A historic survey demonstrates that the proposed use would not have an effect on historic buildings or structures because:

(1)    The SHPO concludes that the historic buildings or structures are clearly not significant, as determined by using the criteria in the “National Register Criteria for Evaluation” (36 CFR 60.4); or

(2)    The proposed use would not compromise the historic or architectural character of the affected buildings or structures, or compromise features of the site that are important in defining the overall historic character of the affected buildings or structures, as determined by the guidelines and standards in The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and Illustrated Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings and The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Treatment of Historic Properties. The historic survey conducted by the Gorge Commission may provide sufficient information to satisfy these guidelines. If it does not, architectural and building plans, photographs, and archival research may be required. The project applicant shall be responsible for providing information beyond that included in the survey conducted by the Gorge Commission. The historic survey and report must demonstrate that these guidelines have been clearly and absolutely satisfied. If the SHPO or the responsible official question whether these guidelines have been satisfied, the project applicant shall conduct an evaluation of significance.

C.    Evaluation of Significance.

1.    Evaluation Criteria and Information Needs. If cultural resources would be affected by a new use, an evaluation of their significance shall be conducted. Evaluations of significance shall meet the following guidelines:

a.    Evaluations of significance shall follow the procedures in How to Apply the National Register Criteria for Evaluation (U.S. Department of the Interior, no date) and Guidelines for Evaluating and Documenting Traditional Cultural Properties (Parker and King, no date). They shall be presented within local and regional contexts and shall be guided by previous research and current research designs that are relevant to specific research questions for the Columbia River Gorge.

b.    To evaluate the significance of cultural resources, the information gathered during the reconnaissance or historic survey may have to be supplemented. Detailed field mapping, subsurface testing, photographic documentation, laboratory analyses, and archival research may be required.

c.    The project applicant shall contact Indian tribal governments and commenting parties as appropriate. Ethnographic research shall be undertaken as necessary to fully evaluate the significance of the cultural resources.

d.    The evaluation of significance shall follow the principles, guidelines, and report format recommended by Washington Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (Washington SHPO, no date). It shall incorporate the results of the reconnaissance or historic survey and shall illustrate why each cultural resource is or is not significant. Findings shall be presented within the context of relevant local and regional research.

e.    All documentation used to support the evaluation of significance shall be cited. Evidence of consultation with Indian tribal governments and other commenting parties shall be presented. All comments, recommendations, and correspondence from Indian tribal governments and commenting parties shall be appended to the evaluation of significance.

2.    Notice of Evaluation Results.

a.    If the evaluation of significance demonstrates that the cultural resources are not significant, the responsible official shall submit a copy of the evaluation of significance to the SHPO and the Indian tribal governments.

b.    The SHPO, Indian tribal governments, and commenting parties shall have thirty (30) calendar days from the date the evaluation of significance is mailed to submit written comments to the responsible official. The responsible official shall record and address all written comments in the development review order.

3.    Cultural Resources are Culturally Significant.

a.    If an Indian tribal government believes that the affected cultural resources are culturally significant, contrary to the evaluation submitted by the project applicant, the Cultural Advisory Committee (CAC) shall make an independent review of the applications evaluation and the Indian tribal government’s substantiated concerns. The CAC shall formulate a recommendation regarding the significance of the cultural resources.

b.    The Indian tribal government shall substantiate its concerns in a written report. The report shall be submitted to the responsible official, CAC, and the project applicant within fifteen (15) calendar days from the date the evaluation of significance is mailed. The CAC must submit its recommendation to the responsible official within thirty (30) calendar days from the date the evaluation of significance is mailed.

4.    Conclusion of the Cultural Resource Protection Process.

a.    The responsible official shall make a final decision on whether the affected resources are significant. If the final decision contradicts the comments or recommendations submitted by the SHPO or CAC, the responsible official shall justify how an opposing conclusion was reached.

b.    The cultural resource protection process may conclude if the affected cultural resources are not significant.

c.    If the project applicant or the responsible official determines that the cultural resources are significant, the effects of the proposed use shall be assessed.

D.    Assessment of Effect.

1.    Assessment Criteria and Information Needs. If a use could potentially affect significant cultural resources, an assessment shall be made to determine if it would have no effect, no adverse effect, or an adverse effect.

a.    The assessment of effect shall be based on the criteria published in “Protection of Historic Properties” (36 CFR 800.5) and shall incorporate the results of the reconnaissance or historic survey and the evaluation of significance. All documentation shall follow the requirements listed in 36 CFR 800.11.

(1)    Proposed uses are considered to have an effect on cultural resources when they alter or destroy characteristics of the resources that make them significant (36 CFR 800.5).

(2)    Proposed uses are considered to have an adverse effect when they may diminish the integrity of the cultural resource’s location, design, setting, materials, workmanship, feeling, or association (36 CFR 800.5). Adverse effects on cultural resources include, but are not limited to:

(a)    Physical destruction, damage, or alteration of all or part of the cultural resource.

(b)    Isolation of the cultural resource from its setting or alteration of the character of the resource’s setting when that character contributes to the resource’s qualification as being significant.

(c)    Introduction of visual, audible, or atmospheric elements that are out of character with the cultural resource or its setting.

(d)    Neglect of a significant cultural resource resulting in its deterioration or destruction, except as described in 36 CFR 800.5.

b.    The assessment of effect shall be prepared in consultation with Indian tribal governments and interested persons, as appropriate. The concerns and recommendations voiced by Indian tribal governments and interested persons shall be recorded and addressed in the assessment.

c.    The effects of a proposed use that would otherwise be determined to be adverse may be considered to be not adverse if any of the following instances apply:

(1)    The cultural resources are of value only for their potential contribution to archaeological, historical, or architectural research, and when such value can be substantially preserved through the conduct of appropriate research before development begins, and such research is conducted in accordance with applicable professional standards and guidelines.

(2)    The undertaking is limited to the rehabilitation of buildings and structures, and is conducted in a manner that preserves the historical and architectural character of affected cultural resources through conformance with The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and Illustrated Guidelines for Rehabilitating Historic Buildings and The Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Treatment of Historic Properties.

2.    Notice of Assessment Results.

a.    If the assessment of effect concludes that the proposed use would have no effect or no adverse effect on significant cultural resources, the responsible official shall submit a copy of the assessment to the SHPO and the Indian tribal governments.

b.    The SHPO, Indian tribal governments, and interested persons shall have thirty (30) calendar days from the date the assessment of effect is mailed to submit written comments to the responsible official. The responsible official shall record and address all written comments in the development review order.

3.    Conclusion of the Cultural Resource Protection Process.

a.    The responsible official shall make a final decision on whether the proposed use would have no effect, no adverse effect, or an adverse effect. If the final decision contradicts the comments submitted by the SHPO, the responsible official shall justify how an opposing conclusion was reached.

b.    The cultural resource protection process may conclude if the proposed use would have no effect or no adverse effect on significant cultural resources.

c.    A mitigation plan shall be prepared if a project applicant or the responsible official determines that the proposed use would have an adverse effect on significant cultural resources.

(Amended: Ord. 2008-06-02)

E.    Mitigation Plans.

1.    Mitigation Plan Criteria and Information Needs. Mitigation plans shall be prepared when proposed uses would have an adverse effect on significant cultural resources. The plans shall reduce an adverse effect to no effect or no adverse effect. Mitigation plans shall meet the following guidelines:

a.    Mitigation plans shall be prepared in consultation with persons who have concerns about or knowledge of the affected cultural resources, including Indian tribal governments, Native Americans, local governments whose jurisdiction encompasses the project area, and the SHPO.

b.    Avoidance of cultural resources through project design and modification is preferred. Avoidance may be affected by reducing the size, scope, configuration, and density of the proposed use.

c.    Alternative mitigation measures shall be used only if avoidance is not practicable. Alternative measures include, but are not limited to, burial under fill, stabilization, removal of the cultural resource to a safer place, and partial to full excavation and recordation. If the mitigation plan includes buffer zones to protect cultural resources, a deed covenant, easement, or other appropriate mechanism shall be developed and recorded in county deeds and records. Mitigation plans shall incorporate the results of the reconnaissance or historic survey, the evaluation of significance, and the assessment of effect, and shall provide the documentation required in 36 CFR 800.11, including, but not limited to:

(1)    A description and evaluation of any alternatives or mitigation measures that the project applicant proposes for reducing the effects of the proposed use.

(2)    A description of any alternatives or mitigation measures that were considered but not chosen and the reasons for their rejection.

(3)    Documentation of consultation with the SHPO regarding any alternatives or mitigation measures.

(4)    A description of the project applicant’s efforts to obtain and consider the views of Indian tribal governments, commenting parties, and the responsible official.

(5)    Copies of any written recommendations submitted to the responsible official or project applicant regarding the effects of the proposed use on cultural resources and alternatives to avoid or reduce those effects.

2.    Notice of Mitigation Plan Results.

a.    If a mitigation plan reduces the effect of a use from an adverse effect to no effect or no adverse effect, the responsible official shall submit a copy of the mitigation plan to the SHPO and the Indian tribal governments.

b.    The SHPO, Indian tribal governments, and commenting parties shall have thirty (30) calendar days from the date the mitigation plan is mailed to submit written comments to the responsible official. The responsible official shall record and address all written comments in the development review order.

3.    Conclusion of the Cultural Resource Protection Process.

a.    The responsible official shall make a final decision on whether the mitigation plan would reduce an adverse effect to no effect or no adverse effect. If the final decision contradicts the comments submitted by the SHPO, the responsible official shall justify how an opposing conclusion was reached.

b.    The cultural resource protection process may conclude if a mitigation plan would reduce an adverse effect to no effect or no adverse effect.

c.    The proposed use shall be prohibited when acceptable mitigation measures fail to reduce an adverse effect to no effect or no adverse effect.

(Amended: Ord. 2008-06-02)

F.    Cultural Resources Discovered After Construction Begins.

    The following procedures shall be put into effect when cultural resources are discovered during construction activities. All survey and evaluation reports and mitigation plans shall be submitted to the responsible official and the SHPO. Indian tribal governments also shall receive a copy of all reports and plans if the cultural resources are prehistoric or otherwise associated with Native Americans.

1.    Halt of Construction. All construction activities within one hundred (100) feet of the discovered cultural resource shall cease. The cultural resources shall remain as found; further disturbance is prohibited.

2.    Notification. The project applicant shall notify the responsible official and the Gorge Commission within twenty-four (24) hours of the discovery. If the cultural resources are prehistoric or otherwise associated with Native Americans, the project applicant shall also notify the Indian tribal governments within twenty-four (24) hours.

3.    Survey and Evaluation. The Gorge Commission shall survey the cultural resources after obtaining written permission from the landowner and appropriate permits from the SHPO. (See Chapter 27.53 RCW). It shall gather enough information to evaluate the significance of the cultural resources. The survey and evaluation shall be documented in a report that generally follows the guidelines in Sections 40.240.820(A)(3)(g) and 40.240.820(C)(1). Based on the survey and evaluation report and any written comments, the responsible official shall make a final decision on whether the resources are significant. Construction activities may recommence if the cultural resources are not significant. A mitigation plan shall be prepared if the affected cultural resources are significant.

4.    Mitigation Plan. Mitigation plans shall be prepared according to the information, consultation, and report guidelines contained in Section 40.240.820(E)(1). Construction activities may recommence when the conditions in the mitigation plan have been executed.

G.    Discovery of Human Remains.

    The following procedures shall be put into effect when human remains are discovered during a cultural resource survey or during construction. “Human remains” means articulated or disarticulated human skeletal remains, bones, or teeth, with or without attendant burial artifacts.

1.    Halt of Activities. All survey, excavation, and construction activities shall cease. The human remains shall not be disturbed any further.

2.    Notification. Local law enforcement officials, the responsible official, the Gorge Commission, and the Indian tribal governments shall be contacted immediately.

3.    Inspection. The county coroner, or appropriate official, shall inspect the remains at the project site and determine if they are prehistoric/historic; or modern. Representatives from the Indian tribal governments shall have an opportunity to monitor the inspection.

4.    Jurisdiction. If the remains are modern, the appropriate law enforcement officials shall assume jurisdiction and the cultural resource protection process may conclude.

5.    Treatment. Prehistoric/historic remains of Native Americans shall generally be treated in accordance with the procedures set forth Chapters 27.44 and 68.05 RCW if the remains are prehistoric/historic. If the human remains will be re-interred or preserved in their original position, a mitigation plan shall be prepared in accordance with the consultation and report requirements specified in Section 40.240.820(E)(1). The mitigation plan shall accommodate the cultural and religious concerns of Native Americans. The cultural resource protection process may conclude when the conditions set forth in Section 40.240.820(E)(3) are met and the mitigation plan is executed.

(Amended: Ord. 2006-05-04)