Division III. Zoning Districts, Allowable Uses, and Development Standards

Chapter 23.24
ESTABLISHMENT OF ZONING DISTRICTS

Sections:

23.24.010    Purpose.

23.24.020    Zoning districts established.

23.24.030    Map established.

23.24.010 Purpose.

This chapter establishes the framework of zoning districts within the City of Elk Grove. This chapter also establishes the zoning map as the official designation of zoning district boundaries. [Ord. 23-2014 §3 (Exh. A), eff. 10-10-2014]

23.24.020 Zoning districts established.

A. Overview. Zoning districts are established in order to classify, regulate, designate, and distribute the uses of land and buildings; to regulate and restrict the height and bulk of buildings; to regulate the area of yards and other open spaces around buildings; and to regulate the density of population.

The City of Elk Grove is divided into zoning districts that are grouped into two (2) categories: 1) base zoning districts, and 2) overlay zoning districts. These districts conform to and implement the City’s General Plan land use. EGMC Chapter 23.27 (Allowed Uses and Required Entitlements) identifies the allowed uses and requirements for planning entitlements. EGMC Chapter 23.29 (Development Standards by Zoning District) identifies development standards unique to each zoning district.

1. Base Zoning Districts. The base zoning district is the primary zoning district that applies to a property. Every parcel throughout the City has a base zoning district that establishes the primary land use type, density, intensity, and site development regulations. Base districts are grouped into eight (8) categories as follows:

a. Agricultural zoning districts;

b. Residential zoning districts;

c. Commercial zoning districts;

d. Mixed-use zoning districts;

e. Office zoning districts;

f. Industrial zoning districts;

g. Public/quasi-public zoning districts;

h. Special purpose zoning districts.

2. Overlay Zoning Districts. The overlay zoning districts function to supplement the base zoning district for one (1) or more of the following purposes. In the event of a conflict between the regulations of the base zoning district and the overlay zoning district, the provisions of the overlay zoning district shall apply.

a. To allow more flexibility from the standard provisions of the underlying base zone;

b. When special provisions are needed to protect unique site features or implement location-specific provisions; and/or

c. To specify a particular standard or guideline for an area.

B. Agricultural Districts.

1. Agricultural (AG-20, AG-80): The AG districts are applied to areas of the City for viable agricultural use and very low density residential use. The agricultural zoning districts allow for a wide range of agricultural uses on large parcels of land. These uses may include crop production, commercial riding academies and stables, animal keeping, agricultural labor housing, and compatible accessory uses. The zoning district number associated with the AG districts corresponds to the minimum lot size in such district.

a. AG-80. The AG-80 zone is applied to areas of the City to accommodate a wide range of agricultural uses on parcels of land a minimum of eighty (80) gross acres in size.

b. AG-20. The AG-20 zone is applied to areas of the City to accommodate agricultural use on parcels a minimum of twenty (20) gross acres in size.

2. Agricultural Residential (AR). The AR districts are applied to areas of the City intended to accommodate very low density single-family residential uses in a rural setting with agricultural and accessory uses. The AR districts implement the estate residential and rural residential General Plan land use designation. The zoning district number associated with the AR districts corresponds to the minimum lot size in such district.

a. AR-1. The AR-1 zoning district is applied to areas of the City to accommodate low density single-family residential uses in a rural setting with agricultural and accessory uses. The AR-1 zoning district implements the estate residential General Plan designation. The AR-1 district allows for one (1) primary residential unit on lots with a minimum size of one (1) gross acre. While the AR-1 zoning district falls within the estate residential density range of the General Plan, the nature and character of the district is more in keeping with the rural residential land use designation of the General Plan. These zoning districts also allow for normal agricultural uses and practices.

b. AR-2. The AR-2 zoning district is applied to areas of the City to accommodate low density single-family residential uses in a rural setting with agricultural and accessory uses. Lots with this zoning designation are rural in nature and include small local roadways, animal keeping and raising, equestrian uses, agriculture and limited commercial opportunities. The AR-2 zoning district implements the rural residential General Plan designation. The AR-2 district allows for one (1) primary residential unit on lots with a minimum size of two (2) gross acres.

c. AR-5, AR-10. The AR-5 and AR-10 zoning districts are applied to areas of the City to accommodate low density single-family development along with agricultural and accessory uses. Lots within the AR-5 and AR-10 zoning designations are rural in nature and include small local roadways, animal keeping and raising, equestrian uses, agriculture and limited commercial opportunities. The AR-5 and AR-10 zoning districts implement the rural residential General Plan designation. The AR-5 zoning district allows for one (1) residential unit on lots with a minimum size of five (5) gross acres. The AR-10 zoning district allows for one (1) primary residential unit on lots with a minimum size of ten (10) gross acres.

C. Residential Districts.

1. Very Low Density Residential (RD-1 through RD-3). The very low density residential zoning district designations are applied to areas of the City intended to accommodate very low density single-family residential uses in a semi-rural setting. Residential densities shall be in the range of one (1) to three (3) dwelling units per acre with minimum lot sizes between one-third (1/3) acre to one (1) acre. This residential designation includes the following specific zoning districts:

a. RD-1, RD-2, and RD-3. The RD districts are applied to areas of the City intended to accommodate very low density single-family estate type uses. Property with these RD designations should serve as a transitional residential district between agricultural residential and traditional lower density single-family neighborhoods. The zoning district number associated with the RD districts corresponds to the number of dwelling units permitted per acre of land. These RD districts allow a density range of one (1) to three (3) dwelling units per acre.

2. Low Density Residential (RD-4 through RD-7). The low density residential zoning district designations are applied to areas of the City intended to accommodate low density single-family residential neighborhoods. Typical development includes detached (and in some cases attached) single-family homes. Permitted uses in the RD districts include single-family and two-family homes, second units, and compatible neighborhood support facilities. Residential densities shall be in the range of 3.1 to seven (7) dwelling units per acre. Property with this designation should be located near other residential properties, schools, parks/open space, and neighborhood commercial services with low-impact office and light industrial uses nearby. Development standards for these districts allow design flexibility and promote a range of housing densities and variety of housing types. This residential designation includes the following specific zoning districts:

a. RD-4. The RD-4 district is intended for detached single-family and two-family homes up to a maximum density of four (4) dwelling units per acre. Development is typically one (1) and two (2) stories in height with larger yard areas.

b. RD-5. The RD-5 district allows single-family and two-family homes up to a maximum density of five (5) dwelling units per acre. This district may include detached and attached housing types. Development is typically one (1) and two (2) stories in height with private yard areas.

c. RD-6. The RD-6 district allows single-family and two-family homes up to a maximum density of six (6) dwelling units per acre. This district may include detached and attached housing types, as well as cluster developments. Building heights in this district are typically one (1) and two (2) stories. Development standards allow for a variety of housing types.

d. RD-7. The RD-7 district allows single-family and two-family homes up to a maximum density of seven (7) dwelling units per acre. This district may include detached and attached housing types, as well as cluster developments. Building heights in this district are typically one (1) and two (2) stories. Development standards allow for a variety of housing types.

3. Medium Density Residential (RD-10 and RD-15). The medium density residential zoning district designations are applied to areas of the City intended to accommodate higher density single-family and lower density multifamily residential neighborhoods. These RD districts accommodate a variety of housing types with a density range between 7.1 and fifteen (15) dwelling units per acre. Specifically, medium density residential development may include detached and attached single-family homes, duplexes, townhomes, condominiums, row houses, and garden apartments. Development standards for these districts allow significant design flexibility to encourage a broad range of housing types and are intended to ensure compatibility and connectivity with surrounding neighborhoods and uses. This residential designation includes the following specific zoning districts:

a. RD-10. The RD-10 district allows higher density single-family attached and detached homes, and may include lower density multifamily for-sale and for-lease units with a maximum of ten (10) dwelling units per acre. Property with this designation should be located near other residential sites, offices, commercial uses and services, or light industrial areas. Development is typically one (1) and two (2) stories in height (three (3) stories in some cases) with greater lot coverage than the low density single-family residential districts.

b. RD-15. The RD-15 district may include single-family, two-family, and/or multifamily residential use within a maximum density of fifteen (15) dwelling units per acre. Development may include both for-sale and for-lease products, such as small-lot single-family attached or detached homes, townhomes, condominiums, row houses, and garden apartments. Residential structures are typically one (1) and two (2) stories in height (three (3) stories in some cases) with greater lot coverage than the low density single-family residential districts. The RD-15 district should serve as a transitional residential district between lower density single-family neighborhoods and high density residential districts, office buildings, commercial uses, or light industrial uses. RD-15 sites should be located near arterial or collector roads.

4. High Density Residential (RD-20 through RD-30). The high density residential zoning district designations are applied to areas of the City intended to accommodate higher density multifamily development such as apartments and condominiums. This designation may also include high density single-family development types such as townhomes and other attached housing types. High density detached homes may be considered in the RD-20 designation. Residential densities shall be in the range of 15.1 to thirty (30) dwelling units per acre. Property with this designation should be located near other multifamily sites, offices, commercial uses, or light industrial areas. Additionally, multifamily residential sites should be located along thoroughfare, arterial, or collector roads or near existing or planned public transit stops. Standards for these districts promote attractive residential development that is compatible with surrounding neighborhoods, while at the same time carefully regulating uses to assure compatible development that limit impacts on surrounding uses. This residential designation includes the following specific zoning districts:

a. RD-20. The RD-20 district is intended for high density attached single-family homes, such as townhomes or row houses, as well as medium density multifamily development that includes apartments and condominiums up to a maximum density of twenty (20) dwelling units per acre. Detached single-family homes may be considered on a case-by-case basis with a conditional use permit request. Development is typically two (2) stories in height (three (3) stories in some cases) with greater lot coverage than the medium density residential districts.

b. RD-25. The RD-25 district is intended for high density residential development, including apartments and condominiums or higher density attached single-family units, such as townhomes. The maximum density in this district is thirty (30) dwelling units per acre and it is expected that most developments will be two (2) to three (3) stories in height with greater lot coverage than in the RD-20 district.

c. RD-30. The RD-30 district allows the maximum residential density permitted in the City. Except with a density bonus, the maximum density is thirty (30) dwelling units per acre and in general building heights will be three (3) stories with greater lot coverage than in the RD-25 district. Apartments or condominiums are generally expected to be the primary type of development in this district. The City encourages the location of RD-30 sites near commercial or office centers or near light industrial uses or other centers of employment.

D. Commercial Districts.

1. Limited Commercial (LC). The limited commercial district is designed to foster low intensity neighborhood-oriented commercial development adjacent to, integrated within, or at the entrance to residential neighborhoods. The limited commercial district may also be located along arterial or collector roads at midblock locations between major intersections. This district is intended to promote a mix of retail goods and services as well as small-scale office uses and low intensity mixed-use development. Limited commercial properties should be smaller in size, developed with buildings that are compatible in scale with surrounding residential neighborhoods. Development should be pedestrian-friendly with entrances and windows oriented to the sidewalk/street.

2. General Commercial (GC). The general commercial district is intended to allow for medium to high intensity uses with a wide range of retail, wholesale commercial, entertainment, office, services, and professional uses. Development should be pedestrian-oriented, but is expected to be auto-accommodating as well. This district should be applied to medium to large sites adjacent to other commercial uses, office uses or higher density residential development. When located adjacent to single-family residential, vehicles using the commercial site should not have a direct impact on the entrances to the neighborhood, but pedestrian connections should be provided. GC sites should be located near freeways, along arterials, or at major intersections. This district is also intended to support the development of urban villages that offer a mixture of uses including retail, offices, services, entertainment, and commercial within the same site with connections between those uses. Development should provide a pleasant visual atmosphere for motorists, transit users, and pedestrians as well as for the other businesses located within the zoning district.

3. Shopping Center (SC). The shopping center district is intended for medium to high intensity shopping centers with a local or regional market area. Developments within this district should include a wide choice of goods and services. The designation should be applied to medium to large sites near freeways, along arterials, and at major intersections. The SC zone should be adjacent to other commercial uses or higher density residential development. When located adjacent to single-family residential, vehicles using the commercial site should not have a direct impact on the entrances to the neighborhood. Development in this district typically involves integrated structures with multiple uses and tenants providing a broad range of goods and services. Development should incorporate pedestrian-friendly designs that include walkways interior to the project as well as connections to adjacent uses and neighborhoods, but should also be auto-accommodating.

4. Auto Commercial (AC). The auto commercial district is characterized by automotive sales and services and related uses. This zone is intended to promote the unified grouping of auto-oriented uses in locations where they will be convenient to residents and visitors alike. The designation should be used on sites adjacent to other existing commercial or office uses and should be located near freeways, thoroughfares, and arterials. Uses should be of medium intensity and should be auto-accommodating.

5. Commercial Recreation (C-O). The commercial recreation district is intended to provide an area for commercial uses normally considered to be recreation-oriented and for commercial uses associated with major recreation areas, such as aquatic centers, private and public sports facilities, and outdoor theaters. In addition to providing automobile access and parking, development within this district should provide access for pedestrians to and throughout the development. Development and uses should be low to medium intensity in nature and should serve as a buffer between residential neighborhoods or agriculture uses and more intense commercial development where possible.

E. Mixed-Use Districts.

1. Village Center Mixed-Use (VCMU). The village center mixed-use district is designated for development that occurs under a “village center” concept where it serves as a gathering location for area employees and residents. This zone is characterized by pedestrian-oriented development with a mix of uses and a focus on ground-floor commercial, retail, or office uses. Residential or office uses are allowed on upper floors. Development should prioritize vertical integration of uses and integrated public plazas with an emphasis on pedestrian-oriented design. This zone is ideally located along major roadways and/or transit corridors.

2. Residential Mixed-Use (RMU). The residential mixed-use district designates areas for residential development that allow for the integration of compatible office, retail, and service uses. The predominant land use is residential, with commercial and office serving as supporting uses. This zone is characterized by pedestrian-oriented development, with vertical mixes of uses that feature ground-floor activity spaces, live-work units, or retail or office uses with residential uses on upper floors.

F. Office Districts.

1. Business and Professional Office (BP). The business and professional office district is intended for low to medium intensity office development located along thoroughfares, arterials, or collectors or near existing/planned public transit stops. This designation allows mixed-use development and high density development in conjunction with nonresidential development. The designation should be applied to sites adjacent to other commercial uses or higher density residential development. The district is intended for office development and may include supporting services such as retail, service, or restaurant uses developed in conjunction with office use. Office development should be designed to be pedestrian-friendly, but should also be auto-accommodating. Development in this district should take advantage of existing or planned public transit opportunities.

2. Industrial-Office Park (MP). The industrial-office park district is intended to provide well-designed and integrated development that supports a range of clean, light industrial or high-technology office and manufacturing uses and may include research, retail, service, and storage components or other supportive uses, such as dry cleaners, day care centers, restaurants or medical clinics. The MP designation is intended for low to medium intensity uses located along freeways, thoroughfares, arterials, or collectors or near existing/planned public transit stops. The emphasis in this district is on development in a business park setting on sites adjacent to other industrial, commercial, or office uses or near higher density residential development. Development should be pedestrian-friendly with connections between and among different uses; however, it should also accommodate automobiles. Development in this district should take advantage of existing or planned public transit opportunities.

G. Industrial Districts.

1. Light Industrial (LI). The light industrial district is intended for low to medium intensity uses that involve the manufacture, fabrication, assembly, or processing of primarily finished materials. These activities, along with supportive and complementary uses, such as storage, shipping, retail, wholesale, or sales operations, are allowed in this district. Uses in this district should pose limited environmental impact in terms of noise, odors, traffic, hazardous materials, and other health and safety risks. In addition, the development standards are designed to promote attractive development that is compatible with surrounding development. Sites designated for LI uses should be located on medium to large sites along freeways, thoroughfares, arterials, or collectors adjacent to other office, industrial, commercial or higher density residential uses. Residential uses of any kind are prohibited in this district with the exception of a caretaker residence. Development should be auto-accommodating with sufficient and clearly defined parking and loading areas.

2. Light Industrial/Flex (LI/FX). The light industrial/flex district is intended to accommodate a diverse range of light industrial and office activities, and may serve as a buffer between heavy industrial areas and residential and other sensitive land uses. The LI/FX is generally located in areas providing adequate access for the movement of goods. The LI/FX designation allows flexibility in developing a greater extent of office uses and professional services than are allowed by right in the light industrial district.

3. Heavy Industrial (HI). The heavy industrial district is intended to accommodate a broad range of manufacturing and industrial uses. Permitted activity may vary from medium to higher intensity uses that involve the manufacture, fabrication, assembly, or processing of raw and/or finished materials. Sites designated for heavy industrial uses should not be located near residential development. Furthermore, residential uses of any kind are prohibited in this district with the exception of a caretaker residence. Development standards are designed to limit noise, odors, traffic, hazardous materials, and other health and safety risks as well as ensure safe, functional, and environmentally sound development. Development should be auto-accommodating with sufficient and clearly defined parking and loading areas.

H. Public/Quasi-Public Districts.

1. Park and Recreation (PR). This district is designated for existing and future park facilities, including local, neighborhood, and community parks; public golf courses; sports facilities and complexes; and other recreational facilities that serve the outdoor recreational needs of the community.

2. Public Services (PS). The public services district is applied to land and facilities owned or leased by public agencies, including the City of Elk Grove, the Elk Grove Unified School District and other public school districts, the Cosumnes Community Services District (with the exception of public parks), and other similar public agencies. This designation also allows other institutional uses such as higher education, private schools, cemeteries, or post offices.

3. Open Space Land Use (O). The open space zoning district is applied to lands owned by public and private entities that have been reserved for open space uses such as landscape corridors, habitat mitigation, wetlands, wildlife habitat and corridors, lakes, trails, and similar uses. Some quasi-public uses such as recreation centers, nature centers, public golf courses, and joint use facilities may be permitted with approval of a conditional use permit.

I. Special Purpose Districts.

1. Specific Plan (SP). The purpose of the specific plan (SP) district is to designate unique planning areas within the City for which the City Council has adopted or requires adoption of a separate planning document, a specific plan, consistent with the General Plan and State law.

2. Special Planning Area (SPA). The purpose of the special planning area (SPA) district is to designate areas for unique and imaginative planning standards and regulations not provided through the application of standard zoning districts.

3. Mobile Home (RM-1). The purpose of the mobile home subdivision (RM-1) district is to provide regulations for the placement of mobile homes on individual lots within an approved subdivision specifically designed and designated for the sale, not rental, of lots to accommodate mobile homes as the dwelling unit.

J. Overlay/Combining Districts.

1. Multifamily Overlay District (MF). The purpose of the multifamily overlay zone (MF) is to implement the General Plan by establishing opportunities for multifamily housing in specified locations throughout the City. This overlay zone supplements the allowed uses and development standards of the underlying zoning district. The intent is to allow multifamily development in conjunction with nonresidential uses permitted in the underlying zoning district to which it is applied.

2. Flood Combining District (F). The flood (F) combining district provides special regulations for the development of properties within the City covered by rivers, creeks, and streams and subject to flooding.

3. Mobile Home Park Combining District (MHP). The mobile home park (MHP) combining district is designed to provide for the development of mobile home parks, as defined in Division VI, Zoning Definitions A – Z, of this title. When combined with the underlying zone, it will provide opportunity for a variety of mobile home park environments that are compatible with the communities in which they are placed.

4. Rural Commercial Combining Zone (RUC). The rural commercial (RUC) combining district as shown on the City’s zoning map includes all parcels generally located at or near the intersection of Grant Line Road and Wilton Road that are zoned as either general commercial (GC), limited commercial (LC), or industrial (LI), as well as all parcels at or near that intersection that have a General Plan designation of commercial or light industry.

5. Surface Mining Combining District (SM). The surface mining combining district (SM) identifies lands for the development of surface mining operations as required by State law.

6. Business Center District Sign Overlay Zone (BCS). The business center district sign overlay zone (BCS) is established to increase the visibility and economic vitality of specified areas of the City while at the same time ensuring public safety. In doing so, it provides a mechanism for the identification of establishments, uses, activities, or features within a business center area as defined in this section.

7. East Franklin (EF) Overlay District. The purpose of the East Franklin Specific Plan overlay district is to provide unique development standards for properties in the East Franklin area that are consistent with historical development patterns in that area.

8. East Elk Grove (EEG) Overlay District. The purpose of the East Elk Grove overlay district is to provide unique development standards for properties in the East Elk Grove area that are consistent with historical development patterns in that area.

9. Calvine Road/Highway 99 (CR-99) Overlay District. The purpose of the Calvine Road/Highway 99 overlay district is to provide unique development standards for properties in the area previously designated as the Calvine/99 Special Planning Area that are consistent with historical development patterns in that area. [Ord. 6-2019 §3 (Exh. A), eff. 4-26-2019; Ord. 24-2015 §11 (Exh. I), eff. 2-12-2016; Ord. 23-2014 §3 (Exh. A), eff. 10-10-2014]

23.24.030 Map established.

The City Council hereby adopts the City of Elk Grove zoning map as the official designation of zoning district boundaries on real property within the City. The zoning map shall be regulated as set forth below.

A. Map Amendments. Amendments to the zoning map shall follow the zoning amendment process established in EGMC Chapter 23.16 (Permit Requirements).

B. Relationship to General Plan and Other Plans. The zoning map shall implement and shall be consistent with the City’s adopted General Plan. The zoning map shall be specifically consistent with the General Plan land use plan and the roadway sizing diagram, and any adopted specific plans, special planning areas, or other applicable plans.

C. Zoning District Symbol. Zoning districts shall be illustrated on the zoning map as follows:

1. Each base zoning district shall be described on the zoning map by use of its identified zoning district symbol, as listed in EGMC Section 23.24.020 (Zoning districts established).

2. Each specific plan and special planning area zoning district shall be delineated with a name, number, symbol, or other delineation, as determined by the Development Services Director, which distinguishes it from other special purpose zones, base zoning districts, or overlay zones. The assignment of the special purpose designation serves to provide a reference to the corresponding special purpose zoning document (e.g., specific plan) adopted by the City Council.

3. Overlay zoning districts shall be designated by their representative symbol in conjunction with the base zoning district in a format determined by the Development Services Director (e.g., GC-BCS).

D. Zoning Map Interpretation. If there is uncertainty about the location of any zoning district boundary shown on the zoning map, the precise location of the boundary shall be determined by the Development Services Director as follows:

1. The boundaries of a zoning district shall be the centerlines of streets, alleys, railroad right-of-way, drainage channel, or other watercourse, or the lot lines of real property, unless otherwise shown. Where a district’s boundaries approximately follow centerlines or lot lines, those lines shall be interpreted as the district boundaries.

2. If a district boundary divides a lot and the boundary line location is not specified by distances printed on the zoning map or the adopting ordinance, the location of the boundary shall be determined by using the scale appearing on the zoning map. Each portion of the property shall be developed to the standards and allowed use provisions of the applied zoning district and any applied overlay zone(s).

3. Where the street layout on the ground or the parcel lines differ from such layout or lines shown on the zoning map, the Development Services Director shall determine the exact boundary and correct the map accordingly.

4. Where a public street or alley is legally vacated or abandoned, the property that was formerly in the street or alley shall be included within the zoning district of the adjoining property on either side of the centerline of the vacated or abandoned street or alley. [Ord. 24-2015 §11 (Exh. I), eff. 2-12-2016; Ord. 23-2014 §3 (Exh. A), eff. 10-10-2014]