Chapter 22C.010
RESIDENTIAL ZONES

Sections:

22C.010.010    Purpose.

22C.010.020    List of the residential zones.

22C.010.030    Characteristics of residential zones.

22C.010.040    Additional zoning standards.

22C.010.050    Residential zone primary uses.

22C.010.060    Permitted uses.

22C.010.070    Permitted uses – Development conditions.

22C.010.080    Densities and dimensions.

22C.010.090    Densities and dimensions – Development conditions.

22C.010.100    Measurement methods.

22C.010.110    Calculations – Allowable dwelling units.

22C.010.120    Calculations – Site area used for density calculations.

22C.010.130    Lot area – Prohibited reduction.

22C.010.140    Minimum lot area for construction.

22C.010.150    Setbacks – Specific building or use.

22C.010.160    Setbacks – Modifications.

22C.010.170    Setbacks – From regional utility corridors.

22C.010.180    Setbacks – From private roads or access easements.

22C.010.190    Setbacks – From alleys.

22C.010.200    Setbacks – Adjoining half-street or designated arterial.

22C.010.210    Setbacks – Projections allowed.

22C.010.220    Height – Exceptions to limits.

22C.010.230    Lot divided by zone boundary.

22C.010.240    Sight distance requirements.

22C.010.250    Nonresidential land uses in residential zones.

22C.010.255    Residential design requirements – Purpose.

22C.010.260    Residential design requirements – Applicability and interpretations.

22C.010.270    Zero lot line development.

22C.010.280    Cottage housing developments.

22C.010.290    Site and building design standards.

22C.010.300    Commercial, multiple-family, townhome, and group residences – Vehicular access and parking location.

22C.010.310    Small lot single-family dwelling development standards.

22C.010.320    Open space and recreation space required.

22C.010.330    Townhouse open space.

22C.010.340    Maintenance or dedication of open space and recreation space.

22C.010.350    On-site recreation – Fee in lieu of open space or recreation space.

22C.010.360    On-site recreation – Acceptance criteria for fee in lieu of recreation space.

22C.010.370    Storage space and collection points for recyclables.

22C.010.380    Fences.

22C.010.390    Special limitations in the R-12 through R-28 zones.

22C.010.400    Duplex performance and design standards.

22C.010.410    Nonconforming situations.

22C.010.420    Parking and loading.

22C.010.430    Signs.

22C.010.440    Landscaping and screening.

22C.010.450    Planned residential developments.

22C.010.010 Purpose.

The residential zones implement the single-family and higher density residential goals and policies and land use plan map designations of the comprehensive plan. They are intended to preserve land for housing and to provide housing opportunities for individual households. The zones are distinguished by the uses allowed and the intensity of development allowed. The differences in the zoning categories reflect the diversity of residential areas in the city. The limits on the intensity of uses and the development standards promote the desired character for the residential area. The standards are intended to provide certainty to property owners, developers and neighbors of what is allowed in the various categories. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.020 List of the residential zones.

The full names, short names and map symbols of the single-family and higher density residential zones are listed below:

Full Name

Short Name/Map Symbol

Medium density single-family

R-4.5

High density single-family

R-6.5

High density single-family, small lot

R-8

Whiskey Ridge, high density single-family

WR-R-4-8

Low density multiple-family

R-12

Medium density multiple-family

R-18

High density multiple-family

R-28

Whiskey Ridge, medium density multiple-family

WR-R-6-18

Residential mobile home park

R-MHP

Small farms overlay

SF (suffix to zone’s map symbol)

Property-specific development standards

P (suffix to zone’s map symbol)

(Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.030 Characteristics of residential zones.

(1) Medium Density Single-Family (R-4.5). The R-4.5 zone is a medium-density single-family residential zone. It allows single-family residences at a density of 4.5 dwelling units per acre. Duplexes are permitted as a conditional use with a maximum density of six dwelling units per acre. The major type of new development will be detached single-family residences. The R-4.5 zone is applied to areas that are designated medium density single-family on the land use plan map of the comprehensive plan.

(2) High Density Single-Family (R-6.5). The R-6.5 zone is a high-density single-family residential zone. It allows single-family residences at a density of 6.5 dwelling units per acre. Duplexes are permitted outright on 7,200-square-foot lots with a maximum density of eight dwelling units per acre. The major type of new development will be detached single-family residences. The R-6.5 zone is applied to areas that are designated high density single-family on the land use plan map of the comprehensive plan.

(3) High Density Single-Family, Small Lot (R-8). The R-8 zone is a high-density single-family, small lot residential zone. It allows single-family residences at a density of eight dwelling units per acre. Duplexes are permitted outright on 7,200-square-foot lots with a maximum density of eight dwelling units per acre. The major type of new development will be detached single-family residences. The R-8 zone is applied to areas that are designated high density single-family – small lot on the land use plan map of the comprehensive plan.

(4) Whiskey Ridge, High Density Single-Family (WR-R-4-8). The WR-R-4-8 zone is a high-density single-family residential zone. It allows single-family residences at a density range of 4.5 to eight dwelling units per acre. Duplexes are permitted outright on 7,200-square-foot lots with a maximum density of eight dwelling units per acre. The major type of new development will be detached single-family residences. The WR-R-4-8 zone is applied to areas that are designated Whiskey Ridge, high density single-family on the land use plan map of the comprehensive plan.

(5) Low Density Multiple-Family (R-12). The R-12 zone is a low density multiple-family residential zone. The major types of new housing development will be attached and detached single-family residential, duplexes, apartments and condominiums. The density is 12 units per acre; the maximum is limited to 18 units per acre.

(6) Medium Density Multiple-Family (R-18). The R-18 zone is a medium density multiple-family residential zone. The major types of new housing development will be attached and detached single-family residential, duplexes, apartments and condominiums. The density is 18 units per acre; the maximum is limited to 27 units per acre.

(7) High Density Multiple-Family (R-28). The R-28 zone is a high density multiple-family residential zone. The major types of new housing development will be attached and detached single-family residential, duplexes, apartments and condominiums. The density is 28 units per acre; the maximum is limited to 36 units per acre.

(8) Whiskey Ridge, Medium Density Multiple-Family (WR-R-6-18). The WR-R-6-18 zone is a medium density multiple-family residential zone. The major types of new housing development will be attached and detached single-family residential, duplexes, apartments and condominiums. The density is six units per acre for detached single-family and 10 units per acre for attached multiple-family; the maximum is limited to 18 units per acre.

(9) Residential Mobile Home Park (R-MHP). The R-MHP zone preserves high density, affordable detached single-family and senior housing. This zone is assigned to existing mobile home parks within residential zones which contain rental pads, as opposed to fee simple owned lots, and as such are more susceptible to future development. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.040 Additional zoning standards.

The standards in this chapter state the allowed uses and development standards for the base zones. Sites with overlay zones, subarea or master plans are subject to additional standards. The official zoning maps indicate which sites are subject to these additional standards. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.050 Residential zone primary uses.

(1) Permitted Uses (P). Uses permitted in the residential zones are listed in MMC 22C.010.060 with a “P.” These uses are allowed if they comply with the development standards and other standards of this chapter.

(2) Conditional Uses (C). Uses that are allowed if approved through the conditional use review process are listed in MMC 22C.010.060 with a “C.” These uses are allowed provided they comply with the conditional use approval criteria for that use, the development standards and other standards of this chapter. Uses listed with a “C” that also have a footnote number in the table are subject to the standards cited in the footnote. The conditional use review process and approval criteria are stated in Chapter 22G.010 MMC.

(3) Uses Not Permitted. If no symbol appears in the box at the intersection of the column and the row, the use is not permitted in that district, except for certain temporary uses.

(4) If a number appears in the box at the intersection of the column and the row, the use may be allowed subject to the appropriate review process indicated above, the general requirements of this code and the specific conditions indicated in the development condition with the corresponding number as listed in MMC 22C.010.070.

(5) If more than one letter-number combination appears in the box at the intersection of the column and the row, the use is allowed in that zone subject to different sets of limitation or conditions depending on the review process indicated by the letter, the general requirements of this code and the specific conditions indicated in the development condition with the corresponding number as listed in MMC 22C.010.070.

(6) All applicable requirements shall govern a use whether or not they are cross-referenced in a section. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.060 Permitted uses.

 

Specific Land Use

R-4.5

R-6.5

R-8

WR
R-4-8

R-12

R-18

R-28

WR
R-6-18

R-MHP

Residential Land Uses

Dwelling Units, Types:

Single detached (14)

P11

P11

P11

P11

P11

P11

P11

P11

P43

Model home

P30

P30

P30

P30

P30

P30

P30

P30

P30

Cottage housing

C6

C6

C6

C6

C6

C6

C6

C6

 

Duplex (14)

C8

P8

P8

P8

P

P

P

P

 

Townhouse

P3

P3

P3

P3

P

P

P

P

 

Multiple-family

 

 

 

 

P

P

P

P

 

Mobile home

P12

P12

P12

P12

P12

P12

P12

P12

P12

Mobile/manufactured home park

P3

P3

P3

 

C

P

P

 

P45

Senior citizen assisted

C2

C2

C2

C2

C2

C2

C2

C2

C2

Factory-built

P7

P7

P7

P7

P7

P7

P7

P7

P7, 43

Recreational vehicle

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

P44

Group Residences:

Adult family home

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Convalescent, nursing, retirement

C2

C2

C2

C2

C2

C2

C2

C2

 

Residential care facility

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Master planned senior community (15)

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

Accessory Uses:

Residential accessory uses (1), (9), (10), (49), (50)

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Home occupation (5)

P

P

P

P

P13

P13

P13

P13

P

Temporary Lodging:

Hotel/motel

 

 

 

 

P

P

P

P

 

Bed and breakfast guesthouse (4)

 

C

C

C

P

P

P

P

 

Bed and breakfast inn (4)

 

 

 

 

P

P

P

P

 

Recreation/Cultural Land Uses

Park/Recreation:

Park

P16

P16

P16

P16

P16

P16

P16

P16

P16

Recreational vehicle park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

C46

Community center

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

Amusement/Entertainment:

Sports club

 

 

 

 

C

C

C

C

 

Golf facility (17)

C

C

C

C

P

P

P

P

 

Cultural:

Library, museum and art gallery

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

Church, synagogue and temple

C

C

C

C

P

P

P

P

C

General Services Land Uses

Personal Services:

Funeral home/crematory

C18

C18

C18

C18

C18

C18

C18

C18

C18

Cemetery, columbarium or mausoleum

P24

C19

P24

C19

P24

C19

P24

C19

P24

C19

P24

C19

P24

C19

P24

C19

P24

C19

Day care I

P20

P20

P20

P20

P20

P20

P20

P20

P20

Day care II

C25

C25

C25

C25

C

C

C

C

C25

Stable

C

C

C

C

 

 

 

 

 

Kennel or cattery, hobby

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

 

Electric vehicle (EV) charging station (38), (39)

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

EV rapid charging station (40), (41), (42)

 

 

 

 

P

P

P

P

 

Health Services:

Medical/dental clinic

 

 

 

 

C

C

C

C

 

Supervised drug consumption facility

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education Services:

Elementary, middle/junior high, and senior high (including public, private and parochial)

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

Commercial school

C21

C21

C21

C21

C21

C21

C21

C21

 

School district support facility

C23

C23

C23

C23

C23

C23

C23

C23

 

Interim recycling facility

P22

P22

P22

P22

P22

P22

P22

P22

 

Vocational school

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Government/Business Service Land Uses

Government Services:

Public safety facilities, including police and fire

C26

C26

C26

C26

C26

C26

C26

C26

C26

Utility facility

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Private storm water management facility

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Public storm water management facility

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

Business Services:

Self-service storage (31)

 

 

 

 

C27

C27

C27

C27

 

Professional office

 

 

 

 

C

C

C

C

 

Automotive parking

P29

P29

P29

P29

P29

P29

P29

P29

 

Model house sales office

P47

P47

P47

P47

 

 

 

 

 

Wireless communication facility (28)

P

C

P

C

P

C

P

C

P

C

P

C

P

C

P

C

P

C

State-Licensed Marijuana Facilities:

Marijuana cooperative (48)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marijuana processing facility – Indoor only (48)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marijuana production facility – Indoor only (48)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Marijuana retail facility (48)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Retail/Wholesale Land Uses

Forest products sales

P32

P32

P32

P32

 

 

 

 

 

Agricultural crop sales

P32

P32

P32

P32

 

 

 

 

 

Resource Land Uses

Agriculture:

Growing and harvesting crops

P34

P34

P34

P34

 

 

 

 

 

Raising livestock and small animals

P35

P35

P35

P35

 

 

 

 

 

Forestry:

Growing and harvesting forest products

P34

P34

P34

P34

 

 

 

 

 

Fish and Wildlife Management:

Hatchery/fish preserve (33)

C

C

C

C

 

 

 

 

 

Aquaculture (33)

C

C

C

C

 

 

 

 

 

Regional Land Uses

Regional storm water management facility

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

Nonhydroelectric generation facility

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

Transit park and pool lot

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

P

 

Transit park and ride lot

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

 

School bus base

C36

C36

C36

C36

C36

C36

C36

C36

 

Racetrack

C37

C37

C37

C37

C37

C37

C37

C37

 

College/university

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

 

(Ord. 3085 § 2, 2018; Ord. 3071 § 3, 2017; Ord. 3054 § 7, 2017; Ord. 3022 § 7, 2016; Ord. 2959 § 5, 2014; Ord. 2898 § 7, 2012; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.070 Permitted uses – Development conditions.

(1) Accessory dwelling units must comply with development standards in Chapter 22C.180 MMC. Accessory dwelling units in the MHP zone are only allowed on single lots of record containing one single-family detached dwelling.

(2) Limited to three residents per the equivalent of each minimum lot size or dwelling units per acre allowed in the zone in which it is located.

(3) Only as part of a planned residential development (PRD) proposal, and subject to the same density as the underlying zone.

(4) Bed and breakfast guesthouses and inns are subject to the requirements and standards contained in Chapter 22C.210 MMC.

(5) Home occupations are subject to the requirements and standards contained in Chapter 22C.190 MMC.

(6) Subject to cottage housing provisions set forth in MMC 22C.010.280.

(7) Factory-built dwelling units shall comply with the following standards:

(a) A factory-built house must be inspected at least two times at the factory by the State Building Inspector during the construction process, and must receive an approval certifying that it meets all requirements of the International Building Code. At the building site, the city building official will conduct foundation, plumbing and final inspections.

(b) A factory-built house cannot be attached to a metal frame allowing it to be mobile. All such structures must be placed on a permanent foundation at the building site.

(8) Permitted outright in the R-6.5, R-8, and WR-R-4-8 zones on minimum 7,200-square-foot lots. A conditional use permit is required for the R-4.5 zone, and the minimum lot size must be 12,500 square feet. Duplexes must comply with the comprehensive plan density requirements for the underlying land use designation.

(9) A garage sale shall comply with the following standards:

(a) No residential premises shall have more than two such sales per year and no such sale shall continue for more than six days within a 15-day period.

(b) Signs advertising such sales shall not be attached to any public structures, signs or traffic control devices, nor to any utility poles. All such signs shall be removed 24 hours after the sale is completed.

A garage sale complying with the above conditions shall be considered as being an allowable accessory use to all residential land uses. A garage sale violating one or more of the above conditions shall be considered as being a commercial use and will be disallowed unless it complies with all requirements affecting commercial uses.

(10) Residential accessory structures must comply with development standards in Chapter 22C.180 MMC.

(11) Manufactured homes must:

(a) Be set on a permanent foundation, as specified by the manufacturer, enclosed with an approved concrete product from the bottom of the home to the ground which may be either load-bearing or decorative;

(b) Meet all design standards applicable to all other single-family homes in the neighborhood in which the manufactured home is to be located;

(c) Be no more than five years old, as evidenced by the date of manufacture recorded on the HUD data plate. An administrative variance to the requirement that a manufactured home be no more than five years old may be granted by the community development director only if the applicant demonstrates all of the following:

(i) The strict enforcement of the provisions of this title creates an unnecessary hardship to the property owner;

(ii) The proposed manufactured home is well maintained and does not present any health or safety hazards;

(iii) The variance is necessary or warranted because of the unique size, shape, topography, location, critical areas encumbrance, or other feature of the subject property;

(iv) The proposed manufactured home will be compatible with the neighborhood or area where it will be located;

(v) The subject property is otherwise deprived, by provisions of this title, of rights and privileges enjoyed by other properties in the vicinity and within an identical zone;

(vi) The need for the variance is not the result of deliberate actions of the applicant or property owner; and

(vii) The variance is the minimum necessary to grant relief to the applicant.

(12) Mobile homes are only allowed in existing mobile home parks established prior to October 16, 2006.

(13) Home occupations are limited to home office uses in multifamily dwellings. No signage is permitted in townhouse or multifamily dwellings.

(14) No more than one single-family detached or duplex dwelling is allowed per lot except in planned residential developments, through the provisions of Chapter 22G.080 MMC, using the binding site plan (BSP) process outlined in Chapter 22G.100 MMC, and designated on the face of the BSP, for multiple single-family detached dwellings on a single parcel; or accessory dwelling units through the provisions of Chapter 22C.180 MMC.

(15) Subject to Chapter 22C.220 MMC, Master Planned Senior Communities.

(16) The following conditions and limitations shall apply, where appropriate:

(a) Parks are permitted in residential and mixed use zones when reviewed as part of a subdivision, mobile/manufactured home park, or multiple-family development proposal; otherwise, a conditional use permit is required;

(b) Lighting for structures and fields shall be directed away from residential areas; and

(c) Structures or service yards shall maintain a minimum distance of 50 feet from property lines adjoining residential zones.

(17) Golf facilities shall comply with the following:

(a) Structures, driving ranges and lighted areas shall maintain a minimum distance of 50 feet from property lines adjoining residential zones.

(b) Restaurants are permitted as an accessory use to a golf course.

(18) Only as an accessory to a cemetery.

(19) Structures shall maintain a minimum distance of 100 feet from property lines adjoining residential zones.

(20) Only as an accessory to residential use and subject to the criteria set forth in Chapter 22C.200 MMC.

(21) Only as an accessory to residential use, provided:

(a) Students are limited to 12 per one-hour session;

(b) All instruction must be within an enclosed structure; and

(c) Structures used for the school shall maintain a distance of 25 feet from property lines adjoining residential zones.

(22) Limited to drop box facilities accessory to a public or community use such as a school, fire station or community center.

(23) Only when adjacent to an existing or proposed school.

(24) Limited to columbariums accessory to a church; provided, that existing required landscaping and parking are not reduced.

(25) Day care IIs must be located on sites larger than one-half acre and are subject to minimum standards identified in Chapter 22C.200 MMC for day care I facilities. Parking facilities and loading areas shall be located to the rear of buildings or be constructed in a manner consistent with the surrounding residential character. Evaluation of site suitability shall be reviewed through the conditional use permit process.

(26) Public safety facilities, including police and fire, shall comply with the following:

(a) All buildings and structures shall maintain a minimum distance of 20 feet from property lines adjoining residential zones;

(b) Any buildings from which fire-fighting equipment emerges onto a street shall maintain a distance of 35 feet from such street.

(27) Accessory to an apartment development of at least 12 units, provided:

(a) The gross floor area in self-service storage shall not exceed 50 percent of the total gross floor area of the apartment dwellings on the site;

(b) All outdoor lights shall be deflected, shaded and focused away from all adjoining property;

(c) The use of the facility shall be limited to dead storage of household goods;

(d) No servicing or repair of motor vehicles, boats, trailers, lawn mowers or similar equipment;

(e) No outdoor storage or storage of flammable liquids, highly combustible or explosive materials or hazardous chemicals;

(f) No residential occupancy of the storage units;

(g) No business activity other than the rental of storage units to the apartment dwellings on the site; and

(h) A resident manager shall be required on the site and shall be responsible for maintaining the operation of the facility in conformance with the conditions of approval.

(28) All WCFs and modifications to WCFs are subject to Chapter 22C.250 MMC including, but not limited to, the siting hierarchy, MMC 22C.250.060. WCFs may be a permitted use or a conditional use subject to MMC 22C.250.040.

(29) Limited to commuter parking facilities for users of transit, carpools or ride-share programs, provided:

(a) They are located on existing parking lots for churches, schools, or other permitted nonresidential uses which have excess capacity available during commuting hours; and

(b) The site is adjacent to a designated arterial that has been improved to a standard acceptable to the department.

(30) Model Homes.

(a) The community development director may approve construction of model homes subject to the following conditions:

(i) No model home shall be constructed without the issuance of a building permit;

(ii) In no event shall the total number of model homes in a preliminary subdivision be greater than nine;

(iii) A hard-surfaced roadway to and abutting all model homes shall be constructed to standards determined by the city engineer or designee;

(iv) Operational fire hydrant(s) must be available in accordance with the International Fire Code;

(v) Submittal of a site plan, stamped by a registered civil engineer or licensed surveyor, delineating the location of each structure relative to existing and proposed utilities, lot lines, easements, roadways, topography and critical areas;

(vi) Submittal of building permit applications for each of the proposed structures;

(vii) Approval of water, sewer and storm sewer extension plans to serve the proposed structures; and

(viii) Execution of an agreement with the city saving and holding it harmless from any damages, direct or indirect, as a result of the approval of the construction of model homes on the site.

(b) Prior to occupancy of any model home, the final plat of the subject subdivision shall be approved and recorded.

(31) Any outdoor storage areas are subject to the screening requirements of the landscape code.

(32) Subject to approval of a small farms overlay zone.

(33) May be further subject to the provisions of the Marysville shoreline master program.

(34) Only allowed in conjunction with the small farms overlay zone.

(35) Provided, that the property has received approval of a small farms overlay designation, or is larger than one acre in size.

(36) Only in conjunction with an existing or proposed school.

(37) Except racing of motorized vehicles.

(38) Level 1 and Level 2 charging only.

(39) Allowed only as an accessory use to a principal outright permitted use or permitted conditional use.

(40) The term “rapid” is used interchangeably with “Level 3” and “fast charging.”

(41) Only “electric vehicle charging stations – restricted” as defined in Chapter 22A.020 MMC.

(42) Rapid (Level 3) charging stations are required to be placed within a parking garage.

(43) One single-family detached dwelling per existing single lot of record. Manufactured homes on single lots must meet the criteria outlined in subsection (11) of this section.

(44) Used as a permanent residence in an established MHP or RV park; provided, that utility hookups in MHPs meet current standards for MHPs or RV parks.

(45) MHPs shall fulfill the requirements of Chapter 22C.230 MMC.

(46) Recreational vehicle parks are subject to the requirements and conditions of Chapter 22C.240 MMC.

(47) Model house sales offices are subject to the requirements of MMC 22C.110.030(12).

(48) No person or entity may produce, grow, manufacture, process, accept donations for, give away, or sell marijuana concentrates, marijuana-infused products, or usable marijuana within residential zones in the city. Provided, activities in strict compliance with RCW 69.51A.210 and 69.51A.260 are not a violation of the Marysville Municipal Code.

(49) Shipping/cargo and similar storage containers are prohibited on lots within a platted subdivision and properties under one acre in size. Shipping/cargo and similar storage containers may be located on properties over one acre in size if located behind the primary residence, observe all setbacks applicable to an accessory structure, and are screened from public view.

(50) Accessory structures may not be utilized as, or converted to, a dwelling unless the structure complies with the accessory dwelling unit standards outlined in MMC 22C.180.030. (Ord. 3054 § 8, 2017; Ord. 3022 § 8, 2016; Ord. 2959 § 6, 2014; Ord. 2898 § 8, 2012; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.080 Densities and dimensions.

(1) Interpretation of Table.

(a) Subsection (2) of this section contains general density and dimension standards for the various zones and limitations specific to a particular zone(s). Additional rules and exceptions, and methodology, are set forth in MMC 22C.010.100 through 22C.010.250.

(b) The density and dimension table is arranged in a matrix format and is delineated into the residential use categories.

(c) Development standards are listed down the left side of the table, and the zones are listed at the top. The matrix cells contain the minimum dimensional requirements of the zone. The parenthetical numbers in the matrix identify specific requirements applicable either to a specific use or zone set forth in MMC 22C.010.090. A blank box indicates that there are no specific requirements. If more than one standard appears in a cell, each standard will be subject to any applicable parenthetical footnote following the standard.

(2) General Densities and Dimension Standards.

 

R-4.5

R-6.5

R-8

WR-R-4-8 (16)(17)

R-12 (13)

R-18 (13)

R-28 (13)

WR-R-6-18 (13)(16)(17)

Density: Dwelling unit/acre (6)

4.5 du/ac

6.5 du/ac

8 du/ac

4.5 du/ac

12 du/ac

18 du/ac

28 du/ac

6 du/ac (detached sf) 10 du/ac (attached multifamily)

Maximum density: Dwelling unit/acre (1)

8 du/ac

18 du/ac

27 du/ac

36 du/ac

18 du/ac

Minimum street setback (3) (15)

20 ft

(8)

20 ft

(8)

20 ft

(8)

20 ft

(8)

20 ft

25 ft

25 ft

20 ft

Minimum side yard setback (3)

5 ft

(10)

5 ft

(10)

5 ft

(10)

5 ft

(10, 11, 12)

10 ft

(10, 11, 12)

10 ft

(10, 11, 12)

10 ft

(10)

10 ft

(10, 11, 12)

Minimum rear yard setback (3)

20 ft

20 ft

20 ft

20 ft

25 ft

25 ft

25 ft

25 ft

Base height

30 ft

(18)

30 ft

(18)

30 ft

(18)

30 ft

(18)

35 ft (4)

45 ft (4)

45 ft (4)

35 ft (4)

Maximum building coverage: Percentage (5)

40%

40%

50%

50%

50%

50%

50%

40%

Maximum impervious surface: Percentage (5)

45%; 50%

45%; 50%

50%; 65%

50%; 65%

70%

70%

75%

70%

Minimum lot area

5,000 sq ft

5,000 sq ft

4,000 sq ft

5,000 sq ft

Minimum lot area for duplexes (2)

12,500 sq ft

7,200 sq ft

7,200 sq ft

7,200 sq ft

Minimum lot width (3)

60 ft

50 ft

40 ft

40 ft

70 ft

70 ft

70 ft

70 ft

Minimum lot frontage on cul-de-sac, sharp curve, or panhandle (14)

20 ft

20 ft

20 ft

20 ft

(Ord. 3057 § 4, 2017; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.090 Densities and dimensions – Development conditions.

(1) Maximum Density – Dwelling Unit/Acre.

(a) The maximum density for R-12, R-18, R-28, WR-R-4-8 and WR-R-6-18 zones may be achieved only through the application of residential density incentive provisions outlined in Chapter 22C.090 MMC.

(b) The maximum net density for the single-family zones is the same as the base density; provided, that for PRD developments the maximum density may be increased by up to 20 percent through the application of residential density incentive provisions outlined in Chapter 22C.090 MMC.

(2) The minimum lot sizes for duplexes apply to lots or parcels which existed on or before the effective date of the ordinance codified in this chapter. All new duplex lots created through the subdivision or short subdivision process shall be a minimum of 12,500 square feet in size in the R-4.5 zone, and 7,200 square feet in size in the R-6.5, R-8 and WR-R-4-8 zones. Additionally, all new duplex lots must include a “duplex disclosure” on the plat map, and must comply with the density requirements of the comprehensive plan (six units per acre for the R-4.5 zone and eight units per acre for the R-6.5, R-8, and WR-R-4-8 zones).

(3) These standards may be modified under the provisions for zero lot line and townhome developments.

(4) Base Height.

(a) Height limits may be increased when portions of the structure which exceed the base height limit provide one additional foot of street and interior setback beyond the required setback for each foot above the base height limit; provided, that the maximum height may not exceed 60 feet.

(b) Multiple-family developments, located outside of Planning Area 1, abutting or adjacent to areas zoned as single-family, or areas identified in the comprehensive plan as single-family, may have no more floors than the adjacent single-family dwellings, when single-family is the predominant adjacent land use.

(5) Applies to Each Individual Lot.

(a) The higher percentages of impervious surface coverage apply to complete land use applications submitted on or after the effective date of Ordinance 3057, adopted May 8, 2017; provided, however, in the case of approved development applications that have not yet started construction, an applicant may file for a minor revision to the approved land use application in accordance with MMC 22G.010.260.

(b) Building coverage and impervious surface area standards for:

(i) Regional uses shall be established at the time of permit review; or

(ii) Nonresidential uses in residential zones shall comply with MMC 22C.010.250.

(6) Density – Dwelling Unit/Acre.

(a) The densities listed for the single-family zones (R-4.5, R-6.5, R-8) and single-family development in the Whiskey Ridge zones (WR-R-4-8, WR-R-6-18) are maximum net densities.

(b) Mobile home parks shall be allowed a maximum density of eight dwelling units per acre, unless located in the R-4.5 or R-6.5 zones, in which case they are limited to the density of the underlying zone.

(7) The standards of the R-4.5 zone shall apply if a lot is less than 15,000 square feet in area.

(8) On a case-by-case basis, the street setback may be reduced to 10 feet; provided, that at least 20 linear feet of driveway are provided between any garage, carport, or other fenced parking area and the street property line, or the lot takes access from an alley. The linear distance shall be measured in a straight line from the nearest point of the garage, carport or fenced area to the access point at the street property line. In the case of platted lots, no more than two consecutive lots may be reduced to 10 feet.

(9) Residences shall have a setback of at least 50 feet from any property line if adjoining an agricultural zone either within or outside the city limits.

(10) For townhomes or apartment developments, the setback shall be the greater of:

(a) Twenty feet along any property line abutting R-4.5 through R-8, and WR-R-4-8 zones; or

(b) The average setback of the R-4.5 through R-8 zoned and platted single-family detached dwelling units from the common property line separating said dwelling units from the adjacent townhome or apartment development, provided the required setback applied to said development shall not exceed 60 feet. The setback shall be measured from said property line to the closest point of each single-family detached dwelling unit, excluding projections allowed per MMC 22C.010.210 and accessory structures existing at the time the townhome or apartment development receives approval by the city.

(11) Townhome setbacks are reduced to zero on an interior side yard setback where the units have a common wall for zero lot line developments.

(12) Townhome setbacks are reduced to five feet on side yard setbacks provided the buildings meet a 10-foot separation between structures.

(13) Single-family detached units and duplexes on individual lots within the R-12 through R-28, and WR-R-6-18 zones shall utilize the dimensional requirements of the R-8 zone, except the base density.

(14) Provided that the front yard setback shall be established as the point at which the lot meets the minimum width requirements. On a case-by-case basis, the street setback may be reduced to the minimum of 20 feet; provided, that the portion of the structure closest to the street is part of the “living area,” to avoid having the garage become the predominant feature on the lot.

(15) Subject to MMC 22A.020.130, subsection (1)(a) of the definition of “lot lines.”

(16) Required landscaping setbacks for developments on the north side of Soper Hill Road are 25 feet from the edge of sidewalk.

(17) Projects with split zoning (two or more distinct land use zones) may propose a master site plan to density average at the zone edge or modify the zone boundaries using topography, access, critical areas, or other site characteristics in order to provide a more effective transition between land uses and zones. Approval is at the discretion of the community development director.

(18) In order to accommodate a daylight basement or garage, the base height for the principal dwelling may be increased to 35 feet on lots with a 10 percent or greater slope within the building’s footprint. (Ord. 3057 § 5, 2017*; Ord. 3054 § 9, 2017; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

*    Code reviser’s note: Ord. 3057 amends this section without taking into account the amendments of Ord. 3054. The amendments of Ord. 3054 have been retained per the intent of the city.

22C.010.100 Measurement methods.

The following provisions shall be used to determine compliance with this title:

(1) Street setbacks shall be measured from the existing edge of a street right-of-way or temporary turnaround or, in the case of a substandard street, the setbacks shall be measured from the edge of the ultimate right-of-way section planned for the street, except as provided by MMC 22C.010.200;

(2) Impervious surface calculations shall not include areas of turf, landscaping, natural vegetation, five-foot (or less) wide pedestrian walkways or surface water retention/detention facilities. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.110 Calculations – Allowable dwelling units.

Permitted number of dwelling units shall be determined as follows:

(1) The maximum allowed number of dwelling units shall be computed by multiplying the net project area (in acres) by the applicable residential density.

(2) When calculations result in a fraction, the fraction shall be rounded to the nearest whole number as follows:

(a) Fractions of 0.50 or above shall be rounded up; and

(b) Fractions below 0.50 shall be rounded down. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.120 Calculations – Site area used for density calculations.

(1) Critical areas and their buffers may be used for calculation of allowed residential density whenever two or more residential lots or dwelling units are created subject to the on-site density transfer provisions outlined in MMC 22E.010.360.

(2) The net project area of a multiple-family or single-family site may be used in the calculation of allowed residential density. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.130 Lot area – Prohibited reduction.

Any portion of a lot that was required to calculate and ensure compliance with the standards and regulations of this title shall not be subsequently subdivided or segregated from such lot. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.140 Minimum lot area for construction.

Except as provided for in Chapter 22G.080 MMC:

(1) In the R zones, a single-family dwelling may be established on an existing vacant lot, which cannot satisfy the bulk or dimensional requirements of this chapter, provided the following criteria are met:

(a) The lot was established by conveyance of record prior to August 10, 1969, and its dimensions have not been modified since said conveyance, or the lot was created by an approved plat and satisfied the bulk and dimensional requirements applicable at the time of its creation; and

(b) The lot is not less than 4,000 square feet in size, or such greater size as may be required by the Snohomish health district if an on-site sewage disposal system is involved; and

(c) Development of the lot will comply with all bulk and dimensional regulations in this chapter relating to setbacks, maximum lot coverage and off-street parking, as such regulations exist on the date of application for development permits. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.150 Setbacks – Specific building or use.

When a building or use is required to maintain a specific setback from a property line or other building, such setback shall apply only to the specified building or use. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.160 Setbacks – Modifications.

The following setback modifications are permitted:

(1) When the common property line of two lots is covered by a building(s), the setbacks required by this chapter shall not apply along the common property line.

(2) When a lot is located between lots having nonconforming street setbacks, the required street setback for such lot may be the average of the two nonconforming setbacks or 60 percent of the required street setback, whichever results in the greater street setback.

(3) When a base station or WCF equipment is proposed for placement on private property abutting ROW, the setback may be administratively reduced, provided the application demonstrates good cause for such reduction and adequate area for screening and landscaping is provided. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.170 Setbacks – From regional utility corridors.

(1) In subdivisions and short subdivisions, areas used as regional utility corridors shall be contained in separate tracts.

(2) In other types of land development permits, easements shall be used to delineate such corridors.

(3) All buildings and structures shall maintain a minimum distance of five feet from property or easement lines delineating the boundary of regional utility corridors, except for utility structures necessary to the operation of the utility corridor. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.180 Setbacks – From private roads or access easements.

Structures may be built to five feet of the property line on lots adjacent to a private road or access easement. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.190 Setbacks – From alleys.

(1) Structures may be built to five feet of the property line abutting an alley, except as provided in subsection (2) of this section.

(2) Vehicle access points from garages, carports or fenced parking areas shall be set back a minimum of 10 feet from the lot line abutting an alley, except where the access point faces an alley with a right-of-way width of 10 feet, in which case the garage, carport, or fenced parking area shall not be located within 20 feet from the rear lot line. No portion of the garage or the door in motion may cross the property line.

(3) Rear setbacks for detached accessory structures located in Planning Area 1 “Downtown Neighborhood” may be reduced as set forth in MMC 22C.180.020(2). (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.200 Setbacks – Adjoining half-street or designated arterial.

In addition to providing the standard street setback, a lot adjoining a half-street or designated arterial shall provide an additional width of street setback sufficient to accommodate construction of the planned half-street or arterial. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.210 Setbacks – Projections allowed.

Projections may extend into required setbacks as follows:

(1) Fireplace structures including eaves and factory-built garden or bay windows may project into any setback, provided such projections are:

(a) Limited to two per facade;

(b) Not wider than 10 feet; and

(c) Not more than 24 inches into a side setback or 30 inches into a front or rear setback;

(2) Uncovered porches and decks, including stairs, which exceed 30 inches above the finished grade may project:

(a) Eighteen inches into side setbacks; and

(b) Five feet into the front or rear setback;

(3) Uncovered porches and decks not exceeding 30 inches above the finished grade, and uncovered accessory structures such as mechanical equipment, play structures, and tennis courts, may project to the property line; provided, that with the exception of uncovered porches and decks, the front property line setback for the zone shall be observed;

(4) Eaves may not project more than:

(a) Twenty-four inches into a side setback;

(b) Thirty-four inches into a front or rear setback; or

(c) Eighteen inches across a lot line in a zero lot line development.

(5) Accessory structures such as flagpoles and lampposts shall be set back a minimum of five feet from all property lines, provided:

(a) They are not located within a utility or access easement; and

(b) Flags are not displayed in a manner that would cause the flag to encroach onto a neighboring property. (Ord. 3054 § 10, 2017; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.220 Height – Exceptions to limits.

(1) Flagpoles may be up to 25 feet tall in all single-family zones, and up to 35 feet tall in all multifamily zones; provided, that flagpoles on multi-family zoned properties developed with single-family residences or duplexes shall be limited to 25 feet tall. Exception: flagpoles on single-family and multifamily zoned properties that are 40,000 square feet or greater in size and developed with single-family residences or duplexes may be up to 35 feet tall; provided, that setbacks that are equivalent to the height of the flagpole are maintained from all property lines.

(2) The following structures may be erected above the height limits of MMC 22C.010.080:

(a) Roof structures housing or screening elevators, stairways, tanks, ventilating fans or similar equipment required for building operation and maintenance; and

(b) Fire or parapet walls, skylights, chimneys, smokestacks, church steeples, and utility line towers and poles. (Ord. 3054 § 11, 2017; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.230 Lot divided by zone boundary.

When a lot is divided by a zone boundary, the following rules shall apply:

(1) When a lot contains both residential and nonresidential zoning, the zone boundary between the zones shall be considered a lot line for determining permitted building height and required setbacks on the site;

(2) When a lot contains residential zones of varying density, any residential density transfer within the lot shall only be allowed from the portion with the lesser residential density to that of the greater residential density; and

(3) Uses on each portion of the lot shall only be those permitted in each zone pursuant to this chapter and Chapter 22C.020 MMC. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.240 Sight distance requirements.

Except for traffic control signs, the following sight distance provisions shall apply to all intersections and site access points:

(1) A sight distance triangle area per city standards shall contain no fence, berm, vegetation, on-site vehicle parking area, signs or other physical obstruction between 30 inches and eight feet above the existing street grade.

Note: The area of a sight distance triangle between 30 inches and eight feet above the existing street grade shall remain open.

(2) The community development director or city engineer may require modification or removal of structures or landscaping located in required street setbacks, if:

(a) Such improvements prevent adequate sight distance to drivers entering or leaving a driveway; and

(b) No reasonable driveway relocation alternative for an adjoining lot is feasible. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.250 Nonresidential land uses in residential zones.

Except for utility facilities and regional land uses listed in MMC 22C.010.060, all nonresidential uses located in residential zones shall be subject to the following requirements:

(1) Building coverage shall not exceed:

(a) Fifty percent of the site in the R-4.5, R-6.5, R-8 and WR-R-4-8 zones.

(b) Sixty percent of the site in the R-12, R-18, R-28 and WR-R-6-18 zones.

(2) Impervious surface coverage shall not exceed:

(a) Seventy percent of the site in the R-4.5, R-6.5, R-8 and WR-R-4-8 zones.

(b) Eighty percent of the site in the R-12, R-18, R-28 and WR-R-6-18 zones.

(3) Buildings and structures, except fences and wire or mesh backstops, shall not be closer than 30 feet to any property line, except as provided in subsection (4) of this section.

(4) A single detached dwelling unit allowed as accessory to a church or school shall conform to the setback requirements of the zone.

(5) Parking areas are permitted within the required setback area from property lines, provided such parking areas are located outside of the required landscape area.

(6) Sites shall abut or be accessible from at least one public street functioning at a level consistent with city of Marysville street design standards. New high school sites shall abut or be accessible from a public street functioning as an arterial per the city of Marysville design standards.

(7) The base height shall conform to height limitation of the zone in which the use is located. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.255 Residential design requirements – Purpose.

MMC 22C.010.255 through 22C.010.400 apply to new multifamily residential and high density (eight-plus du/acre) single-family development. The purpose of these sections is to:

(1) Encourage the realization and creation of a desirable and aesthetic environment in the city of Marysville;

(2) Encourage and promote development which features amenities and excellence in site planning, streetscape, building design and contribution to community charm;

(3) Encourage creative approaches to the use of land and related physical developments;

(4) Minimize incompatible and unsightly surroundings and visual blight which prevent orderly community development;

(5) Reinforce streets as public places that encourage pedestrian and bicycle travel;

(6) Reduce opportunities for crimes against persons and property;

(7) Minimize land use conflicts and adverse impacts;

(8) Provide roadway and pedestrian connections between residential and commercial areas;

(9) Provide public places and open space networks to create gateways, gathering places, and recreational opportunities that enhance the natural and built environment;

(10) Minimize the rate of crime associated with persons and property and provide for the highest standards of public safety through the implementation of crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) principles in design review. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).*

*Code reviser’s note: Ord. 2852 added this section as 22C.010.250. It has been editorially renumbered to avoid duplication.

22C.010.260 Residential design requirements – Applicability and interpretations.

(1) Applicability.

(a) These design standards apply to all new planned residential developments (PRD) in any zone, multifamily structures in any zone and residential development within the following zones: high density multiple-family (R-28), medium density multiple-family (R-18), low density multiple-family (R-12), high density single-family, and small lot (R-8).

(b) The standards specified in the following sections shall be applied by the city to individual building permits for single-family residences, MMC 22C.010.310; duplexes, MMC 22C.010.400; and accessory uses, Chapter 22C.180 MMC; provided, that the applicable standards shall be those in effect on the date that the city approves the preliminary subdivision, short subdivision, or binding site plan, whichever is applicable, unless the applicant opts to have the city apply the standards that may have been revised by the city after such date.

(c) The following activities shall be exempt from these standards:

(i) Construction activities which do not require a building permit;

(ii) Interior remodels of existing structures;

(iii) Modifications or additions to existing multifamily and public properties when the modification or addition:

(A) Constitutes less than 10 percent of the existing horizontal square footage of the use or structure; and

(B) Constitutes less than 10 percent of the existing building’s exterior facade.

(d) These standards are intended to supplement the zoning standards in the Marysville Municipal Code. Where these standards and the zoning ordinance standards conflict, the city shall determine which regulation applies based on which is more in the public interest and more consistent with the comprehensive plan.

(2) Interpreting and Applying the Design Standards.

(a) These standards capture the community visions and values as reflected in the comprehensive plan’s neighborhood planning areas. The city’s community development director (hereinafter referred to as director) retains full authority to determine whether a proposal meets these standards. The director is authorized to promulgate guidelines, graphic representations, and examples of designs and methods of construction that do or do not satisfy the intent of these standards. The following resources can be used in interpreting the guidelines: Residential Development Handbook for Snohomish County Communities (prepared for Snohomish County Tomorrow by Makers, Inc.), Site Planning and Community Design for Great Neighborhoods (Frederick D. Jarvis, 1993), and City Comforts (David Sucher, 1996).

(b) Within these standards, certain words are used to indicate the relative importance and priority the city places upon a particular standard.

(i) The words “shall,” “must,” and “is/are required” mean that the development proposal must comply with the standard unless the director finds that:

(A) The standard is not applicable in the particular instance; or

(B) The development proposal meets the intent of the standards in some other manner.

(ii) The word “should” means that the development proposal will comply with the standard unless the director finds that:

(A) The standard is not applicable in the particular instance;

(B) The development proposal meets the intent of the standards in some other manner; or

(C) There is convincing evidence that applying the standard would not be in the public interest.

(iii) The words “is/are encouraged,” “can,” “consider,” “help,” and “allow” mean that the action or characteristic is allowed and will usually be viewed as a positive element in the city’s review.

(c) The project proponent may submit proposals that he/she feels meet the intent of the standards but not necessarily the specifics of one or more standards. In this case, the director will determine if the intent of the standard has been met. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.270 Zero lot line development.

In any PRD overlay zone, interior setbacks may be modified during subdivision or short subdivision review as follows:

If a building is proposed to be located within a normally required interior setback:

(1) An easement shall be provided on the abutting lot of the subdivision that is wide enough to ensure a 10-foot separation between the walls of structures on adjoining lots, except as provided for common wall construction;

(2) The easement area shall be free of structures and other obstructions that would prevent normal repair and maintenance of the structure’s exterior;

(3) Buildings utilizing reduced setbacks shall not have doors that open directly onto the private yard areas of abutting property. Windows in such buildings shall not be oriented toward such private yard areas unless they consist of materials such as glass block, textured glass, or other opaque materials, and shall not be capable of being opened, except for clerestory-style windows or skylights; and

(4) The final plat or short plat shall show the approximate location of buildings proposed to be placed in a standard setback area. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.280 Cottage housing developments.

(1) Purpose. The purpose of this section is to:

(a) Provide a housing type that responds to changing household sizes and ages (e.g., retirees, small families, single-person households);

(b) Provide opportunities for ownership of small, detached units within a single-family neighborhood;

(c) Encourage creation of more usable space for residents of the development through flexibility in density and lot standards;

(d) Support the growth management goal of more efficient use of urban residential land; and

(e) Provide guidelines to ensure compatibility with surrounding uses.

(2) Applicability. Cottage housing developments are allowed, as follows:

(a) Within residentially zoned properties in Downtown Planning Area 1;

(b) Within single-family zones where properties are encumbered by at least 35 percent critical areas and associated buffers;

(c) On single-family zoned parcels adjacent to multifamily, commercial and industrial zoned parcels, as a transition to multifamily, commercial and industrial uses, including across the street on a case-by-case basis, if approved by the director;

(d) Within single-family zones where two or more unique site circumstances exist. Unique site circumstances may include shared common boundary with a city-owned park or nature preserve; close proximity to multifamily, commercial or industrial zoned properties as a complementary use; or other unique site circumstances as determined by the director;

(e) Within multifamily zoned properties.

(3) Review Process.

(a) Cottage housing developments that are developed with all cottages located on a common lot shall be processed in accordance with Chapter 22G.120 MMC, Site Plan Review; and

(b) Cottage housing developments that are developed with cottages on individual lots shall be processed in accordance with Chapter 22G.090 MMC, Subdivisions and Short Subdivisions.

(4) Accessory Uses. The following accessory uses are permitted within cottage housing developments:

(a) Community Buildings. Commonly owned community building(s) for the use of the residents of the cottage housing development are allowed but not required. Where provided, common buildings must be centrally located; clearly incidental in use and size to the rest of the development; and similar in design (i.e., roof pitch, architecture, materials and colors) to the cottage units. Common buildings may include meeting space, recreational facilities, a food preparation area, sinks, and toilets, but shall not include commercial uses, sleeping quarters, or bathing facilities (unless the bathing facility is clearly incidental to a recreational facility located within the common building).

(b) Garages or carports as outlined in subsection (11) of this section.

(c) Community gardens, play structures, and similar amenities for use of the occupants of the cottage housing development.

(5) Accessory Dwelling Units. Accessory dwelling units and/or extended-family dwelling units are not allowed in cottage housing developments.

(6) Density and Dimensions.

Density (dwelling unit/ acre)

2 times the base density of the underlying zone (a)

Development size

Minimum 4 cottage units.

Maximum 12 cottage unit per grouping. Development may contain multiple groupings.

Minimum lot size

Beyond density and dimensional restrictions, there is no required minimum lot size for subdivided cottage lots.

Minimum front setback or yard

10 feet (b)

Minimum side setback or yard

5 feet (c), (d)

Minimum rear setback or yard

10 feet (b), (c)

Minimum setback from critical area buffers, or critical areas, if no buffer is required

15 feet

Maximum building coverage: percentage

40 percent (e)

Maximum impervious coverage: percentage

60 percent (e)

(a) Existing detached single-family residences, which may be nonconforming with respect to the standards of this section, shall be permitted to remain; provided, that the extent of the nonconformity may not be increased. Said residences shall be included in the maximum permitted cottage density, and must meet the applicable density and dimensional requirements of the underlying zone.

(b) The front and rear yard setbacks for cottages and two-story accessory structures shall be increased to 20 feet along the perimeter of cottage housing developments that abut existing single-family residential development or single-family zoned properties; provided, that this requirement shall not apply along perimeter boundaries abutting public right-of-way, or for infill lots located within Downtown Planning Area 1.

(c) The side or rear yard setback adjacent to a public street or private drive aisle shall be 10 feet except when the side or rear yard abuts a designated arterial in which case the setback shall be increased to 15 feet.

(d) There shall be a minimum separation of six feet between principal structures; provided, that:

(i) Where cottages will be subdivided onto individual lots, a five-foot side yard setback from the property line and 10 feet of structure separation shall be provided;

(ii) When there is a principal entrance on an interior facade of either or both of the facing facades, the minimum separation shall be 10 feet; and

(iii) When there is a principal entrance along a side facade, the side yard shall be no less than 10 feet.

(e) The building and impervious surface coverage allowances apply to the overall development site (when subdivision is not proposed), or to the individual lots.

(7) Cottage Size, Height, and Porch Dimensional Standards.

Maximum cottage main floor area

800 square feet (a)

Maximum cottage total floor area

1 1/2 times the area of the main floor or 1,200 square feet, whichever is less.

Height

18 feet

23 feet (to ridge of pitched roof with minimum slope of 4:12)

28 feet (to ridge of pitched roof with minimum slope of 6: 12)

All parts of roof above 18 feet must be pitched.

Porch (primary)

Primary entry: 60 square feet

Minimum dimension: 6 feet

Porch (secondary)

Secondary entry: 36 square feet

Minimum dimension: 6 feet

(a) Cottage floor area shall be subject to the following standards:

(i) Enclosed space in a cottage located either above the main floor and more than 12 feet above finished grade, or below the main floor, shall be limited to no more than 50 percent of the enclosed space of the main floor, or 400 square feet, whichever is less. This restriction applies regardless of whether a floor is proposed in the enclosed space, but shall not apply to attic or crawl spaces (less than six feet in height).

(ii) Attached garages shall be included in the calculation of total floor area.

(iii) Areas that do not count as total floor area are:

(A) Unheated storage space located under the main floor of the cottage.

(B) Attached roofed porches.

(C) Detached garages or carports.

(D) Spaces with ceiling height of six feet or less measured to the exterior walls, such as a second floor area under the slope of a roof.

(iv) The total square foot area of a cottage dwelling unit may not be increased. A note shall be placed on the title to the property for the purpose of notifying future property owners that any increase in the total square footage of a cottage is prohibited for the life of the cottage or the duration of city cottage regulations.

(8) Cottage Orientation and Open Space Standards. Cottages shall meet the following orientation and open space standards:

(a) Cottages shall be oriented around and have their main entry from the common open space.

(b) Each cottage shall abut the common open space, and the common open space shall have cottages abutting at least two sides.

(c) Four hundred square feet of open space shall be provided (200 square feet of private open space and 200 square feet of common open space).

(i) Private and common open space must be calculated separately (i.e., private open space does not count towards common open space, and common open space does not count towards private open space);

(ii) All open space must be usable and located at ground level. Critical areas and buffers shall not count towards open space;

(iii) Setbacks shall not be counted as either private or common open space unless the setback abuts a designated common open space area in which case the setback area may meet both setback and private open space requirements.

(d) Private open space shall:

(i) Be located in a contiguous area and abut the cottage it serves;

(ii) Be oriented towards the common open space as much as possible;

(iii) Have no horizontal dimension less than 10 feet; and

(iv) A fence or hedge not to exceed three and one-half feet may separate private open space from common open space.

(e) Common open space shall:

(i) Be provided in a contiguous area to the extent feasible;

(ii) Be allocated so that at least 50 percent of the common open space for a grouping of cottages is located centrally among the grouping of cottages; and

(iii) Have no horizontal dimension less than 15 feet.

(9) Building Design Standards – Including Garages/Parking Structures. The purpose of the design standards is to: encourage variety and visual interest in new residential development in a manner that is compatible with the neighborhood character; ensure the scale of the cottages is proportional to their lot and parcel size; provide landscaping between new and existing development to buffer and provide a transition, to enhance the building and site appearance, and to maintain the quality of the neighborhood.

(a) Inviting Facade. Each cottage unit shall have an inviting facade for any facades abutting common open space areas, public rights-of-way, and private roads or accesses serving the cottage housing development. If a cottage unit abuts more than one public rightof-way or private road or access, the director shall determine which access the inviting facade shall be oriented towards.

(b) Building Character Proportionality and Massing. Size and height reductions of cottage housing, design techniques and perimeter buffer landscaping shall be used to promote compatibility with the surrounding neighborhood and proportionality and massing of new cottage development adjacent to existing single-family neighborhoods.

(c) Variety in Buildings and Visual Interest with Consistency in Architectural Style. The building designs and layout shall prevent the repetitive use of the same combination of building features, building layout, and site design elements within any cottage development, grouping of cottages, and adjacent dwellings.

(i) Varied and Interesting Rooflines. Varied and interesting rooflines must be provided which include use of varied pitched roof styles, gables, or dormers. Roof breaks or step-downs are encouraged and can be used to reduce required setbacks adjacent to parcel boundaries.

(ii) Separation of Identical Buildings and Elevations. Units of identical elevation types must be separated by at least two different elevations. This will result in at least three different building elevation plans per cluster. No two adjacent structures shall be built with the same building elevation (reverse elevations do not count as a different building elevation), facade materials, or colors.

(iii) Different Roof, Window Design and Entries. Provide differing roof forms, gables or dormers. Roof overhangs a minimum of six inches are required. Different window design, entry treatments and base treatments shall be utilized to help achieve variety.

(iv) Corner Lot Cottages. Cottages on corner lots shall be architecturally designed to provide modulation and detail on both frontages. Examples of modulation include use of bay windows, wrapped porches, and dormers.

(v) Open and Closed Cottages along Private Side Yards. Private side yards are an important element in cottage development. The side yard is typically designated to a particular cottage (like zero lot line homes) and this cottage should be open to the side yard using doors, windows or a wrapped porch. The adjacent cottage having a closed side and window placement is an essential part of the design to achieve this relationship.

(d) Variety in Building Design. Provide variety and visual interest by using a combination of building elements, features and treatments in cottages as well as garages. Structures must include building articulation, change in materials or textures, windows, or other architectural features. A minimum of at least one side articulation or roof break shall occur for side elevations facing public streets or common open spaces or walkways to the common open spaces. No blank walls are allowed. The following building elements, features, and treatments that provide variety and visual interest shall be used in combination to create variety in building design, but are not limited to:

(i) Variation in building type and plans.

(ii) Variation in layout and orientation.

(iii) Variation in building materials, mixture and texture.

(A) Vertical Changes. Changes in materials in a vertical wall shall occur at an internal corner or a logical transition such as aligning with a window edge or chimney.

(B) Horizontal Changes. Transition in materials on a wall surface, such as shingle or lap siding, shall be required to have a material separation, such as a trim band board.

(C) Acceptable Exterior Wall Material. Wood, cement fiberboard, stucco, standard sized brick and stone may be used. Simulated stone, wood, stone or brick may be used to detail homes.

(D) Trim. Trim may be wood, cement fiberboard, stucco, or stone materials. Trim is required around all doors and windows. The trim must be three and onehalf inches minimum and be used on all elevations.

(iv) Building modulation.

(v) Building intervals and articulation.

(vi) Varying roof shapes, pitches and gables.

(vii) Varied roof heights and roof breaks or roof extensions.

(viii) Dormers.

(ix) Window trim and mullions.

(x) Bay windows or bump outs.

(xi) Entry enhancement.

(xii) Porches and patios. (Porches with railings preferred.)

(xiii) Use of varied siding, trim and base colors.

(xiv) At a minimum use bottom and top material treatment and if recommended use tripartite architecture.

(xv) Chimney or tower.

(xvi) Trellis.

(xvii) Belly bands, brackets/braces.

(xviii) Other building elements and the combined use of the above shall be approved by the planning director.

(10) Site Access Standards. Access to the cottage housing development shall be provided as follows:

(a) Access to parking shall be from the alley when the cottage housing development abuts a platted alley improved to the city’s engineering design and development standards, or when the director determines that alley access is feasible and desirable to mitigate parking access impacts.

(b) For cottage housing developments where all of the cottages are located on a common lot and alley access is not available, the private drive aisle standards outlined in MMC 22C.130.050 Table 2 shall apply.

(c) For cottage housing developments where the cottages will be subdivided onto individual lots, the city’s PRD and cottage housing street standards as set forth in the Engineering Development and Design Standards (EDDS) shall apply. The “PRD and Cottage Housing Access Street” standard shall apply where fewer than 20 dwelling units are proposed, and the “PRD and Cottage Housing Access Street with Parking” standard shall apply where 20 or more dwelling units are proposed. Modifications to the “PRD and Cottage Housing Access Street” and the “PRD and Cottage Housing Access Street with Parking” standards may be requested for sidewalks, planter strips, and on-street parking. The burden to clearly demonstrate the proposed modification meets the requirements of this section is the applicant’s. (Note: It is not likely multiple reductions will be allowed along a single section of road.) If requesting a modification, the applicant shall submit an integrated pedestrian travel, landscape and parking plan as well as other information to demonstrate:

(i) Safe, aesthetically pleasing pedestrian travel is provided throughout the development.

(ii) Pedestrian travel within the development shall be tied to pedestrian travel routes outside the development, actual and/or planned.

(iii) Reduction of planter strips shall require additional equivalent or greater landscaping to benefit the development.

(iv) Any proposed modifications shall allow for efficient flow and movement of automobiles and pedestrians without negatively altering or constraining their movement.

(d) Five-foot-wide pedestrian pathways (sidewalks) must be included to provide for movement of residents and guests from parking areas to homes and other amenities.

(11) Parking Standards. Parking shall meet the following standards:

(a) Off-street parking spaces shall be provided as follows:

(i) One space for cottages 700 square feet or less;

(ii) One and one-half spaces for cottages 701 to 1,000 square feet; and

(iii) Two spaces for cottages 1,001 to 1,200 square feet.

(b) Parking stalls, garages and carports must be screened from public streets or abutting residential properties.

(c) Parking stalls, garages and carports shall be located in the following preferential order:

(i) To the rear of the units accessed off an alley;

(ii) To the side of the units accessed by a private driveway; or

(iii) A garage, landscaping, and/or fencing shall screen parking next to a side street.

(d) Parking stalls, garages and carports must meet the front yard setback requirements outlined in subsection (6) of this section.

(e) Parking areas must be located in clusters of not more than six adjoining spaces. Landscaping or other architectural features shall separate clusters of parking, and clusters of parking from common areas.

(f) The parking area should not be the major view from the public right-of-way or street. Landscaping, cottages, or the common area should provide the view into the cottage development.

(g) Garages and carports shall be located so their visual presence is minimized, and associated noise or other impacts do not intrude into public spaces.

(h) The architectural design of all garages and carports must be similar and compatible to that of the cottage dwelling units within the development.

(i) Garage and carport rear and side elevations facing the public street or adjacent existing development shall have architectural details to minimize the impact of the facade.

(j) A six-single-vehicle-stall garage or carport is the maximum number allowed in any garage or carport.

(k) Shared detached garage structures shall be reserved for the parking of vehicles owned by the residents of the development. Storage of items which precludes the use of the parking spaces for vehicles is prohibited.

(12) Screening Standards.

(a) Boundaries between cottage dwellings and neighboring properties shall be screened with landscaping to reduce the appearance of bulk or intrusion onto adjacent properties, or otherwise treated (i.e., through setbacks or architectural techniques) to meet the intent of this section.

(b) Yard and open space fencing within the cottage housing development shall not exceed three and one-half feet tall.

(c) Trash and Recycling Container Enclosure and Landscape Screening. All dumpster containers, individual refuse containers, and trash compactors shall be enclosed per the following standards:

(i) All loading, trash, recycling and storage areas shall be located so they are not visible from streets and will be concealed.

(ii) An architectural screen shall surround all sides except the access entry. Building walls of adjacent structures may be used to partially satisfy this requirement. Screen walls shall be a solid visual screen constructed out of metal, concrete, and/or masonry units; or other materials similar to the cottages and garage structures. Required gates and trellises, and other architectural screening elements, shall be designed so that they complement the surrounding buildings unless there is some overriding fire access issue.

(iii) A concrete slab shall be installed as the base material within the enclosure.

(13) Homeowners’ Association. A homeowners’ association and covenants are required for the maintenance of the common areas and buildings.

(14) Requests for Modifications to Standards. The community development director may approve minor modifications to the general parameters and design standards set forth in this chapter, provided the site is constrained due to unusual shape, topography, easements or sensitive areas.

(a) The modification is consistent with the objectives of this chapter.

(b) The modification will not result in a development that is less compatible with neighboring land uses. (Ord. 3130 § 4 (Exh. B), 2019).

22C.010.290 Site and building design standards.

(1) Applicability.

(a) Prior to submitting a building permit application, all development to which these standards apply shall be required to submit a site plan and elevations addressing the standards in this section for administrative review and approval by the community development director.

(b) The site and building design standards of this section apply to multifamily developments, whereas only subsections (2) and (4) of this section apply to single-family and condominium developments.

(c) The crime prevention through environmental design (CPTED) provisions of this section apply to all new multifamily developments of 10 or more units and planned residential developments.

(2) Relationship of Buildings to Site and Street Front.

(a) The site shall be oriented and designed to create an attractive street edge and accommodate pedestrian access. The following provisions apply:

(i) The street edge shall be defined with buildings, landscaping or other features.

(ii) Primary building entrance(s) shall face the street unless it is not feasible due to parcel size, topography, environmental conditions, or other factors as determined by the director, and alternate design elements are incorporated into the facade which enliven the streetscape. Alternatively, for multifamily projects, building entries that face onto a courtyard which is oriented towards the street are acceptable.

(iii) Buildings with individual ground floor entries should face the street to the extent possible. Alternatively, for multifamily projects, configurations where entries face onto a courtyard or open space that is oriented to the street are acceptable.

(iv) Buildings shall provide windows that face the street to provide “eyes on the street” for safety. To meet this requirement, at least 15 percent of the facade facing the street shall be occupied by transparent windows or doors.

(v) Provide for a sidewalk at least five feet wide if there is not space in the public right-of-way.

(vi) Provide building entries that are accessed from the sidewalk; preferably these access ways should be separated from the parking and drive aisles. If access traverses the parking lot, then it should be raised and clearly marked.

(b) The development shall provide site development features that are visible and pedestrian-accessible from the street. These features could include plazas, open space areas, recreational areas, architectural focal points, and access lighting.

(c) The development shall create a well-defined streetscape to allow for the safe movement of pedestrians.

(d) For multifamily residences, no more than 50 percent of the total parking spaces may be located between the building and the primary public street (street from which primary access is obtained) unless it is not feasible due to parcel size, topography, environmental conditions, or other facts as determined by the director. Where the property fronts on more than one public street, this provision applies to only one street frontage.

(e) For multifamily residences, parking lots shall not be located at the intersection of public streets unless no feasible alternative location exists.

Figure 1 – Illustration of facade transparency requirements which enhance safety and the relationship to the street front.

(3) Relationship of Buildings and Site to Adjoining Area.

(a) Where adjacent buildings and neighborhoods are consistent with the comprehensive plan and desired community character, new buildings and structures should consider the visual continuity between the proposed and existing development with respect to building setbacks, placement of structures, location of pedestrian/vehicular facilities and spacing from adjoining buildings. Solar access of the subject and adjacent properties should be considered in building design and location.

(b) Harmony in texture, lines and masses is encouraged.

(c) Attractive landscape transition to adjoining properties shall be provided.

(d) Public and quasi-public buildings and structures shall be consistent with the established neighborhood character.

(4) Landscape and Site Treatment.

(a) Parking lot screening and interior landscaping shall be provided consistent with Chapter 22C.120 MMC. The following criteria shall guide review of plans and administration of the landscaping standards in the zoning code:

(i) The landscape plan shall demonstrate visual relief from large expanses of parking areas.

(ii) The landscape plan shall provide some physical separation between vehicular and pedestrian traffic.

(iii) The landscape plan shall provide decorative landscaping as a focal setting for signs, special site elements, and/or pedestrian areas.

(iv) In locations where plants will be susceptible to injury by pedestrian or motor traffic, they shall be protected by appropriate curbs, tree guards or other devices.

(v) Where building sites limit planting, the placement of trees or shrubs in parkways or paved areas is encouraged.

(vi) Screening of outdoor service yards and other places which tend to be unsightly shall be accomplished by use of walls, fencing, planting, berms or combinations of these.

(vii) Landscaping should be designed to create definition between public and private spaces.

(viii) Where feasible, the landscape plan shall coordinate the selection of plant material to provide a succession of blooms, seasonal color, and a variety of textures.

(ix) The landscape plan shall provide a transition in landscaping design between adjacent sites, within a site, and from native vegetation areas in order to achieve greater continuity.

(x) The landscape plan shall use plantings to highlight significant site features and to define the function of the site, including parking, circulation, entries, and open spaces.

(xi) Where feasible, the landscape plan shall integrate natural approaches to storm water management, including featured low impact development techniques.

(b) Street Landscaping. Where the site plan includes streetscape plantings, the following guidelines apply:

(i) Sidewalks and pathways should be separated from the roadway by planting strips with street trees wherever possible.

(ii) Planting strips should generally be at least five feet in width. They should include evergreen shrubs no more than four feet in height and/or ground cover in accordance with the city of Marysville landscape standards (Chapter 22C.120 MMC) and Marysville administrative landscaping guidelines.

(iii) Street trees placed in tree grates may be more desirable than planting strips in key pedestrian areas.

(iv) Use of trees and other plantings with special qualities (e.g., spring flowers and/or good fall color) are strongly encouraged to unify development.

(c) Exterior lighting shall be part of the architectural concept. Lighting shall enhance the building design and adjoining landscaping. Appropriate lighting levels shall be provided in all areas used by pedestrians or automobiles, including building entries, walkways, parking areas, circulation areas, and other open space areas, in order to ensure safety and security; enhance and encourage evening activities; and provide a distinctive character to the area. New developments shall provide a lighting site plan which identifies lighting equipment, locations and standards, and implements the following design standards:

(i) All public areas shall be lighted with average minimum and maximum levels as follows:

(A) Minimum (for low or nonpedestrian and vehicular traffic areas) of one-half foot candle;

(B) Moderate (for moderate or high volume pedestrian areas) of one to two foot candles; and

(C) Maximum (for high volume pedestrian areas and building entries) of four foot candles.

(ii) Lighting shall be provided at consistent levels, with gradual transitions between maximum and minimum levels of lighting and between lit areas and unlit areas. Highly contrasting pools of light and dark areas shall be avoided.

(iii) Parking lot lighting shall be subject to the provisions set forth in MMC 22C.130.050(3)(d).

(iv) Pedestrian-scale lighting (light fixtures no taller than 15 feet) is encouraged in areas with high anticipated pedestrian activity. All fixtures over 15 feet in height shall be fitted with a full cut-off shield, be dark sky rated, and mounted no more than 25 feet above the ground with lower fixtures preferable so as to maintain a human scale. Lighting shall enable pedestrians to identify a face 45 feet away in order to promote safety.

(v) Light levels at the property line should not exceed 0.1 foot candles (fc) adjacent to business properties, and 0.05 foot candles adjacent to residential properties. All building lights shall be directed onto the building itself and/or the ground immediately adjacent to it. The light emissions should not be visible above the roofline of the building. Light fixtures other than traditional cobra heads are encouraged.

(vi) Uplighting on trees and provisions for seasonal lighting are encouraged.

(vii) Accent lighting on architectural and landscape features is encouraged to add interest and focal points.

(5) Site Design Utilizing Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) Principles. Development that is subject to this section shall incorporate the following CPTED strategies into building design and site layout:

(a) Access Control. Guidance of people coming and going from a building or site by placement of real and perceived barriers. Provision of natural access control limits access and increases natural surveillance to restrict criminal intrusion, especially into areas that are not readily observable.

(b) Surveillance. Placement of features, uses, activities, and people to maximize visibility. Provision of natural surveillance helps to create environments where there is plenty of opportunity for people engaged in their normal behavior to observe the space around them.

(c) Territoriality/Ownership. Delineation of private space from semi-public and public spaces that creates a sense of ownership. Techniques that reduce the perception of areas as “ownerless” and, therefore, available for undesirable uses.

Examples of ways in which a proposal can comply with CPTED principles are outlined in the CPTED Guidelines for Project Design and Review, prepared by the city.

(6) Building Design – Human-Scale Standards. The human-scale standards are intended to encourage the use of building components that relate to the size of the human body, and to add visual interest to buildings. “Human scale” addresses the relationship between a building and the human body. Generally, buildings attain a good human scale when they feature elements or characteristics that are sized to fit human activities, such as doors, porches, and balconies. A minimum of three of the following human-scale building elements shall be incorporated into the new development:

(a) Balconies or decks in upper stories, at least one balcony or deck per upper floor on the facades facing streets, provided they are integrated into the architecture of the building;

(b) Bay windows or other window treatments that extend out from the building face;

(c) At least 150 square feet of pedestrian-oriented space for each 100 lineal feet of building facade;

(d) First floor individual windows, generally less than 32 square feet per pane and separated from the windows by at least a six-inch molding;

(e) A porch or covered entry;

(f) Spatially defining building elements, such as a trellis, overhang, canopy, or other element, that defines space that can be occupied by people;

(g) Upper story setbacks, provided one or more of the upper stories are set back from the face of the building at least six feet;

(h) Composing smaller building elements near the entry of pedestrian-oriented street fronts of large buildings;

(i) Landscaping components that meet the intent of these standards; and/or

(j) The director may consider other methods to provide human-scale elements not specifically listed here. The proposed methods must satisfy the intent of these standards.

Figure 2 – An example of balconies that have been integrated into the architecture of the building.

(7) Building Design – Architectural Scale. The architectural scale standards are intended to encourage compatibility of structures with nearby structures, to help the building fit in with its context, and to add visual interest to buildings.

(a) Vertical Facade Modulation. All new residential buildings shall provide modulation (measured and proportioned inflexion or setback in a building’s facade) on facades facing a street, common open space, public area, or common parking area as follows:

(i) Buildings with facades that are 30 feet or longer shall provide vertical modulation of the exterior wall that extends through all floors; provided, that where horizontal modulation is used different stories may be modulated at different depths.

(ii) The minimum modulation depth shall be five feet and the minimum modulation width for each modulation shall be 10 feet. On facades that are 100 feet or longer, the minimum depth of modulation shall be 10 feet and the minimum width for each modulation shall be 20 feet.

(iii) The minimum modulation depth identified in subsection (7)(a)(ii) of this section may be reduced to two feet if tied to a change in color or building materials, and/or roofline modulation as defined in subsection (7)(c) of this section.

(iv) The director may consider departures from these standards, provided the proposed treatment meets or exceeds the intent of these standards.

(b) Facade Articulation. All new residential buildings shall include two of the following articulation features at intervals of no more than 30 feet along all facade facing a street, common open space, public area, and common parking areas:

(i) Repeating distinctive window patterns at intervals of no more than 30 feet (see Figure 3 below for an example).

(ii) Horizontal modulation (upper level step-backs) (see Figure 4). To qualify for this measure, the minimum horizontal modulation shall be five feet.

(iii) Balconies that are recessed or projected from the facade at least 18 inches and integrated with the building’s architecture as determined by the director.

(iv) Change of building materials.

(v) Articulation of the building’s top, middle, and bottom. This typically includes a distinctive ground floor or lower floor design, consistent articulation of middle floors, and a distinctive roofline (see Figures 3 and 4.)

(c) Roofline Modulation. Roofline modulation can be used in order to articulate the structure:

(i) In order to qualify as an articulation element in subsection (7)(b) of this section or in this subsection, the roofline shall meet the following modulation requirement (see Figure 5):

(A) For flat roofs or facades with horizontal eave, fascia, or parapet, the minimum vertical dimension of roofline modulation is the greater of two feet or 0.1 multiplied by the wall height (finish grade to top of the wall) when combined with vertical building modulation techniques described in subsection (7)(a) of this section. Otherwise, the minimum vertical dimension of roofline modulation is the greater of four feet or 0.2 multiplied by the wall height.

(B) Buildings with pitched roofs must include a minimum slope of 5:12 and feature modulated roofline components at the interval required per the applicable standard above.

Figure 3 – Note the repeating distinctive window patterns and the articulation of the building’s top, middle and bottom.

Figure 4 – An example of articulating a building’s top, middle, and bottom by utilizing brick on the ground floor, defined window patterns and articulation treatments on upper floors, and a distinctive roofline.

Figure 5 – Roofline modulation standards.

Figure 6 – Example of good articulation for a multifamily building.

(8) Building Design – Entrances. The intent of the building entrances standards is to ensure that buildings are inviting and accessible, and to encourage pedestrian activity. The principal building entrances of all buildings shall feature the following improvements, unless the director determines an alternate technique better addresses the intent of these standards:

(a) A distinct entry feature that provides weather cover that is at least three feet deep must be provided for the primary entrance(s) to residential units. Figures 7 and 8 demonstrate this requirement.

(b) Access to Residential Units. Ground floor residential units facing a street or common open space shall be directly accessible from the applicable street or open space.

(c) Townhouse Entrances. Townhomes and all other multifamily dwelling units with private exterior ground floor entries shall provide at least 20 square feet of landscaping adjacent to the entry. This is particularly important for units where the primary entrance is next to private garages off an interior access road. Such landscaping areas soften the appearance of the building and highlight individual entries. See Figure 8 for an example of what is desired and Figure 9 for an example of what is unacceptable.

Figure 7 – Weather protection that articulates the front facade is provided.

Figure 8 – Ground floor residential units directly accessible to the street with landscaping defining the entry.

Figure 9 – An example of unacceptable townhouse design where there is no landscaping adjacent to the entries.

(9) Building Design – Details. The building design details standards are intended to ensure that buildings have design interest at all observable distances and to enhance the architecture of multifamily buildings. At closer distances, the most important aspects of a building are its design details, texture of materials, quality of its finishes, and small, decorative elements. Multifamily building facades shall incorporate four architectural details, except that if option e below is used, only three architectural details must be used. Chosen details shall be compatible with the chosen architectural character of the building. Detail options include:

(a) Decorative porch design with distinct design and use of materials.

(b) Decorative treatment of windows and doors such as decorative molding/framing details around all ground floor windows and doors, bay windows, decorative glazing, or door designs and/or unique window designs.

(c) Landscaped trellises or other decorative element that incorporates landscaping near the building entry or entries.

(d) Decorative light fixtures with a diffuse visible light source, such as a globe or “acorn” that is nonglaring or a decorative shade or mounting for each building entry on the facade.

(e) Brick or stonework covering more than 10 percent of the facade.

(f) Decorative building materials that add visual interest, including:

(i) Individualized patterns or continuous wood details.

(ii) Decorative moldings, brackets, wave trim or lattice work.

(iii) Decorative brick or stonework (may be in addition to the brick or stonework credits noted above if they are arranged in a decorative manner that adds visual interest to the facade).

(iv) Other materials with decorative or textural qualities as approved by the director. The applicant must submit architectural drawings and material samples for approval.

(g) Decorative roofline design, including multiple gables and/or dormers or other design that adds distinct visual interest.

(h) Decorative railings, grill work, or terraced landscape beds integrated along the facade of the building.

(i) Decorative balcony design, such as distinctive railings.

(j) Other details that meet the intent of the standards as approved by the director.

Figure 10 – This building uses brick for more than 10 percent of the facade, a decorative mix of materials and colors, decorative entries, and decorative windows to add visual interest.

(10) Window Design for Residential Uses. Building facades shall employ techniques to recess or project individual windows above the ground floor at least two inches from the facade, or incorporate window trim at least four inches in width that features color that contrasts with the base building color. Exceptions will be considered by the director where buildings employ other distinctive windows or facade treatments that add visual interest to the building.

Figure 11 – Acceptable and unacceptable window treatments.

(11) Building Materials. The building materials standards are intended to encourage the use of a variety of high-quality, durable materials that will enhance the visual image of the city; provide visual interest and distinct design qualities; and promote compatibility and improvement within surrounding neighborhoods through effective architectural detailing and the use of traditional building techniques and materials. The following standards apply:

(a) Building exteriors shall be constructed from high-quality, durable materials. Building materials such as masonry, stone, lap-siding, and wood are encouraged.

(b) The following materials are prohibited in visible locations unless an exception is granted by the director based on the integration of the material into the overall design of the structure:

(i) Plywood siding (including T-111 or similar plywood). Board and batten is an exception.

(ii) Corrugated fiberglass.

(iii) Noncorrugated and highly reflective sheet metal.

(iv) Chain link fencing; provided, that the director may approve chain link fencing when it is integrated into the overall site design (chain link fencing is also allowed for temporary purposes such as a construction site, or as a gate for a refuse enclosure).

(12) Blank Walls. The blank wall standards are intended to: reduce the visual impact of large, undifferentiated walls; reduce the apparent size of large walls through the use of various architectural and landscaping treatments; enhance the character and identity of the city; and ensure that all visible sides of buildings provide visual interest. Blank walls visible from a public street, sidewalk, trail, interior pathway, or parking lot are prohibited.

(a) A wall (including building facades and other exterior building walls, retaining walls, and fences) is defined as a blank wall if:

(i) A ground floor wall or portion of a ground floor wall over four feet in height has a horizontal length greater than 15 feet and does not include a transparent window or door; or

(ii) Any portion of a ground floor wall having a surface area of 400 square feet or greater does not include a transparent window or door.

(b) All blank walls visible from a public street, sidewalk, trail, interior pathway, or parking lot shall be treated in one or more of the following measures:

(i) Incorporate transparent windows or doors;

(ii) Install a vertical trellis in front of the wall with climbing vines or plant materials sufficient to obscure or screen at least 60 percent of the wall’s surface within three years. For large blank wall areas, the trellis must be used in conjunction with other treatments described below;

(iii) Provide a landscaped planting bed at least five feet wide, or a raised planter bed at least two feet high and three feet wide in front of the wall. Plant materials must be able to obscure or screen at least 60 percent of the wall’s surface within three years;

(iv) Provide artwork (mosaic, mural, sculpture, relief, etc.) over at least 50 percent of the blank wall surface; and/or

(v) Other method as approved by the director. For example, landscaping or other treatments may not be necessary on a wall that employs high-quality building materials (such as brick) and provides desirable visual interest.

Figure 12 – Blank wall treatments.

Figure 13 – Terraced planting beds effectively screen a large blank wall.

(Ord. 2927 § 3, 2013; Ord. 2870 § 6, 2011; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.300 Commercial, multiple-family, townhome, and group residences – Vehicular access and parking location.

(1) On sites abutting an alley, commercial, apartment, townhome and all group residence developments shall have parking areas placed to the rear of buildings with primary vehicular access via the alley, except when waived by the planning director due to physical site limitations.

(2) When alley access is available, and provides adequate access for the site, its use will be encouraged.

(3) When common parking facilities for attached dwellings and group residences exceed 30 spaces, no more than 50 percent of the required parking shall be permitted between the street property line and any building, except when authorized by the planning director due to physical site limitations.

(4) Direct parking space access to an alley may be used for parking lots with five or fewer spaces. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.310 Small lot single-family dwelling development standards.

The provisions of this section apply to building permits for single-family dwellings on lots having an area less than 5,000 square feet and single-family dwellings when multiple single-family dwellings are on a single lot, excluding accessory dwelling units; review will be done through the building permit process.

(1) It is the intent of these development standards that single-family dwellings on small lots be compatible with neighboring properties, friendly to the streetscape, and in scale with the lots upon which they are to be constructed. The director is authorized to promulgate guidelines, graphic representations, and examples of housing designs and methods of construction that do or do not satisfy the intent of these standards.

(2) Entry. Where lots front on a public street, the house shall have doors and windows which face the street. Houses should have a distinct entry feature such as a porch or weather-covered entryway with an entry feature that is at least 60 square feet with no dimension less than six feet.

The director may approve a street orientation or entryway with dimensions different than specified herein; provided, the entry visually articulates the front facade of the dwelling so as to create a distinct entryway, meets setback requirements, provides weather cover, has a minimum dimension of four feet, and is attached to the home.

(3) Alleys.

(a) If the lot abuts an alley, the garage or off-street parking area shall take access from the alley, unless precluded by steep topography. No curb cuts shall be permitted unless access from the alley is precluded by steep topography.

(b) The minimum driveway length may be reduced to between six and zero feet for garages when the following conditions are met:

(i) An alley is provided for access;

(ii) At least one off-street parking space, in addition to any provided in the garage, is provided to serve that dwelling unit and the stall(s) is conveniently located for that particular dwelling; and

(iii) The applicable total parking stall requirement is met.

(c) The rear yard setback may be reduced to zero feet to accommodate the garage.

(d) If the garage does not extend to the property line or alley, the dwelling unit above the garage may be extended to the property line or alley.

(e) Dwellings with a wall facing an alley must provide at least one window facing the alley to allow observation of the alley.

(4) Auto Courts.

(a) Auto courts are only allowed in a PRD.

(b) Auto courts provide ingress and egress to a cluster of no more than six dwellings and access from a nonarterial street. Auto court design must be consistent with the city’s design guidelines for auto courts.

(c) Auto courts shall be no less than 20 feet in width; provided, that if emergency services access is required, the driving surface dimensions will comply with emergency vehicle access requirements.

(d) Auto courts shall be no greater than 150 feet in length, unless acceptable emergency vehicle turnaround is provided and designed so vehicles will not back onto public streets.

(e) Driveway length may be reduced to between three feet and six feet for garages when at least two parking spaces are provided for the unit in addition to the garage. The additional parking must be conveniently located to the dwelling.

(5) Facade and Driveway Cuts. If there is no alley access and the lot fronts on a public or private street, living space equal to at least 50 percent of the garage facade shall be flush with or projected forward of the garage, and the dwelling shall have entry, window and/or roofline design treatment which emphasizes the house more than the garage. Where materials and/or methods such as modulation, articulation, or other architectural elements such as porches, dormers, gables, or varied roofline heights are utilized, the director or designee may waive or reduce the 50 percent standard. Driveway cuts shall be no more than 80 percent of the lot frontage; provided, that the director or designee may waive the 80 percent maximum if materials and/or methods to de-emphasize the driveway, such as ribbon driveways, grasscrete surface, or accent paving, are utilized.

(6) Privacy. Dwellings built on lots without direct frontage on the public street should be situated to respect the privacy of abutting homes and to create usable yard space for the dwelling(s). The review authority shall have the discretion to establish setback requirements that are different than may otherwise be required in order to accomplish these objectives.

(7) Individual Identity. Home individuality will be achieved by the following:

(a) Avoiding the appearance of a long row of homes by means such as angling houses, varied street setbacks, and varied architectural design features.

(b) Each dwelling unit shall have horizontal or vertical variation within each unit’s front building face and between the front building faces of all adjacent units/structures to provide visual diversity and individual identity to each unit. Upon building permit application, a plot plan of the entire structure shall be provided by the builder to show compliance with this requirement. The director or designee shall review and approve or deny the building design, which may incorporate variations in rooflines, setbacks between adjacent buildings, and other structural variations.

(c) The same building plans cannot be utilized on consecutive lots. “Flip-flopping” of plans is not permitted; provided, that upon demonstration to the director that the alteration of building facades would provide comparable visual diversity and individual identity to the dwelling units as different building plans, this provision shall not apply. Materials and/or methods which may be utilized to achieve visual diversity include, but are not limited to, use of differing siding material, building modulations and roofline variations.

(8) Landscaping. Landscaping of a size and type consistent with the development will be provided to enhance the streetscape. Landscaping will enhance privacy for dwellings on abutting lots and provide separation and buffering on easement access drives.

(9) Duplexes. Duplexes must be designed to architecturally blend with the surrounding single-family dwellings and not be readily discernible as a duplex but appear to be a single-family dwelling. (Ord. 2898 § 12, 2012; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.320 Open space and recreation space required.

The on-site open space and recreation space standards are intended to provide usable, accessible, and inviting open space for residents that enhances residential areas. Multifamily residential uses shall provide open space equivalent to at least 20 percent of the building’s gross floor area. The required area may be satisfied with one or more of the elements listed below:

(1) Common open space accessible to all residents shall count for up to 100 percent of the required open space. This includes landscaped courtyards or decks, gardens with pathways, children’s play areas, or other multipurpose recreational and/or green spaces. Special requirements and recommendations for common spaces include the following:

(a) Space shall be large enough to provide functional leisure or recreational activity area per the director. For example, long narrow spaces less than 20 feet wide rarely, if ever, can function as usable common open space.

(b) Consider space as a focal point of development.

(c) Open space, particularly children’s play areas, shall be visible from dwelling units and positioned near pedestrian activity.

(d) Space shall feature paths, plantings, seating, lighting and other pedestrian amenities to make the area more functional and enjoyable.

(e) Individual entries shall be provided onto common open space from adjacent ground floor residential units. Small, semi-private open spaces for adjacent ground floor units that maintain visual access to the common area are strongly encouraged to enliven the space.

(f) Separate common space from ground floor windows, streets, service areas and parking lots with landscaping and/or low-level fencing, where desirable.

(g) Space shall be oriented to receive sunlight, facing east, west, or (preferably) south, when possible.

(h) Required setbacks, landscaping, driveways, parking, or other vehicular use areas shall not be counted toward the common open space requirement.

(i) Rooftops or rooftop decks shall not be considered as common open space for the purpose of calculating minimum open space area; provided, that the director may consider rooftops or rooftop decks as common open space where usable open space amenities are provided and available to all residents.

(j) Outdoor open space shall not include areas devoted to parking or vehicular access.

(2) The following amenities may be used to satisfy up to 50 percent of the open space requirement. A combination of these amenities may be provided in different ratios; provided, that (i) the total credit for any combination of the following amenities may not exceed 50 percent of the open space requirement, and (ii) the amount of the amenity provided is sufficient to achieve the purpose of the amenity as determined by the director:

(a) Individual balconies that provide a space usable for human activity. To qualify, the balconies shall be at least 35 square feet and have no dimension less than four feet.

(b) Natural areas that function as an amenity to the development, subject to the following requirements and recommendations:

(i) The natural area shall be accessible to all residents. For example, safe and attractive trails provided along or through the natural area where they could serve as a major amenity to the development.

(ii) Steep slopes, wetlands, or similar unbuildable areas shall not be counted in the calculations for required open space unless they provide a visual amenity for all units, as determined by the director.

(c) Storm water retention areas if the facility has natural-looking edges, natural vegetation, and no fencing except along the property line. The design of such areas shall go well beyond functional storm water requirements per the director in terms of the area involved and the quality of landscaping and resident amenities. The side slope of the storm water facilities shall not exceed a grade of 1:3 (one vertical to three horizontal) unless slopes are existing, natural, and covered with vegetation.

(3) Children’s play equipment and recreational activity space for children and/or teens that include parent seating areas are required in residential complexes with 20 or more units. Exceptions: age-restricted senior citizen housing; mixed use developments; developments reserved for student housing; infill lots within the downtown master plan area; and developments located within a quarter mile of safe walking distance to a public park that features a play area.

(4) Active recreation facilities may be provided instead of common open space, subject to the following:

(a) Active recreation facilities may include, but are not limited to, exercise rooms, sports courts, swimming pools, tennis courts, game rooms, or community centers; and

(b) Indoor recreation areas may be credited towards the total recreation space requirement, when the director determines that such areas are located, designed and improved in a manner which provides recreational opportunities functionally equivalent to those recreational opportunities available outdoors.

Figure 14 – Balconies provide private, usable open space for residents.

Figure 15 – A residential courtyard providing semi-private patio spaces adjacent to individual units.

Figure 16 – Children’s play area incorporated into a multifamily development.

(Ord. 2927 § 4, 2013; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.330 Townhouse open space.

Townhouses and other ground based multifamily residential units with individual exterior entries must provide at least 200 square feet of private open space per dwelling unit adjacent to, and directly accessible from, each dwelling unit. This may include private balconies, individual rear yards, landscaped front yards, and covered front porch areas. Exception: Common open space designed in accordance with MMC 22C.010.320(1) may substitute for up to 50 percent of each unit’s required private or semi-private open space on a square foot per square foot basis.

Figure 17 – Common open space for a townhouse development.

Figure 18 – These townhouses provide balconies and semi-private yard space.

Figure 19 – Example townhouse configuration with a combination of private open spaces adjacent to units and larger common open space accessible to all units.

(Ord. 2927 § 5, 2013; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.340 Maintenance or dedication of open space and recreation space.

(1) Unless the open space or recreation space is dedicated to the city pursuant to subsection (2) of this section, maintenance of any open space or recreation space retained in private ownership shall be the responsibility of the owner or other separate entity capable of long-term maintenance and operation in a manner acceptable to the city.

(2) Open space or recreation space may be dedicated as a public park when the following criteria are met:

(a) The dedicated area is at least one and one-half acres in size, except when adjacent to an existing or planned public park;

(b) The dedicated land provides one or more of the following:

(i) Shoreline access;

(ii) Regional trail linkages;

(iii) Habitat linkages;

(iv) Recreation facilities; or

(v) Heritage sites;

(c) The entire dedicated area is located less than one mile from the project site. (Ord. 2927 § 6, 2013; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.350 On-site recreation – Fee in lieu of open space or recreation space.

Nothing herein shall prohibit voluntary agreements with the city that allow a payment in lieu of providing on-site open space or recreation space when a proposed development is located within one-quarter mile of an existing or proposed recreational facility. (Ord. 2927 § 7, 2013; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.360 On-site recreation – Acceptance criteria for fee in lieu of recreation space.

City acceptance of this payment is discretionary, and may be permitted if:

(1) The proposed on-site recreation space does not meet the criteria of MMC 22C.010.340(2); or

(2) The recreation space provided within a public park in the vicinity will be of greater benefit to the prospective residents of the development. (Ord. 2927 § 8, 2013; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.370 Storage space and collection points for recyclables.

Developments shall provide storage space for the collection of recyclables as follows:

(1) The storage space shall be provided at the rate of:

(a) One and one-half square feet per dwelling unit in multiple-dwelling developments except where the development is participating in a public agency-sponsored or approved direct collection program in which individual recycling bins are used for curbside collection;

(b) Two square feet per every 1,000 square feet of building gross floor area in office, educational and institutional developments.

(2) The storage space for residential developments shall be apportioned and located in collection points as follows:

(a) The required storage area shall be dispersed in collection points throughout the site when a residential development comprises more than one building.

(b) There shall be one collection point for every 30 dwelling units.

(c) Collection points may be located within residential buildings, in separate buildings/structures without dwelling units, or outdoors.

(d) Collection points located in separate buildings/structures or outdoors shall be no more than 200 feet from a common entrance of a residential building.

(e) Collection points shall be located in a manner so that hauling trucks do not obstruct pedestrian or vehicle traffic on-site or project into any public right-of-way.

(3) The storage space for nonresidential development shall be apportioned and located in collection points as follows:

(a) Storage space may be allocated to a centralized collection point.

(b) Outdoor collection points shall not be located in any required setback areas.

(c) Collection points shall be located in a manner so that hauling trucks do not obstruct pedestrian or vehicle traffic on-site or project into any public right-of-way.

(d) Access to collection points may be limited, except during regular business hours and/or specified collection hours.

(4) The collection points shall be designed as follows:

(a) Dimensions of the collection points shall be of sufficient width and depth to enclose containers for recyclables.

(b) Architectural design of any structure enclosing an outdoor collection point or any building primarily used to contain a collection point shall be consistent with the design of the primary structure(s) on the site.

(c) Collection points shall be identified by signs not exceeding two square feet.

(d) A six-foot wall or fence shall enclose any outdoor collection point, excluding collection points located in industrial developments that are greater than 100 feet from residentially zoned property.

(e) Enclosures for outdoor collection points and buildings used primarily to contain a collection point shall have gate openings at least 12 feet wide for haulers. In addition, the gate opening for any building or other roofed structure used primarily as a collection point shall have a vertical clearance of at least 12 feet.

(f) Weather protection of recyclables shall be ensured by using weather-proof containers or by providing a roof over the storage area.

(5) Only recyclable materials generated on-site shall be collected and stored at such collection points. Except for initial sorting of recyclables by users, all other processing of such materials shall be conducted off-site. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.380 Fences.

(1) Purpose. The fence standards promote the positive benefits of fences without negatively affecting the community or endangering public or vehicle safety. Fences can create a sense of privacy, protect children and pets, provide separation from busy streets, and enhance the appearance of property by providing attractive landscape materials. The negative effects of fences can include the creation of street walls that inhibit police and community surveillance, decrease the sense of community, hinder emergency access and the safe movement of pedestrians and vehicles, and create an unattractive appearance.

(2) Types of Fences.

(a) The standards apply to walls, fences, trellises, arbors and screens of all types whether open, solid, wood, metal, wire, masonry or other material.

(b) No barbed or razor-wire fence shall be permitted, except for the following:

(i) Confinement of livestock.

(ii) Public facilities, transmitter and transformer sites.

(iii) Government installations where security or public safety is required.

(3) Height.

(a) Access Streets.

(i) Front lot line: Four feet solid or six feet if entirely open-work fence.

(ii) Side lot line: Six feet.

(iii) Rear lot line: Six feet.

(b) Arterial Streets.

(i) Front lot line: Six feet; provided, that the top two feet are constructed as an open-work fence.

(ii) Side lot line: Six feet.

(iii) Rear lot line: Six feet.

(c) When a protective fence is located on top of a rockery, any portion of the fence above a height of six feet shall be an open-work fence.

(d) Open wire mesh or similar type fences may be erected in excess of the maximum heights permitted in this code on the periphery of playgrounds associated with private and public schools and parks, public facilities, transmitter and transformer sites, and government installations where security or public safety is required.

(e) The height of a fence or freestanding wall, retaining wall or combination of the same shall be measured from its top surface, board, rail, or wire to the natural elevation of the ground on which it stands.

(f) Where the finished grade is a different elevation on either side of a fence, the height may be measured from the side having the highest elevation.

(4) Setbacks.

(a) Front Lot Line.

(i) Solid fences greater than four feet in height shall be set back at least 20 feet from the street right-of-way, except in the following circumstances:

(A) For a corner lot the 20-foot setback shall only apply to the street which provides primary access to the lot.

(B) This setback requirement may be waived or modified by the city engineer or his designee if a fence is designed and constructed so that it does not cause a public safety hazard by obstructing visibility of pedestrians or motorists using streets, driveways or sidewalks.

(ii) A four-foot fence, or six-foot fence with the top two feet constructed as an open-work fence, may be constructed on the front property line, provided the fence is designed and constructed so that it does not cause a public safety hazard by obstructing visibility of pedestrians or motorists using streets, driveways or sidewalks.

(b) Side lot line: No setback requirement.

(c) Rear lot line: No setback requirement.

(d) For special rules relating to fences and walls near fire hydrants, see MMC 14.03.050(2) and the International Fire Code.

(5) Fence Variances.

(a) The community development director shall have authority to administratively grant a variance to the fence requirements outlined in this section. The community development director is authorized to issue variances in cases of special hardships, unique circumstances and practical difficulties. No variance shall be granted which would be detrimental to the public health, welfare or environment.

(b) Variance requests shall be submitted in writing on a form provided by the city. At the time the applicant submits the variance request to the city, the applicant shall also provide written notification of the variance request to immediately adjoining property owners by first class mail or personal service. Said notice shall include an adequate description of the height and location of the proposed fence.

(c) In considering a request for a modification of the fence requirements outlined in subsections (1) through (4) of this section, the community development director shall consider the following factors:

(i) If the proposed fence is designed and constructed so that it does not cause a public safety hazard by obstructing visibility of pedestrians or motorists using streets, driveways or sidewalks;

(ii) The proposed fence will not infringe upon or interfere with utility and/or access easements or covenant rights or responsibilities;

(iii) The increased fence height will not adversely affect adjacent property owners;

(iv) Fences greater than six feet in height are required to obtain a city building permit;

(v) Other information which is relevant and necessary to make a determination as to the validity of the request for variation. Such additional information may include site plans, elevation drawings, and information concerning the surrounding properties and uses.

(d) Each variance request shall be considered on a case-by-case basis, and the resulting decision shall not be construed as setting precedent for any subsequent application.

(e) The decision of the community development director on a variance application shall be final, subject to appeal to the city hearing examiner pursuant to the procedures in Chapter 22G.010 MMC, Article VIII, Appeals. Appeals shall be filed within 14 calendar days of the written decision of the community development director. (Ord. 2898 § 5, 2012; Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.390 Special limitations in the R-12 through R-28 zones.

Where a single lot or a combination of lots under single ownership is developed with more than one multiple-family residential building, such property shall not be subsequently subdivided except when each division thereof complies with all requirements of applicable city codes and ordinances. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.400 Duplex performance and design standards.

All new duplexes located within any residential zone shall meet the following standards and regulations:

(1) Bulk and Setback Variation. Each duplex structure shall have horizontal or vertical variation within each dwelling unit’s front building face and between the front building faces of all adjacent units/structures to provide visual diversity to the duplex structures and individual identity to duplex units. Upon building permit or conditional use permit (if required) application, a plot plan of the entire structure in which each unit is located shall be provided by the builder to show compliance with this requirement. The planning director shall review and approve or deny the building design which may incorporate variations in rooflines, setbacks between adjacent buildings or lots, and other structural variations. Where the applicant and the community development director are not able to reach agreement on the provisions of the final building design, the dispute shall be submitted to the hearing examiner in accordance with the procedures established in Chapter 22G.010 MMC, Land Use Application Procedures.

(2) Building Plans. The same building plan cannot be utilized on consecutive lots. “Flip-flopping” of plans is not permitted; provided, that upon demonstration to the planning director that the alteration of building facades would provide comparable visual diversity and individual identity to the duplexes as different building plans, this provision shall not apply. Materials and/or methods which may be utilized to achieve visual diversity include, but are not limited to, use of differing siding material, building modulations and roofline variations.

(3) Landscaping. At the time of application for a building permit or conditional use permit (if required), the developer shall submit landscaping plans for, at a minimum, all front and side setbacks and common open space areas associated with the building for which permit application is made. Landscaping shall consist of two native trees per unit, planted in the front yard, which are at least one and one-half inches in caliper for deciduous or six feet in height for evergreen trees, plus a mixture of trees, shrubs and ground cover as appropriate to the site. All required landscaping shall be installed in accordance with the plans prior to issuance of an occupancy permit. Where applicable, street frontage landscaping shall comply with the city’s streetscape plan.

(4) Orientation. Building orientation should be utilized as a method to provide visual diversity and individual identity to the duplex structures; provided, that where physical or economic considerations make such orientation impractical, this provision shall not apply. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.410 Nonconforming situations.

Existing developments that do not conform to the development standards of this chapter are subject to the standards of Chapter 22C.100 MMC, Nonconforming Situations. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.420 Parking and loading.

The standards pertaining to the required number of auto parking spaces, bicycle parking spaces, parking lot placement, parking lot setbacks and internal parking lot pedestrian connections are stated in Chapter 22C.130 MMC, Parking and Loading. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.430 Signs.

The sign standards are stated in Chapter 22C.160 MMC, Signs. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.440 Landscaping and screening.

The landscaping and screening standards are stated in Chapter 22C.120 MMC, Landscaping and Screening. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).

22C.010.450 Planned residential developments.

See Chapter 22G.080 MMC, Planned Residential Developments. (Ord. 2852 § 10 (Exh. A), 2011).